Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberWO2015109145 A9
Publication typeApplication
Application numberPCT/US2015/011697
Publication date11 Sep 2015
Filing date16 Jan 2015
Priority date17 Jan 2014
Also published asWO2015109145A1
Publication numberPCT/2015/11697, PCT/US/15/011697, PCT/US/15/11697, PCT/US/2015/011697, PCT/US/2015/11697, PCT/US15/011697, PCT/US15/11697, PCT/US15011697, PCT/US1511697, PCT/US2015/011697, PCT/US2015/11697, PCT/US2015011697, PCT/US201511697, WO 2015/109145 A9, WO 2015109145 A9, WO 2015109145A9, WO-A9-2015109145, WO2015/109145A9, WO2015109145 A9, WO2015109145A9
InventorsRalph F. Osterhout, John N. Border, John D. Haddick, Robert Michael Lohse, Nima L. Shams, Edward H. Nortrup
ApplicantOsterhout Group, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: Patentscope, Espacenet
See-through computer display systems
WO 2015109145 A9
Abstract
The present invention relate to head-worn computing ("HWC") systems. HWC involves, in some instances, a system that mimics the appearance of head-worn glasses or sunglasses. The glasses may be a fully developed computing platform, such as including computer displays presented in each of the lenses of the glasses to the eyes of the user. In embodiments, the lenses and displays may be configured to allow a person wearing the glasses to see the environment through the lenses while also seeing, simultaneously, digital imagery, which forms an overlaid image that is perceived by the person as a digitally augmented image of the environment, or augmented reality ("AR").
Claims  (OCR text may contain errors)
Claims
We claim:
A head-worn computer display, comprising:
a. A reflective display including a plurality of multi-positional micro- mirrors;
b. An illumination system adapted to produce illumination light and project the illumination light in a direction away from the reflective display and towards a first side of a reflective surface such that the reflective surface reflects the illumination light in a direction towards the reflective display to generate image light;
c. image delivery optics with an eyebox wherein the image light is provided to a user's eye; and
d. A processor adapted to control the reflective display such that each of the plurality of multi-positional micro-mirrors is positionally controlled between an on-state and an off -state to reflect the illumination light in at least one of two directions:
i. a first direction in-line with the image light delivery optics adapted to present on-state light as the image light to the user's eye in the eyebox; and
ii. a second direction in-line with a dark-light trap at a side of the image delivery optics adapted to capture at least a portion of off- state light and prevent the at least a portion of the off-state light from entering the eyebox.
The head-worn computer display of claim 1, wherein the reflective surface is partially reflective and partially transmissive.
The head-worn computer display of claim 2, wherein the image light passes through the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface.
4. The head-worn computer display of claim 2, further comprising a multi-piece solid optic wherein the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface is positioned within the multi-piece solid optic.
5. The head-worn computer display of claim 2, wherein the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface is a reflective polarizer film.
6. The head-worn computer display of claim 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera, wherein the eye imaging camera is positioned to capture images of the eye of the user, wherein the eye imaging camera and the image light delivery optics have a common optical axis within the eyebox.
7. The head-worn computer of claim 6, wherein light associated with the image of the user's eye is reflected by a second side of the reflective surface before being captured by the eye imaging camera.
8. The head-worn computer display of claim 1, wherein the image light delivery optics are see-through such that the user's eye is provided with a see-through view of a surrounding environment proximate the user and image light.
9. The head-worn computer display of claim 8, wherein the image light delivery optics includes a notch filter, wherein the notch filter reflects a greater portion of image light in comparison to the portion of visible light reflected that is associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment.
10. The head worn computer display of claim 9 wherein the notch filter reflects a majority of image light and transmits a majority of visible light associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment.
11. The head-worn computer display of claim 1, wherein the image light delivery optics includes a holographic filter, wherein the holographic filter reflects at least a portion of image light to the eye of the user.
12. The head-worn computer display of claim 1, wherein the image light delivery optics includes a combiner element positioned to reflect at least a portion of the image light to the eye of the user and to transmit at least a portion of light associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment to the eye of the user.
13. The head-worn computer display of claim 12, wherein the combiner element is angled at greater than 45 degrees from horizontal.
14. The head-worn computer display of claim 12, wherein the combiner element is adapted to accept the image light at an angle less than 45 degrees from a front surface of the combiner.
15. A method, comprising:
a. Establishing a geo-position of a head-worn computer;
b. Establishing a viewing direction of a person wearing the head- worn computer; and
c. Displaying a computer generated object in association with a computer
generated shadow in a field of view of the head-worn computer, wherein the direction of the computer generated shadow is based on the established geo- position and viewing direction such that the direction of the computer generated shadow appears to follow a natural shadow in a surrounding environment as viewed by the person through the field of view.
16. A method, comprising:
a. Receiving a personally selected geo-spatial location from a sender of digital content for the presentation of the digital content in a recipient's head-worn see-through display; and
b. Presenting, based on data indicative that the user is near the geo-spatial location, the digital content in the head-worn see-through display such that the digital content is perceived by the recipient to be associated with a physical attribute proximate the geo-spatial location.
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of the following U.S. patent applications, which are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety: United States Patent Application No. 14/158,198 entitled "EXTERNAL USER INTERFACE FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jan 17, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/218,606 entitled "EYE IMAGING IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Mar 18, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/160,377 entitled "OPTICAL

CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jan 21, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/163,646 entitled "PERIPHERAL LIGHTING FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jan 24, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/172,901 entitled "OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Feb 4, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/181,459 entitled

"SUPPRESSION OF STRAY LIGHT IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Feb 14, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/216,175 entitled "EYE IMAGING IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Mar 17, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/296,699 entitled "OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD-WORN SEE-THROUGH DISPLAYS" and filed on Jun 5, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/325,991 entitled "OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD-WORN SEE-THROUGH DISPLAYS" and filed on Jul 8, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/457,853 entitled

"MEASURING CONTENT BRIGHTNESS IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Aug 12, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/489,706 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Sep 18, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/498,765 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Sep 26, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/504,723 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Oct 2, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/561,146 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Dec 4, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/554,044 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Nov 26, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/178,047 entitled "MICRO DOPPLER

PRESENTATIONS IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Feb 11, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/181,473 entitled "SECURE SHARING IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Feb 14, 2014; United States Patent Application No.

14/205,313 entitled "SPATIAL LOCATION PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN

COMPUTING" and filed on Mar 11, 2014; United States Patent Application No.

14/228,526 entitled "SENSOR DEPENDENT CONTENT POSITION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Mar 28, 2014. United States Patent Application No.

14/244,417 entitled "SIGHT INFORMATION COLLECTION IN HEAD WORN

COMPUTING" and filed on Apr 3, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/254,253 entitled "EYE IMAGING IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Apr 16, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/252,508 entitled "SIGHT INFORMATION COLLECTION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Apr 14, 2014; United States Patent

Application No. 14/262,695 entitled "IN-VEHICLE USE IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Apr 25, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/280,740 entitled "CONTENT POSITION CALIBRATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on May 19, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/299,474 entitled "CONTENT

PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jun 9, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/300,387 entitled "CONTENT PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jun 10, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/331,481 entitled "CONTENT PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jul 15, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/337,371 entitled

"CONTENT PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Jul 22, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/457,731 entitled "CONTENT PRESENTATION IN HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Aug 12, 2014; United States Patent

Application No. 14/554,039 entitled "SEE-THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Nov 26, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/559,126 entitled "OPTICAL CONFIGURATIONS FOR HEAD WORN COMPUTING" and filed on Dec 3, 2014; United States Patent Application No. 14/589,713 entitled "SEE THROUGH COMPUTER DISPLAY SYSTEMS" and filed on Jan 5, 2015.

Background

Field of the Invention

[0002] This invention relates to see-through computer display systems.

Description of Related Art [0003] Wearable computing systems have been developed and are beginning to be commercialized. Many problems persist in the wearable computing field that need to be resolved to make them meet the demands of the market.

Summary

[0004] Aspects of the present invention relate to methods and systems for the see-through computer display systems.

[0005] These and other systems, methods, objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment and the drawings. All documents mentioned herein are hereby incorporated in their entirety by reference.

Brief Description of the Drawings

[0006] Embodiments are described with reference to the following Figures. The same numbers may be used throughout to reference like features and components that are shown in the Figures:

[0007] Figure 1 illustrates a head worn computing system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0008] Figure 2 illustrates a head worn computing system with optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[0009] Figure 3a illustrates a large prior art optical arrangement.

[00010] Figure 3b illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00011] Figure 4 illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00012] Figure 4a illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00013] Figure 4b illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00014] Figure 5 illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00015] Figure 5a illustrates an upper optical module in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [00016] Figure 5b illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[00017] Figure 5c illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[00018] Figure 5d illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[00019] Figure 5e illustrates an upper optical module and dark light trap according to the principles of the present invention.

[00020] Figure 6 illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00021] Figure 7 illustrates angles of combiner elements in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00022] Figure 8 illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00023] Figure 8a illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00024] Figure 8b illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00025] Figure 8c illustrates upper and lower optical modules in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00026] Figure 9 illustrates an eye imaging system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00027] Figure 10 illustrates a light source in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00028] Figure 10a illustrates a back lighting system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00029] Figure 10b illustrates a back lighting system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00030] Figures 11a to lid illustrate light source and filters in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00031] Figures 12a to 12c illustrate light source and quantum dot systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [00032] Figures 13a to 13c illustrate peripheral lighting systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00033] Figures 14a to 14c illustrate a light suppression systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00034] Figure 15 illustrates an external user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00035] Figure 16a to 16c illustrate distance control systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00036] Figure 17a to 17c illustrate force interpretation systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00037] Figure 18a to 18c illustrate user interface mode selection systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00038] Figure 19 illustrates interaction systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00039] Figure 20 illustrates external user interfaces in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00040] Figure 21 illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00041] Figure 22 illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00042] Figure 23 illustrates an mD scanned environment in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00043] Figure 23a illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00044] Figure 24 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00045] Figure 25 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00046] Figure 26 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00047] Figure 27 illustrates a stray light suppression technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00048] Figures 28a to 28c illustrate DLP mirror angles. [00049] Figures 29 to 33 illustrate eye imaging systems according to the principles of the present invention.

[00050] Figures 34 and 34a illustrate structured eye lighting systems according to the principles of the present invention.

[00051] Figure 35 illustrates eye glint in the prediction of eye direction analysis in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00052] Figure 36a illustrates eye characteristics that may be used in personal identification through analysis of a system according to the principles of the present invention.

[00053] Figure 36b illustrates a digital content presentation reflection off of the wearer's eye that may be analyzed in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00054] Figure 37 illustrates eye imaging along various virtual target lines and various focal planes in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00055] Figure 38 illustrates content control with respect to eye movement based on eye imaging in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00056] Figure 39 illustrates eye imaging and eye convergence in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00057] Figure 40 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00058] Figure 41 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00059] Figure 42 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00060] Figure 43 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00061] Figure 44 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00062] Figure 45 illustrates various headings over time in an example.

[00063] Figure 46 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00064] Figure 47 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [00065] Figure 48 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00066] Figure 49 illustrates content position dependent on sensor feedback in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00067] Figure 50 illustrates light impinging an eye in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00068] Figure 51 illustrates a view of an eye in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00069] Figure 52a and 52b illustrate views of an eye with a structured light pattern in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00070] Figure 53 illustrates an optics module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00071] Figure 54 illustrates an optics module in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00072] Figure 55 shows a series of example spectrum for a variety of controlled substances as measured using a form of infrared spectroscopy.

[00073] Figure 56 shows an infrared absorbance spectrum for glucose.

[00074] Figure 57 illustrates a scene where a person is walking with a HWC mounted on his head.

[00075] Figure 57a illustrates a scene where a person is walking with a HWC 102 mounted on his head in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00076] Figure 58 illustrates a system for receiving, developing and using movement heading, sight heading, eye heading and/or persistence information from HWC(s) in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00077] Figure 59a illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00078] Figure 59b illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00079] Figure 59c illustrates an mD scanned environment in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00080] Figure 59d illustrates mD trace representations presented in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [00081] Figure 59 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00082] Figure 60 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00083] Figure 61 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00084] Figure 62 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00085] Figure 63 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00086] Figure 64 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00087] Figure 65 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00088] Figure 66 illustrates a presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00089] Figure 67 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00090] Figure 68 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00091] Figure 69 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00092] Figure 70 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00093] Figure 71 illustrates an optical configuration in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00094] Figure 72 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00095] Figure 73 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00096] Figure 74 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [00097] Figure 75 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00098] Figure 76 illustrates an optical element in a see-through computer display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[00099] Figure 77 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000100] Figure 78 illustrates an optical element in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000101] Figure 79a illustrates a schematic of an upper optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000102] Figure 79 illustrates a schematic of an upper optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000103] Figure 80 illustrates a stray light control technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000104] Figures 81a and 81b illustrate a display with a gap and masked technologies in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000105] Figure 82 illustrates an upper module with a trim polarizer in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000106] Figure 83 illustrates an optical system with a laminated multiple polarizer film in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000107] Figures 84a and 84b illustrate partially reflective layers in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000108] Figure 84c illustrates a laminated multiple polarizer with a complex curve in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000109] Figure 84d illustrates a laminated multiple polarizer with a curve in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000110] Figure 85 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000111] Figure 86 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000112] Figure 87 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [000113] Figure 88 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000114] Figure 89 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000115] Figure 90 illustrates an optical system adapted for a head-mounted display in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000116] Figure 91 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000117] Figure 92 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000118] Figure 93 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000119] Figure 94 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000120] Figure 95 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000121] Figure 96 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000122] Figure 97 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000123] Figure 98 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000124] Figure 99 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000125] Figure 100 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000126] Figure 101 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000127] Figure 102 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000128] Figure 103, 103a and 103b illustrate optical systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [000129] Figure 104 illustrates an optical system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000130] Figure 105 illustrates a blocking optic in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000131] Figure 106a, 106b, and 106c illustrate a blocking optic system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000132] Figure 107 illustrates a full color image in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000133] Figures 108A and 108B illustrate color breakup management in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000134] Figure 109 illustrates timing sequences in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000135] Figure 110 illustrates timing sequences in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000136] Figures 111a and 111b illustrate sequentially displayed images in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000137] Figure 112 illustrates a see-through display with rotated components in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000138] Figure 113 illustrates an optics module with twisted reflective surfaces in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000139] Figure 114 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000140] Figure 115 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000141] Figure 116 illustrates PCB and see-through optics module positions within a glasses form factor in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000142] Figure 117 illustrates a user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000143] Figure 118 illustrates a user interface in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [000144] Figure 119 illustrates a lens arrangement in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000145] Figures 120 and 121 illustrate eye imaging systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000146] Figure 122 illustrates an identification process in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000147] Figures 123 and 124 illustrate combiner assemblies in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000148] Figure 125 illustrates a communication network in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000149] Figure 126 illustrates a sharing FOV in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000150] Figure 127 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000151] Figure 128 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000152] Figure 129 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000153] Figure 130 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000154] Figure 131 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000155] Figure 132 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000156] Figure 133 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000157] Figure 134 illustrates a sharing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000158] Figure 135 illustrates an object shadowing technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000159] Figure 136 illustrates a system wear a head-worn computer in connection with vehicle systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [000160] Figure 137 illustrates a position calibration process in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000161] Figure 138 illustrates a location based presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000162] Figure 139 illustrates a location based presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000163] Figure 140 illustrates personal setting preferences for location based content presentation in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000164] Figure 141 illustrates supplemental and primary content in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000165] Figure 142 illustrates group message treatment in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000166] Figure 143 illustrates shared content treatment in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000167] Figure 144 illustrates marker recognition activation in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000168] Figure 145 illustrates content, tag and preference settings in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000169] Figure 146 illustrates presentation confirmation in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000170] Figure 147 illustrates presentation confirmation in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000171] Figure 148 illustrates a distance determination technology for the presentation of content at a focal plane in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000172] Figure 149 illustrates a distance determination technology for the presentation of content at a focal plane in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000173] Figure 150 illustrates a distance determination technology for the presentation of content at a focal plane in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000174] Figure 151 illustrates an AR content presentation during a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention. [000175] Figure 152 illustrates a marker in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000176] Figure 153 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000177] Figure 154 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000178] Figures 155a and 155b illustrate a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000179] Figure 156 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000180] Figure 157 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000181] Figure 158 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000182] Figure 159 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000183] Figure 160 illustrates a medical procedure in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000184] While the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, other embodiments would be understood by one of ordinary skill in the art and are encompassed herein.

Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment(s)

[000185] Aspects of the present invention relate to head-worn computing ("HWC") systems. HWC involves, in some instances, a system that mimics the appearance of head-worn glasses or sunglasses. The glasses may be a fully developed computing platform, such as including computer displays presented in each of the lenses of the glasses to the eyes of the user. In embodiments, the lenses and displays may be configured to allow a person wearing the glasses to see the environment through the lenses while also seeing, simultaneously, digital imagery, which forms an overlaid image that is perceived by the person as a digitally augmented image of the environment, or augmented reality ("AR"). [000186] HWC involves more than just placing a computing system on a person's head. The system may need to be designed as a lightweight, compact and fully functional computer display, such as wherein the computer display includes a high resolution digital display that provides a high level of emersion comprised of the displayed digital content and the see-through view of the environmental surroundings. User interfaces and control systems suited to the HWC device may be required that are unlike those used for a more conventional computer such as a laptop. For the HWC and associated systems to be most effective, the glasses may be equipped with sensors to determine environmental conditions, geographic location, relative positioning to other points of interest, objects identified by imaging and movement by the user or other users in a connected group, and the like. The HWC may then change the mode of operation to match the conditions, location, positioning, movements, and the like, in a method generally referred to as a contextually aware HWC. The glasses also may need to be connected, wirelessly or otherwise, to other systems either locally or through a network. Controlling the glasses may be achieved through the use of an external device, automatically through contextually gathered information, through user gestures captured by the glasses sensors, and the like. Each technique may be further refined depending on the software application being used in the glasses. The glasses may further be used to control or coordinate with external devices that are associated with the glasses.

[000187] Referring to Fig. 1, an overview of the HWC system 100 is presented. As shown, the HWC system 100 comprises a HWC 102, which in this instance is configured as glasses to be worn on the head with sensors such that the HWC 102 is aware of the objects and conditions in the environment 114. In this instance, the HWC 102 also receives and interprets control inputs such as gestures and movements 116. The HWC 102 may communicate with external user interfaces 104. The external user interfaces 104 may provide a physical user interface to take control instructions from a user of the HWC 102 and the external user interfaces 104 and the HWC 102 may communicate bi-directionally to affect the user's command and provide feedback to the external device 108. The HWC 102 may also communicate bi-directionally with externally controlled or coordinated local devices 108. For example, an external user interface 104 may be used in connection with the HWC 102 to control an externally controlled or coordinated local device 108. The externally controlled or coordinated local device 108 may provide feedback to the HWC 102 and a customized GUI may be presented in the HWC 102 based on the type of device or specifically identified device 108. The HWC 102 may also interact with remote devices and information sources 112 through a network connection 110. Again, the external user interface 104 may be used in connection with the HWC 102 to control or otherwise interact with any of the remote devices 108 and information sources 112 in a similar way as when the external user interfaces 104 are used to control or otherwise interact with the externally controlled or coordinated local devices 108. Similarly, HWC 102 may interpret gestures 116 (e.g captured from forward, downward, upward, rearward facing sensors such as camera(s), range finders, IR sensors, etc.) or environmental conditions sensed in the environment 114 to control either local or remote devices 108 or 112.

[000188] We will now describe each of the main elements depicted on Fig. 1 in more detail; however, these descriptions are intended to provide general guidance and should not be construed as limiting. Additional description of each element may also be further described herein.

[000189] The HWC 102 is a computing platform intended to be worn on a person's head. The HWC 102 may take many different forms to fit many different functional requirements. In some situations, the HWC 102 will be designed in the form of conventional glasses. The glasses may or may not have active computer graphics displays. In situations where the HWC 102 has integrated computer displays the displays may be configured as see-through displays such that the digital imagery can be overlaid with respect to the user's view of the environment 114. There are a number of see-through optical designs that may be used, including ones that have a reflective display (e.g. LCoS, DLP), emissive displays (e.g. OLED, LED), hologram, TIR waveguides, and the like. In embodiments, lighting systems used in connection with the display optics may be solid state lighting systems, such as LED, OLED, quantum dot, quantum dot LED, etc. In addition, the optical configuration may be monocular or binocular. It may also include vision corrective optical components. In embodiments, the optics may be packaged as contact lenses. In other embodiments, the HWC 102 may be in the form of a helmet with a see-through shield, sunglasses, safety glasses, goggles, a mask, fire helmet with see-through shield, police helmet with see through shield, military helmet with see-through shield, utility form customized to a certain work task (e.g. inventory control, logistics, repair, maintenance, etc.), and the like. [000190] The HWC 102 may also have a number of integrated computing facilities, such as an integrated processor, integrated power management,

communication structures (e.g. cell net, WiFi, Bluetooth, local area connections, mesh connections, remote connections (e.g. client server, etc.)), and the like. The HWC 102 may also have a number of positional awareness sensors, such as GPS, electronic compass, altimeter, tilt sensor, IMU, and the like. It may also have other sensors such as a camera, rangefinder, hyper-spectral camera, Geiger counter, microphone, spectral illumination detector, temperature sensor, chemical sensor, biologic sensor, moisture sensor, ultrasonic sensor, and the like.

[000191] The HWC 102 may also have integrated control technologies. The integrated control technologies may be contextual based control, passive control, active control, user control, and the like. For example, the HWC 102 may have an integrated sensor (e.g. camera) that captures user hand or body gestures 116 such that the integrated processing system can interpret the gestures and generate control commands for the HWC 102. In another example, the HWC 102 may have sensors that detect movement (e.g. a nod, head shake, and the like) including accelerometers, gyros and other inertial measurements, where the integrated processor may interpret the movement and generate a control command in response. The HWC 102 may also automatically control itself based on measured or perceived environmental conditions. For example, if it is bright in the environment the HWC 102 may increase the brightness or contrast of the displayed image. In embodiments, the integrated control technologies may be mounted on the HWC 102 such that a user can interact with it directly. For example, the HWC 102 may have a button (s), touch capacitive interface, and the like.

[000192] As described herein, the HWC 102 may be in communication with external user interfaces 104. The external user interfaces may come in many different forms. For example, a cell phone screen may be adapted to take user input for control of an aspect of the HWC 102. The external user interface may be a dedicated UI, such as a keyboard, touch surface, button(s), joy stick, and the like. In embodiments, the external controller may be integrated into another device such as a ring, watch, bike, car, and the like. In each case, the external user interface 104 may include sensors (e.g. IMU, accelerometers, compass, altimeter, and the like) to provide additional input for controlling the HWD 104. [000193] As described herein, the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with other local devices 108. The external devices 108 may be an audio device, visual device, vehicle, cell phone, computer, and the like. For instance, the local external device 108 may be another HWC 102, where information may then be exchanged between the separate HWCs 108.

[000194] Similar to the way the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with local devices 106, the HWC 102 may control or coordinate with remote devices 112, such as the HWC 102 communicating with the remote devices 112 through a network 110. Again, the form of the remote device 112 may have many forms. Included in these forms is another HWC 102. For example, each HWC 102 may communicate its GPS position such that all the HWCs 102 know where all of HWC 102 are located.

[000195] Figure 2 illustrates a HWC 102 with an optical system that includes an upper optical module 202 and a lower optical module 204. While the upper and lower optical modules 202 and 204 will generally be described as separate modules, it should be understood that this is illustrative only and the present invention includes other physical configurations, such as that when the two modules are combined into a single module or where the elements making up the two modules are configured into more than two modules. In embodiments, the upper module 202 includes a computer controlled display (e.g. LCoS, DLP, OLED, etc.) and image light delivery optics. In embodiments, the lower module includes eye delivery optics that are configured to receive the upper module's image light and deliver the image light to the eye of a wearer of the HWC. In figure 2, it should be noted that while the upper and lower optical modules 202 and 204 are illustrated in one side of the HWC such that image light can be delivered to one eye of the wearer, that it is envisioned by the present invention that embodiments will contain two image light delivery systems, one for each eye.

[000196] Figure 3b illustrates an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. In this embodiment, the upper optical module 202 includes a DLP (also known as DMD or digital micromirror

device)computer operated display 304 which includes pixels comprised of rotatable mirrors (such as, for example, the DLP3000 available from Texas Instruments), polarized light source 302, wave retarder film 308, reflective polarizer 310 and a field lens 312. The polarized light source 302 provides substantially uniform polarized light that is generally directed towards the reflective polarizer 310. The reflective polarizer reflects light of one polarization state (e.g. S polarized light) and transmits light of the other polarization state (e.g. P polarized light). The polarized light source 302 and the reflective polarizer 310 are oriented so that the polarized light from the polarized light source 302 is reflected generally towards the DLP 304. The light then passes through the wave film 308 once before illuminating the pixels of the DLP 304 and then again after being reflected by the pixels of the DLP 304. In passing through the wave film 308 twice, the light is converted from one polarization state to the other polarization state (e.g. the light is converted from S to P polarized light). The light then passes through the reflective polarizer 310. In the event that the DLP pixel(s) are in the "on" state (i.e. the mirrors are positioned to reflect light towards the field lens 312, the "on" pixels reflect the light generally along the optical axis and into the field lens 312. This light that is reflected by "on" pixels and which is directed generally along the optical axis of the field lens 312 will be referred to as image light 316. The image light 316 then passes through the field lens to be used by a lower optical module 204.

[000197] The light that is provided by the polarized light source 302, which is subsequently reflected by the reflective polarizer 310 before it reflects from the DLP 304, will generally be referred to as illumination light. The light that is reflected by the "off" pixels of the DLP 304 is reflected at a different angle than the light reflected by the On" pixels, so that the light from the "off" pixels is generally directed away from the optical axis of the field lens 312 and toward the side of the upper optical module 202 as shown in FIG. 3.. The light that is reflected by the "off" pixels of the DLP 304 will be referred to as dark state light 314.

[000198] The DLP 304 operates as a computer controlled display and is generally thought of as a MEMs device. The DLP pixels are comprised of small mirrors that can be directed. The mirrors generally flip from one angle to another angle. The two angles are generally referred to as states. When light is used to illuminate the DLP the mirrors will reflect the light in a direction depending on the state. In embodiments herein, we generally refer to the two states as "on" and "off," which is intended to depict the condition of a display pixel. "On" pixels will be seen by a viewer of the display as emitting light because the light is directed along the optical axis and into the field lens and the associated remainder of the display system. "Off" pixels will be seen by a viewer of the display as not emitting light because the light from these pixels is directed to the side of the optical housing and into a light trap or light dump where the light is absorbed. The pattern of "on" and "off" pixels produces image light that is perceived by a viewer of the display as a computer generated image. Full color images can be presented to a user by sequentially providing illumination light with complimentary colors such as red, green and blue. Where the sequence is presented in a recurring cycle that is faster than the user can perceive as separate images and as a result the user perceives a full color image comprised of the sum of the sequential images. Bright pixels in the image are provided by pixels that remain in the "on" state for the entire time of the cycle, while dimmer pixels in the image are provided by pixels that switch between the "on" state and "off" state within the time of the cycle, or frame time when in a video sequence of images.

[000199] FIG. 3a shows an illustration of a system for a DLP 304 in which the unpolarized light source 350 is pointed directly at the DLP 304. In this case, the angle required for the illumination light is such that the field lens 352 must be positioned substantially distant from the DLP 304 to avoid the illumination light from being clipped by the field lens 352. The large distance between the field lens 352 and the DLP 304 along with the straight path of the dark state light 354, means that the light trap for the dark state light 354 is also located at a substantial distance from the DLP. For these reasons, this configuration is larger in size compared to the upper optics module 202 of the preferred embodiments.

[000200] The configuration illustrated in figure 3b can be lightweight and compact such that it fits into a small portion of a HWC. For example, the upper modules 202 illustrated herein can be physically adapted to mount in an upper frame of a HWC such that the image light can be directed into a lower optical module 204 for

presentation of digital content to a wearer's eye. The package of components that combine to generate the image light (i.e. the polarized light source 302, DLP 304, reflective polarizer 310 andl/4 wave film 308) is very light and is compact. The height of the system, excluding the field lens, may be less than 8 mm. The width (i.e. from front to back) may be less than 8 mm. The weight may be less than 2 grams. The

compactness of this upper optical module 202 allows for a compact mechanical design of the HWC and the light weight nature of these embodiments help make the HWC lightweight to provide for a HWC that is comfortable for a wearer of the HWC.

[000201] The configuration illustrated in figure 3b can produce sharp contrast, high brightness and deep blacks, especially when compared to LCD or LCoS displays used in HWC. The "on" and "off" states of the DLP provide for a strong differentiator in the light reflection path representing an "on" pixel and an "off " pixel. As will be discussed in more detail below, the dark state light from the "off" pixel reflections can be managed to reduce stray light in the display system to produce images with high contrast.

[000202] Figure 4 illustrates another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. This

embodiment includes a light source 404, but in this case, the light source can provide unpolarized illumination light. The illumination light from the light source 404 is directed into a TIR wedge 418 such that the illumination light is incident on an internal surface of the TIR wedge 418 (shown as the angled lower surface of the TRI wedge 418 in FIG. 4) at an angle that is beyond the critical angle as defined by Eqn 1.

[000203] Critical angle = arc-sin(l/n) Eqn 1

[000204] Where the critical angle is the angle beyond which the illumination light is reflected from the internal surface when the internal surface comprises an interface from a solid with a higher refractive index (n) to air with a refractive index of 1 (e.g. for an interface of acrylic, with a refractive index of n = 1.5, to air, the critical angle is 41.8 degrees; for an interface of polycarbonate, with a refractive index of n = 1.59, to air the critical angle is 38.9 degrees). Consequently, the TIR wedge 418 is associated with a thin air gap 408 along the internal surface to create an interface between a solid with a higher refractive index and air. By choosing the angle of the light source 404 relative to the DLP 402 in correspondence to the angle of the internal surface of the TIR wedge 418, illumination light is turned toward the DLP 402 at an angle suitable for providing image light 414 as reflected from "on"pixels. Wherein, the illumination light is provided to the DLP 402 at approximately twice the angle of the pixel mirrors in the DLP 402 that are in the "on" state, such that after reflecting from the pixel mirrors, the image light 414 is directed generally along the optical axis of the field lens. Depending on the state of the DLP pixels, the illumination light from "on" pixels may be reflected as image light 414 which is directed towards a field lens and a lower optical module 204, while illumination light reflected from "off" pixels (generally referred to herein as "dark" state light, "off" pixel light or "off" state light) 410 is directed in a separate direction, which may be trapped and not used for the image that is ultimately presented to the wearer's eye.

[000205] The light trap for the dark state light 410 may be located along the optical axis defined by the direction of the dark state light 410 and in the side of the housing, with the function of absorbing the dark state light. To this end, the light trap may be comprised of an area outside of the cone of image light 414 from the "on" pixels. The light trap is typically made up of materials that absorb light including coatings of black paints or other light absorbing materials to prevent light scattering from the dark state light degrading the image perceived by the user. In addition, the light trap may be recessed into the wall of the housing or include masks or guards to block scattered light and prevent the light trap from being viewed adjacent to the displayed image..

[000206] The embodiment of figure 4 also includes a corrective wedge 420 to correct the effect of refraction of the image light 414 as it exits the TIR wedge 418. By including the corrective wedge 420 and providing a thin air gap 408 (e.g. 25 micron), the image light from the "on" pixels can be maintained generally in a direction along the optical axis of the field lens (i.e. the same direction as that defined by the image light 414) so it passes into the field lens and the lower optical module 204. As shown in FIG. 4, the image light 414 from the "on" pixels exits the corrective wedge 420 generally perpendicular to the surface of the corrective wedge 420 while the dark state light exits at an oblique angle. As a result, the direction of the image light 414 from the "on" pixels is largely unaffected by refraction as it exits from the surface of the corrective wedge 420. In contrast, the dark state light 410 is substantially changed in direction by refraction when the dark state light 410 exits the corrective wedge 420.

[000207] The embodiment illustrated in figure 4 has the similar advantages of those discussed in connection with the embodiment of figure 3b. The dimensions and weight of the upper module 202 depicted in figure 4 may be approximately 8 X 8 mm with a weight of less than 3 grams. A difference in overall performance between the configuration illustrated in figures 3b and the configuration illustrated in figure 4 is that the embodiment of figure 4 doesn't require the use of polarized light as supplied by the light source 404. This can be an advantage in some situations as will be discussed in more detail below (e.g. increased see-through transparency of the HWC optics from the user's perspective). Polarized light may be used in connection with the embodiment depicted in figure 4, in embodiments. An additional advantage of the embodiment of figure 4 compared to the embodiment shown in figure 3b is that the dark state light (shown as DLP off light 410) is directed at a steeper angle away from the optical axis of the image light 414 due to the added refraction encountered when the dark state light 410 exits the corrective wedge 420. This steeper angle of the dark state light 410 allows for the light trap to be positioned closer to the DLP 402 so that the overall size of the upper module 202 can be reduced. The light trap can also be made larger since the light trap doesn't interfere with the field lens, thereby the efficiency of the light trap can be increased and as a result, stray light can be reduced and the contrast of the image perceived by the user can be increased. Figure 4a illustrates the embodiment described in connection with figure 4 with an example set of corresponding angles at the various surfaces with the reflected angles of a ray of light passing through the upper optical module 202. In this example, the DLP mirrors are provided at 17 degrees to the surface of the DLP device. The angles of the TIR wedge are selected in correspondence to one another to provide TIR reflected illumination light at the correct angle for the DLP mirrors while allowing the image light and dark state light to pass through the thin air gap, various combinations of angles are possible to achieve this.

[000208] Figure 5 illustrates yet another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 in accordance with the principles of the present invention. As with the embodiment shown in figure 4, the embodiment shown in figure 5 does not require the use of polarized light. Polarized light may be used in connection with this embodiment, but it is not required. The optical module 202 depicted in figure 5 is similar to that presented in connection with figure 4; however, the embodiment of figure 5 includes an off light redirection wedge 502. As can be seen from the illustration, the off light redirection wedge 502 allows the image light 414 to continue generally along the optical axis toward the field lens and into the lower optical module 204 (as illustrated). However, the off light 504 is redirected substantially toward the side of the corrective wedge 420 where it passes into the light trap. This configuration may allow further height compactness in the HWC because the light trap (not illustrated) that is intended to absorb the off light 504 can be positioned laterally adjacent the upper optical module 202 as opposed to below it. In the embodiment depicted in figure 5 there is a thin air gap between the TIR wedge 418 and the corrective wedge 420 (similar to the embodiment of figure 4). There is also a thin air gap between the corrective wedge 420 and the off light redirection wedge 502. There may be HWC mechanical configurations that warrant the positioning of a light trap for the dark state light elsewhere and the illustration depicted in figure 5 should be considered illustrative of the concept that the off light can be redirected to create compactness of the overall HWC. Figure 5a illustrates an example of the embodiment described in connection with figure 5 with the addition of more details on the relative angles at the various surfaces and a light ray trace for image light and a light ray trace for dark light are shown as it passes through the upper optical module 202. Again, various combinations of angles are possible.

[000209] Figure 4b shows an illustration of a further embodiment in which a solid transparent matched set of wedges 456 is provided with a reflective polarizer 450 at the interface between the wedges. Wherein the interface between the wedges in the wedge set 456 is provided at an angle so that illumination light 452 from the polarized light source 458 is reflected at the proper angle (e.g. 34 degrees for a 17 degree DLP mirror) for the DLP mirror "on" state so that the reflected image light 414 is provided along the optical axis of the field lens. The general geometry of the wedges in the wedge set 456 is similar to that shown in figures 4 and 4a. A quarter wave film 454 is provided on the DLP 402 surface so that the illumination light 452 is one polarization state (e.g. S polarization state) while in passing through the quarter wave film 454, reflecting from the DLP mirror and passing back through the quarter wave film 454, the image light 414 is converted to the other polarization state (e.g. P polarization state). The reflective polarizer is oriented such that the illumination light 452 with it's polarization state is reflected and the image light 414 with it's other polarization state is transmitted. Since the dark state light from the "off pixels 410 also passes through the quarter wave film 454 twice, it is also the other polarization state (e.g. P polarization state) so that it is transmitted by the reflective polarizer 450.

[000210] The angles of the faces of the wedge set 450 correspond to the needed angles to provide illumination light 452 at the angle needed by the DLP mirrors when in the "on" state so that the reflected image light 414 is reflected from the DLP along the optical axis of the field lens. The wedge set 456 provides an interior interface where a reflective polarizer film can be located to redirect the illumination light 452 toward the mirrors of the DLP 402. The wedge set also provides a matched wedge on the opposite side of the reflective polarizer 450 so that the image light 414 from the "on" pixels exits the wedge set 450 substantially perpendicular to the exit surface, while the dark state light from the 'off pixels 410 exits at an oblique angle to the exit surface. As a result, the image light 414 is substantially unrefracted upon exiting the wedge set 456, while the dark state light from the "off" pixels 410 is substantially refracted upon exiting the wedge set 456 as shown in figure 4b.

[000211] By providing a solid transparent matched wedge set, the flatness of the interface is reduced, because variations in the flatness have a negligible effect as long as they are within the cone angle of the illuminating light 452. Which can be f# 2.2 with a 26 degree cone angle. In a preferred embodiment, the reflective polarizer is bonded between the matched internal surfaces of the wedge set 456 using an optical adhesive so that Fresnel reflections at the interfaces on either side of the reflective polarizer 450 are reduced. The optical adhesive can be matched in refractive index to the material of the wedge set 456 and the pieces of the wedge set 456 can be all made from the same material such as BK7 glass or cast acrylic. Wherein the wedge material can be selected to have low birefringence as well to reduce non-uniformities in brightness. The wedge set 456 and the quarter wave film 454 can also be bonded to the DLP 402 to further reduce Fresnel reflections at the DLP interface losses. In addition, since the image light 414 is substantially normal to the exit surface of the wedge set 456, the flatness of the surface is not critical to maintain the wavefront of the image light 414 so that high image quality can be obtained in the displayed image without requiring very tightly toleranced flatness on the exit surface.

[000212] A yet further embodiment of the invention that is not illustrated, combines the embodiments illustrated in figures 4b and figure 5. In this embodiment, the wedge set 456 is comprised of three wedges with the general geometry of the wedges in the wedge set corresponding to that shown in figure 5 and 5a. A reflective polarizer is bonded between the first and second wedges similar to that shown in figure 4b, however, a third wedge is provided similar to the embodiment of figure 5. Wherein there is an angled thin air gap between the second and third wedges so that the dark state light is reflected by TIR toward the side of the second wedge where it is absorbed in a light trap. This embodiment, like the embodiment shown in figure 4b, uses a polarized light source as has been previously described. The difference in this embodiment is that the image light is transmitted through the reflective polarizer and is transmitted through the angled thin air gap so that it exits normal to the exit surface of the third wedge. [000213] Figure 5b illustrates an upper optical module 202 with a dark light trap 514a. As described in connection with figures 4 and 4a, image light can be generated from a DLP when using a TIR and corrective lens configuration. The upper module may be mounted in a HWC housing 510 and the housing 510 may include a dark light trap 514a. The dark light trap 514a is generally positioned/constructed/formed in a position that is optically aligned with the dark light optical axis 512. As illustrated, the dark light trap may have depth such that the trap internally reflects dark light in an attempt to further absorb the light and prevent the dark light from combining with the image light that passes through the field lens. The dark light trap may be of a shape and depth such that it absorbs the dark light. In addition, the dark light trap 514b, in embodiments, may be made of light absorbing materials or coated with light absorbing materials. In embodiments, the recessed light trap 514a may include baffles to block a view of the dark state light. This may be combined with black surfaces and textured or fiberous surfaces to help absorb the light. The baffles can be part of the light trap, associated with the housing, or field lens, etc.

[000214] Figure 5c illustrates another embodiment with a light trap 514b. As can be seen in the illustration, the shape of the trap is configured to enhance internal reflections within the light trap 514b to increase the absorption of the dark light 512. Figure 5d illustrates another embodiment with a light trap 514c. As can be seen in the illustration, the shape of the trap 514c is configured to enhance internal reflections to increase the absorption of the dark light 512.

[000215] Figure 5e illustrates another embodiment of an upper optical module 202 with a dark light trap 514d. This embodiment of upper module 202 includes an off light reflection wedge 502, as illustrated and described in connection with the embodiment of figure 5 and 5a. As can be seen in figure 5e, the light trap 514d is positioned along the optical path of the dark light 512. The dark light trap 514d may be configured as described in other embodiments herein. The embodiment of the light trap 514d illustrated in figure 5e includes a black area on the side wall of the wedge, wherein the side wall is located substantially away from the optical axis of the image light 414. In addition, baffles 5252 may be added to one or more edges of the field lens 312 to block the view of the light trap 514d adjacent to the displayed image seen by the user. [000216] Figure 6 illustrates a combination of an upper optical module 202 with a lower optical module 204. In this embodiment, the image light projected from the upper optical module 202 may or may not be polarized. The image light is reflected off a flat combiner element 602 such that it is directed towards the user's eye. Wherein, the combiner element 602 is a partial mirror that reflects image light while transmitting a substantial portion of light from the environment so the user can look through the combiner element and see the environment surrounding the HWC.

[000217] The combiner 602 may include a holographic pattern, to form a holographic mirror. If a monochrome image is desired, there may be a single

wavelength reflection design for the holographic pattern on the surface of the combiner 602. If the intention is to have multiple colors reflected from the surface of the combiner 602, a multiple wavelength holographic mirror maybe included on the combiner surface. For example, in a three-color embodiment, where red, green and blue pixels are generated in the image light, the holographic mirror may be reflective to wavelengths substantially matching the wavelengths of the red, green and blue light provided by the light source. This configuration can be used as a wavelength specific mirror where pre-determined wavelengths of light from the image light are reflected to the user's eye. This configuration may also be made such that substantially all other wavelengths in the visible pass through the combiner element 602 so the user has a substantially clear view of the surroundings when looking through the combiner element 602. The transparency between the user's eye and the surrounding may be approximately 80% when using a combiner that is a holographic mirror. Wherein holographic mirrors can be made using lasers to produce interference patterns in the holographic material of the combiner where the wavelengths of the lasers correspond to the wavelengths of light that are subsequently reflected by the holographic mirror.

[000218] In another embodiment, the combiner element 602 may include a notch mirror comprised of a multilayer coated substrate wherein the coating is designed to substantially reflect the wavelengths of light provided by the light source and substantially transmit the remaining wavelengths in the visible spectrum. For example, in the case where red, green and blue light is provided by the light source to enable full color images to be provided to the user, the notch mirror is a tristimulus notch mirror wherein the multilayer coating is designed to reflect narrow bands of red, green and blue light that are matched to the what is provided by the light source and the remaining visible wavelengths are transmitted through the coating to enable a view of the environment through the combiner. In another example where monochrome images are provided to the user, the notch mirror is designed to reflect a single narrow band of light that is matched to the wavelength range of the light provided by the light source while transmitting the remaining visible wavelengths to enable a see-thru view of the environment. The combiner 602 with the notch mirror would operate, from the user's perspective, in a manner similar to the combiner that includes a holographic pattern on the combiner element 602. The combiner, with the tristimulus notch mirror, would reflect the "on" pixels to the eye because of the match between the reflective wavelengths of the notch mirror and the color of the image light, and the wearer would be able to see with high clarity the surroundings. The transparency between the user's eye and the surrounding may be approximately 80% when using the tristimulus notch mirror. In addition, the image provided by the upper optical module 202 with the notch mirror combiner can provide higher contrast images than the holographic mirror combiner due to less scattering of the imaging light by the combiner.

[000219] Light can escape through the combiner 602 and may produce face glow as the light is generally directed downward onto the cheek of the user. When using a holographic mirror combiner or a tristimulus notch mirror combiner, the escaping light can be trapped to avoid face glow. In embodiments, if the image light is polarized before the combiner, a linear polarizer can be laminated, or otherwise associated, to the combiner, with the transmission axis of the polarizer oriented relative to the polarized image light so that any escaping image light is absorbed by the polarizer. In embodiments, the image light would be polarized to provide S polarized light to the combiner for better reflection. As a result, the linear polarizer on the combiner would be oriented to absorb S polarized light and pass P polarized light. This provides the preferred orientation of polarized sunglasses as well.

[000220] If the image light is unpolarized, a microlouvered film such as a privacy filter can be used to absorb the escaping image light while providing the user with a see-thru view of the environment. In this case, the absorbance or transmittance of the microlouvered film is dependent on the angle of the light,. Where steep angle light is absorbed and light at less of an angle is transmitted. For this reason, in an embodiment, the combiner with the microlouver film is angled at greater than 45 degrees to the optical axis of the image light (e.g. the combiner can be oriented at 50 degrees so the image light from the file lens is incident on the combiner at an oblique angle.

[000221] Figure 7 illustrates an embodiment of a combiner element 602 at various angles when the combiner element 602 includes a holographic mirror.

Normally, a mirrored surface reflects light at an angle equal to the angle that the light is incident to the mirrored surface. Typically, this necessitates that the combiner element be at 45 degrees, 602a, if the light is presented vertically to the combiner so the light can be reflected horizontally towards the wearer's eye. In embodiments, the incident light can be presented at angles other than vertical to enable the mirror surface to be oriented at other than 45 degrees, but in all cases wherein a mirrored surface is employed (including the tristimulus notch mirror described previously), the incident angle equals the reflected angle. As a result, increasing the angle of the combiner 602a requires that the incident image light be presented to the combiner 602a at a different angle which positions the upper optical module 202 to the left of the combiner as shown in figure 7. In contrast, a holographic mirror combiner, included in embodiments, can be made such that light is reflected at a different angle from the angle that the light is incident onto the holographic mirrored surface. This allows freedom to select the angle of the combiner element 602b independent of the angle of the incident image light and the angle of the light reflected into the wearer's eye. In embodiments, the angle of the combiner element 602b is greater than 45 degrees (shown in figure 7) as this allows a more laterally compact HWC design. The increased angle of the combiner element 602b decreases the front to back width of the lower optical module 204 and may allow for a thinner HWC display (i.e. the furthest element from the wearer's eye can be closer to the wearer's face).

[000222] Figure 8 illustrates another embodiment of a lower optical module 204. In this embodiment, polarized image light provided by the upper optical module 202, is directed into the lower optical module 204. The image light reflects off a polarized mirror 804 and is directed to a focusing partially reflective mirror 802, which is adapted to reflect the polarized light. An optical element such as a wave film located between the polarized mirror 804 and the partially reflective mirror 802, is used to change the polarization state of the image light such that the light reflected by the partially reflective mirror 802 is transmitted by the polarized mirror 804 to present image light to the eye of the wearer. The user can also see through the polarized mirror 804 and the partially reflective mirror 802 to see the surrounding environment. As a result, the user perceives a combined image comprised of the displayed image light overlaid onto the see-thru view of the environment.

[000223] While many of the embodiments of the present invention have been referred to as upper and lower modules containing certain optical components, it should be understood that the image light and dark light production and management functions described in connection with the upper module may be arranged to direct light in other directions (e.g. upward, sideward, etc.). In embodiments, it may be preferred to mount the upper module 202 above the wearer's eye, in which case the image light would be directed downward. In other embodiments it may be preferred to produce light from the side of the wearer's eye, or from below the wearer's eye. In addition, the lower optical module is generally configured to deliver the image light to the wearer's eye and allow the wearer to see through the lower optical module, which may be accomplished through a variety of optical components.

[000224] Figure 8a illustrates an embodiment of the present invention where the upper optical module 202 is arranged to direct image light into a TIR waveguide 810. In this embodiment, the upper optical module 202 is positioned above the wearer's eye 812 and the light is directed horizontally into the TIR waveguide 810. The TIR waveguide is designed to internally reflect the image light in a series of downward TIR reflections until it reaches the portion in front of the wearer's eye, where the light passes out of the TIR waveguide 812 into the wearer's eye. In this embodiment, an outer shield 814 is positioned in front of the TIR waveguide 810.

[000225] Figure 8b illustrates an embodiment of the present invention where the upper optical module 202 is arranged to direct image light into a TIR waveguide 818. In this embodiment, the upper optical module 202 is arranged on the side of the TIR waveguide 818. For example, the upper optical module may be positioned in the arm or near the arm of the HWC when configured as a pair of head worn glasses. The TIR waveguide 818 is designed to internally reflect the image light in a series of TIR reflections until it reaches the portion in front of the wearer's eye, where the light passes out of the TIR waveguide 812 into the wearer's eye.

[000226] Figure 8c illustrates yet further embodiments of the present invention where an upper optical module 202 is directing polarized image light into an optical guide 828 where the image light passes through a polarized reflector 824, changes polarization state upon reflection of the optical element 822 which includes a wave film for example and then is reflected by the polarized reflector 824 towards the wearer's eye, due to the change in polarization of the image light. The upper optical module 202 may be positioned to direct light to a mirror 820, to position the upper optical module 202 laterally, in other embodiments, the upper optical module 202 may direct the image light directly towards the polarized reflector 824. It should be understood that the present invention comprises other optical arrangements intended to direct image light into the wearer's eye.

[000227] Another aspect of the present invention relates to eye imaging. In embodiments, a camera is used in connection with an upper optical module 202 such that the wearer's eye can be imaged using pixels in the "off" state on the DLP. Figure 9 illustrates a system where the eye imaging camera 802 is mounted and angled such that the field of view of the eye imaging camera 802 is redirected toward the wearer's eye by the mirror pixels of the DLP 402 that are in the "off" state. In this way, the eye imaging camera 802 can be used to image the wearer's eye along the same optical axis as the displayed image that is presented to the wearer. Wherein, image light that is presented to the wearer's eye illuminates the wearer's eye so that the eye can be imaged by the eye imaging camera 802. In the process, the light reflected by the eye passes back though the optical train of the lower optical module 204 and a portion of the upper optical module to where the light is reflected by the "off" pixels of the DLP 402 toward the eye imaging camera 802.

[000228] In embodiments, the eye imaging camera may image the wearer's eye at a moment in time where there are enough "off" pixels to achieve the required eye image resolution. In another embodiment, the eye imaging camera collects eye image information from "off" pixels over time and forms a time lapsed image. In another embodiment, a modified image is presented to the user wherein enough "off" state pixels are included that the camera can obtain the desired resolution and brightness for imaging the wearer's eye and the eye image capture is synchronized with the presentation of the modified image.

[000229] The eye imaging system may be used for security systems. The HWC may not allow access to the HWC or other system if the eye is not recognized (e.g. through eye characteristics including retina or iris characteristics, etc.). The HWC may be used to provide constant security access in some embodiments. For example, the eye security confirmation may be a continuous, near-continuous, real-time, quasi real-time, periodic, etc. process so the wearer is effectively constantly being verified as known. In embodiments, the HWC may be worn and eye security tracked for access to other computer systems.

[000230] The eye imaging system may be used for control of the HWC. For example, a blink, wink, or particular eye movement may be used as a control

mechanism for a software application operating on the HWC or associated device.

[000231] The eye imaging system may be used in a process that determines how or when the HWC 102 delivers digitally displayed content to the wearer. For example, the eye imaging system may determine that the user is looking in a direction and then HWC may change the resolution in an area of the display or provide some content that is associated with something in the environment that the user may be looking at. Alternatively, the eye imaging system may identify different user's and change the displayed content or enabled features provided to the user. User's may be identified from a database of users eye characteristics either located on the HWC 102 or remotely located on the network 110 or on a server 112. In addition, the HWC may identify a primary user or a group of primary users from eye characteristics wherein the primary user(s) are provided with an enhanced set of features and all other user's are provided with a different set of features. Thus in this use case, the HWC 102 uses identified eye characteristics to either enable features or not and eye characteristics need only be analyzed in comparison to a relatively small database of individual eye characteristics.

[000232] Figure 10 illustrates a light source that may be used in association with the upper optics module 202 (e.g. polarized light source if the light from the solid state light source is polarized such as polarized light source 302 and 458 ), and light source 404. In embodiments, to provide a uniform surface of light 1008 to be directed into the upper optical module 202 and towards the DLP of the upper optical module, either directly or indirectly, the solid state light source 1002 may be projected into a backlighting optical system 1004. The solid state light source 1002 may be one or more LEDs, laser diodes, OLEDs. In embodiments, the backlighting optical system 1004 includes an extended section with a length/distance ratio of greater than 3, wherein the light undergoes multiple reflections from the sidewalls to mix of homogenize the light as supplied by the solid state light source 1002. The backlighting optical system 1004 can also include structures on the surface opposite (on the left side as shown in figure 10) to where the uniform light 1008 exits the backlight 1004 to change the direction of the light toward the DLP 302 and the reflective polarizer 310 or the DLP 402 and the TIR wedge 418. The backlighting optical system 1004 may also include structures to collimate the uniform light 1008 to provide light to the DLP with a smaller angular distribution or narrower cone angle. Diffusers or polarizers can be used on the entrance or exit surface of the backlighting optical system. Diffusers can be used to spread or uniformize the exiting light from the backlight to improve the uniformity or increase the angular spread of the uniform light 1008. Elliptical diffusers that diffuse the light more in some directions and less in others can be used to improve the uniformity or spread of the uniform light 1008 in directions orthogonal to the optical axis of the uniform light 1008. Linear polarizers can be used to convert unpolarized light as supplied by the solid state light source 1002 to polarized light so the uniform light 1008 is polarized with a desired polarization state. A reflective polarizer can be used on the exit surface of the backlight 1004 to polarize the uniform light 1008 to the desired polarization state, while reflecting the other polarization state back into the backlight where it is recycled by multiple reflections within the backlight 1004 and at the solid state light source 1002. Therefore by including a reflective polarizer at the exit surface of the backlight 1004, the efficiency of the polarized light source is improved.

[000233] Figures 10a and 10b show illustrations of structures in backlight optical systems 1004 that can be used to change the direction of the light provided to the entrance face 1045 by the light source and then collimates the light in a direction lateral to the optical axis of the exiting uniform light 1008. Structure 1060 includes an angled sawtooth pattern in a transparent waveguide wherein the left edge of each sawtooth clips the steep angle rays of light thereby limiting the angle of the light being redirected. The steep surface at the right (as shown) of each sawtooth then redirects the light so that it reflects off the left angled surface of each sawtooth and is directed toward the exit surface 1040. The sawtooth surfaces shown on the lower surface in figures 10a and 10b, can be smooth and coated (e.g. with an aluminum coating or a dielectric mirror coating) to provide a high level of reflectivity without scattering.

Structure 1050 includes a curved face on the left side (as shown) to focus the rays after they pass through the exit surface 1040, thereby providing a mechanism for collimating the uniform light 1008. In a further embodiment, a diffuser can be provided between the solid state light source 1002 and the entrance face 1045 to homogenize the light provided by the solid state light source 1002. In yet a further embodiment, a polarizer can be used between the diffuser and the entrance face 1045 of the backlight 1004 to provide a polarized light source. Because the sawtooth pattern provides smooth reflective surfaces, the polarization state of the light can be preserved from the entrance face 1045 to the exit face 1040. In this embodiment, the light entering the backlight from the solid state light source 1002 passes through the polarizer so that it is polarized with the desired polarization state. If the polarizer is an absorptive linear polarizer, the light of the desired polarization state is transmitted while the light of the other polarization state is absorbed. If the polarizer is a reflective polarizer, the light of the desired polarization state is transmitted into the backlight 1004 while the light of the other polarization state is reflected back into the solid state light source 1002 where it can be recycled as previously described, to increase the efficiency of the polarized light source.

[000234] Figure 11a illustrates a light source 1100 that may be used in association with the upper optics module 202. In embodiments, the light source 1100 may provide light to a backlighting optical system 1004 as described above in connection with figure 10. In embodiments, the light source 1100 includes a tristimulus notch filter 1102. The tristimulus notch filter 1102 has narrow band pass filters for three wavelengths, as indicated in figure 11c in a transmission graph 1108. The graph shown in figure lib, as 1104 illustrates an output of three different colored LEDs. One can see that the bandwidths of emission are narrow, but they have long tails. The tristimulus notch filter 1102 can be used in connection with such LEDs to provide a light source 1100 that emits narrow filtered wavelengths of light as shown in figure lid as the transmission graph 1110. Wherein the clipping effects of the tristimulus notch filter 1102 can be seen to have cut the tails from the LED emission graph 1104 to provide narrower wavelength bands of light to the upper optical module 202. The light source 1100 can be used in connection with a combiner 602 with a holographic mirror or tristimulus notch mirror to provide narrow bands of light that are reflected toward the wearer's eye with less waste light that does not get reflected by the combiner, thereby improving efficiency and reducing escaping light that can cause faceglow.

[000235] Figure 12a illustrates another light source 1200 that may be used in association with the upper optics module 202. In embodiments, the light source 1200 may provide light to a backlighting optical system 1004 as described above in connection with figure 10. In embodiments, the light source 1200 includes a quantum dot cover glass 1202. Where the quantum dots absorb light of a shorter wavelength and emit light of a longer wavelength (figure 12b shows an example wherein a UV spectrum 1202 applied to a quantum dot results in the quantum dot emitting a narrow band shown as a PL spectrum 1204) that is dependent on the material makeup and size of the quantum dot. As a result, quantum dots in the quantum dot cover glass 1202 can be tailored to provide one or more bands of narrow bandwidth light (e.g. red, green and blue emissions dependent on the different quantum dots included as illustrated in the graph shown in figure 12c where three different quantum dots are used. In

embodiments, the LED driver light emits UV light, deep blue or blue light. For sequential illumination of different colors, multiple light sources 1200 would be used where each light source 1200 would include a quantum dot cover glass 1202 with a quantum dot selected to emit at one of the desired colors. The light source 1100 can be used in connection with a combiner 602 with a holographic mirror or tristimulus notch mirror to provide narrow transmission bands of light that are reflected toward the wearer's eye with less waste light that does not get reflected.

[000236] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the generation of peripheral image lighting effects for a person wearing a HWC. In embodiments, a solid state lighting system (e.g. LED, OLED, etc), or other lighting system, may be included inside the optical elements of an lower optical module 204. The solid state lighting system may be arranged such that lighting effects outside of a field of view (FOV) of the presented digital content is presented to create an immersive effect for the person wearing the HWC. To this end, the lighting effects may be presented to any portion of the HWC that is visible to the wearer. The solid state lighting system may be digitally controlled by an integrated processor on the HWC. In embodiments, the integrated processor will control the lighting effects in coordination with digital content that is presented within the FOV of the HWC. For example, a movie, picture, game, or other content, may be displayed or playing within the FOV of the HWC. The content may show a bomb blast on the right side of the FOV and at the same moment, the solid state lighting system inside of the upper module optics may flash quickly in concert with the FOV image effect. The effect may not be fast, it may be more persistent to indicate, for example, a general glow or color on one side of the user. The solid state lighting system may be color controlled, with red, green and blue LEDs, for example, such that color control can be coordinated with the digitally presented content within the field of view.

[000237] Figure 13a illustrates optical components of a lower optical module 204 together with an outer lens 1302. Figure 13a also shows an embodiment including effects LED's 1308a and 1308b. Figure 13a illustrates image light 1312, as described herein elsewhere, directed into the upper optical module where it will reflect off of the combiner element 1304, as described herein elsewhere. The combiner element 1304 in this embodiment is angled towards the wearer's eye at the top of the module and away from the wearer's eye at the bottom of the module, as also illustrated and described in connection with figure 8 (e.g. at a 45 degree angle). The image light 1312 provided by an upper optical module 202 (not shown in figure 13a) reflects off of the combiner element 1304 towards the collimating mirror 1310, away from the wearer's eye, as described herein elsewhere. The image light 1312 then reflects and focuses off of the collimating mirror 1304, passes back through the combiner element

1304, and is directed into the wearer's eye. The wearer can also view the surrounding environment through the transparency of the combiner element 1304, collimating mirror 1310, and outer lens 1302 (if it is included). As described herein elsewhere, various surfaces are polarized to create the optical path for the image light and to provide transparency of the elements such that the wearer can view the surrounding environment. The wearer will generally perceive that the image light forms an image in the FOV 1305. In embodiments, the outer lens 1302 may be included. The outer lens 1302 is an outer lens that may or may not be corrective and it may be designed to conceal the lower optical module components in an effort to make the HWC appear to be in a form similar to standard glasses or sunglasses.

[000238] In the embodiment illustrated in figure 13a, the effects LEDs 1308a and 1308b are positioned at the sides of the combiner element 1304 and the outer lens 1302 and/or the collimating mirror 1310. In embodiments, the effects LEDs 1308a are positioned within the confines defined by the combiner element 1304 and the outer lens 1302 and/or the collimating mirror. The effects LEDs 1308a and 1308b are also positioned outside of the FOV 1305. In this arrangement, the effects LEDs 1308a and 1308b can provide lighting effects within the lower optical module outside of the FOV

1305. In embodiments the light emitted from the effects LEDs 1308a and 1308b may be polarized such that the light passes through the combiner element 1304 toward the wearer's eye and does not pass through the outer lens 1302 and/or the collimating mirror 1310. This arrangement provides peripheral lighting effects to the wearer in a more private setting by not transmitting the lighting effects through the front of the HWC into the surrounding environment. However, in other embodiments, the effects LEDs 1308a and 1308b may be unpolarized so the lighting effects provided are made to be purposefully viewable by others in the environment for entertainment such as giving the effect of the wearer's eye glowing in correspondence to the image content being viewed by the wearer.

[000239] Figure 13b illustrates a cross section of the embodiment described in connection with figure 13a. As illustrated, the effects LED 1308a is located in the upper-front area inside of the optical components of the lower optical module. It should be understood that the effects LED 1308a position in the described embodiments is only illustrative and alternate placements are encompassed by the present invention.

Additionally, in embodiments, there may be one or more effects LEDs 1308a in each of the two sides of HWC to provide peripheral lighting effects near one or both eyes of the wearer.

[000240] Figure 13c illustrates an embodiment where the combiner element 1304 is angled away from the eye at the top and towards the eye at the bottom (e.g. in accordance with the holographic or notch filter embodiments described herein). In this embodiment, the effects LED 1308a is located on the outer lens 1302 side of the combiner element 1304 to provide a concealed appearance of the lighting effects. As with other embodiments, the effects LED 1308a of figure 13c may include a polarizer such that the emitted light can pass through a polarized element associated with the combiner element 1304 and be blocked by a polarized element associated with the outer lens 1302.

[000241] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the mitigation of light escaping from the space between the wearer's face and the HWC itself. Another aspect of the present invention relates to maintaining a controlled lighting environment in proximity to the wearer's eyes. In embodiments, both the maintenance of the lighting environment and the mitigation of light escape are accomplished by including a removable and replaceable flexible shield for the HWC. Wherein the removable and replaceable shield can be provided for one eye or both eyes in correspondence to the use of the displays for each eye. For example, in a night vision application, the display to only one eye could be used for night vision while the display to the other eye is turned off to provide good see-thru when moving between areas where visible light is available and dark areas where night vision enhancement is needed.

[000242] Figure 14a illustrates a removable and replaceable flexible eye cover 1402 with an opening 1408 that can be attached and removed quickly from the HWC 102 through the use of magnets. Other attachment methods may be used, but for illustration of the present invention we will focus on a magnet implementation. In embodiments, magnets may be included in the eye cover 1402 and magnets of an opposite polarity may be included (e.g. embedded) in the frame of the HWC 102. The magnets of the two elements would attract quite strongly with the opposite polarity configuration. In another embodiment, one of the elements may have a magnet and the other side may have metal for the attraction. In embodiments, the eye cover 1402 is a flexible elastomeric shield. In embodiments, the eye cover 1402 may be an elastomeric bellows design to accommodate flexibility and more closely align with the wearer's face. Figure 14b illustrates a removable and replaceable flexible eye cover 1404 that is adapted as a single eye cover. In embodiments, a single eye cover may be used for each side of the HWC to cover both eyes of the wearer. In embodiments, the single eye cover may be used in connection with a HWC that includes only one computer display for one eye. These configurations prevent light that is generated and directed generally towards the wearer's face by covering the space between the wearer's face and the HWC. The opening 1408 allows the wearer to look through the opening 1408 to view the displayed content and the surrounding environment through the front of the HWC. The image light in the lower optical module 204 can be prevented from emitting from the front of the HWC through internal optics polarization schemes, as described herein, for example.

[000243] Figure 14c illustrates another embodiment of a light suppression system. In this embodiment, the eye cover 1410 may be similar to the eye cover 1402, but eye cover 1410 includes a front light shield 1412. The front light shield 1412 may be opaque to prevent light from escaping the front lens of the HWC. In other

embodiments, the front light shield 1412 is polarized to prevent light from escaping the front lens. In a polarized arrangement, in embodiments, the internal optical elements of the HWC (e.g. of the lower optical module 204) may polarize light transmitted towards the front of the HWC and the front light shield 1412 may be polarized to prevent the light from transmitting through the front light shield 1412.

[000244] In embodiments, an opaque front light shield 1412 may be included and the digital content may include images of the surrounding environment such that the wearer can visualize the surrounding environment. One eye may be presented with night vision environmental imagery and this eye's surrounding environment optical path may be covered using an opaque front light shield 1412. In other embodiments, this arrangement may be associated with both eyes.

[000245] Another aspect of the present invention relates to automatically configuring the lighting system(s) used in the HWC 102. In embodiments, the display lighting and/or effects lighting, as described herein, may be controlled in a manner suitable for when an eye cover 1408 is attached or removed from the HWC 102. For example, at night, when the light in the environment is low, the lighting system(s) in the HWC may go into a low light mode to further control any amounts of stray light escaping from the HWC and the areas around the HWC. Covert operations at night, while using night vision or standard vision, may require a solution which prevents as much escaping light as possible so a user may clip on the eye cover(s) 1408 and then the HWC may go into a low light mode. The low light mode may, in some embodiments, only go into a low light mode when the eye cover 1408 is attached if the HWC identifies that the environment is in low light conditions (e.g. through environment light level sensor detection). In embodiments, the low light level may be determined to be at an intermediate point between full and low light dependent on environmental conditions.

[000246] Another aspect of the present invention relates to automatically controlling the type of content displayed in the HWC when eye covers 1408 are attached or removed from the HWC. In embodiments, when the eye cover(s) 1408 is attached to the HWC, the displayed content may be restricted in amount or in color amounts. For example, the display(s) may go into a simple content delivery mode to restrict the amount of information displayed. This may be done to reduce the amount of light produced by the display (s). In an embodiment, the display (s) may change from color displays to monochrome displays to reduce the amount of light produced. In an embodiment, the monochrome lighting may be red to limit the impact on the wearer's eyes to maintain an ability to see better in the dark. [000247] Referring to Fig. 15, we now turn to describe a particular external user interface 104, referred to generally as a pen 1500. The pen 1500 is a specially designed external user interface 104 and can operate as a user interface, such as to many different styles of HWC 102. The pen 1500 generally follows the form of a conventional pen, which is a familiar user handled device and creates an intuitive physical interface for many of the operations to be carried out in the HWC system 100. The pen 1500 may be one of several user interfaces 104 used in connection with controlling operations within the HWC system 100. For example, the HWC 102 may watch for and interpret hand gestures 116 as control signals, where the pen 1500 may also be used as a user interface with the same HWC 102. Similarly, a remote keyboard may be used as an external user interface 104 in concert with the pen 1500. The combination of user interfaces or the use of just one control system generally depends on the operation(s) being executed in the HWC's system 100.

[000248] While the pen 1500 may follow the general form of a conventional pen, it contains numerous technologies that enable it to function as an external user interface 104. Fig. 15 illustrates technologies comprised in the pen 1500. As can be seen, the pen 1500 may include a camera 1508, which is arranged to view through lens 1502. The camera may then be focused, such as through lens 1502, to image a surface upon which a user is writing or making other movements to interact with the HWC 102. There are situations where the pen 1500 will also have an ink, graphite, or other system such that what is being written can be seen on the writing surface. There are other situations where the pen 1500 does not have such a physical writing system so there is no deposit on the writing surface, where the pen would only be communicating data or commands to the HWC 102. The lens configuration is described in greater detail herein. The function of the camera is to capture information from an unstructured writing surface such that pen strokes can be interpreted as intended by the user. To assist in the predication of the intended stroke path, the pen 1500 may include a sensor, such as an IMU 1512. Of course, the IMU could be included in the pen 1500 in its separate parts (e.g. gyro, accelerometer, etc.) or an IMU could be included as a single unit. In this instance, the IMU 1512 is used to measure and predict the motion of the pen 1500. In turn, the integrated microprocessor 1510 would take the IMU information and camera information as inputs and process the information to form a prediction of the pen tip movement. [000249] The pen 1500 may also include a pressure monitoring system 1504, such as to measure the pressure exerted on the lens 1502. As will be described in greater detail herein, the pressure measurement can be used to predict the user's intention for changing the weight of a line, type of a line, type of brush, click, double click, and the like. In embodiments, the pressure sensor may be constructed using any force or pressure measurement sensor located behind the lens 1502, including for example, a resistive sensor, a current sensor, a capacitive sensor, a voltage sensor such as a piezoelectric sensor, and the like.

[000250] The pen 1500 may also include a communications module 1518, such as for bi-directional communication with the HWC 102. In embodiments, the communications module 1518 may be a short distance communication module (e.g. Bluetooth). The communications module 1518 may be security matched to the HWC 102. The communications module 1518 may be arranged to communicate data and commands to and from the microprocessor 1510 of the pen 1500. The microprocessor 1510 may be programmed to interpret data generated from the camera 1508, IMU 1512, and pressure sensor 1504, and the like, and then pass a command onto the HWC 102 through the communications module 1518, for example. In another embodiment, the data collected from any of the input sources (e.g. camera 1508, IMU 1512, pressure sensor 1504) by the microprocessor may be communicated by the communication module 1518 to the HWC 102, and the HWC 102 may perform data processing and prediction of the user's intention when using the pen 1500. In yet another embodiment, the data may be further passed on through a network 110 to a remote device 112, such as a server, for the data processing and prediction. The commands may then be communicated back to the HWC 102 for execution (e.g. display writing in the glasses display, make a selection within the UI of the glasses display, control a remote external device 112, control a local external device 108), and the like. The pen may also include memory 1514 for long or short term uses.

[000251] The pen 1500 may also include a number of physical user interfaces, such as quick launch buttons 1522, a touch sensor 1520, and the like. The quick launch buttons 1522 may be adapted to provide the user with a fast way of jumping to a software application in the HWC system 100. For example, the user may be a frequent user of communication software packages (e.g. email, text, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Google+, and the like), and the user may program a quick launch button 1522 to command the HWC 102 to launch an application. The pen 1500 may be provided with several quick launch buttons 1522, which may be user programmable or factory programmable. The quick launch button 1522 may be programmed to perform an operation. For example, one of the buttons may be programmed to clear the digital display of the HWC 102. This would create a fast way for the user to clear the screens on the HWC 102 for any reason, such as for example to better view the environment. The quick launch button functionality will be discussed in further detail below. The touch sensor 1520 may be used to take gesture style input from the user. For example, the user may be able to take a single finger and run it across the touch sensor 1520 to affect a page scroll.

[000252] The pen 1500 may also include a laser pointer 1524. The laser pointer 1524 may be coordinated with the IMU 1512 to coordinate gestures and laser pointing. For example, a user may use the laser 1524 in a presentation to help with guiding the audience with the interpretation of graphics and the IMU 1512 may, either simultaneously or when the laser 1524 is off, interpret the user's gestures as commands or data input.

[000253] Figs. 16A-C illustrate several embodiments of lens and camera arrangements 1600 for the pen 1500. One aspect relates to maintaining a constant distance between the camera and the writing surface to enable the writing surface to be kept in focus for better tracking of movements of the pen 1500 over the writing surface. Another aspect relates to maintaining an angled surface following the circumference of the writing tip of the pen 1500 such that the pen 1500 can be rolled or partially rolled in the user's hand to create the feel and freedom of a conventional writing instrument.

[000254] Fig. 16A illustrates an embodiment of the writing lens end of the pen 1500. The configuration includes a ball lens 1604, a camera or image capture surface 1602, and a domed cover lens 1608. In this arrangement, the camera views the writing surface through the ball lens 1604 and dome cover lens 1608. The ball lens 1604 causes the camera to focus such that the camera views the writing surface when the pen 1500 is held in the hand in a natural writing position, such as with the pen 1500 in contact with a writing surface. In embodiments, the ball lens 1604 should be separated from the writing surface to obtain the highest resolution of the writing surface at the camera 1602. In embodiments, the ball lens 1604 is separated by approximately 1 to 3 mm. In this configuration, the domed cover lens 1608 provides a surface that can keep the ball lens 1604 separated from the writing surface at a constant distance, such as substantially independent of the angle used to write on the writing surface. For instance, in embodiments the field of view of the camera in this

arrangement would be approximately 60 degrees.

[000255] The domed cover lens, or other lens 1608 used to physically interact with the writing surface, will be transparent or transmissive within the active bandwidth of the camera 1602. In embodiments, the domed cover lens 1608 may be spherical or other shape and comprised of glass, plastic, sapphire, diamond, and the like. In other embodiments where low resolution imaging of the surface is acceptable. The pen 1500 can omit the domed cover lens 1608 and the ball lens 1604 can be in direct contact with the surface.

[000256] Fig. 16B illustrates another structure where the construction is somewhat similar to that described in connection with Fig. 16A; however this

embodiment does not use a dome cover lens 1608, but instead uses a spacer 1610 to maintain a predictable distance between the ball lens 1604 and the writing surface, wherein the spacer may be spherical, cylindrical, tubular or other shape that provides spacing while allowing for an image to be obtained by the camera 1602 through the lens 1604. In a preferred embodiment, the spacer 1610 is transparent. In addition, while the spacer 1610 is shown as spherical, other shapes such as an oval, doughnut shape, half sphere, cone, cylinder or other form may be used.

[000257] Figure 16C illustrates yet another embodiment, where the structure includes a post 1614, such as running through the center of the lensed end of the pen 1500. The post 1614 may be an ink deposition system (e.g. ink cartridge), graphite deposition system (e.g. graphite holder), or a dummy post whose purpose is mainly only that of alignment. The selection of the post type is dependent on the pen's use. For instance, in the event the user wants to use the pen 1500 as a conventional ink depositing pen as well as a fully functional external user interface 104, the ink system post would be the best selection. If there is no need for the 'writing' to be visible on the writing surface, the selection would be the dummy post. The embodiment of Fig. 16C includes camera(s) 1602 and an associated lens 1612, where the camera 1602 and lens 1612 are positioned to capture the writing surface without substantial interference from the post 1614. In embodiments, the pen 1500 may include multiple cameras 1602 and lenses 1612 such that more or all of the circumference of the tip 1614 can be used as an input system. In an embodiment, the pen 1500 includes a contoured grip that keeps the pen aligned in the user's hand so that the camera 1602 and lens 1612 remains pointed at the surface.

[000258] Another aspect of the pen 1500 relates to sensing the force applied by the user to the writing surface with the pen 1500. The force measurement may be used in a number of ways. For example, the force measurement may be used as a discrete value, or discontinuous event tracking, and compared against a threshold in a process to determine a user's intent. The user may want the force interpreted as a 'click' in the selection of an object, for instance. The user may intend multiple force exertions interpreted as multiple clicks. There may be times when the user holds the pen 1500 in a certain position or holds a certain portion of the pen 1500 (e.g. a button or touch pad) while clicking to affect a certain operation (e.g. a 'right click'). In embodiments, the force measurement may be used to track force and force trends. The force trends may be tracked and compared to threshold limits, for example. There may be one such threshold limit, multiple limits, groups of related limits, and the like. For example, when the force measurement indicates a fairly constant force that generally falls within a range of related threshold values, the microprocessor 1510 may interpret the force trend as an indication that the user desires to maintain the current writing style, writing tip type, line weight, brush type, and the like. In the event that the force trend appears to have gone outside of a set of threshold values intentionally, the microprocessor may interpret the action as an indication that the user wants to change the current writing style, writing tip type, line weight, brush type, and the like. Once the microprocessor has made a determination of the user's intent, a change in the current writing style, writing tip type, line weight, brush type, and the like may be executed. In embodiments, the change may be noted to the user (e.g. in a display of the HWC 102), and the user may be presented with an opportunity to accept the change.

[000259] Fig. 17A illustrates an embodiment of a force sensing surface tip 1700 of a pen 1500. The force sensing surface tip 1700 comprises a surface connection tip 1702 (e.g. a lens as described herein elsewhere) in connection with a force or pressure monitoring system 1504. As a user uses the pen 1500 to write on a surface or simulate writing on a surface the force monitoring system 1504 measures the force or pressure the user applies to the writing surface and the force monitoring system communicates data to the microprocessor 1510 for processing. In this configuration, the microprocessor 1510 receives force data from the force monitoring system 1504 and processes the data to make predictions of the user's intent in applying the particular force that is currently being applied. In embodiments, the processing may be provided at a location other than on the pen (e.g. at a server in the HWC system 100, on the HWC 102). For clarity, when reference is made herein to processing information on the microprocessor 1510, the processing of information contemplates processing the information at a location other than on the pen. The microprocessor 1510 may be programmed with force threshold(s), force signature(s), force signature library and/or other characteristics intended to guide an inference program in determining the user's intentions based on the measured force or pressure. The microprocessor 1510 may be further programmed to make inferences from the force measurements as to whether the user has attempted to initiate a discrete action (e.g. a user interface selection 'click') or is performing a constant action (e.g. writing within a particular writing style). The inferencing process is important as it causes the pen 1500 to act as an intuitive external user interface 104.

[000260] Fig. 17B illustrates a force 1708 versus time 1710 trend chart with a single threshold 1718. The threshold 1718 may be set at a level that indicates a discrete force exertion indicative of a user's desire to cause an action (e.g. select an object in a GUI). Event 1712, for example, may be interpreted as a click or selection command because the force quickly increased from below the threshold 1718 to above the threshold 1718. The event 1714 may be interpreted as a double click because the force quickly increased above the threshold 1718, decreased below the threshold 1718 and then essentially repeated quickly. The user may also cause the force to go above the threshold 1718 and hold for a period indicating that the user is intending to select an object in the GUI (e.g. a GUI presented in the display of the HWC 102) and 'hold' for a further operation (e.g. moving the object).

[000261] While a threshold value may be used to assist in the interpretation of the user's intention, a signature force event trend may also be used. The threshold and signature may be used in combination or either method may be used alone. For example, a single-click signature may be represented by a certain force trend signature or set of signatures. The single-click signature(s) may require that the trend meet a criteria of a rise time between x any y values, a hold time of between a and b values and a fall time of between c and d values, for example. Signatures may be stored for a variety of functions such as click, double click, right click, hold, move, etc. The microprocessor 1510 may compare the real-time force or pressure tracking against the signatures from a signature library to make a decision and issue a command to the software application executing in the GUI.

[000262] Fig. 17C illustrates a force 1708 versus time 1710 trend chart with multiple thresholds 1718. By way of example, the force trend is plotted on the chart with several pen force or pressure events. As noted, there are both presumably intentional events 1720 and presumably non-intentional events 1722. The two thresholds 1718 of figure 4C create three zones of force: a lower, middle and higher range. The beginning of the trend indicates that the user is placing a lower zone amount of force. This may mean that the user is writing with a given line weight and does not intend to change the weight, the user is writing. Then the trend shows a significant increase 1720 in force into the middle force range. This force change appears, from the trend to have been sudden and thereafter it is sustained. The microprocessor 1510 may interpret this as an intentional change and as a result change the operation in

accordance with preset rules (e.g. change line width, increase line weight, etc.). The trend then continues with a second apparently intentional event 1720 into the higher- force range. During the performance in the higher-force range, the force dips below the upper threshold 1718. This may indicate an unintentional force change and the microprocessor may detect the change in range however not affect a change in the operations being coordinated by the pen 1500. As indicated above, the trend analysis may be done with thresholds and/or signatures.

[000263] Generally, in the present disclosure, instrument stroke parameter changes may be referred to as a change in line type, line weight, tip type, brush type, brush width, brush pressure, color, and other forms of writing, coloring, painting, and the like.

[000264] Another aspect of the pen 1500 relates to selecting an operating mode for the pen 1500 dependent on contextual information and/or selection interface(s). The pen 1500 may have several operating modes. For instance, the pen 1500 may have a writing mode where the user interface(s) of the pen 1500 (e.g. the writing surface end, quick launch buttons 1522, touch sensor 1520, motion based gesture, and the like) is optimized or selected for tasks associated with writing. As another example, the pen 1500 may have a wand mode where the user interface (s) of the pen is optimized or selected for tasks associated with software or device control (e.g. the HWC 102, external local device, remote device 112, and the like). The pen 1500, by way of another example, may have a presentation mode where the user interface(s) is optimized or selected to assist a user with giving a presentation (e.g. pointing with the laser pointer 1524 while using the button(s) 1522 and/or gestures to control the presentation or applications relating to the presentation). The pen may, for example, have a mode that is optimized or selected for a particular device that a user is

attempting to control. The pen 1500 may have a number of other modes and an aspect of the present invention relates to selecting such modes.

[000265] Fig. 18A illustrates an automatic user interface(s) mode selection based on contextual information. The microprocessor 1510 may be programmed with IMU thresholds 1814 and 1812. The thresholds 1814 and 1812 may be used as indications of upper and lower bounds of an angle 1804 and 1802 of the pen 1500 for certain expected positions during certain predicted modes. When the microprocessor 1510 determines that the pen 1500 is being held or otherwise positioned within angles 1802 corresponding to writing thresholds 1814, for example, the microprocessor 1510 may then institute a writing mode for the pen's user interfaces. Similarly, if the microprocessor 1510 determines (e.g. through the IMU 1512) that the pen is being held at an angle 1804 that falls between the predetermined wand thresholds 1812, the microprocessor may institute a wand mode for the pen's user interface. Both of these examples may be referred to as context based user interface mode selection as the mode selection is based on contextual information (e.g. position) collected

automatically and then used through an automatic evaluation process to automatically select the pen's user interface(s) mode.

[000266] As with other examples presented herein, the microprocessor 1510 may monitor the contextual trend (e.g. the angle of the pen over time) in an effort to decide whether to stay in a mode or change modes. For example, through signatures, thresholds, trend analysis, and the like, the microprocessor may determine that a change is an unintentional change and therefore no user interface mode change is desired.

[000267] Fig. 18B illustrates an automatic user interface(s) mode selection based on contextual information. In this example, the pen 1500 is monitoring (e.g.

through its microprocessor) whether or not the camera at the writing surface end 1508 is imaging a writing surface in close proximity to the writing surface end of the pen 1500. If the pen 1500 determines that a writing surface is within a predetermined relatively short distance, the pen 1500 may decide that a writing surface is present 1820 and the pen may go into a writing mode user interface(s) mode. In the event that the pen 1500 does not detect a relatively close writing surface 1822, the pen may predict that the pen is not currently being used to as a writing instrument and the pen may go into a non-writing user interface (s) mode.

[000268] Fig. 18C illustrates a manual user interface (s) mode selection. The user interface (s) mode may be selected based on a twist of a section 1824 of the pen 1500 housing, clicking an end button 1828, pressing a quick launch button 1522, interacting with touch sensor 1520, detecting a predetermined action at the pressure monitoring system (e.g. a click), detecting a gesture (e.g. detected by the IMU), etc. The manual mode selection may involve selecting an item in a GUI associated with the pen 1500 (e.g. an image presented in the display of HWC 102).

[000269] In embodiments, a confirmation selection may be presented to the user in the event a mode is going to change. The presentation may be physical (e.g. a vibration in the pen 1500), through a GUI, through a light indicator, etc.

[000270] Fig. 19 illustrates a couple pen use-scenarios 1900 and 1901. There are many use scenarios and we have presented a couple in connection with Fig. 19 as a way of illustrating use scenarios to further the understanding of the reader. As such, the use-scenarios should be considered illustrative and non-limiting.

[000271] Use scenario 1900 is a writing scenario where the pen 1500 is used as a writing instrument. In this example, quick launch button 122A is pressed to launch a note application 1910 in the GUI 1908 of the HWC 102 display 1904. Once the quick launch button 122A is pressed, the HWC 102 launches the note program 1910 and puts the pen into a writing mode. The user uses the pen 1500 to scribe symbols 1902 on a writing surface, the pen records the scribing and transmits the scribing to the HWC 102 where symbols representing the scribing are displayed 1912 within the note application 1910.

[000272] Use scenario 1901 is a gesture scenario where the pen 1500 is used as a gesture capture and command device. In this example, the quick launch button 122B is activated and the pen 1500 activates a wand mode such that an application launched on the HWC 102 can be controlled. Here, the user sees an application chooser 1918 in the display(s) of the HWC 102 where different software applications can be chosen by the user. The user gestures (e.g. swipes, spins, turns, etc.) with the pen to cause the application chooser 1918 to move from application to application. Once the correct application is identified (e.g. highlighted) in the chooser 1918, the user may gesture or click or otherwise interact with the pen 1500 such that the identified application is selected and launched. Once an application is launched, the wand mode may be used to scroll, rotate, change applications, select items, initiate processes, and the like, for example.

[000273] In an embodiment, the quick launch button 122A may be activated and the HWC 102 may launch an application chooser presenting to the user a set of applications. For example, the quick launch button may launch a chooser to show all communication programs (e.g. SMS, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, email, etc.) available for selection such that the user can select the program the user wants and then go into a writing mode. By way of further example, the launcher may bring up selections for various other groups that are related or categorized as generally being selected at a given time (e.g. Microsoft Office products, communication products, productivity products, note products, organizational products, and the like)

[000274] Fig. 20 illustrates yet another embodiment of the present invention. Figure 2000 illustrates a watchband clip on controller 2000. The watchband clip on controller may be a controller used to control the HWC 102 or devices in the HWC system 100. The watchband clip on controller 2000 has a fastener 2018 (e.g. rotatable clip) that is mechanically adapted to attach to a watchband, as illustrated at 2004.

[000275] The watchband controller 2000 may have quick launch interfaces 2008 (e.g. to launch applications and choosers as described herein), a touch pad 2014 (e.g. to be used as a touch style mouse for GUI control in a HWC 102 display) and a display 2012. The clip 2018 may be adapted to fit a wide range of watchbands so it can be used in connection with a watch that is independently selected for its function. The clip, in embodiments, is rotatable such that a user can position it in a desirable manner. In embodiments the clip may be a flexible strap. In embodiments, the flexible strap may be adapted to be stretched to attach to a hand, wrist, finger, device, weapon, and the like

[000276] In embodiments, the watchband controller may be configured as a removable and replaceable watchband. For example, the controller may be incorporated into a band with a certain width, segment spacing' s, etc. such that the watchband, with its incorporated controller, can be attached to a watch body. The attachment, in embodiments, may be mechanically adapted to attach with a pin upon which the watchband rotates. In embodiments, the watchband controller may be electrically connected to the watch and/or watch body such that the watch, watch body and/or the watchband controller can communicate data between them.

[000277] The watchband controller may have 3-axis motion monitoring (e.g. through an IMU, accelerometers, magnetometers, gyroscopes, etc.) to capture user motion. The user motion may then be interpreted for gesture control.

[000278] In embodiments, the watchband controller may comprise fitness sensors and a fitness computer. The sensors may track heart rate, calories burned, strides, distance covered, and the like. The data may then be compared against performance goals and/or standards for user feedback.

[000279] Another aspect of the present invention relates to visual display techniques relating to micro Doppler ("mD") target tracking signatures ("mD

signatures"). mD is a radar technique that uses a series of angle dependent

electromagnetic pulses that are broadcast into an environment and return pulses are captured. Changes between the broadcast pulse and return pulse are indicative of changes in the shape, distance and angular location of objects or targets in the environment. These changes provide signals that can be used to track a target and identify the target through the mD signature. Each target or target type has a unique mD signature. Shifts in the radar pattern can be analyzed in the time domain and frequency domain based on mD techniques to derive information about the types of targets present (e.g. whether people are present), the motion of the targets and the relative angular location of the targets and the distance to the targets. By selecting a frequency used for the mD pulse relative to known objects in the environment, the pulse can penetrate the known objects to enable information about targets to be gathered even when the targets are visually blocked by the known objects. For example, pulse frequencies can be used that will penetrate concrete buildings to enable people to be identified inside the building. Multiple pulse frequencies can be used as well in the mD radar to enable different types of information to be gathered about the objects in the environment. In addition, the mD radar information can be combined with other information such as distance measurements or images captured of the environment that are analyzed jointly to provide improved object identification and improved target identification and tracking. In embodiments, the analysis can be performed on the HWC or the information can be transmitted to a remote network for analysis and results transmitted back to the HWC. Distance measurements can be provided by laser range finding, structured lighting, stereoscopic depth maps or sonar measurements. Images of the environment can be captured using one or more cameras capable of capturing images from visible, ultraviolet or infrared light. The mD radar can be attached to the HWC, located adjacently (e.g. in a vehicle) and associated wirelessly with the HWC or located remotely. Maps or other previously determined information about the environment can also be used in the analysis of the mD radar information.

Embodiments of the present invention relate to visualizing the mD signatures in useful ways.

[000280] Figure 21 illustrates a FOV 2102 of a HWC 102 from a wearer's perspective. The wearer, as described herein elsewhere, has a see-through FOV 2102 wherein the wearer views adjacent surroundings, such as the buildings illustrated in figure 21. The wearer, as described herein elsewhere, can also see displayed digital content presented within a portion of the FOV 2102. The embodiment illustrated in figure 21 is indicating that the wearer can see the buildings and other surrounding elements in the environment and digital content representing traces, or travel paths, of bullets being fired by different people in the area. The surroundings are viewed through the transparency of the FOV 2102. The traces are presented via the digital computer display, as described herein elsewhere. In embodiments, the trace presented is based on a mD signature that is collected and communicated to the HWC in real time. The mD radar itself may be on or near the wearer of the HWC 102 or it may be located remote from the wearer. In embodiments, the mD radar scans the area, tracks and identifies targets, such as bullets, and communicates traces, based on locations, to the HWC 102.

[000281] There are several traces 2108 and 2104 presented to the wearer in the embodiment illustrated in figure 21. The traces communicated from the mD radar may be associated with GPS locations and the GPS locations may be associated with objects in the environment, such as people, buildings, vehicles, etc, both in latitude and longitude perspective and an elevation perspective. The locations may be used as markers for the HWC such that the traces, as presented in the FOV, can be associated, or fixed in space relative to the markers. For example, if the friendly fire trace 2108 is determined, by the mD radar, to have originated from the upper right window of the building on the left, as illustrated in figure 21, then a virtual marker may be set on or near the window. When the HWC views, through it's camera or other sensor, for example, the building's window, the trace may then virtually anchor with the virtual marker on the window. Similarly, a marker may be set near the termination position or other flight position of the friendly fire trace 2108, such as the upper left window of the center building on the right, as illustrated in figure 21. This technique fixes in space the trace such that the trace appears fixed to the environmental positions independent of where the wearer is looking. So, for example, as the wearer's head turns, the trace appears fixed to the marked locations.

[000282] In embodiments, certain user positions may be known and thus identified in the FOV. For example, the shooter of the friendly fire trace 2108 may be from a known friendly combatant and as such his location may be known. The position may be known based on his GPS location based on a mobile communication system on him, such as another HWC 102. In other embodiments, the friendly combatant may be marked by another friendly. For example, if the friendly position in the environment is known through visual contact or communicated information, a wearer of the HWC 102 may use a gesture or external user interface 104 to mark the location. If a friendly combatant location is known the originating position of the friendly fire trace 2108 may be color coded or otherwise distinguished from unidentified traces on the displayed digital content. Similarly, enemy fire traces 2104 may be color coded or otherwise distinguished on the displayed digital content. In embodiments, there may be an additional distinguished appearance on the displayed digital content for unknown traces.

[000283] In addition to situationally associated trace appearance, the trace colors or appearance may be different from the originating position to the terminating position. This path appearance change may be based on the mD signature. The mD signature may indicate that the bullet, for example, is slowing as it propagates and this slowing pattern may be reflected in the FOV 2102 as a color or pattern change. This can create an intuitive understanding of wear the shooter is located. For example, the originating color may be red, indicative of high speed, and it may change over the course of the trace to yellow, indicative of a slowing trace. This pattern changing may also be different for a friendly, enemy and unknown combatant. The enemy may go blue to green for a friendly trace, for example.

[000284] Figure 21 illustrates an embodiment where the user sees the environment through the FOV and may also see color coded traces, which are dependent on bullet speed and combatant type, where the traces are fixed in

environmental positions independent on the wearer's perspective. Other information, such as distance, range, range rings, time of day, date, engagement type (e.g. hold, stop firing, back away, etc.) may also be displayed in the FOV.

[000285] Another aspect of the present invention relates to mD radar techniques that trace and identify targets through other objects, such as walls (referred to generally as through wall mD), and visualization techniques related therewith.

Figure 22 illustrates a through wall mD visualization technique according to the principles of the present invention. As described herein elsewhere, the mD radar scanning the environment may be local or remote from the wearer of a HWC 102. The mD radar may identify a target (e.g. a person) that is visible 2204 and then track the target as he goes behind a wall 2208. The tracking may then be presented to the wearer of a HWC 102 such that digital content reflective of the target and the target's movement, even behind the wall, is presented in the FOV 2202 of the HWC 102. In embodiments, the target, when out of visible sight, may be represented by an avatar in the FOV to provide the wearer with imagery representing the target.

[000286] mD target recognition methods can identify the identity of a target based on the vibrations and other small movements of the target. This can provide a personal signature for the target. In the case of humans, this may result in a personal identification of a target that has been previously characterized. The cardio, heart beat, lung expansion and other small movements within the body may be unique to a person and if those attributes are pre-identified they may be matched in real time to provide a personal identification of a person in the FOV 2202. The person's mD signatures may be determined based on the position of the person. For example, the database of personal mD signature attributes may include mD signatures for a person standing, sitting, laying down, running, walking, jumping, etc. This may improve the accuracy of the personal data match when a target is tracked through mD signature techniques in the field. In the event a person is personally identified, a specific indication of the person's identity may be presented in the FOV 2202. The indication may be a color, shape, shade, name, indication of the type of person (e.g. enemy, friendly, etc.), etc. to provide the wearer with intuitive real time information about the person being tracked. This may be very useful in a situation where there is more than one person in an area of the person being tracked. If just one person in the area is personally identified, that person or the avatar of that person can be presented differently than other people in the area.

[000287] Figure 23 illustrates an mD scanned environment 2300. An mD radar may scan an environment in an attempt to identify objects in the environment. In this embodiment, the mD scanned environment reveals two vehicles 2302a and 2302b, en enemy combatant 2309, two friendly combatants 2308a and 2308b and a shot trace 2318. Each of these objects may be personally identified or type identified. For example, the vehicles 2302a and 2302b may be identified through the mD signatures as a tank and heavy truck. The enemy combatant 2309 may be identified as a type (e.g. enemy combatant) or more personally (e.g. by name). The friendly combatants may be identified as a type (e.g. friendly combatant) or more personally (e.g. by name). The shot trace 2318 may be characterized by type of projectile or weapon type for the projectile, for example.

[000288] Figure 23a illustrates two separate HWC 102 FOV display techniques according to the principles of the present invention. FOV 2312 illustrates a map view 2310 where the mD scanned environment is presented. Here, the wearer has a perspective on the mapped area so he can understand all tracked targets in the area. This allows the wearer to traverse the area with knowledge of the targets. FOV 2312 illustrates a heads-up view to provide the wearer with an augmented reality style view of the environment that is in proximity of the wearer.

[000289] An aspect of the present invention relates to suppression of extraneous or stray light. As discussed herein elsewhere, eyeglow and faceglow are two such artifacts that develop from such light. Eyeglow and faceglow can be caused by image light escaping from the optics module. The escaping light is then visible, particularly in dark environments when the user is viewing bright displayed images with the HWC. Light that escapes through the front of the HWC is visible as eyeglow as it that light that is visible in the region of the user's eyes. Eyeglow can appear in the form of a small version of the displayed image that the user is viewing. Light that escapes from the bottom of the HWC shines onto the user's face, cheek or chest so that these portions of the user appear to glow. Eyeglow and faceglow can both increase the visibility of the user and highlight the use of the HWC, which may be viewed negatively by the user. As such, reducing eyeglow and faceglow is advantageous. In combat situations (e.g. the mD trace presentation scenarios described herein) and certain gaming situations, the suppression of extraneous or stray light is very important.

[000290] The disclosure relating to figure 6 shows an example where a portion of the image light passes through the combiner 602 such that the light shines onto the user's face, thereby illuminating a portion of the user's face in what is generally referred to herein as faceglow. Faceglow be caused by any portion of light from the HWC that illuminates the user's face.

[000291] An example of the source for the faceglow light can come from wide cone angle light associated with the image light incident onto the combiner 602. Where the combiner can include a holographic mirror or a notch mirror in which the narrow bands of high reflectivity are matched to wavelengths of light by the light source. The wide cone angle associated with the image light corresponds with the field of view provided by the HWC. Typically the reflectivity of holographic mirrors and notch mirrors is reduced as the cone angle of the incident light is increased above 8 degrees. As a result, for a field of view of 30 degrees, substantial image light can pass through the combiner and cause faceglow.

[000292] Figure 24 shows an illustration of a light trap 2410 for the faceglow light. In this embodiment, an extension of the outer shield lens of the HWC is coated with a light absorbing material in the region where the converging light responsible for faceglow is absorbed in a light trap 2410. The light absorbing material can be black or it can be a filter designed to absorb only the specific wavelengths of light provided by the light source (s) in the HWC. In addition, the surface of the light trap 2410 may be textured or fibrous to further improve the absorption.

[000293] Figure 25 illustrates an optical system for a HWC that includes an outer absorptive polarizer 2520 to block the faceglow light. In this embodiment, the image light is polarized and as a result the light responsible for faceglow is similarly polarized. The absorptive polarizer is oriented with a transmission axis such that the faceglow light is absorbed and not transmitted. In this case, the rest of the imaging system in the HWC may not require polarized image light and the image light may be polarized at any point before the combiner. In embodiments, the transmission axis of the absorptive polarizer 2520 is oriented vertically so that external glare from water (S polarized light) is absorbed and correspondingly, the polarization of the image light is selected to be horizontal (S polarization). Consequently, image light that passes through the combiner 602 and is then incident onto the absorptive polarizer 2520, is absorbed. In figure 25 the absorptive polarizer 2520 is shown outside the shield lens, alternatively the absorptive polarizer 2520 can be located inside the shield lens.

[000294] Figure 26 illustrates an optical system for a HWC that includes a film with an absorptive notch filter 2620. In this case, the absorptive notch filter absorbs narrow bands of light that are selected to match the light provided by the optical system's light source. As a result, the absorptive notch filter is opaque with respect to the faceglow light and is transparent to the remainder of the wavelengths included in the visible spectrum so that the user has a clear view of the surrounding environment. A triple notch filter suitable for this approach is available from Iridian Spectral Technologies, Ottawa, ON: http://www.ilphotonics.com/cdv2/Iridian- Interference%20Filters/New%20filters/Triple%20Notch%20Filter.pdf

[000295] In embodiments, the combiner 602 may include a notch mirror coating to reflect the wavelengths of light in the image light and a notch filter 2620 can be selected in correspondence to the wavelengths of light provided by the light source and the narrow bands of high reflectivity provided by the notch mirror. In this way, image light that is not reflected by the notch mirror is absorbed by the notch filter 2620. In embodiments of the invention the light source can provide one narrow band of light for a monochrome imaging or three narrow bands of light for full color imaging. The notch mirror and associated notch filter would then each provide one narrow band or three narrow bands of high reflectivity and absorption respectively.

[000296] Figure 27 includes a microlouver film 2750 to block the faceglow light. Microlouver film is sold by 3M as ALCF-P, for example and is typically used as a privacy filter for computer. See

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserver?mwsId=SSSSSuH8gc7nZxtUoY xlY eevUqel7zHvTSevTSeSSSSSS— &fn=ALCF-P ABR2 Control Film DS.pdf The microlouver film transmits light within a somewhat narrow angle (e.g. 30 degrees of normal and absorbs light beyond 30 degrees of normal). In Figure 27, the microlouver film 2750 is positioned such that the faceglow light 2758 is incident beyond 30 degrees from normal while the see-through light 2755 is incident within 30 degrees of normal to the microlouver film 2750. As such, the faceglow light 2758 is absorbed by the microlouver film and the see-through light 2755 is transmitted so that the user has a bright see-thru view of the surrounding environment.

[000297] We now turn back to a description of eye imaging technologies. Aspects of the present invention relate to various methods of imaging the eye of a person wearing the HWC 102. In embodiments, technologies for imaging the eye using an optical path involving the "off" state and "no power" state, which is described in detail below, are described. In embodiments, technologies for imaging the eye with optical configurations that do not involve reflecting the eye image off of DLP mirrors is described. In embodiments, unstructured light, structured light, or controlled lighting conditions, are used to predict the eye's position based on the light reflected off of the front of the wearer's eye. In embodiments, a reflection of a presented digital content image is captured as it reflects off of the wearer's eye and the reflected image may be processed to determine the quality (e.g. sharpness) of the image presented. In embodiments, the image may then be adjusted (e.g. focused differently) to increase the quality of the image presented based on the image reflection.

[000298] Figures 28a, 28b and 28c show illustrations of the various positions of the DLP mirrors. Figure 28a shows the DLP mirrors in the "on" state 2815. With the mirror in the "on" state 2815, illumination light 2810 is reflected along an optical axis 2820 that extends into the lower optical module 204. Figure 28b shows the DLP mirrors in the "off" state 2825. With the mirror in the "off" state 2825, illumination light 2810 is reflected along an optical axis 2830 that is substantially to the side of optical axis 2820 so that the "off" state light is directed toward a dark light trap as has been described herein elsewhere. Figure 28c shows the DLP mirrors in a third position, which occurs when no power is applied to the DLP. This "no power" state differs from the "on" and "off" states in that the mirror edges are not in contact with the substrate and as such are less accurately positioned. Figure 28c shows all of the DLP mirrors in the "no power" state 2835. The "no power" state is achieved by simultaneously setting the voltage to zero for the "on" contact and "off" contact for a DLP mirror, as a result, the mirror returns to a no stress position where the DLP mirror is in the plane of the DLP platform as shown in Figure 28c. Although not normally done, it is also possible to apply the "no power" state to individual DLP mirrors. When the DLP mirrors are in the "no power" state they do not contribute image content. Instead, as shown in Figure 28c, when the DLP mirrors are in the "no power" state, the illumination light 2810 is reflected along an optical axis 2840 that is between the optical axes 2820 and 2830 that are respectively associated with the "on" and "off" states and as such this light doesn't contribute to the displayed image as a bright or dark pixel. This light can however contribute scattered light into the lower optical module 204 and as a result the displayed image contrast can be reduced or artifacts can be created in the image that detract from the image content. Consequently, it is generally desirable, in embodiments, to limit the time associated with the "no power" state to times when images are not displayed or to reduce the time associated with having DLP mirrors in the "no power" state so that the affect of the scattered light is reduced.

[000299] Figure 29 shows an embodiment of the invention that can be used for displaying digital content images to a wearer of the HWC 102 and capturing images of the wearer's eye. In this embodiment, light from the eye 2971 passes back through the optics in the lower module 204, the solid corrective wedge 2966, at least a portion of the light passes through the partially reflective layer 2960, the solid illumination wedge 2964 and is reflected by a plurality of DLP mirrors on the DLP 2955 that are in the "no power" state. The reflected light then passes back through the illumination wedge 2964 and at least a portion of the light is reflected by the partially reflective layer 2960 and the light is captured by the camera 2980.

[000300] For comparison, illuminating light rays 2973 from the light source 2958 are also shown being reflected by the partially reflective layer 2960. Where the angle of the illuminating light 2973 is such that the DLP mirrors, when in the "on" state, reflect the illuminating light 2973 to form image light 2969 that substantially shares the same optical axis as the light from the wearer's eye 2971. In this way, images of the wearer's eye are captured in a field of view that overlaps the field of view for the displayed image content. In contrast, light reflected by DLP mirrors in the "off" state form dark light 2975 which is directed substantially to the side of the image light 2969 and the light from eye 2971. Dark light 2975 is directed toward a light trap 2962 that absorbs the dark light to improve the contrast of the displayed image as has been described above in this specification.

[000301] In an embodiment, partially reflective layer 2960 is a reflective polarizer. The light that is reflected from the eye 2971 can then be polarized prior to entering the corrective wedge 2966 (e.g with an absorptive polarizer between the upper module 202 and the lower module 204), with a polarization orientation relative to the reflective polarizer that enables the light reflected from the eye 2971 to substantially be transmitted by the reflective polarizer. A quarter wave retarder layer 2957 is then included adjacent to the DLP 2955 (as previously disclosed in Figure 3b) so that the light reflected from the eye 2971 passes through the quarter wave retarder layer 2957 once before being reflected by the plurality of DLP mirrors in the "no power" state and then passes through a second time after being reflected. By passing through the quarter wave retarder layer 2957 twice, the polarization state of the light from the eye 2971 is reversed, such that when it is incident upon the reflective polarizer, the light from the eye 2971 is then substantially reflected toward the camera 2980. By using a partially reflective layer 2960 that is a reflective polarizer and polarizing the light from the eye 2971 prior to entering the corrective wedge 2964, losses attributed to the partially reflective layer 2960 are reduced.

[000302] Figure 28c shows the case wherein the DLP mirrors are

simultaneously in the "no power" state, this mode of operation can be particularly useful when the HWC 102 is first put onto the head of the wearer. When the HWC 102 is first put onto the head of the wearer, it is not necessary to display an image yet. As a result, the DLP can be in a "no power" state for all the DLP mirrors and an image of the wearer's eyes can be captured. The captured image of the wearer's eye can then be compared to a database, using iris identification techniques, or other eye pattern identification techniques to determine, for example, the identity of the wearer.

[000303] In a further embodiment illustrated by Figure 29 all of the DLP mirrors are put into the "no power" state for a portion of a frame time (e.g. 50% of a frame time for the displayed digital content image) and the capture of the eye image is synchronized to occur at the same time and for the same duration. By reducing the time that the DLP mirrors are in the "no power" state, the time where light is scattered by the DLP mirrors being in the "no power" state is reduced such that the wearer doesn't perceive a change in the displayed image quality. This is possible because the DLP mirrors have a response time on the order of microseconds while typical frame times for a displayed image are on the order of 0.016 seconds. This method of capturing images of the wearer's eye can be used periodically to capture repetitive images of the wearer's eye. For example, eye images could be captured for 50% of the frame time of every 10th frame displayed to the wearer. In another example, eye images could be captured for 10% of the frame time of every frame displayed to the wearer. [000304] Alternately, the "no power" state can be applied to a subset of the DLP mirrors (e.g. 10% of the DLP mirrors) within while another subset is in busy generating image light for content to be displayed. This enables the capture of an eye image(s) during the display of digital content to the wearer. The DLP mirrors used for eye imaging can, for example, be distributed randomly across the area of the DLP to minimize the impact on the quality of the digital content being displayed to the wearer. To improve the displayed image perceived by the wearer, the individual DLP mirrors put into the "no power" state for capturing each eye image, can be varied over time such as in a random pattern, for example. In yet a further embodiment, the DLP mirrors put into the "no power" state for eye imaging may be coordinated with the digital content in such a way that the "no power" mirrors are taken from a portion of the image that requires less resolution.

[000305] In the embodiments of the invention as illustrated in Figures 9 and 29, in both cases the reflective surfaces provided by the DLP mirrors do not preserve the wavefront of the light from the wearer's eye so that the image quality of captured image of the eye is somewhat limited. It may still be useful in certain embodiments, but it is somewhat limited. This is due to the DLP mirrors not being constrained to be on the same plane. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 9, the DLP mirrors are tilted so that they form rows of DLP mirrors that share common planes. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 29, the individual DLP mirrors are not accurately positioned to be in the same plane since they are not in contact with the substrate. Examples of advantages of the embodiments associated with Figure 29 are: first, the camera 2980 can be located between the DLP 2955 and the illumination light source 2958 to provide a more compact upper module 202. Second, the polarization state of the light reflected from the eye 2971 can be the same as that of the image light 2969 so that the optical path of the light reflected from the eye and the image light can be the same in the lower module 204.

[000306] Figure 30 shows an illustration of an embodiment for displaying images to the wearer and simultaneously capturing images of the wearer's eye, wherein light from the eye 2971 is reflected towards a camera 3080 by the partially reflective layer 2960. The partially reflective layer 2960 can be an optically flat layer such that the wavefront of the light from the eye 2971 is preserved and as a result, higher quality images of the wearer's eye can be captured. In addition, since the DLP 2955 is not included in the optical path for the light from the eye 2971, and the eye imaging process shown in Figure 30 does not interfere with the displayed image, images of the wearer's eye can be captured independently (e.g. with independent of timing, impact on resolution, or pixel count used in the image light) from the displayed images.

[000307] In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 30, the partially reflective layer 2960 is a reflective polarizer, the illuminating light 2973 is polarized, the light from the eye 2971 is polarized and the camera 3080 is located behind a polarizer 3085. The polarization axis of the illuminating light 2973 and the polarization axis of the light from the eye are oriented perpendicular to the transmission axis of the reflective polarizer so that they are both substantially reflected by the reflective polarizer. The illumination light 2973 passes through a quarter wave layer 2957 before being reflected by the DLP mirrors in the DLP 2955. The reflected light passes back through the quarter wave layer 2957 so that the polarization states of the image light 2969 and dark light 2975 are reversed in comparison to the illumination light 2973. As such, the image light 2969 and dark light 2975 are substantially transmitted by the reflective polarizer. Where the DLP mirrors in the "on" state provide the image light 2969 along an optical axis that extends into the lower optical module 204 to display an image to the wearer. At the same time, DLP mirrors in the "off" state provide the dark light 2975 along an optical axis that extends to the side of the upper optics module 202. In the region of the corrective wedge 2966 where the dark light 2975 is incident on the side of the upper optics module 202, an absorptive polarizer 3085 is positioned with it's transmission axis perpendicular to the polarization axis of the dark light and parallel to the polarization axis of the light from the eye so that the dark light 2975 is absorbed and the light from the eye 2971 is transmitted to the camera 3080.

[000308] Figure 31 shows an illustration of another embodiment of a system for displaying images and simultaneously capturing image of the wearer's eye that is similar to the one shown in Figure 30. The difference in the system shown in Figure 31 is that the light from the eye 2971 is subjected to multiple reflections before being captured by the camera 3180. To enable the multiple reflections, a mirror 3187 is provided behind the absorptive polarizer 3185. Therefore, the light from the eye 2971 is polarized prior to entering the corrective wedge 2966 with a polarization axis that is perpendicular to the transmission axis of the reflective polarizer that comprises the partially reflective layer 2960. In this way, the light from the eye 2971 is reflected first by the reflective polarizer, reflected second by the mirror 3187 and reflected third by the reflective polarizer before being captured by the camera 3180. While the light from the eye 2971 passes through the absorptive polarizer 3185 twice, since the polarization axis of the light from the eye 2971 is oriented parallel to the polarization axis of the light from the eye 2971, it is substantially transmitted by the absorptive polarizer 3185. As with the system described in connection with Figure 30, the system shown in Figure 31 includes an optically flat partially reflective layer 2960 that preserves the wavefront of the light from the eye 2971 so that higher quality images of the wearer's eye can be captured. Also, since the DLP 2955 is not included in the optical path for the light reflected from the eye 2971 and the eye imaging process shown in Figure 31 does not interfere with the displayed image, images of the wearer's eye can be captured independently from the displayed images.

[000309] Figure 32 shows an illustration of a system for displaying images and simultaneously capturing images of the wearer's eye that includes a beam splitter plate 3212 comprised of a reflective polarizer, which is held in air between the light source 2958, the DLP 2955 and the camera 3280. The illumination light 2973 and the light from the eye 2971 are both polarized with polarization axes that are perpendicular to the transmission axis of the reflective polarizer. As a result, both the illumination light 2973 and the light from the eye 2971 are substantially reflected by the reflective polarizer. The illumination light 2873 is reflected toward the DLP 2955 by the reflective polarizer and split into image light 2969 and dark light 3275 depending on whether the individual DLP mirrors are respectively in the "on" state or the "off" state. By passing through the quarter wave layer 2957 twice, the polarization state of the illumination light 2973 is reversed in comparison to the polarization state of the image light 2969 and the dark light 3275. As a result, the image light 2969 and the dark light 3275 are then substantially transmitted by the reflective polarizer. The absorptive polarizer 3285 at the side of the beam splitter plate 3212 has a transmission axis that is perpendicular to the polarization axis of the dark light 3275 and parallel to the polarization axis of the light from the eye 2971 so that the dark light 3275 is absorbed and the light from the eye 2971 is transmitted to the camera 3280. As in the system shown in Figure 30, the system shown in Figure 31 includes an optically flat beam splitter plate 3212 that preserves the wavefront of the light from the eye 2971 so that higher quality images of the wearer's eye can be captured. Also, since the DLP 2955 is not included in the optical path for the light from the eye 2971 and the eye imaging process shown in Figure 31 does not interfere with the displayed image, images of the wearer's eye can be captured independently from the displayed images.

[000310] Eye imaging systems where the polarization state of the light from the eye 2971 needs to be opposite to that of the image light 2969 (as shown in Figures 30, 31 and 32), need to be used with lower modules 204 that include combiners that will reflect both polarization states. As such, these upper modules 202 are best suited for use with the lower modules 204 that include combiners that are reflective regardless of polarization state, examples of these lower modules are shown in Figures 6, 8a, 8b, 8c and 24-27.

[000311] In a further embodiment shown in Figure 33, the partially reflective layer 3360 is comprised of a reflective polarizer on the side facing the illumination light 2973 and a short pass dichroic mirror on the side facing the light from the eye 3371 and the camera 3080. Where the short pass dichroic mirror is a dielectric mirror coating that transmits visible light and reflects infrared light. The partially reflective layer 3360 can be comprised of a reflective polarizer bonded to the inner surface of the illumination wedge 2964 and a short pass dielectric mirror coating on the opposing inner surface of the corrective wedge 2966, wherein the illumination wedge 2964 and the corrective wedge 2966 are then optically bonded together. Alternatively, the partially reflective layer 3360 can be comprised of a thin substrate that has a reflective polarizer bonded to one side and a short pass dichroic mirror coating on the other side, where the partially reflective layer 3360 is then bonded between the illumination wedge 2964 and the corrective wedge 2966. In this embodiment, an infrared light is included to illuminate the eye so that the light from the eye and the images captured of the eye are substantially comprised of infrared light. The wavelength of the infrared light is then matched to the reflecting wavelength of the shortpass dichroic mirror and the wavelength that the camera can capture images, for example an 800nm wavelength can be used. In this way, the short pass dichroic mirror transmits the image light and reflects the light from the eye. The camera 3080 is then positioned at the side of the corrective wedge 2966 in the area of the absorbing light trap 3382, which is provided to absorb the dark light 2975. By positioning the camera 3080 in a depression in the absorbing light trap 3382, scattering of the dark light 2975 by the camera 3080 can be reduced so that higher contrast images can be displayed to the wearer. An advantage of this embodiment is that the light from the eye need not be polarized, which can simplify the optical system and increase efficiency for the eye imaging system.

[000312] In yet another embodiment shown in Figure 32a a beam splitter plate 3222 is comprised of a reflective polarizer on the side facing the illumination light 2973 and a short pass dichroic mirror on the side facing the light from the eye 3271 and the camera 3280. An absorbing surface 3295 is provided to trap the dark light 3275 and the camera 3280 is positioned in an opening in the absorbing surface 3295. In this way the system of Figure 32 can be made to function with unpolarized light from the eye 3271.

[000313] In embodiments directed to capturing images of the wearer's eye, light to illuminate the wearer's eye can be provided by several different sources including: light from the displayed image (i.e. image light); light from the environment that passes through the combiner or other optics; light provided by a dedicated eye light, etc. Figures 34 and 34a show illustrations of dedicated eye illumination lights 3420. Figure 34 shows an illustration from a side view in which the dedicated illumination eye light 3420 is positioned at a corner of the combiner 3410 so that it doesn't interfere with the image light 3415. The dedicated eye illumination light 3420 is pointed so that the eye illumination light 3425 illuminates the eyebox 3427 where the eye 3430 is located when the wearer is viewing displayed images provided by the image light 3415. Figure 34a shows an illustration from the perspective of the eye of the wearer to show how the dedicated eye illumination light 3420 is positioned at the corner of the combiner 3410. While the dedicated eye illumination light 3420 is shown at the upper left corner of the combiner 3410, other positions along one of the edges of the combiner 3410, or other optical or mechanical components, are possible as well. In other embodiments, more than one dedicated eye light 3420 with different positions can be used. In an embodiment, the dedicated eye light 3420 is an infrared light that is not visible by the wearer (e.g. 800 nm) so that the eye illumination light 3425 doesn't interfere with the displayed image perceived by the wearer.

[000314] Figure 35 shows a series of illustrations of captured eye images that show the eye glint (i.e. light that reflects off the front of the eye) produced by a dedicated eye light. In this embodiment of the invention, captured images of the wearer's eye are analyzed to determine the relative positions of the iris 3550, pupil, or other portion of the eye, and the eye glint 3560. The eye glint is a reflected image of the dedicated eye light 3420 when the dedicated light is used. Figure 35 illustrates the relative positions of the iris 3550 and the eye glint 3560 for a variety of eye positions. By providing a dedicated eye light 3420 in a fixed position, combined with the fact that the human eye is essentially spherical, or at least a reliably repeatable shape, the eye glint provides a fixed reference point against which the determined position of the iris can be compared to determine where the wearer is looking, either within the displayed image or within the see-through view of the surrounding environment. By positioning the dedicated eye light 3420 at a corner of the combiner 3410, the eye glint 3560 is formed away from the iris 3550 in the captured images. As a result, the positions of the iris and the eye glint can be determined more easily and more accurately during the analysis of the captured images, since they do not interfere with one another. In a further embodiment, the combiner includes an associated cut filter that prevents infrared light from the environment from entering the HWC and the camera is an infrared camera, so that the eye glint is only provided by light from the dedicated eye light. For example, the combiner can include a low pass filter that passes visible light while absorbing infrared light and the camera can include a high pass filter that absorbs visible light while passing infrared light.

[000315] In an embodiment of the eye imaging system, the lens for the camera is designed to take into account the optics associated with the upper module 202 and the lower module 204. This is accomplished by designing the camera to include the optics in the upper module 202 and optics in the lower module 204, so that a high MTF image is produced, at the image sensor in the camera, of the wearer's eye. In yet a further embodiment, the camera lens is provided with a large depth of field to eliminate the need for focusing the camera to enable sharp image of the eye to be captured. Where a large depth of field is typically provided by a high f/# lens (e.g. f/# >5). In this case, the reduced light gathering associated with high f/# lenses is compensated by the inclusion of a dedicated eye light to enable a bright image of the eye to be captured. Further, the brightness of the dedicated eye light can be modulated and synchronized with the capture of eye images so that the dedicated eye light has a reduced duty cycle and the brightness of infrared light on the wearer's eye is reduced.

[000316] In a further embodiment, Figure 36a shows an illustration of an eye image that is used to identify the wearer of the HWC. In this case, an image of the wearer's eye 3611 is captured and analyzed for patterns of identifiable features 3612. The patterns are then compared to a database of eye images to determine the identity of the wearer. After the identity of the wearer has been verified, the operating mode of the HWC and the types of images, applications, and information to be displayed can be adjusted and controlled in correspondence to the determined identity of the wearer. Examples of adjustments to the operating mode depending on who the wearer is determined to be or not be include: making different operating modes or feature sets available, shutting down or sending a message to an external network, allowing guest features and applications to run, etc.

[000317] is an illustration of another embodiment using eye imaging, in which the sharpness of the displayed image is determined based on the eye glint produced by the reflection of the displayed image from the wearer's eye surface. By capturing images of the wearer's eye 3611, an eye glint 3622, which is a small version of the displayed image can be captured and analyzed for sharpness. If the displayed image is determined to not be sharp, then an automated adjustment to the focus of the HWC optics can be performed to improve the sharpness. This ability to perform a

measurement of the sharpness of a displayed image at the surface of the wearer's eye can provide a very accurate measurement of image quality. Having the ability to measure and automatically adjust the focus of displayed images can be very useful in augmented reality imaging where the focus distance of the displayed image can be varied in response to changes in the environment or changes in the method of use by the wearer.

[000318] An aspect of the present invention relates to controlling the HWC 102 through interpretations of eye imagery. In embodiments, eye-imaging technologies, such as those described herein, are used to capture an eye image or series of eye images for processing. The image(s) may be process to determine a user intended action, an HWC predetermined reaction, or other action. For example, the imagery may be interpreted as an affirmative user control action for an application on the HWC 102. Or, the imagery may cause, for example, the HWC 102 to react in a pre-determined way such that the HWC 102 is operating safely, intuitively, etc.

[000319] Another aspect of the present invention relates to measuring the brightness of content or a content portion and adjusting the brightness of the content. When using a DLP display in a head mounted display, light is provided by a light source and is reflected by the DLP mirrors either to the user's eye or to a light trap. The brightness of a pixel in an image displayed to the user's eye is determined by the relative time within a duty cycle that the light is reflected to the user's eye relative to the time that the light is reflected to the light trap. Wherein the maximum brightness of the pixel is determined by the brightness of the light source. The invention provides a method for measuring the brightness of the light source by measuring the brightness of light reflected to the light trap and determining the brightness of the image presented to the user in correspondence to this measurement.

[000320] Equation 1 illustrates the relationship associated with the brightness of a pixel as perceived by a user's eye in a head mounted display.

[000321] Bp = b a R t/f Equation 1

[000322] Wherein Bp is the perceived pixel brightness by the user, a is the area of the pixel, b is the brightness of the light source, R is the reflectivity of the DLP mirrors, t is the time that the pixel light is reflected toward the user's eye (also known as on-state light) and f is the frame time that an image is displayed (as a result f = t + d where d is the time that the pixel light is reflected toward the light trap, which is also known as off-state light). For a single pixel, t/f represents the % of time within a frame time that the light is directed toward the user's eye. Since the frame time f is typically a shorter period of time than the human eye can detect (e.g. 0.033 sec for 30 frames/sec), longer t is perceived as a brighter pixel. Within an image, a higher code value equates to a brighter pixel and hence a longer t (i.e. t/f = Cpixel/Cmax where Cpixel is the pixel code value and Cmax is the maximum code value possible for pixels in the image). In some cases, t is broken into multiple subtimes within a frame time that together add to t to further reduce any perceptible flicker in the image.

[000323] The invention provides a brightness sensor within the light trap in the optics of the head mounted display for determining the brightness of the light source b so the brightness of displayed image provided to the user's eye can be controlled. Where the brightness sensor measures the light provided by multiple pixels to the light trap as related in Equation 2

[000324] Bm = (Bmax - Bp) pm Equation 2 [000325] Wherein Bmax is the maximum brightness that a pixel can have when it has the maximum code value allowed by the DLP and associated electronics (Cmax) in the image (Bmax = b a R because for C max, t = f) and Bm is the brightness measured by the brightness sensor in the light trap. In addition, pm is the number of pixels that reflect light from the DLP such that their reflected light is sensed by the brightness sensor. Typically pm will be some portion of the total number of pixels in the image, ptot (e.g. pm = 0.25 ptot). However the brightness sensor can be large enough to cover the entire area of the light trap wherein pm = ptot.

[000326] The brightness of the light source b can then be determined as a relationship between the brightness measured by the brightness sensor, the portion of the image pixels measured, the area and reflectivity of the DLP mirrors and the average code values of the measured image pixels as for example shown in Equation 3. Where Cavg is the average code value for the measured image pixels. Thus the embodiments of the present invention provides a method for determining the brightness of the light source in correspondence to a measurement of the light reflected toward the light trap, some properties of the DLP and a determined average code value in the portion of the image that is measured. Wherein the properties of the DLP (pm, a and R) are a constant associated with the DLP and the optics of the head mounted display. Cmax is a constant associated with the DLP and the associated electronics. Cavg must be determined for each image that is displayed and from which a measure of brightness is obtained. The measurement of light source brightness b can be used to adjust the voltage or current applied to the LEDs or adjust the pulse width modulation of the LEDs or tune the pulse width modulation of the mirrors in the DLP. Measurements of the light source brightness can be done continuously for each frame when displaying a video in a head mounted display.

[000327] b = (Bm/(pm a R)) (Cmax/(Cmax - Cavg)) Equation 3

[000328] The brightness of the displayed image provided to the eye of the user, Bdi, can then be determined for example based on the % of pixels in the image that are measured by the brightness sensor and the difference between the maximum brightness Bmax and the measured brightness Bm as illustrated for example in

Equation 4.

[000329] Bdi = (ptot/pm) (Bmax - Bm) Equation 4

[000330] Where brightness measurements can be in terms of a variety of units including: candelas/square meter and lumens. The brightness measurements can be used to determine the brightness of the displayed image in a way that gives a direct and accurate measurement of the display light provided by the head mounted display to the user's eye. By providing a direct measurement, adjustments to the brightness of the light source can be made for example to compensate for changes in voltage within the head mounted display such as when the environmental temperature changes or a battery in the head mounted display is losing it's charge. Since the brightness measurement is based on a direct measurement of the light provided by individual pixels, the number of pixels measured by the brightness sensor can be relatively small. The brightness sensor can be located in any area that the off-state light impinges upon such as, for example, within a light trap shown in Figures5b- 5e, 29, 30, 31, 32, 32a, 33, 53, and 54, . The brightness sensor should be absorbing to prevent stray light from reflections of the off-state light.

[000331] In a further embodiment, when the head mounted display includes a see-through view of the environment where the displayed image is overlaid on the see-through view so the user sees a combined image, the brightness measurement system of the invention is combined with a measurement of the brightness of the see- through view Bstv. Wherein, the brightness of the see-through view Bstv is determined by the brightness of the environment (Benv) and the optical density of the optics (OD) between the user's eye and the environment as shown in Equation 5. The optics included in the see-through view may include a tinted layer, a photochromic layer or an adjustable optical density layer.

[000332] Bstv = OD Benv Equation 5

[000333] The brightness of the displayed image Bdi can then be adjusted in relation to Bstv by adjusting the brightness of the light source b or by scaling the code values in the image. The brightness of the see-through view Bstv can be changed by changing a portion of the see-through optics to change the tinted layer, allowing the photochromic layer to automatically change optical density due to changes in the brightness of the environment, or by adjusting the optical density of the adjustable optical density layer or a combination thereof as the brightness of the environment changes.

[000334] Equation 6 is an example of the relationship wherein the brightness of the displayed image Bdi can be changed in relation to the measured brightness of the environment Benv or the measured brightness of the see-through view Bstv. Wherein k is a controlling factor that can be a constant that is associated with the operating function of the head mounted display. As such, k can change as the operating function of the head mounted display changes. For example, if the user is not moving and a wide portion of the field of view is being used to display an image such as a movie or email, k may be a larger number such as 10 and the user will be only able to see a minimal view of the environment. However, in another example, the user may be moving rapidly and a narrow portion of the field of view is being used to display an image (or the majority of the displayed image is black so that the user only sees light from the environment in the majority of the field of view), k may be a small number such as 0.5, or even 0.0 so that the user is provided with a more easily distinguishable view of the environment. In a further example, k may be a larger number when the user is determined to be holding his head to look straight ahead thereby indicating a longer range see-through view, and k may be smaller when the user is determined to be holding his head to look down thereby indicating a shorter range see-through.

[000335] Bdi = k Bstv Equation 6

[000336] Thus the invention provides a method for control of the brightness of the light source in relation to the brightness of the environment or the brightness of the see-through view, and the operating function of the head mounted display. Wherein the brightness of the light source can be measured as previously described and actively controlled to maintain the relationship to the brightness of the environment or the brightness of the see-through view. [000337] In an embodiment of the invention, k is automatically changed by the head mounted display in response to: sensed changes in the environment; changes in operating mode; sensed changes in what the user is looking at; sensed changes in where the user is located; sensed patterns in head movement; sensed changes in the gaze direction of the user; sensed changes in the vertical gaze angle of the user; or sensed changes in the speed of movement of the user. Wherein sensed changes in the way the user is acting indicate intended changes of the way the user would like to operate the head mounted display.

[000338] In another embodiment, the measurement of Bstv is provided by a brightness sensor located behind the tinted layer, photochromic layer or adjustable optical density layer. This method of measurement provides a more direct

measurement of the brightness of the see-through view.

[000339] In yet another embodiment, a relative measurement of Bstv + Bdi is obtained by measuring the brightness of the light reflected by the user's eye. This method of measurement provides a more direct relative measurement of the brightness of the combined displayed image and the see-through view as seen by the user.

[000340] Figure 37 illustrates a eye imagery process that involves imaging the HWC 102 wearer's eye(s) and processing the images (e.g. through eye imaging technologies described herein) to determine in what position 3702 the eye is relative to it's neutral or forward looking position and/or the FOV 3708. The process may involve a calibration step where the user is instructed, through guidance provided in the FOV of the HWC 102, to look in certain directions such that a more accurate prediction of the eye position relative to areas of the FOV can be made. In the event the wearer's eye is determined to be looking towards the right side of the FOV 3708 (as illustrated in figure 37, the eye is looking out of the page) a virtual target line may be established to project what in the environment the wearer may be looking towards or at. The virtual target line may be used in connection with an image captured by camera on the HWC 102 that images the surrounding environment in front of the wearer. In embodiments, the field of view of the camera capturing the surrounding environment matches, or can be matched (e.g. digitally), to the FOV 3708 such that making the comparison is made more clear. For example, with the camera capturing the image of the surroundings in an angle that matches the FOV 3708 the virtual line can be processed (e.g. in 2d or 3d, depending on the camera images capabilities and/or the processing of the images) by projecting what surrounding environment objects align with the virtual target line. In the event there are multiple objects along the virtual target line, focal planes may be established corresponding to each of the objects such that digital content may be placed in an area in the FOV 3708 that aligns with the virtual target line and falls at a focal plane of an intersecting object. The user then may see the digital content when he focuses on the object in the environment, which is at the same focal plane. In embodiments, objects in line with the virtual target line may be established by comparison to mapped

information of the surroundings.

[000341] In embodiments, the digital content that is in line with the virtual target line may not be displayed in the FOV until the eye position is in the right position. This may be a predetermined process. For example, the system may be set up such that a particular piece of digital content (e.g. an advertisement, guidance information, object information, etc.) will appear in the event that the wearer looks at a certain object(s) in the environment. A virtual target line(s) may be developed that virtually connects the wearer's eye with an object(s) in the environment (e.g. a building, portion of a building, mark on a building, GPS location, etc.) and the virtual target line may be continually updated depending on the position and viewing direction of the wearer (e.g. as determined through GPS, e-compass, IMU, etc.) and the position of the object. When the virtual target line suggests that the wearer's pupil is substantially aligned with the virtual target line or about to be aligned with the virtual target line, the digital content may be displayed in the FOV 3704.

[000342] In embodiments, the time spent looking along the virtual target line and/or a particular portion of the FOV 3708 may indicate that the wearer is interested in an object in the environment and/or digital content being displayed. In the event there is no digital content being displayed at the time a predetermined period of time is spent looking at a direction, digital content may be presented in the area of the FOV 3708. The time spent looking at an object may be interpreted as a command to display information about the object, for example. In other embodiments, the content may not relate to the object and may be presented because of the indication that the person is relatively inactive. In embodiments, the digital content may be positioned in proximity to the virtual target line, but not in-line with it such that the wearer's view of the surroundings are not obstructed but information can augment the wearer's view of the surroundings. In embodiments, the time spent looking along a target line in the direction of displayed digital content may be an indication of interest in the digital content. This may be used as a conversion event in advertising. For example, an advertiser may pay more for an add placement if the wearer of the HWC 102 looks at a displayed advertisement for a certain period of time. As such, in embodiments, the time spent looking at the advertisement, as assessed by comparing eye position with the content placement, target line or other appropriate position may be used to determine a rate of conversion or other compensation amount due for the presentation.

[000343] An aspect of the invention relates to removing content from the FOV of the HWC 102 when the wearer of the HWC 102 apparently wants to view the surrounding environments clearly. Figure 38 illustrates a situation where eye imagery suggests that the eye has or is moving quickly so the digital content 3804 in the FOV 3808 is removed from the FOV 3808. In this example, the wearer may be looking quickly to the side indicating that there is something on the side in the environment that has grabbed the wearer's attention. This eye movement 3802 may be captured through eye imaging techniques (e.g. as described herein) and if the movement matches a predetermined movement (e.g. speed, rate, pattern, etc.) the content may be removed from view. In embodiments, the eye movement is used as one input and HWC movements indicated by other sensors (e.g. IMU in the HWC) may be used as another indication. These various sensor movements may be used together to project an event that should cause a change in the content being displayed in the FOV.

[000344] Another aspect of the present invention relates to determining a focal plane based on the wearer's eye convergence. Eyes are generally converged slightly and converge more when the person focuses on something very close. This is generally referred to as convergence. In embodiments, convergence is calibrated for the wearer. That is, the wearer may be guided through certain focal plane exercises to determine how much the wearer's eyes converge at various focal planes and at various viewing angles. The convergence information may then be stored in a database for later reference. In embodiments, a general table may be used in the event there is no calibration step or the person skips the calibration step. The two eyes may then be imaged periodically to determine the convergence in an attempt to understand what focal plane the wearer is focused on. In embodiments, the eyes may be imaged to determine a virtual target line and then the eye's convergence may be determined to establish the wearer's focus, and the digital content may be displayed or altered based thereon.

[000345] Figure 39 illustrates a situation where digital content is moved 3902 within one or both of the FOVs 3908 and 3910 to align with the convergence of the eyes as determined by the pupil movement 3904. By moving the digital content to maintain alignment, in embodiments, the overlapping nature of the content is maintained so the object appears properly to the wearer. This can be important in situations where 3D content is displayed.

[000346] An aspect of the present invention relates to controlling the HWC 102 based on events detected through eye imaging. A wearer winking, blinking, moving his eyes in a certain pattern, etc. may, for example, control an application of the HWC 102. Eye imaging (e.g. as described herein) may be used to monitor the eye(s) of the wearer and once a pre-determined pattern is detected an application control command may be initiated.

[000347] An aspect of the invention relates to monitoring the health of a person wearing a HWC 102 by monitoring the wearer's eye(s). Calibrations may be made such that the normal performance, under various conditions (e.g. lighting conditions, image light conditions, etc.) of a wearer's eyes may be documented. The wearer's eyes may then be monitored through eye imaging (e.g. as described herein) for changes in their performance. Changes in performance may be indicative of a health concern (e.g. concussion, brain injury, stroke, loss of blood, etc.). If detected the data indicative of the change or event may be communicated from the HWC 102.

[000348] Aspects of the present invention relate to security and access of computer assets (e.g. the HWC itself and related computer systems) as determined through eye image verification. As discussed herein elsewhere, eye imagery may be compared to known person eye imagery to confirm a person's identity. Eye imagery may also be used to confirm the identity of people wearing the HWCs 102 before allowing them to link together or share files, streams, information, etc.

[000349] A variety of use cases for eye imaging are possible based on technologies described herein. An aspect of the present invention relates to the timing of eye image capture. The timing of the capture of the eye image and the frequency of the capture of multiple images of the eye can vary dependent on the use case for the information gathered from the eye image. For example, capturing an eye image to identify the user of the HWC may be required only when the HWC has been turned ON or when the HWC determines that the HWC has been put onto a wearer's head to control the security of the HWC and the associated information that is displayed to the user. Wherein, the orientation, movement pattern, stress or position of the earhorns (or other portions of the HWC) of the HWC can be used to determine that a person has put the HWC onto their head with the intention to use the HWC. Those same parameters may be monitored in an effort to understand when the HWC is dismounted from the user's head. This may enable a situation where the capture of an eye image for identifying the wearer may be completed only when a change in the wearing status is identified. In a contrasting example, capturing eye images to monitor the health of the wearer may require images to be captured periodically (e.g. every few seconds, minutes, hours, days, etc.). For example, the eye images may be taken in minute intervals when the images are being used to monitor the health of the wearer when detected

movements indicate that the wearer is exercising. In a further contrasting example, capturing eye images to monitor the health of the wearer for long-term effects may only require that eye images be captured monthly. Embodiments of the invention relate to selection of the timing and rate of capture of eye images to be in correspondence with the selected use scenario associated with the eye images. These selections may be done automatically, as with the exercise example above where movements indicate exercise, or these selections may be set manually. In a further embodiment, the selection of the timing and rate of eye image capture is adjusted automatically depending on the mode of operation of the HWC. The selection of the timing and rate of eye image capture can further be selected in correspondence with input characteristics associated with the wearer including age and health status, or sensed physical conditions of the wearer including heart rate, chemical makeup of the blood and eye blink rate.

[000350] Figure 40 illustrates an embodiment in which digital content presented in a see-through FOV is positioned based on the speed in which the wearer is moving. When the person is not moving, as measured by sensor(s) in the HWC 102 (e.g. IMU, GPS based tracking, etc.), digital content may be presented at the stationary person content position 4004. The content position 4004 is indicated as being in the middle of the see-through FOV 4002; however, this is meant to illustrate that the digital content is positioned within the see-through FOV at a place that is generally desirable knowing that the wearer is not moving and as such the wearer's surrounding see through view can be somewhat obstructed. So, the stationary person content position, or neutral position, may not be centered in the see-through FOV; it may be positioned somewhere in the see-through FOV deemed desirable and the sensor feedback may shift the digital content from the neutral position. The movement of the digital content for a quickly moving person is also shown in Figure 40 wherein as the person turns their head to the side, the digital content moves out of the see-through FOV to content position 4008 and then moves back as the person turns their head back. For a slowly moving person, the head movement can be more complex and as such the movement of the digital content in an out of the see-through FOV can follow a path such as that shown by content position 4010.

[000351] In embodiments, the sensor that assesses the wearer's movements may be a GPS sensor, IMU, accelerometer, etc. The content position may be shifted from a neutral position to a position towards a side edge of the field of view as the forward motion increases. The content position may be shifted from a neutral position to a position towards a top or bottom edge of the field of view as the forward motion increases. The content position may shift based on a threshold speed of the assessed motion. The content position may shift linearly based on the speed of the forward motion. The content position may shift non-linearly based on the speed of the forward motion. The content position may shift outside of the field of view. In embodiments, the content is no longer displayed if the speed of movement exceeds a predetermined threshold and will be displayed again once the forward motion slows.

[000352] In embodiments, the content position may generally be referred to as shifting; it should be understood that the term shifting encompasses a process where the movement from one position to another within the see-through FOV or out of the FOV is visible to the wearer (e.g. the content appears to slowly or quickly move and the user perceives the movement itself) or the movement from one position to another may not be visible to the wearer (e.g. the content appears to jump in a discontinuous fashion or the content disappears and then reappears in the new position).

[000353] Another aspect of the present invention relates to removing the content from the field of view or shifting it to a position within the field of view that increases the wearer's view of the surrounding environment when a sensor causes an alert command to be issued. In embodiments, the alert may be due to a sensor or combination of sensors that sense a condition above a threshold value. For example, if an audio sensor detects a loud sound of a certain pitch, content in the field of view may be removed or shifted to provide a clear view of the surrounding environment for the wearer. In addition to the shifting of the content, in embodiments, an indication of why the content was shifted may be presented in the field of view or provided through audio feedback to the wearer. For instance, if a carbon monoxide sensor detects a high concentration in the area, content in the field of view may be shifted to the side of the field of view or removed from the field of view and an indication may be provided to the wearer that there is a high concentration of carbon monoxide in the area. This new information, when presented in the field of view, may similarly be shifted within or outside of the field of view depending on the movement speed of the wearer.

[000354] Figure 41 illustrates how content may be shifted from a neutral position 4104 to an alert position 4108. In this embodiment, the content is shifted outside of the see-through FOV 4102. In other embodiments, the content may be shifted as described herein.

[000355] Another aspect of the present invention relates to identification of various vectors or headings related to the HWC 102, along with sensor inputs, to determine how to position content in the field of view. In embodiments, the speed of movement of the wearer is detected and used as an input for position of the content and, depending on the speed, the content may be positioned with respect to a movement vector or heading (i.e. the direction of the movement), or a sight vector or heading (i.e. the direction of the wearer's sight direction). For example, if the wearer is moving very fast the content may be positioned within the field of view with respect to the

movement vector because the wearer is only going to be looking towards the sides of himself periodically and for short periods of time. As another example, if the wearer is moving slowly, the content may be positioned with respect to the sight heading because the user may more freely be shifting his view from side to side.

[000356] Figure 42 illustrates two examples where the movement vector may effect content positioning. Movement vector A 4202 is shorter than movement vector B 4210 indicating that the forward speed and/or acceleration of movement of the person associated with movement vector A 4202 is lower than the person

associated with movement vector B 4210. Each person is also indicated as having a sight vector or heading 4208 and 4212. The sight vectors A 4208 and B 4210 are the same from a relative perspective. The white area inside of the black triangle in front of each person is indicative of how much time each person likely spends looking at a direction that is not in line with the movement vector. The time spent looking off angle A 4204 is indicated as being more than that of the time spent looking off angle B 4214. This may be because the movement vector speed A is lower than movement vector speed B. The faster the person moves forward the more the person tends to look in the forward direction, typically. The FOVs A 4218 and B 4222 illustrate how content may be aligned depending on the movement vectors 4202 and 4210 and sight vectors 4208 and 4212. FOV A 4218 is illustrated as presenting content in-line with the sight vector 4220. This may be due to the lower speed of the movement vector A 4202. This may also be due to the prediction of a larger amount of time spent looking off angle A 4204. FOV B 4222 is illustrated as presenting content in line with the movement vector 4224. This may be due to the higher speed of movement vector B 4210. This may also be due to the prediction of a shorter amount of time spent looking off angle B 4214.

[000357] Another aspect of the present invention relates to damping a rate of content position change within the field of view. As illustrated in figure 43, the sight vector may undergo a rapid change 4304. This rapid change may be an isolated event or it may be made at or near a time when other sight vector changes are occurring. The wearer's head may be turning back and forth for some reason. In embodiments, the rapid successive changes in sight vector may cause a damped rate of content position change 4308 within the FOV 4302. For example, the content may be positioned with respect to the sight vector, as described herein, and the rapid change in sight vector may normally cause a rapid content position change; however, since the sight vector is successively changing, the rate of position change with respect to the sight vector may be damped, slowed, or stopped. The position rate change may be altered based on the rate of change of the sight vector, average of the sight vector changes, or otherwise altered.

[000358] Another aspect of the present invention relates to simultaneously presenting more than one content in the field of view of a see-through optical system of a HWC 102 and positioning one content with the sight heading and one content with the movement heading. Figure 44 illustrates two FOVs A 4414 and B 4420, which correspond respectively to the two identified sight vectors A 4402 and B 4404. Figure 44 also illustrates an object in the environment 4408 at a position relative to the sight vectors A 4402 and B 4404. When the person is looking along sight vector A 4402, the environment object 4408 can be seen through the field of view A 4414 at position 4412. As illustrated, sight heading aligned content is presented as TEXT in proximity with the environment object 4412. At the same time, other content 4418 is presented in the field of view A 4414 at a position aligned in correspondence with the movement vector. As the movement speed increases, the content 4418 may shift as described herein. When the sight vector of the person is sight vector B 4404 the environmental object 4408 is not seen in the field of view B 4420. As a result, the sight aligned content 4410 is not presented in field of view B 4420; however, the movement aligned content 4418 is presented and is still dependent on the speed of the motion.

[000359] Figure 45 shows an example set of data for a person moving through an environment over a path that starts with a movement heading of 0 degrees and ends with a movement heading of 114 degrees during which time the speed of movement varies from 0 m/sec to 20 m/sec. The sight heading can be seen to vary on either side of the movement heading while moving as the person looks from side to side. Large changes in sight heading occur when the movement speed is 0 m/sec when the person is standing still, followed by step changes in movement heading.

[000360] Embodiments provide a process for determining the display heading that takes into account the way a user moves through an environment and provides a display heading that makes it easy for the user to find the displayed information while also providing unencumbered see-through views of the environment in response to different movements, speed of movement or different types of

information being displayed.

[000361] Figure 46 illustrates a see-through view as may be seen when using a HWC wherein information is overlaid onto a see-through view of the

environment. The tree and the building are actually in the environment and the text is displayed in the see-through display such that it appears overlaid on the environment. In addition to text information such as, for example, instructions and weather

information, some augmented reality information is shown that relates to nearby objects in the environment.

[000362] In an embodiment, the display heading is determined based on speed of movement. At low speeds, the display heading may be substantially the same as the sight heading while at high speed the display heading may be substantially the same as the movement heading. In embodiments, as long as the user remains stationary, the displayed information is presented directly in front of the user and HWC. However, as the movement speed increases (e.g. above a threshold or continually, etc.) the display heading becomes substantially the same as the movement heading regardless of the direction the user is looking, so that when the user looks in the direction of movement, the displayed information is directly in front of the user and HMD and when the user looks to the side the displayed information is not visible.

[000363] Rapid changes in sight heading can be followed by a slower change in the display heading to provide a damped response to head rotation. Alternatively, the display heading can be substantially the time averaged sight heading so that the displayed information is presented at a heading that is in the middle of a series of sight headings over a period of time. In this embodiment, if the user stops moving their head, the display heading gradually becomes the same as the sight heading and the displayed information moves into the display field of view in front of the user and HMD. In embodiments, when there is a high rate of sight heading change, the process delays the effect of the time averaged sight heading on the display heading. In this way, the effect of rapid head movements on display heading is reduced and the positioning of the displayed information within the display field of view is stabilized laterally.

[000364] In another embodiment, display heading is determined based on speed of movement where at high-speed, the display heading is substantially the same as the movement heading. At mid-speed the display heading is substantially the same as a time averaged sight heading so that rapid head rotations are damped out and the display heading is in the middle of back and forth head movements.

[000365] In yet another embodiment, the type of information being displayed is included in determining how the information should be displayed.

Augmented reality information that is connected to objects in the environment is given a display heading that substantially matches the sight heading. In this way, as the user rotates their head, augmented reality information comes into view that is related to objects that are in the see-through view of the environment. At the same time, information that is not connected to objects in the environment is given a display heading that is determined based on the type of movements and speed of movements as previously described in this specification.

[000366] In yet a further embodiment, when the speed of movement is determined to be above a threshold, the information displayed is moved downward in the display field of view so that the upper portion of the display field of view has less information or no information displayed to provide the user with an unencumbered see-through view of the environment.

[000367] Figures 47 and 48 show illustrations of a see-through view including overlaid displayed information. Figure 47 shows the see-through view immediately after a rapid change in sight heading from the sight heading associated with the see-through view shown in Figure 46 wherein the change in sight heading comes from a head rotation. In this case, the display heading is delayed. Figure 48 shows how at a later time, the display heading catches up to the sight heading. The augmented reality information remains in positions within the display field of view where the association with objects in the environment can be readily made by the user.

[000368] Figure 49 shows an illustration of a see-through view example including overlaid displayed information that has been shifted downward in the display field of view to provide an unencumbered see-through view in the upper portion of the see- through view. At the same time, augmented reality labels have been maintained in locations within the display field of view so they can be readily associated with objects in the environment.

[000369] In a further embodiment, in an operating mode such as when the user is moving in an environment, digital content is presented at the side of the user's see-through FOV so that the user can only view the digital content by turning their head. In this case, when the user is looking straight ahead, such as when the movement heading matches the sight heading, the see-through view FOV does not include digital content. The user then accesses the digital content by turning their head to the side whereupon the digital content moves laterally into the user's see-through FOV. In another embodiment, the digital content is ready for presentation and will be presented if an indication for it's presentation is received. For example, the information may be ready for presentation and if the sight heading or predetermined position of the HWC 102 is achieved the content may then be presented. The wearer may look to the side and the content may be presented. In another embodiment, the user may cause the content to move into an area in the field of view by looking in a direction for a

predetermined period of time, blinking, winking, or displaying some other pattern that can be captured through eye imaging technologies (e.g. as described herein elsewhere). [000370] In yet another embodiment, an operating mode is provided wherein the user can define sight headings wherein the associated see-through FOV includes digital content or does not include digital content. In an example, this operating mode can be used in an office environment where when the user is looking at a wall digital content is provided within the FOV, whereas when the user is looking toward a hallway, the FOV is unencumbered by digital content. In another example, when the user is looking horizontally digital content is provided within the FOV, but when the user looks down (e.g. to look at a desktop or a cellphone) the digital content is removed from the FOV.

[000371] Another aspect of the present invention relates to collecting and using eye position and sight heading information. Head worn computing with motion heading, sight heading, and/or eye position prediction (sometimes referred to as "eye heading" herein) may be used to identify what a wearer of the HWC 102 is apparently interested in and the information may be captured and used. In embodiments, the information may be characterized as viewing information because the information apparently relates to what the wearer is looking at. The viewing information may be used to develop a personal profile for the wearer, which may indicate what the wearer tends to look at. The viewing information from several or many HWC's 102 may be captured such that group or crowd viewing trends may be established. For example, if the movement heading and sight heading are known, a prediction of what the wearer is looking at may be made and used to generate a personal profile or portion of a crowd profile. In another embodiment, if the eye heading and location, sight heading and/or movement heading are known, a prediction of what is being looked at may be predicted. The prediction may involve understanding what is in proximity of the wearer and this may be understood by establishing the position of the wearer (e.g. through GPS or other location technology) and establishing what mapped objects are known in the area. The prediction may involve interpreting images captured by the camera or other sensors associated with the HWC 102. For example, if the camera captures an image of a sign and the camera is in-line with the sight heading, the prediction may involve assessing the likelihood that the wearer is viewing the sign. The prediction may involve capturing an image or other sensory information and then performing object recognition analysis to determine what is being viewed. For example, the wearer may be walking down a street and the camera that is in the HWC 102 may capture an image and a processor, either on-board or remote from the HWC 102, may recognize a face, object, marker, image, etc. and it may be determined that the wearer may have been looking at it or towards it.

[000372] Figure 50 illustrates a cross section of an eyeball of a wearer of an HWC with focus points that can be associated with the eye imaging system of the invention. The eyeball 5010 includes an iris 5012 and a retina 5014. Because the eye imaging system of the invention provides coaxial eye imaging with a display system, images of the eye can be captured from a perspective directly in front of the eye and inline with where the wearer is looking. In embodiments of the invention, the eye imaging system can be focused at the iris 5012 and/or the retina 5014 of the wearer, to capture images of the external surface of the iris 5012 or the internal portions of the eye, which includes the retina 5014. Figure 50 shows light rays 5020 and 5025 that are respectively associated with capturing images of the iris 5012 or the retina 5014 wherein the optics associated with the eye imaging system are respectively focused at the iris 5012 or the retina 5014. Illuminating light can also be provided in the eye imaging system to illuminate the iris 5012 or the retina 5014. Figure 51 shows an illustration of an eye including an iris 5130 and a sclera 5125. In embodiments, the eye imaging system can be used to capture images that include the iris 5130 and portions the sclera 5125. The images can then be analyzed to determine color, shapes and patterns that are associated with the user. In further embodiments, the focus of the eye imaging system is adjusted to enable images to be captured of the iris 5012 or the retina 5014. Illuminating light can also be adjusted to illuminate the iris 5012 or to pass through the pupil of the eye to illuminate the retina 5014. The illuminating light can be visible light to enable capture of colors of the iris 5012 or the retina 5014, or the illuminating light can be ultraviolet (e.g. 340nm), near infrared (e.g. 850nm) or mid- wave infrared (e.g. 5000nm) light to enable capture of hyperspectral characteristics of the eye.

[000373] Figure 53 illustrates a display system that includes an eye imaging system. The display system includes a polarized light source 2958, a DLP 2955, a quarter wave film 2957 and a beam splitter plate 5345. The eye imaging system includes a camera 3280, illuminating lights 5355 and beam splitter plate 5345. Where the beam splitter plate 5345 can be a reflective polarizer on the side facing the polarized light source 2958 and a hot mirror on the side facing the camera 3280. Wherein the hot mirror reflects infrared light (e.g. wavelengths 700 to 2000nm) and transmits visible light (e.g. wavelengths 400 to 670nm). The beam splitter plate 5345 can be comprised of multiple laminated films, a substrate film with coatings or a rigid transparent substrate with films on either side. By providing a reflective polarizer on the one side, the light from the polarized light source 2958 is reflected toward the DLP 2955 where it passes through the quarter wave film 2957 once, is reflected by the DLP mirrors in correspondence with the image content being displayed by the DLP 2955 and then passes back through the quarter wave film 2957. In so doing, the polarization state of the light from the polarized light source is changed, so that it is transmitted by the reflective polarizer on the beam splitter plate 5345 and the image light 2971 passes into the lower optics module 204 where the image is displayed to the user. At the same time, infrared light 5357 from the illuminating lights 5355 is reflected by the hot mirror so that it passes into the lower optics module 204 where it illuminates the user's eye.

Portions of the infrared light 2969 are reflected by the user's eye and this light passes back through the lower optics module 204, is reflected by the hot mirror on the beam splitter plate 5345 and is captured by the camera 3280. In this embodiment, the image light 2971 is polarized while the infrared light 5357 and 2969 can be unpolarized. In an embodiment, the illuminating lights 5355 provide two different infrared wavelengths and eye images are captured in pairs, wherein the pairs of eye images are analyzed together to improve the accuracy of identification of the user based on iris analysis.

[000374] Figure 54 shows an illustration of a further embodiment of a display system with an eye imaging system. In addition to the features of Figure 53, this system includes a second camera 5460. Wherein the second camera 5460 is provided to capture eye images in the visible wavelengths. Illumination of the eye can be provided by the displayed image or by see-through light from the environment.

Portions of the displayed image can be modified to provide improved illumination of the user's eye when images of the eye are to be captured such as by increasing the

brightness of the displayed image or increasing the white areas within the displayed image. Further, modified displayed images can be presented briefly for the purpose of capturing eye images and the display of the modified images can be synchronized with the capture of the eye images. As shown in Figure 54, visible light 5467 is polarized when it is captured by the second camera 5460 since it passes through the beam splitter 5445 and the beam splitter 5445 is a reflective polarizer on the side facing the second camera 5460. In this eye imaging system, visible eye images can be captured by the second camera 5460 at the same time that infrared eye images are captured by the camera 3280. Wherein, the characteristics of the camera 3280 and the second camera 5460 and the associated respective images captured can be different in terms of resolution and capture rate.

[000375] Figure 52a and 52b illustrate captured images of eyes where the eyes are illuminated with structured light patterns. In Figure 52a, an eye 5220 is shown with a projected structured light pattern 5230, where the light pattern is a grid of lines. A light pattern of such as 5230 can be provided by the light source 5355 show in Figure 53 by including a diffractive or a refractive device to modify the light 5357 as are known by those skilled in the art. A visible light source can also be included for the second camera 5460 shown in Figure 54 which can include a diffractive or refractive to modify the light 5467 to provide a light pattern. Figure 52b illustrates how the structured light pattern of 5230 becomes distorted to 5235 when the user's eye 5225 looks to the side. This distortion comes from the fact that the human eye is not spherical in shape, instead the iris sticks out slightly from the eyeball to form a bump in the area of the iris. As a result, the shape of the eye and the associated shape of the reflected structured light pattern is different depending on which direction the eye is pointed, when images of the eye are captured from a fixed position. Changes in the structured light pattern can subsequently be analyzed in captured eye images to determine the direction that the eye is looking.

[000376] The eye imaging system can also be used for the assessment of aspects of health of the user. In this case, information gained from analyzing captured images of the iris 5012 is different from information gained from analyzing captured images of the retina 5014. Where images of the retina 5014 are captured using light 5357 that illuminates the inner portions of the eye including the retina 5014. The light 5357 can be visible light, but in an embodiment, the light 5357 is infrared light (e.g. wavelength 1 to 5 microns) and the camera 3280 is an infrared light sensor (e.g. an InGaAs sensor) or a low resolution infrared image sensor that is used to determine the relative amount of light 5357 that is absorbed, reflected or scattered by the inner portions of the eye. Wherein the majority of the light that is absorbed, reflected or scattered can be attributed to materials in the inner portion of the eye including the retina where there are densely packed blood vessels with thin walls so that the absorption, reflection and scattering are caused by the material makeup of the blood. These measurements can be conducted automatically when the user is wearing the HWC, either at regular intervals, after identified events or when prompted by an external communication. In a preferred embodiment, the illuminating light is near infrared or mid infrared (e.g. 0.7 to 5 microns wavelength) to reduce the chance for thermal damage to the wearer's eye. In another embodiment, the polarizer 3285 is antireflection coated to reduce any reflections from this surface from the light 5357, the light 2969 or the light 3275 and thereby increase the sensitivity of the camera 3280. In a further embodiment, the light source 5355 and the camera 3280 together comprise a spectrometer wherein the relative intensity of the light reflected by the eye is analyzed over a series of narrow wavelengths within the range of wavelengths provided by the light source 5355 to determine a characteristic spectrum of the light that is absorbed, reflected or scattered by the eye. For example, the light source 5355 can provide a broad range of infrared light to illuminate the eye and the camera 3280 can include: a grating to laterally disperse the reflected light from the eye into a series of narrow wavelength bands that are captured by a linear photodetector so that the relative intensity by wavelength can be measured and a characteristic absorbance spectrum for the eye can be determined over the broad range of infrared. In a further example, the light source 5355 can provide a series of narrow wavelengths of light (ultraviolet, visible or infrared) to sequentially illuminate the eye and camera 3280 includes a photodetector that is selected to measure the relative intensity of the series of narrow wavelengths in a series of sequential measurements that together can be used to determine a characteristic spectrum of the eye. The determined characteristic spectrum is then compared to known characteristic spectra for different materials to determine the material makeup of the eye. In yet another embodiment, the illuminating light 5357 is focused on the retina 5014 and a characteristic spectrum of the retina 5014 is determined and the spectrum is compared to known spectra for materials that may be present in the user's blood. For example, in the visible wavelengths 540nm is useful for detecting hemoglobin and 660nm is useful for differentiating oxygenated hemoglobin. In a further example, in the infrared, a wide variety of materials can be identified as is known by those skilled in the art, including: glucose, urea, alcohol and controlled substances. Figure 55 shows a series of example spectrum for a variety of controlled substances as measured using a form of infrared spectroscopy (ThermoScientific Application Note 51242, by C. Petty, B. Garland and the Mesa Police Department Forensic Laboratory, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein). Figure 56 shows an infrared absorbance spectrum for glucose (Hewlett Packard

Company 1999, G. Hopkins, G. Mauze; "In-vivo NIR Diffuse-reflectance Tissue

Spectroscopy of Human Subjects," which is hereby incorporated by reference herein). United States Patent 6675030, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein, provides a near infrared blood glucose monitoring system that includes infrared scans of a body part such as a foot. United States Patent publication 2006/0183986, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein, provides a blood glucose monitoring system including a light measurement of the retina. Embodiments of the present invention provide methods for automatic measurements of specific materials in the user's blood by illuminating at one or more narrow wavelengths into the iris of the wearer's eye and measuring the relative intensity of the light reflected by the eye to identify the relative absorbance spectrum and comparing the measured absorbance spectrum with known absorbance spectra for the specific material, such as illuminating at 540 and 660nm to determine the level of hemoglobin present in the user's blood.

[000377] Another aspect of the present invention relates to collecting and using eye position and sight heading information. Head worn computing with motion heading, sight heading, and/or eye position prediction (sometimes referred to as "eye heading" herein) may be used to identify what a wearer of the HWC 102 is apparently interested in and the information may be captured and used. In embodiments, the information may be characterized as viewing information because the information apparently relates to what the wearer is looking at. The viewing information may be used to develop a personal profile for the wearer, which may indicate what the wearer tends to look at. The viewing information from several or many HWC's 102 may be captured such that group or crowd viewing trends may be established. For example, if the movement heading and sight heading are known, a prediction of what the wearer is looking at may be made and used to generate a personal profile or portion of a crowd profile. In another embodiment, if the eye heading and location, sight heading and/or movement heading are known, a prediction of what is being looked at may be predicted. The prediction may involve understanding what is in proximity of the wearer and this may be understood by establishing the position of the wearer (e.g. through GPS or other location technology) and establishing what mapped objects are known in the area. The prediction may involve interpreting images captured by the camera or other sensors associated with the HWC 102. For example, if the camera captures an image of a sign and the camera is in-line with the sight heading, the prediction may involve assessing the likelihood that the wearer is viewing the sign. The prediction may involve capturing an image or other sensory information and then performing object recognition analysis to determine what is being viewed. For example, the wearer may be walking down a street and the camera that is in the HWC 102 may capture an image and a processor, either on-board or remote from the HWC 102, may recognize a face, object, marker, image, etc. and it may be determined that the wearer may have been looking at it or towards it.

[000378] Figure 57 illustrates a scene where a person is walking with a HWC 102 mounted on his head. In this scene, the person's geo-spatial location 5704 is known through a GPS sensor, which could be another location system, and his movement heading, sight heading 5714 and eye heading 5702 are known and can be recorded (e.g. through systems described herein). There are objects and a person in the scene. Person 5712 may be recognized by the wearer's HWC 102 system, the person may be mapped (e.g. the person's GPS location may be known or recognized), or otherwise known. The person may be wearing a garment or device that is recognizable. For example, the garment may be of a certain style and the HWC may recognize the style and record it's viewing. The scene also includes a mapped object 5718 and a recognized object 5720. As the wearer moves through the scene, the sight and/or eye headings may be recorded and communicated from the HWC 102. In embodiments, the time that the sight and/or eye heading maintains a particular position may be recorded. For example, if a person appears to look at an object or person for a predetermined period of time (e.g. 2 seconds or longer), the information may be communicated as gaze persistence information as an indication that the person may have been interested in the object.

[000379] In embodiments, sight headings may be used in conjunction with eye headings or eye and/or sight headings may be used alone. Sight headings can do a good job of predicting what direction a wearer is looking because many times the eyes are looking forward, in the same general direction as the sight heading. In other situations, eye headings may be a more desirable metric because the eye and sight headings are not always aligned. In embodiments herein examples may be provided with the term "eye/sight" heading, which indicates that either or both eye heading and sight heading may be used in the example.

[000380] Another aspect of the present invention relates to collecting and using eye position and sight heading information. Head worn computing with motion heading, sight heading, and/or eye position prediction (sometimes referred to as "eye heading" herein) may be used to identify what a wearer of the HWC 102 is apparently interested in and the information may be captured and used. In embodiments, the information may be characterized as viewing information because the information apparently relates to what the wearer is looking at. The viewing information may be used to develop a personal profile for the wearer, which may indicate what the wearer tends to look at. The viewing information from several or many HWC's 102 may be captured such that group or crowd viewing trends may be established. For example, if the movement heading and sight heading are known, a prediction of what the wearer is looking at may be made and used to generate a personal profile or portion of a crowd profile. In another embodiment, if the eye heading and location, sight heading and/or movement heading are known, a prediction of what is being looked at may be predicted. The prediction may involve understanding what is in proximity of the wearer and this may be understood by establishing the position of the wearer (e.g. through GPS or other location technology) and establishing what mapped objects are known in the area. The prediction may involve interpreting images captured by the camera or other sensors associated with the HWC 102. For example, if the camera captures an image of a sign and the camera is in-line with the sight heading, the prediction may involve assessing the likelihood that the wearer is viewing the sign. The prediction may involve capturing an image or other sensory information and then performing object recognition analysis to determine what is being viewed. For example, the wearer may be walking down a street and the camera that is in the HWC 102 may capture an image and a processor, either on-board or remote from the HWC 102, may recognize a face, object, marker, image, etc. and it may be determined that the wearer may have been looking at it or towards it.

[000381] Figure 57a illustrates a scene where a person is walking with a HWC 102 mounted on his head. In this scene, the person's geo-spatial location 5028 is known through a GPS sensor, which could be another location system, and his movement heading, sight heading 5038 and eye heading 5024 are known and can be recorded (e.g. through systems described herein). There are objects and a person in the scene. Person 5034 may be recognized by the wearer's HWC 102 system, the person may be mapped (e.g. the person's GPS location may be known or recognized), or otherwise known. The person may be wearing a garment or device that is recognizable. For example, the garment may be of a certain style and the HWC may recognize the style and record it's viewing. The scene also includes a mapped object 5040 and a recognized object 5042. As the wearer moves through the scene, the sight and/or eye headings may be recorded and communicated from the HWC 102. In embodiments, the time that the sight and/or eye heading maintains a particular position may be recorded. For example, if a person appears to look at an object or person for a predetermined period of time (e.g. 2 seconds or longer), the information may be communicated as gaze persistence information as an indication that the person may have been interested in the object.

[000382] In embodiments, sight headings may be used in conjunction with eye headings or eye and/or sight headings may be used alone. Sight headings can do a good job of predicting what direction a wearer is looking because many times the eyes are looking forward, in the same general direction as the sight heading. In other situations, eye headings may be a more desirable metric because the eye and sight headings are not always aligned. In embodiments herein examples may be provided with the term "eye/sight" heading, which indicates that either or both eye heading and sight heading may be used in the example.

[000383] Figure 58 illustrates a system for receiving, developing and using movement heading, sight heading, eye heading and/or persistence information from HWC(s) 102. The server 5804 may receive heading or gaze persistence information, which is noted as persistence information 5802, for processing and/or use. The heading and/or gaze persistence information may be used to generate a personal profile 5808 and/or a group profile 5810. The personal profile 5718 may reflect the wearer's general viewing tendencies and interests. The group profile 5810 may be an

assemblage of different wearer's heading and persistence information to create impressions of general group viewing tendencies and interests. The group profile 5810 may be broken into different groups based on other information such as gender, likes, dislikes, biographical information, etc. such that certain groups can be distinguished from other groups. This may be useful in advertising because an advertiser may be interested in what a male adult sports goer is generally looking at as oppose to a younger female. The profiles 5808 and 5810 and raw heading and persistence information may be used by retailers 5814, advertisers 5818, trainers, etc. For example, an advertiser may have an advertisement posted in an environment and may be interested in knowing how many people look at the advertisement, how long they look at it and where they go after looking at it. This information may be used as conversion information to assess the value of the advertisement and thus the payment to be received for the advertisement.

[000384] In embodiments, the process involves collecting eye and/or sight heading information from a plurality of head-worn computers that come into proximity with an object in an environment. For example, a number of people may be walking through an area and each of the people may be wearing a head worn computer with the ability to track the position of the wearer's eye(s) as well as possibly the wearer's sight and movement headings. The various HWC wearing individuals may then walk, ride, or otherwise come into proximity with some object in the environment (e.g. a store, sign, person, vehicle, box, bag, etc.). When each person passes by or otherwise comes near the object, the eye imaging system may determine if the person is looking towards the object. All of the eye/sight heading information may be collected and used to form impressions of how the crowd reacted to the object. A store may be running a sale and so the store may put out a sign indicating such. The storeowners and managers may be very interested to know if anyone is looking at their sign. The sign may be set as the object of interest in the area and as people navigate near the sign, possibly determined by their GPS locations, the eye/sight heading determination system may record information relative to the environment and the sign. Once, or as, the eye/sight heading information is collected and associations between the eye headings and the sign are determined, feedback may be sent back to the storeowner, managers, advertiser, etc. as an indication of how well their sign is attracting people. In embodiments, the sign's effectiveness at attracting people's attention, as indicated through the eye/sight headings, may be considered a conversion metric and impact the economic value of the sign and/or the signs placement.

[000385] In embodiments, a map of the environment with the object may be generated by mapping the locations and movement paths of the people in the crowd as they navigate by the object (e.g. the sign). Layered on this map may be an indication of the various eye/sight headings. This may be useful in indicating wear people were in relation to the object when then viewed they object. The map may also have an indication of how long people looked at the object from the various positions in the environment and where they went after seeing the object.

[000386] In embodiments, the process involves collecting a plurality of eye/sight headings from a head-worn computer, wherein each of the plurality of eye/sight headings is associated with a different pre-determined object in an environment. This technology may be used to determine which of the different objects attracts more of the person's attention. For example, if there are three objects placed in an environment and a person enters the environment navigating his way through it, he may look at one or more of the objects and his eye/sight heading may persist on one or more objects longer than others. This may be used in making or refining the person's personal attention profile and/or it may be used in connection with other such people's data on the same or similar objects to determine an impression of how the population or crowd reacts to the objects. Testing advertisements in this way may provide good feedback of its effectiveness.

[000387] In embodiments, the process may involve capturing eye/sight headings once there is substantial alignment between the eye/sight heading and an object of interest. For example, the person with the HWC may be navigating through an environment and once the HWC detects substantial alignment or the projected occurrence of an upcoming substantial alignment between the eye/sight heading and the object of interest, the occurrence and/or persistence may be recorded for use.

[000388] In embodiments, the process may involve collecting eye/sight heading information from a head-worn computer and collecting a captured image from the head- worn computer that was taken at substantially the same time as the eye/sight heading information was captured. These two pieces of information may be used in conjunction to gain an understanding of what the wearer was looking at and possibly interested in. The process may further involve associating the eye/sight heading information with an object, person, or other thing found in the captured image. This may involve processing the captured image looking for objects or patterns. In embodiments, gaze time or persistence may be measured and used in conjunction with the image processing. The process may still involve object and/or pattern recognition, but it may also involve attempting to identify what the person gazed at for the period of time by more particularly identifying a portion of the image in conjunction with image processing.

[000389] In embodiments, the process may involve setting a pre-determined eye/sight heading from a pre-determined geospatial location and using them as triggers. In the event that a head worn computer enters the geospatial location and an eye/sight heading associated with the head worn computer aligns with the pre-determined eye/sight heading, the system may collect the fact that there was an apparent alignment and/or the system may record information identifying how long the eye/sight heading remains substantially aligned with the pre-determined eye/sight heading to form a persistence statistic. This may eliminate or reduce the need for image processing as the triggers can be used without having to image the area. In other embodiments, image capture and processing is performed in conjunction with the triggers. In embodiments, the triggers may be a series a geospatial locations with corresponding eye/sight headings such that many spots can be used as triggers that indicate when a person entered an area in proximity to an object of interest and/or when that person actually appeared to look at the object.

[000390] In embodiments, eye imaging may be used to capture images of both eyes of the wearer in order to determine the amount of convergence of the eyes (e.g. through technologies described herein elsewhere) to get an understanding of what focal plane is being concentrated on by the wearer. For example, if the convergence measurement suggests that the focal plane is within 15 feet of the wearer, than, even though the eye/sight headings may align with an object that is more than 15 feet away it may be determined that the wearer was not looking at the object. If the object were within the 15 foot suggested focal plane, the determination may be that the wearer was looking at the object.

[000391] Another aspect of the present invention relates to visual display techniques relating to micro Doppler ("mD") target tracking signatures ("mD

signatures"). mD is a radar technique that uses a series of angle dependent

electromagnetic pulses that are broadcast into an environment and return pulses are captured. Changes between the broadcast pulse and return pulse are indicative of changes in the shape, distance and angular location of objects or targets in the

environment. These changes provide signals that can be used to track a target and identify the target through the mD signature. Each target or target type has a unique mD signature. Shifts in the radar pattern can be analyzed in the time domain and frequency domain based on mD techniques to derive information about the types of targets present (e.g. whether people are present), the motion of the targets and the relative angular location of the targets and the distance to the targets. By selecting a frequency used for the mD pulse relative to known objects in the environment, the pulse can penetrate the known objects to enable information about targets to be gathered even when the targets are visually blocked by the known objects. For example, pulse frequencies can be used that will penetrate concrete buildings to enable people to be identified inside the building. Multiple pulse frequencies can be used as well in the mD radar to enable different types of information to be gathered about the objects in the environment. In addition, the mD radar information can be combined with other information such as distance measurements or images captured of the environment that are analyzed jointly to provide improved object identification and improved target identification and tracking. In embodiments, the analysis can be performed on the HWC or the information can be transmitted to a remote network for analysis and results transmitted back to the HWC. Distance measurements can be provided by laser range finding, structured lighting, stereoscopic depth maps or sonar measurements. Images of the environment can be captured using one or more cameras capable of capturing images from visible, ultraviolet or infrared light. The mD radar can be attached to the HWC, located adjacently (e.g. in a vehicle) and associated wirelessly with the HWC or located remotely. Maps or other previously determined information about the environment can also be used in the analysis of the mD radar information.

Embodiments of the present invention relate to visualizing the mD signatures in useful ways.

[000392] Figure 59a illustrates a FOV 5918 of a HWC 102 from a wearer's perspective. The wearer, as described herein elsewhere, has a see-through FOV 5918 wherein the wearer views adjacent surroundings, such as the buildings illustrated in Figure 59a. The wearer, as described herein elsewhere, can also see displayed digital content presented within a portion of the FOV 5918. The embodiment illustrated in Figure 59a is indicating that the wearer can see the buildings and other surrounding elements in the environment and digital content representing traces, or travel paths, of bullets being fired by different people in the area. The surroundings are viewed through the transparency of the FOV 5918. The traces are presented via the digital computer display, as described herein elsewhere. In embodiments, the trace presented is based on a mD signature that is collected and communicated to the HWC in real time. The mD radar itself may be on or near the wearer of the HWC 102 or it may be located remote from the wearer. In embodiments, the mD radar scans the area, tracks and identifies targets, such as bullets, and communicates traces, based on locations, to the HWC 102.

[000393] There are several traces 5922 and 5920 presented to the wearer in the embodiment illustrated in Figure 59a. The traces communicated from the mD radar may be associated with GPS locations and the GPS locations may be associated with objects in the environment, such as people, buildings, vehicles, etc, both in latitude and longitude perspective and an elevation perspective. The locations may be used as markers for the HWC such that the traces, as presented in the FOV, can be associated, or fixed in space relative to the markers. For example, if the friendly fire trace 5922 is determined, by the mD radar, to have originated from the upper right window of the building on the left, as illustrated in Figure 59a, then a virtual marker may be set on or near the window. When the HWC views, through it's camera or other sensor, for example, the building's window, the trace may then virtually anchor with the virtual marker on the window. Similarly, a marker may be set near the termination position or other flight position of the friendly fire trace 5922, such as the upper left window of the center building on the right, as illustrated in Figure 59a. This technique fixes in space the trace such that the trace appears fixed to the environmental positions independent of where the wearer is looking. So, for example, as the wearer's head turns, the trace appears fixed to the marked locations.

[000394] In embodiments, certain user positions may be known and thus identified in the FOV. For example, the shooter of the friendly fire trace 5922 may be from a known friendly combatant and as such his location may be known. The position may be known based on his GPS location based on a mobile communication system on him, such as another HWC 102. In other embodiments, the friendly combatant may be marked by another friendly. For example, if the friendly position in the environment is known through visual contact or communicated information, a wearer of the HWC 102 may use a gesture or external user interface 104 to mark the location. If a friendly combatant location is known the originating position of the friendly fire trace 5922 may be color coded or otherwise distinguished from unidentified traces on the displayed digital content. Similarly, enemy fire traces 5920 may be color coded or otherwise distinguished on the displayed digital content. In embodiments, there may be an additional distinguished appearance on the displayed digital content for unknown traces.

[000395] In addition to situationally associated trace appearance, the trace colors or appearance may be different from the originating position to the terminating position. This path appearance change may be based on the mD signature. The mD signature may indicate that the bullet, for example, is slowing as it propagates and this slowing pattern may be reflected in the FOV 5918 as a color or pattern change. This can create an intuitive understanding of wear the shooter is located. For example, the originating color may be red, indicative of high speed, and it may change over the course of the trace to yellow, indicative of a slowing trace. This pattern changing may also be different for a friendly, enemy and unknown combatant. The enemy may go blue to green for a friendly trace, for example.

[000396] Figure 59a illustrates an embodiment where the user sees the environment through the FOV and may also see color coded traces, which are dependent on bullet speed and combatant type, where the traces are fixed in

environmental positions independent on the wearer's perspective. Other information, such as distance, range, range rings, time of day, date, engagement type (e.g. hold, stop firing, back away, etc.) may also be displayed in the FOV.

[000397] Another aspect of the present invention relates to mD radar techniques that trace and identify targets through other objects, such as walls (referred to generally as through wall mD), and visualization techniques related therewith.

Figure 59b illustrates a through wall mD visualization technique according to the principles of the present invention. As described herein elsewhere, the mD radar scanning the environment may be local or remote from the wearer of a HWC 102. The mD radar may identify a target (e.g. a person) that is visible 5928 and then track the target as he goes behind a wall 5930. The tracking may then be presented to the wearer of a HWC 102 such that digital content reflective of the target and the target's movement, even behind the wall, is presented in the FOV 5924 of the HWC 102. In embodiments, the target, when out of visible sight, may be represented by an avatar in the FOV to provide the wearer with imagery representing the target. [000398] mD target recognition methods can identify the identity of a target based on the vibrations and other small movements of the target. This can provide a personal signature for the target. In the case of humans, this may result in a personal identification of a target that has been previously characterized. The cardio, heart beat, lung expansion and other small movements within the body may be unique to a person and if those attributes are pre-identified they may be matched in real time to provide a personal identification of a person in the FOV 5924. The person's mD signatures may be determined based on the position of the person. For example, the database of personal mD signature attributes may include mD signatures for a person standing, sitting, laying down, running, walking, jumping, etc. This may improve the accuracy of the personal data match when a target is tracked through mD signature techniques in the field. In the event a person is personally identified, a specific indication of the person's identity may be presented in the FOV 5924. The indication may be a color, shape, shade, name, indication of the type of person (e.g. enemy, friendly, etc.), etc. to provide the wearer with intuitive real time information about the person being tracked. This may be very useful in a situation where there is more than one person in an area of the person being tracked. If just one person in the area is personally identified, that person or the avatar of that person can be presented differently than other people in the area.

[000399] Figure 59c illustrates an mD scanned environment 5932. An mD radar may scan an environment in an attempt to identify objects in the environment. In this embodiment, the mD scanned environment reveals two vehicles 5933a and 5933b, en enemy combatant 5939, two friendly combatants 5938a and 5938b and a shot trace 5940. Each of these objects may be personally identified or type identified. For example, the vehicles 5933a and 5933b may be identified through the mD signatures as a tank and heavy truck. The enemy combatant 5939 may be identified as a type (e.g. enemy combatant) or more personally (e.g. by name). The friendly combatants may be identified as a type (e.g. friendly combatant) or more personally (e.g. by name). The shot trace 5940 may be characterized by type of projectile or weapon type for the projectile, for example.

[000400] Figure 59d illustrates two separate HWC 102 FOV display techniques according to the principles of the present invention. FOV 5944 illustrates a map view 5948 where the mD scanned environment is presented. Here, the wearer has a perspective on the mapped area so he can understand all tracked targets in the area. This allows the wearer to traverse the area with knowledge of the targets. FOV 5944 illustrates a heads-up view to provide the wearer with an augmented reality style view of the environment that is in proximity of the wearer.

[000401] Figure 59 illustrates an environmentally position locked digital content 5912 that is indicative of a person's location 5902. In this disclosure the term "BlueForce" is generally used to indicate team members or members for which geo- spatial locations are known and can be used. In embodiments, "BlueForce" is a term to indicate members of a tactical arms team (e.g. a police force, secret service force, security force, military force, national security force, intelligence force, etc.). In many embodiments herein one member may be referred to as the primary or first BlueForce member and it is this member, in many described embodiments, that is wearing the HWC. It should be understood that this terminology is to help the reader and make for clear presentations of the various situations and that other members of the Blueforce, or other people, may have HWC's 102 and have similar capabilities. In this embodiment, a first person is wearing a head-worn computer 102 that has a see through field of view ("FOV") 5914. The first person can see through the FOV to view the surrounding environment through the FOV and digital content can also be presented in the FOV such that the first person can view the actual surroundings, through the FOV, in a digitally augmented view. The other BlueForce person's location is known and is indicated at a position inside of a building at point 5902. This location is known in three dimensions, longitude, latitude and altitude, which may have been determined by GPS along with an altimeter associated with the other Blueforce person. Similarly, the location of the first person wearing the HWC 102 is also known, as indicated in figure 59 as point 5908. In this embodiment, the compass heading 5910 of the first person is also known. With the compass heading 5910 known, the angle in which the first person is viewing the surroundings can be estimated. A virtual target line between the location of the first person 5908 and the other person's location 5902 can be established in three

dimensional space and emanating from the HWC 102 proximate the FOV 5914. The three dimensionally oriented virtual target line can then be used to present

environmentally position locked digital content in the FOV 5914, which is indicative of the other person's location 5902. The environmentally position locked digital content 5902 can be positioned within the FOV 5914 such that the first person, who is wearing the HWC 102, perceives the content 5902 as locked in position within the environment and marking the location of the other person 5902.

[000402] The three dimensionally positioned virtual target line can be recalculated periodically (e.g. every millisecond, second, minute, etc.) to reposition the environmentally position locked content 5912 to remain in-line with the virtual target line. This can create the illusion that the content 5912 is staying positioned within the environment at a point that is associated with the other person's location 5902 independent of the location of the first person 5908 wearing the HWC 102 and independent of the compass heading of the HWC 102.

[000403] In embodiments, the environmentally locked digital content 5912 may be positioned with an object 5904 that is between the first person's location 5908 and the other person's location 5902. The virtual target line may intersect the object 5904 before intersecting with the other person's location 5902. In embodiments, the environmentally locked digital content 5912 may be associated with the object intersection point 5904. In embodiments, the intersecting object 5904 may be identified by comparing the two person's locations 5902 and 5908 with obstructions identified on a map. In embodiments the intersecting object 5904 may be identified by processing images captured from a camera, or other sensor, associated with the HWC 102. In embodiments, the digital content 5912 has an appearance that is indicative of being at the location of the other person 5902, at the location of the intersecting object 5904 to provide a more clear indication of the position of the other person's position 5902 in the FOV 5914.

[000404] Figure 60 illustrates how and where digital content may be positioned within the FOV 6008 based on a virtual target line between the location of the first person 5908, who's wearing the HWC 102, and the other person 5902. In addition to positioning the content in a position within the FOV 6008 that is in-line with the virtual target line, the digital content may be presented such that it comes into focus by the first person when the first person focuses at a certain plane or distance in the environment. Presented object A 6018 is digitally generated content that is presented as an image at content position A 6012. The position 6012 is based on the virtual target line. The presented object A 6018 is presented not only along the virtual target line but also at a focal plane B 6014 such that the content at position A 6012 in the FOV 6008 comes into focus by the first person when the first person's eye 6002 focuses at something in the surrounding environment at the focal plane B 6014 distance. Setting the focal plane of the presented content provides content that does not come into focus until the eye 6002 focuses at the set focal plane. In embodiments, this allows the content at position A to be presented without when the HWC's compass is indicative of the first person looking in the direction of the other person 5902 but it will only come into focus when the first person focuses on in the direction of the other person 5902 and at the focal plane of the other person 5902.

[000405] Presented object B 6020 is aligned with a different virtual target line then presented object A 6018. Presented object B 6020 is also presented at content position B 6004 at a different focal plane than the content position A 6012. Presented content B 6020 is presented at a further focal plane, which is indicative that the other person 5902 is physically located at a further distance. If the focal planes are sufficiently different, the content at position A will come into focus at a different time than the content at position B because the two focal planes require different focus from the eye 6002.

[000406] Figure 61 illustrates several BlueForce members at locations with various points of view from the first person's perspective. In embodiments, the relative positions, distances and obstacles may cause the digital content indicative of the other person's location to be altered. For example, if the other person can be seen by the first person through the first person's FOV, the digital content may be locked at the location of the other person and the digital content may be of a type that indicates the other person's position is being actively marked and tracked. If the other person is in relatively close proximity, but cannot be seen by the first person, the digital content may be locked to an intersecting object or area and the digital content may indicate that the actual location of the other person cannot be seen but the mark is generally tracking the other persons general position. If the other person is not within a pre-determined proximity or is otherwise more significantly obscured from the first person's view, the digital content may generally indicate a direction or area where the other person is located and the digital content may indicate that the other person's location is not closely identified or tracked by the digital content, but that the other person is in the general area.

[000407] Continuing to refer to figure 61, several BlueForce members are presented at various positions within an area where the first person is located. The primary BlueForce member 6102 (also referred to generally as the first person, or the person wherein the HWC with the FOV for example purposes) can directly see the BlueForce member in the open field 6104. In embodiments, the digital content provided in the FOV of the primary BlueForce member may be based on a virtual target line and virtually locked in an environment position that is indicative of the open field position of the BlueForce member 6104. The digital content may also indicate that the location of the open field BlueForce member is marked and is being tracked. The digital content may change forms if the BlueForce member becomes obscured from the vision of the primary BlueForce member or otherwise becomes unavailable for direct viewing.

[000408] BlueForce member 6108 is obscured from the primary BlueForce member's 6102 view by an obstacle that is in close proximity to the obscured member 6108. As depicted, the obscured member 6108 is in a building but close to one of the front walls. In this situation, the digital content provided in the FOV of the primary member 6102 may be indicative of the general position of the obscured member 6108 and the digital content may indicate that, while the other person's location is fairly well marked, it is obscured so it is not as precise as if the person was in direct view. In addition, the digital content may be virtually positionally locked to some feature on the outside of the building that the obscured member is in. This may make the

environmental locking more stable and also provide an indication that the location of the person is somewhat unknown.

[000409] BlueForce member 6110 is obscured by multiple obstacles. The member 6110 is in a building and there is another building 6112 in between the primary member 6102 and the obscured member 6110. In this situation, the digital content in the FOV of the primary member will be spatially quite short of the actual obscured member and as such the digital content may need to be presented in a way that indicates that the obscured member 6110 is in a general direction but that the digital marker is not a reliable source of information for the particular location of obscured member 6110.

[000410] Figure 62 illustrates yet another method for positioning digital content within the FOV of a HWC where the digital content is intended to indicate a position of another person. This embodiment is similar to the embodiment described in connection with figure 62 herein. The main additional element in this embodiment is the additional step of verifying the distance between the first person 5908, the one wearing the HWC with the FOV digital content presentation of location, and the other person at location 5902. Here, the range finder may be included in the HWC and measure a distance at an angle that is represented by the virtual target line. In the event that the range finder finds an object obstructing the path of the virtual target line, the digital content presentation in the FOV may indicate such (e.g. as described herein elsewhere). In the event that the range finder confirms that there is a person or object at the end of the prescribed distance and angle defined by the virtual target line, the digital content may represent that the proper location has been marked, as described herein elsewhere.

[000411] Another aspect of the present invention relates to predicting the movement of BlueForce members to maintain proper virtual marking of the BlueForce member locations. Figure 63 illustrates a situation where the primary BlueForce member 6302 is tracking the locations of the other BlueForce members through an augmented environment using a HWC 102, as described herein elsewhere (e.g. as described in connection with the above figures). The primary BlueForce member 6302 may have knowledge of the tactical movement plan 6308. The tactical movement plan maybe maintained locally (e.g. on the HWCs 102 with sharing of the plan between the BlueForce members) or remotely (e.g. on a server and communicated to the HWC's 102, or communicated to a subset of HWC's 102 for HWC 102 sharing). In this case, the tactical plan involves the BlueForce group generally moving in the direction of the arrow 6308. The tactical plan may influence the presentations of digital content in the FOV of the HWC 102 of the primary BlueForce member. For example, the tactical plan may assist in the prediction of the location of the other BlueForce member and the virtual target line may be adjusted accordingly. In embodiments, the area in the tactical movement plan may be shaded or colored or otherwise marked with digital content in the FOV such that the primary BlueForce member can manage his activities with respect to the tactical plan. For example, he may be made aware that one or more BlueForce members are moving towards the tactical path 6308. He may also be made aware of movements in the tactical path that do not appear associated with BlueForce members.

[000412] Figure 63 also illustrates that internal IMU sensors in the HWCs worn by the BlueForce members may provide guidance on the movement of the members 6304. This may be helpful in identifying when a GPS location should be updated and hence updating the position of the virtual marker in the FOV. This may also be helpful in assessing the validity of the GPS location. For example, if the GPS location has not updated but there is significant IMU sensor activity, the system may call into question the accuracy of the identified location. The IMU information may also be useful to help track the position of a member in the event the GPS information is unavailable. For example, dead reckoning may be used if the GPS signal is lost and the virtual marker in the FOV may indicate both indicated movements of the team member and indicate that the location identification is not ideal. The current tactical plan 6308 may be updated periodically and the updated plans may further refine what is

presented in the FOV of the HWC 102.

[000413] Figure 64 illustrates a BlueForce tracking system in accordance with the principles of the present invention. In embodiments, the BlueForce HWC's 102 may have directional antenna's that emit relatively low power directional RF signals such that other BlueForce members within the range of the relatively low power signal can receive and assess it's direction and/or distance based on the strength and varying strength of the signals. In embodiments, the tracking of such RF signals can be used to alter the presentation of the virtual markers of persons locations within the FOV of HWC 102.

[000414] Another aspect of the present invention relates to monitoring the health of BlueForce members. Each BlueForce member may be automatically

monitored for health and stress events. For example, the members may have a watchband as described herein elsewhere or other wearable biometric monitoring device and the device may continually monitor the biometric information and predict health concerns or stress events. As another example, the eye imaging systems described herein elsewhere may be used to monitor pupil dilatations as compared to normal conditions to predict head trauma. Each eye may be imaged to check for differences in pupil dilation for indications of head trauma. As another example, an IMU in the HWC 102 may monitor a person's walking gate looking for changes in pattern, which may be an indication of head or other trauma. Biometric feedback from a member indicative of a health or stress concern may be uploaded to a server for sharing with other members or the information may be shared with local members, for example. Once shared, the digital content in the FOF that indicates the location of the person having the health or stress event may include an indication of the health event. [000415] Figure 65 illustrates a situation where the primary BlueForce member 6502 is monitoring the location of the BlueForce member 6504 that has had a heath event and caused a health alert to be transmitted from the HWC 102. As described herein elsewhere, the FOV of the HWC 102 of the primary BlueForce member may include an indication of the location of the BlueForce member with the health concern 6504. The digital content in the FOV may also include an indication of the health condition in association with the location indication. In embodiments, non- biometric sensors (e.g. IMU, camera, ranger finder, accelerometer, altimeter, etc.) may be used to provide health and/or situational conditions to the BlueForce team or other local or remote persons interested in the information. For example, if one of the BlueForce members is detected as quickly hitting the ground from a standing position an alter may be sent as an indication of a fall, the person is in trouble and had to drop down, was shot, etc.

[000416] Another aspect of the present invention relates to virtually marking various prior acts and events. For example, as depicted in figure 66, the techniques described herein elsewhere may be used to construct a virtual prior movement path 6604 of a BlueForce member. The virtual path may be displayed as digital content in the FOV of the primary BlueForce member 6602 using methods described herein elsewhere. As the BlueForce member moved along the path 6604 he may have virtually placed an event marker 6608 such that when another member views the location the mark can be displayed as digital content. For example, the BlueForce member may inspect and clear an area and then use an external user interface or gesture to indicate that the area has been cleared and then the location would be virtually marked and shared with BlueForce members. Then, when someone wants to understand if the location was inspected he can view the location's information. As indicated herein elsewhere, if the location is visible to the member, the digital content may be displayed in a way that indicates the specific location and if the location is not visible from the person's perspective, the digital content may be somewhat different in that it may not specifically mark the location.

[000417] Turning back to optical configurations, another aspect of the present invention relates to an optical configuration that provides digitally displayed content to an eye of a person wearing a head-worn display (e.g. as used in a HWC 102) and allows the person to see through the display such that the digital content is perceived by the person as augmenting the see through view of the surrounding environment. The optical configuration may have a variable transmission optical element that is in-line with the person's see-through view such that the transmission of the see-through view can be increased and decreased. This may be helpful in situations where a person wants or would be better served with a high transmission see-through view and when, in the same HWC 102, the person wants or would be better served with less see-through transmission. The lower see-through transmission may be used in bright conditions and/or in conditions where higher contrast for the digitally presented content is desirable. The optical system may also have a camera that images the surrounding environment by receiving reflected light from the surrounding

environment off of an optical element that is in-line with the person's see-through view of the surrounding. In embodiments, the camera may further be aligned in a dark light trap such that light reflected and/or transmitted in the direction of the camera that is not captured by the camera is trapped to reduce stray light.

[000418] In embodiments, a HWC 102 is provided that includes a camera that is coaxially aligned with the direction that the user is looking. Figure 67 shows an illustration of an optical system 6715 that includes an absorptive polarizer 6737 and a camera 6739. The image source 6710 can include light sources, displays and reflective surfaces as well as one or more lenses 6720. Image light 6750 is provided by the image source 6710 wherein, a portion of the image light 6750 is reflected toward the user's eye 6730 by a partially reflective combiner 6735. At the same time, a portion of the image light 6750 may be transmitted by the combiner 6735 such that it is incident onto the absorptive polarizer 6737. In this embodiment, the image light 6750 is polarized light with the polarization state of the image light 6750 oriented relative to the transmission axis of the absorptive polarizer 6737 such that the incident image light 6750 is absorbed by the absorptive polarizer 6737. In this way, faceglow produced by escaping image light 6750 is reduced. In embodiments, the absorptive polarizer 6737 includes an antireflection coating to reduce reflections from the surface of the absorptive polarizer 6737.

[000419] Figure 67 further shows a camera 6739 for capturing images of the environment in the direction that the user is looking. The camera 6739 is positioned behind the absorptive polarizer 6737 and below the combiner 6735 so that a portion of light from the environment 6770 is reflected by the combiner 6735 toward the camera 6739. Light from the environment 6770 can be unpolarized so that a portion of the light from the environment 6770 that is reflected by the combiner 6735 passes through the absorptive polarizer 6737 and it is this light that is captured by the camera 6739. As a result, the light captured by the camera will have a polarization state that is opposite that of the image light 6750. In addition, the camera 6739 is aligned relative to the combiner 6735 such that the field of view associated with the camera 6739 is coaxial to the display field of view provided by image light 6750. At the same time, a portion of scene light 6760 from the environment is transmitted by the combiner 6735 to provide a see-through view of the environment to the user's eye 6730. Where the display field of view associated with the image light 6750 is typically coincident to the see-through field of view associated with the scene light 6760 and thereby the see through field of view and the field of view of the camera 6739 are at least partially coaxial. By attaching the camera 6739 to the lower portion of the optical system 6715, the field of view of the camera 6739 as shown by the light from the environment 6770 moves as the user moves their head so that images captured by the camera 6739 correspond to the area of the environment that the user is looking at. By coaxially aligning the camera field of view with the displayed image and the user's view of the scene, augmented reality images with improved alignment to objects in the scene can be provided. This is because the captured images from the camera 6739 provide an accurate representation of the user's perspective view of the scene. As an example, when the user sees an object in the scene as being located in the middle of the see-through view of the HWC, the object will be located in the middle of the image captured by the camera and any augmented reality imagery that is to be associated with the object can be located in the middle of the displayed image. As the user moves their head, the relative position of the object as seen in the see-through view of the scene will change and the position of the augmented reality imagery can be changed within the displayed image in a

corresponding manner. When a camera 6739 is provided for each of the user's eyes, an accurate representation of the 3D view of the scene can be provided as well. This is an important advantage provided by the invention because images captured by a camera located in the frame of the HWC (e.g. between the eyes or at the corners) capture images that are laterally offset from the user's perspective of the scene and as a result it is difficult to align augmented reality images with objects in the scene as seen from the user's perspective. [000420] In the optical system 6715 shown in Figure 67, the absorptive polarizer 6737 simultaneously functions as a light trap for escaping image light 6750, a light blocker of the image light 6750 for the camera 6739 and a window for light from the environment 6770 to the camera 6739. This is possible because the polarization state of the image light 6750 is perpendicular to the transmission axis of the absorptive polarizer 6737 while the light from the environment 6770 is unpolarized so that a portion of the light from the environment 6770 that is the opposite polarization state to the image light is transmitted by the absorptive polarizer 6737. The combiner 6735 can be any partially reflective surface including a simple partial mirror, a notch mirror and a holographic mirror. The reflectivity of the combiner 6735 can be selected to be greater than 50% (e.g. 55% reflectivity and 45% transmission over the visible wavelength spectral band) whereby a majority of the image light 6750 will be reflected toward the user's eye 6730 and a majority of light from the environment 6770 will be reflected toward the camera 6739, this system will provide a brighter displayed image, a brighter captured image with a dimmer see-through view of the environment. Alternatively, the reflectivity of the combiner 6735 can be selected to be less than 50% (e.g. 20%

reflectivity and 80% transmission over the visible wavelength spectral band) whereby the majority of the image light 6750 will be transmitted by the combiner 6735 and a majority of light from the environment 6770 will be transmitted to the user's eye 6730, this system will provide a brighter see-through view of the environment, while providing a dimmer displayed image and a dimmer captured image. As such, the system can be designed to favor the anticipated use by the user.

[000421] In embodiments, the combiner 6735 is planar with an optical flatness that is sufficient to enable a sharp displayed image and a sharp captured image, such as a flatness of less than 20 waves of light within the visible wavelengths. However, in embodiments, the combiner 6735 may be curved in which case the displayed image and the captured image will both be distorted and this distortion will have to be digitally corrected by the associated image processing system. In the case of the displayed image, the image is digitally distorted by the image processing system in a direction that is opposite to the distortion that is caused by the curved combiner so the two distortions cancel one another and as a result the user sees an undistorted displayed image. In the case of the captured image, the captured image is digitally distorted after capture to cancel out the distortion caused by the curved combiner so that the image appears to be undistorted after image processing.

[000422] In embodiments, the combiner 6735 is an adjustable partial mirror in which the reflectivity can be changed by the user or automatically to better function within different environmental conditions or different use cases. The adjustable partial mirror can be an electrically controllable mirror such as for example, the e-Transflector that can be obtained from Kent Optronics

(http://www.kentoptronics.com/mirror.html) where the reflectivity can be adjusted based on an applied voltage. The adjustable partial mirror can also be a fast switchable mirror (e.g. a switching time of less than 0.03 seconds) wherein the perceived transparency is derived from the duty cycle of the mirror rapidly switching between a reflecting state and a transmitting state. In embodiments, the images captured by the camera 6739 can be synchronized to occur when the fast switchable mirror is in the reflecting state to provide an increased amount of light to the camera 6739 during image capture. As such, an adjustable partial mirror allows for the transmissivity of the partial mirror to be changed corresponding to the environmental conditions, e.g. the transmissivity can be low when the environment is bright and the transmissivity can be high when the environment is dim.

[000423] In a further embodiment, the combiner 6735 includes a hot mirror coating on the side facing the camera 6739 wherein visible wavelength light is substantially transmitted while a spectral wavelength band of infrared light is substantially reflected and the camera 6739 captures images that include at least a portion of the infrared wavelength light. In these embodiments, the image light 6750 includes visible wavelength light and a portion of the visible wavelength light is transmitted by the combiner 6735, where it is then absorbed by the absorptive polarizer 6737. A portion of the scene light 6760 is comprised of visible wavelength light and this is also transmitted by the combiner 6735, to provide the user with a see- through view of the environment. The light from the environment 6770 is comprised of visible wavelength light and infrared wavelength light. A portion of the visible wavelength light along with substantially all of the infrared wavelength light within the spectral wavelength band associated with the hot mirror, is reflected by the combiner 6735 toward the camera 6739 thereby passing through the absorptive polarizer 6737. In embodiments, the camera 6739 is selected to include an image sensor that is sensitive to infrared wavelengths of light and the absorptive polarizer 6737 is selected to substantially transmit infrared wavelengths of light of both polarization states (e.g. ITOS XP44 polarizer which transmits both polarization states of light with wavelengths above 750nm: see http://www.itos. de/english/polarisatoren/linear/linear.php)so that an increased % of infrared light is captured by the camera 6739. In these embodiments, the absorptive polarizer 6737 functions as a light trap for the escaping image light 6750 and thereby blocking the image light 6750 that is in the visible wavelengths from the camera 6739 while simultaneously acting as a window for infrared wavelength light from the environment 6770 for the camera 6739.

[000424] By coaxially aligning the camera field of view with the displayed image and the user's view of the scene, augmented reality images with improved alignment to objects in the scene can be provided. This is because the captured images from the camera provide an accurate representation of the user's perspective view of the scene. In embodiments, the camera that is coaxially aligned with the user's view captures an image of the scene, the processor then identifies an object in the captured image and identifies a field of view position for the object, which can be compared to the displayed field of view correlated position so digital content is then displayed relative to the position of the object.

[000425] Another aspect of the present invention relates to an optical assembly that uses a reflective display where the reflective display is illuminated with a front light arranged to direct the illumination at angles around 90 degrees from the active reflective surface of the reflective display. In embodiments, the optical configuration is light weight, small and produces a high quality image in a head-worn see-through display.

[000426] Figure 68 provides a cross sectional illustration of the compact optical display assembly for a HWC 102 according to principles of the present invention along with illustrative light rays to show how the light passes through the assembly. The display assembly is comprised of upper optics and lower optics. The upper optics include a reflective image source 6810, a quarter wave film 6815, a field lens 6820, a reflective polarizer 6830 and a polarized light source 6850. The upper optics convert illumination light 6837 into image light 6835. The lower optics comprise a beam splitter plate 6870 and a rotationally curved partial mirror 6860. The lower optics deliver the image light to a user who is wearing the HWC 102. The compact optical display assembly provides the user with image light 6835 that conveys a displayed image along with scene light 6865 that provides a see-through view of the environment so that user sees the displayed image overlaid onto the view of the environment.

[000427] In the upper optics, linearly polarized light is provided by the polarized light source 6850. Where the polarized light source 6850 can include one or more lights such as LEDs, QLEDs, laser diodes, fluorescent lights, etc. The polarized light source 6850 can also include a backlight assembly with light scattering surfaces or diffusers to spread the light uniformly across the output area of the polarized light source. Light control films or light control structures can be included as well to control the distribution of the light (also known as the cone angle) that is provided by the polarized light source 6850. The light control films can include, for example, diffusers, elliptical diffusers, prism films and lenticular lens arrays. The light control structures can include prism arrays, lenticular lenses, cylindrical lenses, Fresnel lenses, refractive lenses, diffractive lenses or other structures that control the angular distribution of the illumination light 6837. The output surface of the polarized light source 6850 is a polarizer film to ensure that the illumination light 6837 provided to the upper optics is linearly polarized.

[000428] The illumination light 6837 provided by the polarized light source 6850 is reflected by a reflective polarizer 6830. Where the polarizer on the output surface of the polarized light source 6850 and the reflective polarizer 6830 are oriented so that their respective transmission axes are perpendicular to one another. As a result, the majority of the illumination light 6837 provided by the polarized light source 6850 is reflected by the reflective polarizer 6830. In addition, the reflective polarizer 6830 is angled so that the illumination light 6837 is reflected toward the reflective image source 6810 thereby illuminating the reflective image source 6810 as shown in Figure 68.

[000429] The illumination light 6837 passes through a field lens 6820 and is then incident onto the reflective image source 6810. The illumination light 6837 is then reflected by the reflective image source (otherwise referred to as a reflective display herein elsewhere) 6810. Wherein the reflective image source 6810 can comprise a liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) display, a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon (FLCSO) display, a reflective liquid crystal display, a cholesteric liquid crystal display, a bistable nematic liquid crystal display, or other such reflective display. The display can be a monochrome reflective display that is used with sequential red/green/blue illumination light 6837 or a full color display that is used with white illumination light 6837. The reflective image source 6810 locally changes the polarization state of the illumination light 6837 in correspondence to the pixel by pixel image content that is displayed by the reflective image source 6810 thereby forming image light 6835. Wherein if the reflective image source 6810 is a normally white display, the areas of the image light 6835 that correspond to bright areas of the image content end up with a polarization state that is opposite to the polarization state of the illumination light and dark areas of the image light 6835 end up with a polarization state that is the same as the illumination light 6837 (it should be noted that the invention can be used with normally black displays which provide an opposite effect on polarization in the image light). As such, the image light 6835 as initially reflected by the reflective image source 6810 has a mixed polarization state pixel by pixel. The image light 6835 then passes through the field lens 6820 which modifies the distribution of the image light 6835 while preserving the wavefront to match the requirements (such as for example, magnification and focus) of the lower optics. As the image light 6835 passes through the reflective polarizer 6830, the bright areas of the image light 6835 that have a polarization state that is opposite to the illumination light 6837 are transmitted through the reflective polarizer 6830 and the dark areas of the image light 6835 that have the same polarization state as the illumination light 6837 are reflected back toward the polarized light source 6850, as a result, the image light 6835 after passing through the reflective polarizer 6830 is linearly polarized with a single polarization state in all the pixels of the image but now with different intensities pixel by pixel. Thus the reflective polarizer 6830 acts first as a reflector for the illumination light 6837 and then second as an analyzer polarizer for the image light 6835.

[000430] As such, the optical axis of the illumination light 6837 is coincident with the optical axis of the image light 6835 between the reflective polarizer 6830 and the reflective image source 6810. The illumination light 6837 and the image light

[000431] 6835 both pass through the field lens 6820, but in opposite directions. Wherein the field lens acts to expand the illumination light 6837 so it illuminates the entire active area of the reflective image source 6810 and also to expand the image light 6835 so it fills the eyebox 6882 after passing through the rest of the compact optical display system. By overlapping the portion of the compact optical display assembly associated with the illumination light 6837 with the portion of the compact optical display assembly associated with the image light 6835, the overall size of the compact optical display assembly is reduced. Given that the focal length associated with the field lens 6820 requires some space in the compact optical display assembly, the reflective polarizer 6830 and the polarized light source 6850 are located in space that would otherwise be unused so the overall size of the display assembly is more compact.

[000432] The reflective polarizer 6830 can be a relatively thin film (e.g. 80 microns) or thin plate (e.g. 0.2mm) as shown in Figure 68. The reflective polarizer 6830 can be a wiregrid polarizer such as is available from Asahi Kasei under the name WGF, or a multilayer dielectric film polarizer such as is available from 3M under the name DBEF. As previously described, the reflective polarizer 6830 has two functions. First, the reflective polarizer 6830 reflects the illumination light 6837 provided by the polarized light source 6850 and redirects the illumination light 6837 toward the reflective image source 6810. Second, the reflective polarizer 6830 acts as an analyzer polarizer to the image light 6835 thereby converting the mixed polarization state of the image light 6835 above the reflective polarizer 6830 to linearly polarized light with a single polarization state below the reflective polarizer 6830. While the illumination light 6837 incident on the reflective polarizer 6830 is incident on a relatively small portion of the reflective polarizer 6830, the image light 6835 is incident on the majority of the area of the reflective polarizer 6830. Consequently, the reflective polarizer 6830 extends at least across the entire area of the field lens 6820 and may extend across the entire area between the field lens 6820 and the beam splitter 6870 as shown in Figure 68. In addition, the reflective polarizer 6830 is angled at least in the portion where the illumination light 6837 is incident to redirect the illumination light 6837 toward the reflective image source 6810. However, since reflective polarizers (such as a wiregrid polarizer) can be relatively insensitive to the incident angle, in a preferred embodiment, the reflective polarizer 6830 is a flat surface angled to redirect the illumination light 6837 toward the reflective image source 6810 wherein the flat surface extends substantially across the entire area between the field lens 6820 and the beam splitter 6870 in one continuously flat surface to make manufacturing easier. The thin film or thin plate of the reflective polarizer 6870 can be retained at the edges to position it at the desired angle and to make the surface flat. [000433] The systems and methods described herein with respect to figures 68 through 71 have a number of advantages. By avoiding grazing angles of the illumination light 6837 and the image light 6835 at all the surfaces in the compact optical display assembly, scattering of light in the assembly is reduced and as a result the contrast of the image presented to the user's eye 6880 is higher with blacker blacks. In addition, the reflective image source 6810 can include a compensating retarder film 6815 as is known to those skilled in the art, to enable the reflective image source 6810 to provide a higher contrast image with more uniform contrast over the area of the displayed image. Further, by providing an optical display assembly that is largely comprised of air, the weight of the compact optical display assembly is substantially reduced. By using coincident optical axes for the illumination light 6837 and the image light 6835 and overlapping the illumination light 6837 and image light 6835 for a substantial portion of the optical display assembly, the overall size of the compact optical display assembly is reduced. Where the coincident optical axes are provided by passing the illumination light 6837 and the image light 6835 in opposite directions through the field lens 6820. To maintain a uniform polarization state for the

illumination light 6837, the field lens 6820 is made from a low birefringence material such as glass or a plastic such as 0KP4 as available from Osaka Gas Chemicals. By positioning the polarized light source 6850 and the associated illumination light 6837 below the field lens 6820, and by folding the optical path of both the illumination light 6837 at the reflective polarizer 6830 and the image light 6835 at the beam splitter 6870, the overall height of the compact optical display assembly is greatly reduced. For example the overall height of the compact optical display assembly can be less than 24mm as measured from the reflective image source 6810 to the bottom edge of the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860 for a display that provides a 30 degree diagonal field of view with a 6X10mm eyebox.

[000434] In a preferred case, the light control structure in the polarized light source 6850 includes a positive lens, such as for example a positive Fresnel lens, a positive diffractive lens or a positive refractive lens. Wherein a positive Fresnel lens or a positive diffractive lens is preferred because they can be very thin. The illumination light 6837 is thereby focused to form a smaller area or pupil at the reflective polarizer 6830 that has a direct relationship to the area of an eyebox 6882 at the other end of the optics wherein image light 6835 is provided to the user's eye 6880 as shown in Figure 68. Where the positive lens concentrates the illumination light 6837 from the polarized light source 6850 both in terms of intensity and angular distribution to match the etendue of the optical system and thereby fills the eyebox with image light 6835. By using the positive lens to converge the light from the polarized light source 6850 as provided to the reflective polarizer 6830 and then using the field lens 6820 to expand the illumination light 6837 to illuminate the active area of the reflective image source 6810, efficiency is improved since illumination light 6837 is substantially delivered only where needed to form image light 6835. Further, illumination light 6837 outside the pupil can be controlled by the positive lens and clipped by masked edges of the positive lens. By focusing the illumination light 6837 and clipping light outside the pupil, illumination light 6837 is prevented from impinging adjacent surfaces at grazing angles in the compact optical display assembly to reduce scattering of light and thereby increase contrast in the image provided to the user's eye 6880 by providing blacker blacks.

[000435] It should be noted that while Figure 68, 69 and 70 show optical layouts wherein the illumination light 6837 is provided from behind the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860, other optical layouts are possible within the invention. The location of the polarized light source 6850 can be changed for example to be at the side of the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860 wherein the reflective polarizer 6830 is oriented to receive the illumination light 6837 from the side. And reflect it toward the reflective image source 6810 (not shown).

[000436] In a further embodiment, the portion of the image light 6835 that is reflected back toward the polarized light source 6850 is recycled in the polarized light source 6850 to increase the efficiency of the polarized light source 6850. In this case, a diffuser and a reflective surface is provided behind the polarized light source 6850 so the polarization of the light is scrambled and reflected back toward the reflective polarizer 6830.

[000437] In yet another embodiment, another reflective polarizer is provided in the polarized light source 6850 and behind the linear polarizer previously disclosed. Wherein the respective transmission axes of the reflective polarizer and the linear polarizer are parallel to one another. The other reflective polarizer then reflects the light back into the backlight that has the polarization state that would not be transmitted by the linear polarizer. The light that is reflected back into the backlight passes through diffusers associated with the polarized light source 6850 where the polarization state is scrambled and reemitted thereby recycling the light and increasing efficiency.

[000438] In another embodiment, the system according to the principles of the present invention includes an eye imaging system. Figure 69 is an illustration of a compact optical display assembly, which includes an eye imaging camera 6992 that captures an image of the user's eye 6880 that is coaxial with the displayed image provided to the user so that a full image of the user's iris can be reliably captured. The eye imaging camera 6992 is reflected into the lower optics by a reflective polarizer 6930 that includes a notch mirror coating, facing the eye imaging camera 6992, that reflects the wavelengths of light that are captured by the eye imaging camera 6992 (e.g. near infrared wavelengths) while transmitting wavelengths associated with the image light 6835 (e.g. visible wavelengths). Eye light rays 6995 shown in Figure 69 illustrate how the field of view associated with the eye imaging camera 6992 is a relatively narrow field of view because it is multiply reflected through the lower optics to capture an image of the user's eye 6880. However, to enable the eye imaging camera 6992 to focus onto the user's eye 6880, the eye imaging camera 6992 needs to have a very near focus distance (e.g. 35mm). In addition, the field of view and focus distance of the eye imaging camera must take into account the reducing effect of the optical power provided by the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860. To increase the efficiency of capturing the light reflected from the user's eye 6880 and thereby enable a brighter image of the eye, the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860 can be coated with a partial mirror coating that acts as a full mirror in the wavelengths being captured by the eye imaging camera 6992, for example the coating can reflect 50% of visible light associated with the image light and 90% of near infrared light associated with the eye light 6995. Where the reflections and associated changes in polarization state are similar to those associated with the image light 6835 but in the opposite order since the eye light rays 6995 are coming from the user's eye 6880. LEDs or other miniature lights are provided adjacent to the user's eye 6880 to illuminate the user's eye 6880 wherein the wavelengths associated with the LED's or other miniature lights are different than the wavelengths associated with the image light 6835 such as for example near infrared wavelengths (e.g. 850nm, 940nm or 1050nm). Alternatively, the image light 6835 is used to illuminate the user's eye 6880 and a reflective polarizer 6930 with a low extinction ratio in reflection (e.g. reflective extinction ratio < 15) is used so that some of the eye light rays are reflected toward the eye imaging camera 6992.

[000439] In an alternative embodiment, the reflective and partially reflective surfaces can extend laterally to the sides of the areas used for displaying an image to the user.. In this case, the eye imaging camera can be located adjacent to the field lens and pointed in a direction to image the user's eye after reflecting from the beam splitter and the rotationally curved partial mirror as shown in Figure 70. Where Figure 70 is an illustration that shows an eye imaging camera 7092 positioned to the side of the field lens 6820 and reflective polarizer 6830. The eye imaging camera 7092 is pointed such that the field of view captured by the eye imaging camera 7092 includes the user's eye 6880 as illustrated by the eye light rays 7095. The quarter wave film 6890 is also extended laterally to change the polarization state of the eye light 7095 in the same way that the polarization state of the image light is changed so that the eye light passes through the beam splitter 6870 and quarter wave 6890, is partially reflected by the rotationally curved partial mirror 6860 and is then reflected by the beam splitter 6870 and is then captured by the eye imaging camera 7092. By positioning the eye imaging camera 7092 to the side of the field lens 6820 and reflective polarizer 6830, the complexity of the optics associated with displaying an image to the user is reduced. In addition, the space available for the eye imaging camera 7092 is increased since interferences with the display optics are reduced. By positioning the eye imaging camera 7092 adjacent to the display optics, the eye image is captured nearly coaxially with the displayed image.

[000440] In a yet another embodiment, the systems according to the principles of the present invention include a field lens with an internal reflective polarizer and one or more surfaces with optical power. Figure 71 is an illustration of the upper optics including a field lens 7121 comprised of upper prism 7122 and lower prism 7123. The upper prism 7122 and the lower prism 7123 can be molded to shape or grind and polished. A reflective polarizer 7124 is interposed on the flat surface between the upper prism 7122 and the lower prism 7123. The reflective polarizer 7124 can be a wiregrid polarizer film or a multilayer dielectric polarizer as previously mentioned. The reflective polarizer 7124 can be bonded into place with a transparent UV curable adhesive that has the same refractive index as the upper prism 7122 or the lower prism 7123. Typically the upper prism 7122 and the lower prism 7123 would have the same refractive index. Wherein upper prism 7122 includes an angled surface for illumination light 6837 to be provided to illuminate the reflective image source 6810. The illumination light is provided by a light source that includes lights such as LEDs, a backlight 7151, a diffuser 7152 and a polarizer 7153 as has been previously described. The lower prism 7123 includes a curved surface on the exit surface for controlling the wavefront of the image light 6835 as supplied to the lower optics. The upper prism may also include a curved surface on the upper surface next to the reflective image source 6810 as shown in Figure 71 for manipulating the chief ray angles of the light at the surface of the reflective image source 6810. Illumination light 6837 is polarized by the polarizer 7153 prior to entering the upper prism 7122. The transmission axes of the polarizer 7153 and the reflective polarizer 7124 are perpendicular to one another so that the illumination light 6837 is reflected by the reflective polarizer 7124 so that the illumination light is redirected toward the reflective image source 6810. The

polarization state of the illumination light 6837 is then changed by the reflective image source 6810 in correspondence with the image content to be displayed as previously described and the resulting image light 6835 then passes through the reflective polarizer 7124 to form the bright and dark areas associated with the image that is displayed to the user's eye 6880.

[000441] In another embodiment, the field lens 7121 of figure 71 comprises a polarizing beam splitter cube including two prisms, upper prism 7122 and lower prism 7123. In this case, the reflective polarizer 7124 is replaced by a coating that is polarization sensitive so that light of one polarization state (typically S polarized light for example) is reflected and light of the other polarization state is transmitted. The illumination light 6837 is then provided with the polarization state that is reflected by the coating and the image light is provided with the polarization state that is

transmitted by the coating. As shown in Figure 71, the beam splitter cube includes one or more curved surfaces in the upper prism 7122 or the lower prism 7123. The beam splitter cube can also include one or more angled surfaces where the illumination light is supplied. The angled surface can include light control structures such as a microlens array to improve the uniformity of the illumination light 6837, or a lenticular array to collimate the illumination light 6837.

[000442] In yet another embodiment, the curved surface(s) or the angled surface(s) illustrated in Figure 71 can be molded onto a rectangularly shaped beam splitter cube by casting a UV curable material (e.g. UV curable acrylic) onto a flat surface of a beam splitter cube, placing a transparent mold with a cavity that has the desired curve onto the flat surface to force the UV curable material into the desired curve and applying UV light to cure the UV curable material. The beam splitter cube can be made of a material that has the same or different refractive index than the UV curable material.

[000443] In a further embodiment, polarization sensitive reflective coatings such as dielectric partial mirror coatings, can be used in place of reflective polarizers or beam splitters as shown in Figure 68. In this case, the reflective films and plates that comprise the reflective polarizers 6830 and beam splitters 6870 include polarization sensitive coatings that substantially reflect light with one polarization state (e.g. S polarization) while substantially transmitting light with the other polarization state (e.g. P polarization). Since the illumination light source includes a polarizer 7153, the illumination light 6837 is one polarization state and it is not important that the reflective polarizer 7124 be sensitive to the polarization state in reflection, the polarization state just needs to be maintained and presented uniformly over the surface of the reflective image source 6810. However, it is important that the reflective polarizer 7124 be highly sensitive to polarization state in transmission (e.g. extinction ratio >200) to be an effective polarizer analyzer and to provide a high contrast image (e.g. contrast ratio > 200) to the user's eye 6880.

[000444] In a further embodiment, the field lens 7121 shown in Figure 71 can comprise a reflective polarizer 7124 with a curved surface (not shown) instead of a flat surface and wherein the reflective polarizer 7124 is not a film and instead is a polarization sensitive coating, a printed wiregrid polarizer or a molded wiregrid pattern that is then metallized. In this case, the upper prism 7122 and the lower prism 7123 are made as a matched pair with mating curved surfaces that together form the surface of the reflective polarizer. Wherein the polarization sensitive coating, the printed wiregrid or the molded wiregrid pattern are applied to the mating curved surface associated either the upper prism 7122 or the lower prism 7123 and a transparent adhesive is applied to the other mating surface to bond the upper prism 7122 and lower prism 7123 together to form the field lens 7121 with an internal curved reflective polarizer 7121. [000445] Another aspect of the present invention relates to manufacturing and providing an optical element for use in a see-through computer display system. In embodiments, a lightweight low-cost and high optical quality optical element.

[000446] In a head mounted display, a beam splitter can be used to direct illuminating light from a light source toward a reflective image source such as an LCOS or a DLP. Where it is desirable to have a low weight beam splitter with a flat partially reflective surface to provide good image quality. The flat partially reflective surface is particularly important when an eye camera is provided for eye imaging that utilizes the flat partially reflective surface for directing the field of view of the eye camera toward the user's eye.

[000447] Systems and methods provide for a lightweight beam splitter comprised of molded plastic elements and an internal plate element to provide a flat partially reflective surface. Together the pieces form a triplet beam splitter optic including two molded elements and a plate element. By providing the plate element internal to the beam splitter, the matching surfaces of the molded elements do not have to be optically flat, instead the plate element provides the flat surface and an index matching material is used to join the plate element to the molded elements. All three elements can be plastic elements to reduce the weight and cost of the lightweight beam splitter. To provide a more uniform refractive effect, the molded elements and the plate element are preferentially made from plastic materials with similar refractive index and have low birefringence.

[000448] Figure 72 shows an illustration of the two molded elements 7210 and 7220. These molded elements are molded with a relatively uniform thickness to provide uniform flow of the plastic material during molding (either injection molding, compression molding or casting) and thereby enable a low birefringence in the elements as molded. To further reduce birefringence in the molded elements as molded, materials with low viscosity and low stress optic coefficients are preferred including: 0KP4 from Osaka Gas Company; Zeonex F52R, K26R or 350R from Zeon Chemical;

PanLite SP3810 from Teijin.

[000449] The molded elements 7210 and 7220 can include flat surfaces and surfaces with optical power, where the surfaces with optical power can include spherical or aspheric curved surfaces, diffractive surfaces or Fresnel surfaces. Flat surfaces, diffractive surfaces or Fresnel surfaces are preferred on the surfaces associated with light that illuminates the image source and flat surfaces, spherical surfaces or aspheric surfaces are preferred on the surfaces associated with image light. Molded element 7210 is shown with a spherical or aspheric surface 7215 and molded element 7220 is shown with a flat surface 7225, however, any of the surfaces shown can be molded as flat surfaces or surfaces with optical power.

[000450] After molding the molded elements 7210 and 7220 are machined to provide matching angled surfaces. Molded element 7210 is shown in Figure 73 where a milling cutter 7328 is shown machining angled surface 7329. Figure 74 shows an illustration of molded elements 7210 and 7220 after they have been machined to respectively provide beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 that are prisms. The angled surface of beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 are machined to have matching angles. Alternatively, beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 can be machined from sheet material or molded pucks. In either case of using machined angled surfaces or molded angled surface in the beam splitter elements, the surfaces will not be optically flat.

[000451] Figure 75 shows an illustration of the assembled triplet beam splitter optic, wherein the beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 have been assembled with a partially reflecting plate element 7560 to form a beam splitter cube. Wherein the beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 are made from either the same material or different materials that have a very similar refractive index (e.g. within 0.05 of each other). An index matching material is used at the interfaces between the beam splitter elements and the plate element. The index matching material can be a fluid, a light curing adhesive, a moisture curing adhesive or a thermally curing adhesive. The index matching material should have a refractive index that is very similar to that of the beam splitter elements (e.g. within 0.1).

[000452] The partially reflective plate element 7560 can be a transparent plate with a partially reflective layer that is either a partially reflective coating or a laminated partially reflective film. The transparent plate is preferably a cast sheet such as cell cast acrylic that has low birefringence, or a molded plaque of a low birefringence material such as 0KP4, Zeonex F52R, Zeonex K26R, Zeonex 350R or PanLite SP3810. In addition, the transparent plate should be optically flat (e.g. within 20 microns over the surface and with a surface finish of less than 15 nanometers), however optically flat surfaces are easily obtained in sheet stock. By using an index matching material at the interfaces between the beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 and the partially reflective plate element 7560, the lack of optical flatness of the surface of the beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 can be filled by the index matching material so that the flatness of the reflective surface is determined by the flatness of the more easily obtained partially reflective plate element 7560 thereby providing a manufacturing advantage. The partially reflective layer can be a partial mirror, a reflective polarizer or a wiregrid polarizer where the reflective polarizer can be a coating or a film and the wiregrid polarizer can be a film or a molded structure that is partially coated with a conductive layer. Where a suitable reflective polarizer film can be obtained from 3M available under the trade name of DBEFQ and a wiregrid polarizer film can be obtained from Asahi-Kasei available under the trade name of WGF. In a preferred embodiment, the transparent plate of the partially reflective plate element 7560 has a refractive index that is very similar (e.g. within 0.1) to the refractive indices of the beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440

[000453] Figure 76 shows an illustration of an optical system for a head mounted display system. The system includes a reflective display as an image source 7667, a light source 7665 that can be a white light source or a sequential color light source as appropriate for the image source 7665. Wherein the light source 7665 provides illumination light 7674 that can be polarized light provided that a quarter wave layer is associated with the image source 7667 or the partially reflecting plate element 7560 so that the polarization of the illumination light 7674 is changed before becoming image light 7672. The illumination light 7674 is reflected by a surface of the partially reflecting plate element 7560, and then reflected by the image source 7667, whereupon it passes through the partially reflective plate element 7560 thereby becoming image light 7672. The image light 7672 is then reflected by a partially reflective combiner 7682 so that the image light is directed toward the user's eye 7680 to display an image to the user while simultaneously providing a see-through view of the environment. In the optical system, an index matching material can be used at the interface between the image source 7665 and the beam splitter element 7440 sop that the surface of the beam splitter element 7440 does not have to be flat. It is

contemplated by the current inventions that the optical system may include additional lenses and other optical structures that are not shown to improve the image quality or change the form factor of the optical system. [000454] In another embodiment, beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440 are molded directly to shape using injection molding or casting. The molded beam splitter elements are then assembled as shown in Figure 75 as described previously herein.

[000455] In further embodiments, surfaces of the beam splitter elements are molded or machined to have additional structures to provide further features. Figure

77 shows an illustration of lightweight beam splitter 7750 that includes an extended partially reflective plate element 7760 and an extended beam splitter element 7740, wherein the partially reflective surface is extended to provide additional area for the illumination light 7674 to be reflected toward the image source 7665. Where having an extended partially reflective surface is particularly useful when the image source 7665 is a DLP and the illumination light 7665 must be delivered at an oblique angle. Figure

78 shows a lightweight beam splitter 7850 that includes an entrance surface 7840 for the illumination light 7674 that is angled so the illumination light 7674 passes substantially perpendicularly through the entrance surface 7840.

[000456] In yet further embodiments, beam splitter element elements 7430 and 7440 are machined from a single molded element. Where the single molded element is designed to provide the desired optical surfaces. For example, the molded element 7210 as shown in Figure 72 has surfaces that could be used for both surface 7215 and 7225. A series of molded elements 7210 could then be molded and some would be used to make machined beam splitter elements 7430 and some for beam splitter elements 7440. A partially reflective plate element 7560 would then be bonded with the beam splitter element 7430 and 7440 using index-matched adhesive as previously described herein. Alternatively, the single molded element 7210 could be designed with extra thickness across the dimension where the partially reflective plate element 7560 will be added, so that a single molded element 7210 could be sawn, machined or laser cut into beam splitter elements 7430 and 7440.

[000457] In another embodiment, a first molded optical element is molded in a geometry that enables improved optical characteristics including: low

birefringence; more accurate replication of the optical surfaces of the mold (reduced power and irregularity deviation). The first molded optical element is then cut to a different shape wherein the cutting process leaves an optically rough surface finish. A second optical element with an optically smooth surface is then bonded to the optically rough surface of the first molded optical element using an index matched adhesive to provide a combined optical element. The index matched adhesive fills in the optically rough surface on the first molded optical element so that the optically rough surface is no longer visible and an optically smooth surface is provided in the combined optical element by the second optical element. The optical characteristics of the combined optical element are improved as compared to a directly molded optical element that has the geometry of the combined optical element. The cut surface can be flat or curved, as long as the cut surface of the first molded optical element is substantially similar to the bonding surface of the second optical element. In addition, both the first molded optical element and the second optical element can provide optical surface with independent optical features such as optical power, wedge, diffraction, grating, dispersion, filtering and reflection. For example, optically flat surfaces can be difficult to mold on plastic lenses. A lens can be molded to provide a spherically curved surface and another surface that is subsequently milled off to provide a flat surface with a rough surface finish. An optically flat sheet can then be bonded to the milled surface using an index matched adhesive to provide a combined optical element with an optically flat surface.

[000458] In yet further embodiments, surfaces of the beam splitter elements include molded or machined structures to collimate, converge, diverge, diffuse, partially absorb, redirect or polarize the illumination light 7674 or the image light 7672. In this way, the number of parts in the lightweight beam splitter is reduced and the cost and manufacturing complexity is reduced.

[000459] The multi-piece lightweight solid optic has been described in connection with certain embodiments; it should be understood that the multi-piece lightweight solid optic may be used in connection with other optical arrangements (e.g. other see-through head-worn display optical configuration described herein elsewhere).

[000460] In embodiments, the invention provides methods for aligning images, along with methods and apparatus for controlling light within the optics of the display assembly associated with a HMD to prevent scattering and also to trap excess light to thereby improve the image quality provided to the user.

[000461] Figure 79a is a schematic illustration of a cross section of a display assembly for a HMD. Wherein, the display assembly includes upper optics 795 and lower optics 797 that operate together to display an image to a user while

simultaneously providing a see-through view of the environment. Aspects of the upper optics 795 will be discussed in more detail herein. The lower optics 797 can comprise optical elements to manipulate image light 7940 from the upper optics 795 and thereby present the image light 7940 to the user's eye 799. Lower optics 797 can comprise one or more lenses 7950 and a combiner 793. The combiner 793 presents the image light 7940 to the user's eye 799 while simultaneously allowing light from the environment 791 to pass through to the user's eye 799 so that the user sees the displayed image overlaid onto a view of the environment.

[000462] Figure 79 is a schematic drawing of a cross section of the upper optics 795 for a HMD. Included are a light source 7910, a partially reflective layer 7930, a reflective image source 7935 and a lens 7950. The light source 7910 provides illumination light 7920 to the HMD. The illumination light 7920 is redirected by the partially reflective layer 7930 to illuminate the reflective image source 7935. The illumination light 7920 is then reflected by the reflective image source 7935 in correspondence with the image content in the displayed image so that it passes through the partially reflective layer 7930 and thereby forms image light 7940. The image light 7940 is optically manipulated by the lens 7950 and other optical elements (not shown) in the lower optics 797 so that a displayed image is provided to a user's eye 799.

Together, the light source 7910, the partially reflective layer 7930 and the reflective image source 7935 form a frontlighted image source. Where, the reflective image source 7935 can comprise a LCOS, a FLCOS, DLP or other reflective display. Figures 79, 80, 82 and 83 are shown with the illumination light 7920 provided so that it is incident on the reflective image source 7935 at an oblique angle as is required for a DLP. Figure 84c, 84d, 85, 86, 87, 88 and 89 are shown with the illumination light 7920 provided perpendicular to the reflective image source 8535 as is required for an LCOS or FLCOS. The principles of the invention described herein apply to any type of reflective image source where stray reduction is needed. The light source 7910 can include light sources such as LEDs, laser diodes or other light sources (e.g. as described herein) along with various light control elements including: diffusers, prismatic films, lenticular films, Fresnel lenses, refractive lenses and polarizers. Polarizers included in the light source 7910 polarize the light exiting the light source 7910 so that the illumination light 7920 is polarized. The partially reflective layer 7930 can be a partial mirror coating on a substrate or it can be a reflective polarizer film such as a wire grid film supplied by Asahi-Kasei under the name WGF or a multilayer polarizer film supplied by 3M under the name DBEF. When the partially reflective layer 7930 is a reflective polarizer, the illumination light 7920 is supplied as polarized light wherein the polarization axis of the illumination light 7920 is oriented relative to the polarization axis of the reflective polarizer so that the illumination light 7920 is substantially reflected. The reflective image source 7935 then includes a quarter wave retarder (e.g. a quarter wave film) so that the polarization state of the illumination light 7920 is reversed in the process of being reflected by the reflective image source 79345. This enables the reflected illumination light 7920 to then be substantially transmitted by the reflective polarizer. After passing through the partially reflective layer 7930, the light becomes image light 7940. The image light 7940 then passes into a lens 7950 which is part of the lower optics 797 or display optics which manipulates the light to provide a displayed image to the user's eye. While the partially reflective layer 7930 is illustrated as a flat surface, the inventors have contemplated that the surface may be curved, shaped, have simple or complex angles, etc. and such surface shapes are encompassed by the principles of the present invention.

[000463] In HMDs that provide images to both eyes of the user, it is desirable to provide the images so that they are aligned to one another. This is particularly important when the images are viewed as stereo images where the perceived alignment of the images seen with each eye is critical to achieving the perception of depth. To provide an accurate alignment of the images, an active alignment of the optics can be performed after the optics have been assembled into a rigid frame of the HMD. Where active alignment includes aligning the images for each eye to one another by moving portions of the display assembly and affixing the portions into position relative to one another. To this end, Figure 79 shows space 7952 that extends around the reflective image source 7935 so that the reflective image source 7935 can be moved laterally and rotationally. The light source 7910 and partially reflective layer 7930 are arranged to illuminate the area that includes the reflective image source 7935 and a portion of the adjacent space 7952. As a result, the reflective image source 7935 can be moved within the space 7952 during the active alignment process without losing illumination or degrading the brightness of the displayed image. Where movements of the reflective image source 7935 during the active alignment can include movements that correspond to horizontal, vertical and rotational movements of the image provided to one eye relative to the image provided to the other eye of the user. The movements can be 0.5mm in size for example when the reflective image source 7935 is approximately 5X8.5mm in size (this equates to approximately 10% of the reflective image source dimension) and as such the space 7952 can be 0.5mm wide or wider.

[000464] However, by including the space 7952, in the illuminated area, visible artifacts can occur due to light scattering or reflecting from the edges of the reflective image source 7935 or from structures adjacent to the space 7952.

Consequently, a mask 8055 is provided that extends from the edge of the active area of the reflective image source 7935 across the space 7952 to cover the edges of the reflective image source 7935 and structures adjacent to the space 7952 as shown in Figure 80. The mask 8055 is black and non-reflecting so that incident illumination light 7920 is absorbed. In addition the mask 8055 is designed to not interfere with the movements of the reflective image source 7935 that occur during active alignment. To this end, the mask 8055 can be stiff (e.g. a black plastic or a black coated metal) and designed to slide under the adjacent structures such as the light source 7910, the edge of the partially reflective layer 7930 and the sides of the housing that contain the frontlight. Alternatively, the mask 8055 can be flexible (e.g. a black plastic film or a black rubber film or tape) so that it deforms when it contacts the adjacent structures. Figure 81a shows an illustration of the reflective image source 7935, the light source 7910 and the space 7952 as viewed from above. As is typically found with image source of all kinds, there is a mask 8168 applied to the surface of the image source that surrounds the active area 8165, however this mask 8168 does not cover the space 7952. Figure 81b shows a further illustration of the system shown in Figure 81a wherein the mask 8055 is applied to the reflective image source 7935 so that it attaches within the mask 8168 in a way that covers the space 7952 and does not block the active area 8165.

[000465] In another embodiment, the image produced by the image source does not use all of the active display area of the image source so there is room to shift the image in an x and/or y perspective within the active display area for alignment of the content. For example, if a misalignment is observed (as indicated above) rather than physically moving the image source, or in addition to moving the image source, the image is digitally shifted in the x and/or y direction to create better combined content alignment. The originally inactive display area around the content may be referred to as a content shift buffer zone. [000466] In a further embodiment for aligning images in a HMD with see- through, a first image containing features is provided to one eye of the user using a display assembly similar to that shown in Figure 79a or Figure 85. A second image containing features in the same locations is provided to the other eye of the user. The position of at least one of the image sources is then moved within the space provided for adjustment to align the first image to the second image as seen by the user's eyes. This image alignment can also be done using cameras in place of the user's eyes.

[000467] In the case where the first and second images are smaller in size than the active area of the reflective image source, thereby leaving a digital space adjacent to the images that can be used for digital shifting of the images for further alignment adjustment. This adjustment can be used in combination with physical movements of the reflective image sources to align the first image to the second image.

[000468] Figure 82 is an illustration of upper optics 825 that includes the elements of upper optics 795 with the addition of a trim polarizer 8260. Where the polarization axis of the trim polarizer 8260 is oriented so the image light 7940 is transmitted to the lower optics (not shown). Light that has the opposite polarization state compared to the image light 7940 is absorbed by the trim polarizer 8260. As such, light that is scattered from surfaces such as the walls of the housing 8262 that typically has a mixed polarization state will be partially absorbed by the trim polarizer 8260. The trim polarizer 8260 can also absorb a portion of colored light caused by

birefringence in the lens 7950 provided the trim polarizer 8260 is located after the lens 7950. In this case, the trim polarizer 8260 absorbs the light that has the opposite polarization state caused by the birefringence and transmits the light that has the polarization state of the image light 7940 prior to the lens 7950. In some cases, it is advantageous to change the polarization state of the image light 7940 to improve the reflection of the image light 7940 from the combiner 793 so that a half wave retarder is needed in addition to the trim polarizer 8260. For proper operation, the half wave retarder is positioned with it's fast axis oriented at 45 degrees to the transmission axis of the trim polarizer 8260. In this case, it is advantageous to position the half wave retarder (not shown) below the trim polarizer 8260 so that the trim polarizer can absorb any elliptical polarization that may be present due to birefringence in the lens 7950 before the image light is acted upon by the half wave retarder. In this way, any variation in retardation with wavelength that may be present in the half wave retarder will not act to increase the elliptical polarization or act to increase color artifacts in the image light 7940 caused by birefringence in the lens 7950. In an example, the trim polarizer can be a polarizer film that is laminated to a half wave retarder film and antireflection coatings can be applied to the outer surfaces.

[000469] In Figure 83, the partially reflective layer 8330 is a laminated multiple polarizer film comprised of a reflective polarizer film 8332 laminated to an absorptive polarizer film 8331. Where, the reflective polarizer film 8332 is only big enough to reflect the illumination light 7920 that illuminates the active area 8165 of the reflective image source 7935. The absorptive polarizer film 8331 is larger than the reflective polarizer film 8332 and extends across the entire aperture between the reflective image source 7935 and the lens 7950, so that no edges of the absorptive polarizer film 8331 are visible and all the light reflected from the reflective image source 7935 passes through the absorptive polarizer 8331. For the case when the reflective image source 7935 is an LCOS, the absorptive polarizer 8331 acts as an analyzer polarizer to only allow the polarization state of the image light to be transmitted. As such, the reflective polarizer film 8332 only covers a portion of the absorptive polarizer film 8331. The polarization axes of the reflective polarizer film 8332 and the absorptive polarizer film 8331 are aligned so that polarized light that is transmitted by the reflective polarizer film 8332 is also transmitted by the absorptive polarizer film 8331. In contrast, polarized light that is reflected by the reflective polarizer film 8332 is absorbed by the absorptive polarizer film 8331. Thereby, illumination light 7920 that is incident onto the reflective polarizer film 8332 is reflected toward the reflective image source 7935 where the polarization state is reversed so that it is transmitted by the reflective polarizer film 8332 and the absorptive polarizer film 8331 as it becomes image light 7940. At the same time, illumination light 7920 that is incident onto the absorptive polarizer film 8331 in the area surrounding the reflective polarizer film 8332 is absorbed by the absorptive polarizer film 8331. By absorbing this excess illumination light 7920, that would not illuminate the active area 8165 of the reflective image source 7935, stray light is reduced within the display assembly and the contrast in the image presented to the user's eye is increased as a result. By aligning the polarization axes of the reflective polarizer film 8332 and the absorptive polarizer film 8331, the transmission is only reduced by approximately 12%, in the regions that include both reflective polarizer film 8332 and absorptive polarizer film 8331 compared to the regions that include just absorptive polarizer film 8331. Given the location of the partially reflective layer 8330 in the optical system and the fact that it is remote from the reflective image source 7935, having local differences in transmission on the partially reflective layer 8330 comprised of a laminated multiple polarizer will have a very small effect on the brightness uniformity in the image provided to the user's eye. In addition, the fact that the partially reflective layer 8330 is remote from the reflective image source 8330 makes the edges of the reflective polarizer film 8332 indistinct as seen by the user.

[000470] Figures 84a and 84b show illustrations of examples of partially reflective layers 8330, comprised of a reflective polarizer film 8430 and 8431 laminated to an absorptive polarizer film 8432. The reflective polarizer films 8430 and 8431 are cut to a shape that covers only the area where illumination light 7920 will be reflected to illuminate the active area 8165 of the reflective image source 7935. The shape required for the reflective polarizer film will vary depending on the type of frontlight. For the frontlight shown in Figure 83 where the partially reflective layer 8330 is located adjacent to the reflective image source 7935, the shape of the reflective polarizer film 8431 will be rectangular or oval such as shown in Figure 84b. For the frontlight included in the display assembly shown in Figure 85 where the lens 8550 is located between the partially reflective layer 8530 and the reflective image source 8535, the influence of the illumination light 8520 passing through the lens 8550 changes the distribution of illumination light 8520 needed from the light source 8510. As a result, the illumination light 8520 can cover only a portion of the partially reflective layer 8530 and the use of a laminated multiple polarizer is advantageous. In embodiments, the reflective polarizer film can cover less than 80% of the area of the absorptive polarizer film in the laminated partially reflective layer. In further embodiments, the reflective polarizer film can cover less than 50% of the area of the absorptive polarizer film in the laminated partially reflective layer. In this case, the partially reflective layer 8530 can include a reflective polarizer film 8430 with a shape similar to that shown in Figure 84a. In any case, the shape of the reflective polarizer film is selected in concert with the optical elements in the frontlight and display optics associated with the display assembly of the HMD.

[000471] Figure 84c shows an example illustration of a frontlight for a display assembly similar to that shown in Figure 85 wherein a laminated multiple polarizer film 8436 is shown with a complex curved shape that resembles an S with a central flat portion and curved ends. The laminated multiple polarizer 8436 includes a reflective polarizer film 8438 and an absorptive polarizer film 8437. Illumination light

8520 includes rays 8522 that are incident on the reflective polarizer film 8438 and rays

8521 that are incident on the absorptive polarizer film 8437. Due to the alignment of the polarization of the illumination light 8520 to the polarization axes of the reflective polarizer film 8438 and the absorptive polarizer film 8437 as previously described herein, rays 8522 are reflected by the reflective polarizer film 8438 and rays 8521 are absorbed by the absorptive polarizer film 8437. In this way, rays 8521 are prevented from contributing to stray light. It is beneficial to absorb rays 8521 since they cannot contribute to image light 8540 because if they were reflected by the laminated multiple polarizer 8436 they would be incident on the reflective image source 8535 outside of the active area 8165, and if they were transmitted by the laminated multiple polarizer 8436, they would be incident on the housing sidewalls 8262. Consequently, by absorbing rays 8521, the laminated multiple polarizer 8436 reduces stray light and thereby increases the contrast in the image displayed to the user.

[000472] Figure 84d shows a further example illustration of a frontlight for a display assembly similar to that shown in Figure 79 wherein the partially reflective layer 7930 comprises a laminated multiple polarizer film with a curved surface. The laminated polarizer includes an absorptive polarizer film 8442 with a laminated reflective polarizer film 8441. The reflective polarizer film 8441 is positioned in the central portion of the absorptive polarizer film 8442 where the illumination light 7920 is reflected toward the reflective image source 7935. The polarization axes of the reflective polarizer film 8441 and the absorptive polarizer film 8442 are aligned in parallel to each other and perpendicular to the polarization axis of the illumination light 7920 as provided by the polarized light source 7910. The rays 8421 of the illumination light 7920 that are incident on the partially reflective layer 7930 outside of the reflective polarizer film 8441 are absorbed by the absorptive polarizer film 8442. The reflective light source 8535 includes a quarter wave layer 8443 so that the polarization axis of the illuminating light 7920 is changed during the process of being reflected from the reflective image source 8535. As a result, the reflected illumination light 7920 is transmitted by the reflective polarizer film 8441 and the absorptive polarizer film 8442, thereby becoming image light 7940. By absorbing the rays 8421, before they are incident on external surfaces such housing walls or other optical surfaces, stray light is reduced and as a result the contrast in the image provided to the user's eye is increased. It should be noted that while Figures 84c and 84d show the reflective polarizer film being positioned to reduce stray light from the left and right sides as shown in the figure, the reflective polarizer can similarly be positioned to reduce stray light in the direction in and out of the paper as shown in the figure. Figures 84a and 84b show reflective polarizer films 8430 and 8431 positioned in a center portion of the absorptive polarizer 8432 so that stray light can be reduced in all directions. An important aspect of the invention is that this stray light reduction is obtained without a reduction in the brightness of the image provided to the user's eye since the reflective polarizer films 8430 and 8431 reflect illumination light over the entire area that is needed to fully illuminate the reflective image source.

[000473] Figure 85 shows a schematic illustration of a display assembly for a HMD wherein the optical elements of the frontlight are overlapped with the display optics, as the lens 8550 is located between the partially reflective layer 8530 and the reflective image source 8535. The display assembly is then comprised of upper optics and lower optics. The upper optics include a reflective image source 8535, a lens 8550, a partially reflective layer 8530 and a light source 8510. The upper optics convert illumination light 8520 into image light 8540. As shown, the lower optics comprise a beam splitter plate 8580, a quarter wave film 8575 and a rotationally curved partial mirror 8570 (lower optics similar to those shown in Figure 79a are also possible). The lower optics deliver the image light 8540 to a user's eye 8582. As previously stated herein, the display assembly provides the user with image light 8540 that conveys a displayed image along with scene light 8583 that provides a see-through view of the environment so that the user sees the displayed image overlaid onto a view of the environment.

[000474] Figure 85 shows a display assembly wherein the partially reflective layer 8530 is a single flat film. However, it can be advantageous to use a segmented partially reflective layer 8630 such as is shown in Figure 86. In this way, the angle of the central portion 8631 of the partially reflective layer 8630 can be selected to position the light source 8610 differently to reduce the clipping of illumination light 8620 by the lens 8550 or other portions of the supporting structure associated with the display assembly and thereby improve brightness uniformity in the displayed image seen by the user's eye 8582. To this end, a comparison of Figure 85 to Figure 86 shows that by changing the angle of the central portion of the partially reflective film, the position of the light source 8610 is moved downward and the clearance of the illumination light 8620 is increased relative to the lens 8550.

[000475] Segmented partially reflective layers can be used which a variety of geometries and makeups. Figure 86 shows a segmented partially reflective layer 8630 that includes a folded Z shape with three flat sections. Figure 87 shows a segmented partially reflective layer that includes an S shape with a central flat section 8731 and ends that are curved similar to that shown in Figure 84c. The segmented partially reflective layer can comprise a single partially reflective layer such as a reflective polarizer film or a partial mirror film. In addition, illumination light 8620 can be reflected from just the central flat section or it can be reflected from the central flat section plus one or more of the other segments of the segmented partially reflective layer. Alternatively, the partially reflective layer 8630 can comprise a multiple polarizer film to selectively provide a partially reflective layer over just the portions of the partially reflective layer that are actually needed to reflect illumination light to uniformly illuminate the reflective image source 7935 as previously described herein. Figure 88 shows a display assembly wherein the partially reflective layer 8830 is comprised of a laminated multiple polarizer film with a central portion 8831 that includes a reflective polarizer film and the remainder of which is an absorptive polarizer as previously described herein. Where the segmented shape of the partially reflective layer 8830 is similar to that shown in Figure 86. Figure 89 shows a display assembly wherein the partially reflective layer 8930 is comprised of a laminated multiple polarizer film with a central portion 8931 that includes a reflective polarizer film and the remainder of which is an absorptive polarizer as previously described herein. Where the segmented shape of the partially reflective layer 8930 is similar to that shown in Figure 87. While Figures 88 and 89 show the reflective polarizer film as just occupying the flat central segment of the segmented partially reflective layers 8830 and 8930 respectively, the reflective polarizer can extend into the adjacent segments as needed to reflect the illumination light 8620 in the pattern needed to uniformly illuminate the reflective image source 8535. Alternatively the segments associated with the segmented partially reflective layers 8830 and 8930 can have three dimensional shapes when the reflective polarizer portion is shaped like that shown in Figure 84a to keep the reflective polarizer 8430 portion flat.

[000476] In a further embodiment, the reflective polarizer film is laminated to a flexible transparent carrier film to increase the flexibility and the absorptive polarizer film is a separate layer. Figure 90 shows a partially reflective layer 9030 comprised of a reflective polarizer film 8441 laminated to a flexible transparent carrier film 9043. Where the flexible transparent carrier film 9043 does not reflect the illumination light 7920 or change polarization state of the illumination light 7920 and as a result rays 8421 pass through the flexible transparent carrier film 9043. The purpose of the flexible transparent carrier film is to support the reflective polarizer film 8441 while allowing the partially reflective layer 9030 to be substantially as flexible as the reflective polarizer film 8441 alone. Absorptive polarizer film 9042 is then provided as a separate layer positioned adjacent to the partially reflective layer 9030. While the absorptive polarizer film 9042 can be flat or curved as needed to fit within the available space, in a preferred embodiment, the absorptive polarizer film 9042 is curved to be better positioned to absorb rays 8421 that are incident on the partially reflective layer 9030 outside of the reflective polarizer film 8441 as shown in Figure 90.

[000477] In yet another embodiment, the reflective polarizer film is modified to make the portions transparent and non-reflective where illumination light is incident that is not needed to illuminate the active area of the reflective image source and a separate absorptive polarizer is provided to absorb light that is transmitted through the non-reflective portions. Figure 91 is an illustration of a partially reflective layer 9130 comprised of a reflective polarizer film wherein portions 9143 are modified to be transparent and non-reflective while the portion 9141 is a reflective polarizer. As such, polarized illumination light 7920 is reflected by the reflective polarizer portion 9141 and is transmitted by the modified portions 9143. An absorptive polarizer 9042 is provided as a separate layer adjacent to the partially reflective layer 9130 so that rays 8421 of the illumination light 7920 are transmitted by the modified portions 9143 and absorbed by absorptive polarizer. Wherein the transmission axis of the reflective polarizer portion 9141 is parallel aligned to the transmission axis of the absorptive polarizer 9042. The modification of the reflective polarizer film can be accomplished by etching the reflective polarizer film, when the reflective polarizer film is a wiregrid polarizer, and thereby removing the metal wires of the wiregrid in the modified portions. Alternatively the wiregrid polarizer can be masked during the metal deposition step to provide shaped portions of wire grid polarizer during manufacturing. An advantage provided by modifying the reflective polarizer film is that the flexibility of the partially reflective layer 9130 is substantially unchanged by the modification and as a result the partially reflective layer 9130 remains uniformly flexible in both the modified portions 9143 and the reflective polarizer portion 9141. Another advantage provided by using a modified reflective polarizer film is that the transition from the modified portion 9143 to the reflective polarizer portion 9141 does not include a sharp edge that can cause visible artifacts in the image provided to the user's eye due to scattering by the edge or a change in optical density from a thickness change. This embodiment can also be applied to other types of display assemblies such as for example that shown in Figure 85.

[000478] In a yet further embodiment, the partially reflective layer comprises a reflective polarizer film laminated to an absorptive polarizer and the partially reflective layer includes a flat portion and a curved portion. Figure 92 is an illustration of a frontlight for a display assembly similar to that shown in Figure 79a with the addition of a laminated partially reflective layer 9230 that has a portion that is a reflective polarizer laminated to an absorptive polarizer 9230. Where the partially reflective layer 9230 is segmented with a flat segment and a curved segment. By including a flat segment in the portion of the partially reflective layer 9230 that is a reflective polarizer 9241, the uniformity of illumination light 7920 that is reflected onto the reflective image source 7935 is improved because a larger portion of the light source 7910 is mapped to the image as can be seen in Figure 92. Wherein when using a small scale light source and associated light control films such as diffusers, it is important to map a large portion of the light source area to avoid darker or brighter lines across the image produced by a dark or bright spot on the light source. Including a flat segment in the partially reflective layer 9230 also reduces local distortions in the image provided to the user's eye that are caused by local changes in optical path length or localized refraction due to changes in the surface angles that the light is exposed to. This embodiment can also be applied to other types of display assemblies such as for example that shown in Figure 85.

[000479] In head mounted displays that provide a displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of the environment, it is advantageous to have high see- through transmission both so the user can better interact with the environment and so that people in the environment can see the user's eyes so they feel more engaged with the user. It is also advantageous to have a thin optics module with low height to make the head mounted display more compact and thereby more attractive.

[000480] Figure 93 shows an illustration of an optics module that provides the user with a displayed image while simultaneously providing high see-thru transmission. In this way, the user is provided with a displayed image overlaid onto a clear view of the environment. The optics module includes a combiner 9320 that can have a partial mirror coating that transmits a majority (greater than 50% transmission of visible light) of the available light from the environment, with transmission higher than 70% preferred. For example, the combiner 9320 can have a broadband partial mirror that reflects less than 30% and transmits over 70% of the entire visible wavelength band. Alternatively, the combiner 9320 can have a notch mirror coating where the reflectivity band of the notch mirror coating is matched to the wavelength bands provided by the light source 9340, where the light source 9340 can include one or more LEDs, QLEDs, diode lasers or other light source, each with narrow wavelength bands (e.g. 50nm wide bands or less, full width half max). The notch mirror coating can provide for example, greater than 20% reflectivity (e.g. 50% reflectivity) in the wavelengths bands provided by the light source 9340 while providing greater than 80% transmission in the remaining wavelength bands in the visible. For full color images to be provided by the optics module, at least three LEDs with complimentary colors are required such as red, green and blue light or, cyan, magenta and yellow light. In a preferred embodiment, the combiner 9320 has a tristimulus notch mirror that reflects over 50% of the light within the wavelength bands provided by the light source 9340 and transmits an average of over 80% across the entire visible wavelength band. In this way, the tristimulus notch mirror coating provides improved efficiency compared to the partial mirror coating previously described. In an example, if the combiner is to provide 75% transmission of visible light from the environment 9362, the partial mirror coating will reflect only 25% of image light 9360 so that 75% of the image light will be transmitted through the combiner and will not contribute to the brightness of the image provided to the user's eye 9310. In contrast, a tristimulus notch mirror coating can be used to reflect over 50% of the image light 9360 over the wavelengths of light provided by the LEDs in the light source 9340 while transmitting over 90% of the remaining wavelengths of visible light that are not provided by the LEDs so that the average transmission over the entire range of visible light is over 75%. Consequently, the tristimulus notch mirror is twice as efficient as the partial mirror in terms of the ability to reflect image light 9360 toward the user's eye 9310.

[000481] To enable the optics module to operate with a combiner 9320 as shown in Figure 93, image light 9360 is provided to a lens 9330 which focuses the image light 9360 at the user's eye 9310. Wherein lens 9330 is shown as a single lens element for simplicity, but multiple lens elements are also possible. The image light 9360 is provided from illumination light 9364 that comes from the light source 9340. Where, the illumination light 9364 is reflected by a beam splitter 9352 toward a reflective image source 9350. The image source 9350 can be a liquid crystal on silicon display (LCOS), a ferroelectric liquid crystal display (FLCOS) or other such reflective display. A polarizer 9342 can be associated with the light source 9340 to provide polarized illumination light 9364. The beam splitter 9352 can then be a reflective polarizer that is oriented to substantially reflect the polarized illumination light 9364. The image source 9350 changes the polarization state of the illumination light 9364 when the light is reflected by the image source 9350 to form image light 9360 that has a polarization state that is opposite to that of the illumination light 9364. By changing the polarization state of the illumination light 9364 to the polarization state of the image light 9360, the image light 9360 can then be transmitted by the reflective polarizer of the beam splitter 9352. It is important to note that the image light 9360 is polarized to enable a folded illumination system and not because polarized light is required by the combiner 9320. In fact, to provide a transmission of light from the environment 9362 that is greater than 50%, the combiner 9320 cannot include a polarizer.

[000482] Figure 94 is an illustration of an optics module than includes multiply folded optics to reduce the overall height of the optics module. In this case, illumination light 9464 is transmitted by the beam splitter 9452 so that it passes directly toward the image source 9450 wherein the beam splitter 9452 is a reflective polarizer and the light source 9340 includes a polarizer 9342 that is oriented so the transmission axis of the polarizer 9342 is parallel to the transmission axis of the beam splitter 9452. The illumination light 9464 is then reflected and changed in polarization state by the image source 9450 so that the image light 9360 with it's changed polarization state is reflected by beam splitter 9452 toward the lens 9330. As can be seen by comparing Figure 93 to Figure 94, the overall height of the optics module shown in Figure 94 is substantially reduced.

[000483] However, the orientation of the additional fold in the optical path of the image light 9360 in the optics module of Figure 94 increases the thickness of the optics module, where thickness is defined as the distance from the closest back surface of the optics module that is nearest to the user's eye to the farthest front surface of the optics module that is farthest from the user's eye. Figures 95 and 96 show illustrations of an optical module where the added fold in the optical path of the image light 9360 is oriented perpendicular to the fold shown in Figure 94. In this case, the optics module in Figures 95 and 96 is wider but thinner than that shown in Figure 94. Figure 95 shows the optics module from the side and Figure 96 shows the optics module from the position of the user's eye 9310. As such, in the multiply folded optics shown in Figures 95 and 96, optical axis 935 associated with the illumination light 9464 is perpendicular to both the optical axis 934 associated with the image light 9360 as it passes through the lens 9330 and the optical axis 933 associated with the image light 9360 as it proceeds toward the user's eye 9310 in the eyebox. In the case of a head mounted display, it can be very important to have a thin optics module because a thick optics module can cause the head mounted display to stick outward from the user's forehead, which can be uncomfortable and unattractive. Thus, the multiply folded optics module shown in Figures 95 and 96 are shorter and thinner than the optic module shown in Figure 93. The optics module shown in Figures 95 and 96 is wider than the optics module shown in Figure 93, but in a glasses configuration of the head mounted display, wider optics modules can be better fit into the glasses frames than taller or thicker optics modules.

[000484] A further advantage that is provided by an optics module that includes multiply folded optics is that twists can be introduced at the fold surfaces to modify the orientation of different portions of the optics module relative to each other. This can be important when the optics module needs to fit into a thin curved glasses frame, a visor or a helmet where the increased width associated with the upper portion of the multiply folded optics module can make it more difficult to fit into structures that are not parallel to the combiner. In this case, the upper portion including for example (based on Figure 96), the light source 9340, the polarizer 9342, the beam splitter 9452 and the image source 9450, can be twisted relative to the lower portion including the lens 9330 and the combiner 9320. Where to avoid distortion of the image due to the compound angles between the fold surfaces, a twist of the upper portion about the axis 934 must be combined with a corresponding twist of the lower portion about the axis 933. In this way, the effects of the increased width of the upper portion of the multiply folded optics can be reduced when fitting the optics module into a curved structure such as glasses frames, a visor frame or a helmet structure.

[000485] Figure 99 shows a further embodiment wherein the lens 9930 includes a diffractive surface 9931 to enable a more compact and shorter optical design with reduced chromatic aberration. Where the diffractive surface 9931 can be comprised of a series of small annular sections of a refractive lens curve such as for example in a Fresnel lens. The diffractive surface 9931 can be flat as shown in Figure 99 or it can have a base curve to provide additional optical power. The diffractive surface 9931 can be a single order diffractive or a multiple order diffractive. To reduce scattering of wide angle illumination light 9964 that could be incident on the diffractive surface 9931, an absorptive polarizer 9932 is provided and is oriented with it's transmission axis perpendicular to the transmission axis of the reflective polarizer of the beam splitter 9452. In this way, illumination light 9964 that is transmitted by the beam splitter 9452 in the direction that would cause it to be incident on the diffractive surface 9931 is absorbed by the absorptive polarizer 9932 before it can be scattered by the diffractive surface 9931. At the same time, image light 9360 has a polarization state that is opposite to that of the illumination light 9964 so that it is reflected by the beam splitter 9452 and transmitted by the absorptive polarizer 9932 as it passes into the lens 9930.

[000486] Figure 100 shows an illustration of an optics module that includes a reduced angle between the beam splitter 9452 and the lens 9930 to reduce the overall height of the optics module. The fold angle of the image light 9360 (the deflection angle between 934 and 1005) is then more than 90 degrees and as a result, the upper edge of the beam splitter is closer to the lens 9330 thereby providing a reduced overall height of the optics module.

[000487] Figure 100 also shows a compact planar light source 10040 comprised of a thin edge-lit backlight similar to what is provided in displays used in displays for mobile devices like cellphones. The compact planar light source 10040 is positioned directly behind the beam splitter 9452 to reduce the overall size of the optics module. The compact planar light source can include a light guide film or light guide plate with an edge lit light such as one or more LEDs and a reflector on the side opposite the beam splitter 9452. The compact planar light source can include a polarizer so the illumination light 10064 is polarized as previously described herein. To direct the illumination light 10064 toward the image source 9450 for improved efficiency, a turning film 10043 is positioned between the compact planar light source 10040 and the beam splitter 9452. A 20 degree prismatic turning film can be obtained for example, from Luminit 103C (Torrance, CA) under the name DTF. To obtain greater degrees of turning, such as 40 degrees, multiple layers of turning film 10043 can be stacked together provided they are oriented such that the turning effect is additive. A diffuser layer (not shown) can be used in addition to the turning film 10043 to reduce artifacts such as linear shadows that can be associated with prismatic structures that are typically associated with turning films 10043. Figure 101 shows an illustration of an optics module as seen from the position of the user's eye, which is similar to that shown in Figure 100 but with a perpendicular orientation of the added fold in the image light 10164 to reduce the thickness of the optics module as previously described herein. As in the optics module shown in Figures 95 and 96, the multiply folded optics shown in Figure 101 have an optical axis 1005 associated with the illumination light 10164 that is perpendicular to both the optical axis 934 associated with the image light 9360 as it passes through the lens 9330 and the optical axis 933 associated with the image light 9360 as it proceeds toward the user's eye 9310 in the eyebox. As a result, the optics module of Figure 101 is thinner and shorter than the optics module of Figure 93. Figure 101 also includes a field lens 10130 to improve the optical performance of the optics module. The addition of this second lens element is possible because of the change in fold orientation so that the field lens 10130 does not increase the thickness of the optics module, instead the added length of the optical path from the field lens 10130 occurs in the width of the optics module where space is more readily available in the head mounted display.

[000488] Figure 102 shows an illustration of an optics module similar to that shown in Figure 99 but with a different orientation of the upper portion of the optics module relative to the combiner so that the combiner 10220 can be more vertical. This rearrangement of the elements within the optics module can be important to achieve a good fit of the head mounted display onto the user's face. By making the combiner 10220 more vertical, the optics module can be made to have less interference with the user's cheekbones.

[000489] Figure 103, 103a and 103b show illustrations of optics modules as seen from the position of the user's eye, that include multiply folded optics and digital light projector (DLP) image sources 10350. In this case, the illumination light 10364 is provided at an oblique angle to the image source 10350 as required by the

micromirrors in the DLP, to reflect image light 9360 along the optical axis 934 of the lens 9930. Where, in the case of a DLP image source 10350, image light 9360 is comprised of on-state light reflected by on-state micromirrors in the DLP image source 10350 along optical axis 934, in correspondence to the brightness of pixels in the image to be displayed to the user's eye 9310 in the eyebox. The micromirrors in the DLP image source 10350 also reflect off-state light 10371 to the side of the optics module in correspondence to the dark image content and as a result, a light trap 10372 is provided in the optics module to absorb light 10371. The light trap 10372 can be a black absorptive surface or a textured black surface. The purpose of the light trap 10372 is to absorb incident light 10371 and thereby reduce stray light and subsequently improve the contrast of the image displayed to the user's eye 9310. As previously described in other embodiments herein, the light source 10340 is provided to the side of the optics module with a multiply folded optical path to reduce the overall thickness and height of the optics module. Figure 103 provides the DLP image source 10350 at the top of the optics module so that the image light 9360 proceeds straight along the optical axis 934, through the lens 9930 and down to the combiner 9320 where the image light is reflected toward the user's eye 9310 located in the eyebox. A polarizer 10341 is provided with the light source 10340 so that polarized illumination light 10364 is reflected by the beam splitter 9452 to illuminate the DLP image source 10350. Where, the beam splitter 9452 in this case, is a reflective polarizer that is aligned with the polarizer 10341 so that the polarized illumination light 10364 is reflected by the beam splitter 9452 and image light 9360 is transmitted by the beam splitter 9452. A quarter wave film 10351 is located adjacent to the surface of the DLP image source 10350 so that the polarization state of the image light 9360 is opposite to that of the illumination light 10364 after being reflected by the DLP image source 10350. The light source 10340 and the reflective polarizer 9452 are angularly arranged so that the illumination light 10364 is incident onto the DLP image source 10350 at the oblique angle required so that the image light 9360 when reflected by the on-state pixels in the DLP image source 10350 proceeds along the optical axis 934 of the lens 9930. A field lens (similar to 10130 as shown in Figure 101) or other lens elements may be included in the optics of Figure 103 but is not shown, in which case, the illumination light 10364 and the image light 9360 may pass thru the field lens or other lens elements in opposite directions.

[000490] Figure 103a is an illustration of another optics module with a multiply folded optical path that includes a DLP image source 10350 and is shown from the position of the user's eye. The light source 10340 is again provided to the side of the optics module to reduce the thickness of the optics module. In this case, the light source 10340 is provided on the same side of the lens 9930 and combiner 9320, as the DLP image source 10350. Lens 9930 can optionally include one or more diffractive surfaces 9931. The light source 10340 directly illuminates the DLP image source 10350 where the illumination light 10364 is incident on the DLP image source 10350 at an oblique angle so that the image light 9360, after being reflected by the on-state micromirrors in the DLP image source 10350, proceeds along the folded optical axis 934. At least one light trap 10372 is also provided to absorb light 10371 that is reflected from off-state micromirrors in the DLP and thereby improve the contrast of the displayed image as seen by the user. A field lens 10332 is provided between the DLP image source 10350 and the fold mirror 10352. The illumination light L64 in this case can be unpolarized light whereupon the fold mirror 10352 can be comprised of a full mirror coating (e.g. a coating that reflects the entire visible light spectrum) on a substrate. The field lens 10332 can be a single lens element as shown in Figure 103a or it can include multiple lens elements as needed. The field lens 10332 is designed to provide a large air gap between the field lens 10352 and the DLP image source 10350, so that the illumination light 10364 can be introduced to the optics module to directly illuminate the active area associated with the DLP image source 10350. By using unpolarized illumination light 10364, the optics module shown in Figure 103a has improved efficiency over the optics module with DLP image sources 10350 shown in Figures 103 and 103b.

[000491] Figure 103b is an illustration of another optics module with multiply folded optical path that includes a DLP image source 10350 and is shown from the position of the user's eye 9310 in the eyebox. As in the optics modules shown in Figures 103 and 103a, the optics module of Figure 103b has the light source 10340 positioned at the side of the optics module to reduce the height and thickness of the optics module. The DLP image source 10350 is positioned opposite the light source 10340 however in this embodiment they do not share an optical axis. The illumination light 10364 passes through the beam splitter 10352, which in this case can be a first reflective polarizer. A second reflective polarizer 10332 is positioned adjacent to the lens 9930 so that the illumination light 10364 is reflected toward the DLP image source 10350. To reflect the illumination light 10364, the first reflective polarizer (beam splitter 10352) and the second reflective polarizer 10332 are oriented with

perpendicular transmission axes. A quarter wave film 10351 (or quarter wave coating on the DLP cover glass) is provided adjacent to the DLP image source 10350 so that the polarization state of the illumination light 10364 is changed upon reflection from the DLP image source 10350 as it becomes image light 9360. As a result, the polarization of the illumination light 10364 is opposite to that of the image light 9360. Consequently, the illumination light 10364 is transmitted by the beam splitter 10352 and reflected by the second reflective polarizer 10332, while the image light 9360 is reflected by the beam splitter 10352 and transmitted by the second reflective polarizer 10332. The light source 10340 is oriented relative to the second reflective polarizer 10332 so that it is reflected at an oblique angle relative to the DLP image source 10350 as required to provide image light 9360 reflected from on-state micromirrors in the DLP image source 10350 along the folded optical axis 934. The second reflective polarizer 10332 can be extended beyond the lens 9930 to provide the required oblique angle to fully illuminate the DLP image source 10350 as shown in Figure 103b. Because the light source 10340 is located behind the beam splitter 10352, which is a reflective polarizer, the light source 10340 does not affect the image light 9360 and as a result, the light source 10340 can be a different size and orientation than the beam splitter 10352. One or more light traps 10372 are provided to absorb light 10371 that is reflected from off-state micromirrors in the DLP image source 10350 and thereby improve the contrast of the displayed image. In this case, the light trap 10372 can be positioned under the second reflective polarizer 10332 because the polarization state of the light 10371 is such that it is reflected by the beam splitter 10352 and transmitted by the second reflective polarizer 10332. The combined orientation of the light source 10340, the beam splitter 10352 and the DLP image source 10350 provides an optics module that is relatively thin and relatively short compared to optics modules where the image source or the light source are positioned above the fold mirror or beam splitter (e.g. such as the optics module shown in Figure 103).

[000492] Figures 97 and 98 show illustrations of optics modules similar to those shown in Figure 94 but with the addition of an eye imaging camera 979 for capturing images of the user's eye 9310 during use. In these cases, the light source 9340 and image source 9450 are positioned opposite one another so that the eye imaging camera 979 can be positioned directly above the lens 9340 so that the optical axis 934 is shared between the optics module and the eye imaging camera 979. By sharing a common optical axis, the eye imaging camera 979 can capture an image of the user's eye 9310 that has a perspective from directly in front of the user's eye 9310. Image light 9360 can then be used to illuminate the user's eye 9310 during image capture. A portion of the light reflected from the user's eye 9310, which can be unpolarized, passes through the beam splitter 9452 before being captured by the eye imaging camera 979. Because the eye imaging camera 979 is located above the beam splitter 9452, if the beam splitter 9452 is a reflective polarizer, the polarization state of the image light 9360 will be opposite to that of the light 978 captured by the eye imaging camera 979. The eye imaging camera 979 can be used to capture still images or video. Where video images can be used to track movements of the user's eye when looking at displayed images or when looking at a see-through view of the environment. Still images can be used to capture images of the user's eye 9310 for the purpose of identifying the user based on patterns on the iris. Given the small size of available camera modules, an eye imaging camera 979 can be added to the optics module with little impact on the overall size of the optics module. Additional lighting can be provided adjacent to the combiner 9320 to illuminate the user's eye. The additional lighting can be infrared, so the user can simultaneously view images displayed with visible light. If the additional lighting is infrared, the eye camera 979 must be capable of capturing images at matching infrared wavelengths. By capturing images of the user's eye from the perspective of directly in front of the user's eye, undistorted images of the user's eye can be obtained over a wide range of eye movement.

[000493] Figure 120 shows an illustration of another embodiment of an eye imaging camera associated with the optics module shown in Figure 101, however the eye imaging camera can be similarly included in optics modules such as those shown in Figures 99, 100, 103, 103b. These optics modules include absorptive polarizers 9932 to reduce stray light as previously disclosed herein. These optics modules can also include a diffractive surface 9931, but the diffractive surface 9931 is not required for the operation of the eye imaging camera 979. In this embodiment, the polarization state of the image light 9360 is the same as that of the light that is reflected by the user's eye and captured by the eye imaging camera 979 since they both pass through the absorptive polarizer 9932. In this embodiment, the eye imaging camera 979 is positioned adjacent to the beam splitter 9452 and the compact planar light source 10040 and between the beam splitter and the field lens 10130. The optical axis 12034 of the light reflected by the eye is then angled somewhat relative to the optical axis 934 of the image light 9360, so that the center of the user's eye 9310 and the associated eyebox are within the field of view of the eye imaging camera 979. In this way, the eye imaging camera 979 captures images of the user's eye from nearly directly in front and only slightly to the side of the user's eye 9310 as shown in Figure 120. While Figure 120 shows the eye imaging camera 979 positioned adjacent to an end of the beam splitter 9452, it is also possible to position the eye imaging camera 979 adjacent to a side of the beam splitter 9452. The advantage of this embodiment is that the eye imaging camera 979 is provided with a simple optical path so that high image quality is possible in the captured images of the user's eye 9310. It should be noted that the optics associated with the eye imaging camera must take into account the effect of the lens 9930 since the light reflected by the user's eye 9310 that is captured by the eye imaging camera passes through the lens 9930. Also, the addition of the eye imaging camera 979 does not substantially increase the volume of the optics module as can be seen by comparing Figure 120 to Figure 101.

[000494] Figure 121 shows an illustration of a further embodiment of an optics module that includes an eye imaging camera 979. Similar to the embodiment shown in Figure 120, this optics module also includes an absorptive polarizer 9932 to reduce stray light and a diffractive surface 9931 may be included, but is not required. In this embodiment, the eye imaging camera 979 is positioned between the beam splitter 9452 and the field lens 10130 and pointed towards the beam splitter 9452. In this way, light reflected by the user's eye 9310 is reflected upwards by the combiner 9320, passes through the lens 9930 and the absorptive polarizer 9932 and then is reflected laterally toward the eye imaging camera 979 by the beam splitter 9452. The light captured by the eye imaging camera 979 is thereby the same polarization state as the image light 9360, so that it is reflected by the beam splitter 9452 and transmitted by the absorptive polarizer 9932. The light reflected by the user's eye 9310 can be unpolarized as initially reflected by the user's eye 9310, however, after passing through the absorptive polarizer 9932, the light becomes polarized with the same polarization state as the image light 9360. An advantage of this embodiment is that it is even more compact than the embodiment shown in Figure 120. This arrangement of the eye imaging camera 979 is also possible in the optics modules shown in Figures 99, 100, 103, 103a and 103b.

[000495] In the embodiments shown in Figures 120 and 121, the user's eye 9310 and the associated eyebox can be illuminated by image light 9360 or an additional light source can be provided for example, by an LED positioned adjacent to the combiner 9320. Where the LED can provide visible light or infrared light, provided the eye imaging camera can capture at least a portion of the wavelengths of light provided by the LED.

[000496] In an alternative embodiment for the optics module shown in Figure 103a, the light source 10340 provides polarized illumination light 10364 and the fold mirror 10352 is a reflective polarizer plate so that an eye camera (not shown) can be positioned above the fold mirror 10352 and along the optical axis 934 for capturing images of the user's eye 9310 similar to that shown in Figures 97 and 98. The eye camera and the optics module then share a common optical axis 934 so that images of the user's eye 9310 are captured from directly in front of the eye. In this arrangement, the polarization state of the image light 9360 is opposite to that of the light captured by the eye camera because the image light 9360 is reflected by the fold mirror 10352 and the light captured by the eye camera is transmitted by the fold mirror 10352.

[000497] Figure 104 shows an illustration of the optics module of Figure 95 with the additional element of a controllable light blocking element to improve contrast in portions of the displayed image and also to improve the appearance of opacity in displayed objects such as augmented reality objects. Where the controllable light blocking element can operate by absorbing the incident light or scattering the incident light as provided, for example, by an electrochromic element, a polymer stabilized liquid crystal or a ferroelectric liquid crystal. Examples of suitable light blocking elements includes: 3G Switchable Film from Scienstry (Richardson, TX); Switchable Mirror or Switchable Glass from Kent Optronics (Hopewell Junction, NY). The controllable light blocking element 10420 is shown in Figure 104 as being attached to the lower surface of the combiner 9320 so that it doesn't interfere with the displayed image while blocking see-thru light from the environment 9362. Provided the combiner 9320 is flat, the addition of controllable light blocking elements 10420 adjacent to the combiner 9320 is easily done either by attaching directly to the combiner or attaching to the sidewalls of the optics module housing. The controllable light blocking element 10420 can have a single area that can be used to block a selectable portion of the see-through light from the environment over the entire combiner 9320 area thereby enabling a selectable optical density. Alternatively the controllable light blocking element 10420 can provide an array of areas 10520, as shown in figure 105, that can be separately selectably controlled to block portions of the combiner 9320 area that correspond to areas in the displayed image where high contrast areas of the image are located. Figure 105 shows an illustration of an array of separately controllable light blocking elements 10520. Figures 106a, 106b and 106c are illustrations of how the array of separately controllable light blocking elements 10520 can be used. Figure 106a shows how the array of separately controllable light blocking elements 10520 can be put into blocking modes in areas 10622 and non-blocking modes in areas 10623. Where the blocking mode areas 10622 correspond to areas where information or objects are to be displayed such as is shown in the corresponding areas in the illustration of Figure 106b. Figure 106c shows what the user sees when the image of Figure 106b is displayed with the array of controllable light blocking elements 10520 used in light blocking modes 10622 and non-blocking modes 10623. The user then sees the displayed information or objects overlaid onto a see-through view of the environment, but in the areas where information of objects are displayed, the see-through view is blocked to improve the contrast of the displayed information or object and provide a sense of solidness to the displayed information or objects.

[000498] In addition, Figure 104 shows a rear optical element 10490 that can be a protective plate or a corrective optic. The protective plate can be connected to sidewalls and other structural elements to stiffen the positioning of the combiner 9320 and to prevent dust and dirt from getting onto the inner surface of the combiner 9320. The corrective optics can include a prescriptive optic, which includes the ophthalmic prescription (optical power and astigmatism for example) of the user to improve the viewing experience. [000499] Head mounted displays provide the user with freedom to move their head while watching displayed information. See-through head mounted displays also provide the user with a see-through view of the environment whereupon the displayed information is overlaid. While head mounted displays can include various types of image sources, image sources that provide sequential color display typically provide higher perceived resolution relative to the number of pixels in the displayed images because each pixel provides image content for each of the colors and the image perceived by the user as a displayed full color image frame is actually the sum of a series of rapidly displayed sequential color subframes. For example, the image source can sequentially provide subframe images comprised of a red image, a green image and then a blue image that are all derived from a single full color frame image. In this case, full color images are displayed at an image frame rate that includes a series of at least three sequentially colored subframes that are displayed at a subframe rate which is at least 3X the image frame rate. Sequential color images sources include reflective image sources such as LCOS and DLP.

[000500] The color breakup that occurs with a sequential color display occurs because the different color subframe images that together provide the user with a full color frame image are displayed at different times. The inventors realized that with sequential color display in a head mounted display, when there is movement of the head-mounted display or movement of the user's eyes, such that the user's eyes do not move in synch with the displayed image that under such movement conditions the perceived locations of each of the sequential color image subframes are different within the user's field of view. This can happen when the user moves his head and the user's eyes do not follow the same trajectory as the head mounted display, which can be due to the user's eyes moving in a jerky trajectory as the eyes pause to look at an object in the see-through view of the environment. Another way this can happen is if an object passes through the see-through view of the environment and the user's eyes follow the movement of the object. Due to this difference in perceived locations within the user's field of view, the user sees the sequential color images slightly separated at the edges of objects. This separation of colors at the edge of objects is referred to as color breakup. Color breakup may be easily perceived during certain movements because the sequential colors are vividly colored in areas where they do not overlap one another. The faster the user moves their head or the faster the user's eyes move across the display field of view, the more noticeable the color breakup becomes, because the different color subframe images are separated by a greater distance within the field of view. Color breakup is particularly noticeable with see-through head mounted displays, because the user can see the environment and the user's eyes tend to linger on objects seen in the environment as the user turns his head. So even though the user may turn his head at a steady rotational rate, the user's eye movement tends to be jerky and this creates the conditions where color breakup is observed. As such there are two different conditions that tend to be associated with color breakup: rapid head movement and rapid eye movement.

[000501] It is important to note that when the user is not moving his head and the head mounted display is not moving on the user's head, color breakup will not be observed because the subframe images are provided at the same positions within the field of view of the user's eyes. Also, if the user were to move his head and the user moves his eyes in synch with the head movement, color breakup will not be observed. So movement of the head mounted display is indicative of conditions that can lead to color breakup and is also indicative of the degree of color breakup that can occur if the user moves his eyes relative to the movement of the head mounted display. Color breakup is less of an issue with head mounted displays that do not have see-through to the environment, because only the displayed image content is visible to the user and it moves in synch with the movement of the head mounted display. Color breakup is also not an issue if a monochrome image is displayed with a monochrome light source (i.e. there are no sequential color subframes, instead there are only single color frames) since all the displayed images are comprised of the same color. Thus, color breakup is an issue that is most noticeable with head mounted displays that provide a see-through view of the environment.

[000502] Systems and methods according to the principles of the present invention reduce color breakup and thereby improve the viewing experience provided by a head-mounted display with see-through when the user is moving through the environment.

[000503] In embodiments, systems and methods are provided where the head-mounted display detects the speed of movement of the head-mounted display and in response, the resolution of the image is reduced or the bit depth of the image is reduced, while the image frame rate at which the image is displayed and the associated subframe rate are correspondingly increased. In this way, the bandwidth associated with the display of the image can be maintained constant, in spite of the frame rate being increased. Where, by increasing the frame rate associated with the display of images, the time between the display of each sequential color subframe image is reduced and as a result the visually perceived separation between the sequential color images is reduced. Similarly the image frame rate can be reduced while the subframe rate is increased by increasing the number of subframes displayed for each image frame.

[000504] In further embodiments, systems and methods are provided where the sequential color subframe images are shifted laterally or vertically relative to one another by a number of pixels that corresponds to the detected movement of the head mounted display. In this way, the color sequential subframe images are displayed to the user such that they are visually overlaid on top of each other within the displayed field of view. This compensates for separation between subframes and thereby reduces color breakup.

[000505] In yet another embodiment, systems and methods are provided where an eye-imaging camera in the head-mounted display is used to track the movement of the user's eyes. The movement of the head-mounted display may be simultaneously measured. An accommodation in the presentation may then be made to reduce color breakup. For example, the resolution of the images and the frame rate may be changed or the image frame rate can be reduced while increasing the subframe rate, in correspondence to the difference in movement of the user's eyes and the movement of the head mounted display. As another example, the subframes may be shifted to align the subframes in correspondence to the determined difference in movement between the user' eyes and the head mounted display. As a further example, the color saturation of the content may be reduced to reduce the perception of color breakup due to the fact that the colors, while positionally separated as perceived by the user, are not as separated in color space. In yet a further example, the content could be converted to monochrome imagery which is displayed as a single color image (e.g. white) during the detected movement so that color breakup is not visible.

[000506] Figure 107 shows an example of a full color image 10700 that includes an array of pixels, including portions of red, green and blue pixels. For sequential color display, three subframe images are created that are each comprised of only one color, such as only red or only green or only blue. Those skilled in the art will recognize that sequential color images that together provide a perceived full color image can also be comprised of subframes of cyan, magenta and yellow. These subframe images are rapidly displayed in sequence to the user on the head-mounted display so that the user perceives a full color image that combines all three colors. With a reflective display such as an LCOS or a DLP, the subframe images are displayed by changing the reflective display to provide the respective image content associated with the particular subframe image and then illuminating the reflective display with the associated color light, so the light is reflected to provide the subframe image to the optics of the head-mounted display and from there to the user's eye.

[000507] If the subframe images are accurately aligned with each other, then the full color image perceived by the user will be full color out to the edges of the image and there will be no color breakup. This is what is typically seen by the user of a head- mounted display when the head-mounted display is stationary on the user's head and the user is not moving his eyes. However, if the user moves his head or the head- mounted display moves on the user's head (such as due to vibration) and the user's eyes are not moved in unison with the displayed image, the user will perceive the subframe images to be laterally (or vertically) offset relative to one another as shown by illustrations 10802 and 10804 in Figures 108A and 108B. The perceived amount of lateral offset between the displayed subframe images is related to the speed of movement of the head-mounted display and the time between the display of the sequential subframe images, which is also known as subframe time or 1/subframe rate. The lateral shifting between subframe images, that is perceived by the user, is the color breakup and color breakup is perceived as fringes of color at the edges of objects. When the user moves his head (or eyes) quickly and the subframe rate is slow, color breakup can be substantial as illustrated in Figure 108A. If the user moves his head slowly or the subframe rate is higher, the color breakup is less as illustrated in Figure 108B. If the color breakup is less than one pixel, in digital imaging, in lateral shifting, the user will perceive there to be no color breakup.

[000508] Display frame rate in a head-mounted display is typically limited by either the bandwidth of the processor and associated electronics or by the power required to drive the processor and associated electronics, which translates into battery life. The bandwidth required to display images at a given frame rate is related to the number of frames displayed in a period of time and the number of pixels in each frame image. As such, simply increasing the frame rate to reduce color breakup is not always a good solution as it requires a higher bandwidth which the processor or associated electronics may not be able to support and power usage will be increased thereby reducing battery life. Instead, systems and methods in accordance with the principles of the present invention provide a method of display wherein the number of pixels in each subframe image is reduced thereby reducing the bandwidth required to display each subframe image while simultaneously increasing the subframe rate by a corresponding amount to maintain bandwidth while reducing color breakup. This embodiment is suitable for situations wherein subframe images can be provided with different numbers of pixels and different frame rates. For example, it would be suitable in camera and display systems where the capture conditions can be changed to provide images with a lower resolution that can then be displayed with a faster subframe rate. Static images such as text or illustrations can be displayed with a lower frame rate and a faster subframe rate to reduce color breakup since the image content doesn't change quickly. Alternatively, images can be modified to be displayed at lower resolution (fewer pixels) with a faster frame rate or subframe rate to reduce color breakup

[000509] Figure 109 shows an illustration of the timing of a sequential color image comprised of sequential display of a red subframe image 10902 followed by a green subframe image 10904 followed by a blue subframe image 10908 in a repeating process. As long as the subframes together are displayed at a full color image frame rate that is greater than approximately 24 frames/sec, such that the sequential color subframes are displayed at a subframe rate of greater than 72 subframes/sec, the human eye will perceive full color moving images without flicker. This condition is suitable for displaying a video image without color breakup when the head-mounted display is stationary or moving relatively slowly. However, if the user moves his head such that the head-mounted display moves rapidly, color breakup will occur. This color breakup occurs because rapid head movements are typically a reaction of the user to something occurring in the environment (e.g. a loud noise) so that the user's eyes are searching the environment during the rapid head movement, which leads to jerky eye movements and substantial color breakup.

[000510] Movement of the head-mounted display can be detected by an inertial measurement unit, which can include accelerometers, gyro sensors,

magnetometers, tilt sensors, vibration sensors, etc. Where only the movements within the plane of the display field of view (e.g. x and y movements and not z movement) are important for detecting conditions where color breakup may occur. If the head- mounted display is detected to be moving above a predetermined threshold where color breakup is predicted to occur (e.g. greater than 9 degrees/sec), in embodiments, the resolution of the images may be reduced (thereby reducing the number of pixels in the images and effectively making each pixel larger within the display field of view) and the subframe rate may be correspondingly increased. Note that the subframe rate can be increased without changing the image frame rate by increasing the number of subframes that are displayed sequentially, for example six subframes could be displayed for each image frame wherein the sequential color subframe images are each displayed twice. By increasing the number of subframes displayed for each image frame, the subframe rate can be increased without having to increase the image frame rate, which can be more difficult to change because the image frame rate is typically provided by the source of the image content such as in a movie. Figure 110 shows an illustration of a faster subframe rate, wherein the display time for each subframe, 11002, 11004, and 11008 is reduced and the time between display of each sequential subframe is also reduced. Figure 110 shows a subframe rate that is approximately twice as fast as that shown in Figure 109. The associated image frame rate can be twice as fast in Figure 110 as compared to Figure 109, where both the image frame rate and the subframe rate are doubled. Alternatively, as previously described, the image frame rate can be unchanged between Figures 109 and 110, where only the subframe rate is doubled to reduce color breakup. To enable the bandwidth associated with the display of the images shown in Figure 110 to be approximately the same as the bandwidth associated with the display of subframe images shown in Figure 109, the resolution (number of pixels in each subframe image) is reduced by approximately a factor of two.

[000511] While reducing the resolution of the displayed subframe images in correspondence to an increase in the subframe rate may seem to degrade the image quality perceived by the user, the human eye is not capable of perceiving high resolution when there is substantial movement. As such, color breakup is more visible than a reduction in the resolution of the image when the eye is moving. Consequently, the systems and methods of the present invention trade reduced image resolution for increased image frame rate to reduce color breakup without a perceptible loss in resolution, and bandwidth is thereby maintained. This technique can be used, for example, to reduce color breakup by a factor of up to 16, where the resolution of the displayed image is reduced to 1/16th the original resolution and the frame rate of the displayed image is increased by 16X.

[000512] In another embodiment of the invention, when movement of the head-mounted display is detected, the subframe images associated with a full color frame image are digitally shifted relative to one another in a direction counter to the detected direction of movement and with an amount that corresponds to the detected speed of movement. This effectively compensates for the perceived offset between the displayed subframe images that causes color breakup. The digital shifting is applied only to the subframes that together comprise a full color frame image. This is different from typical digital image stabilization wherein full color frame images are digitally shifted relative to one another to compensate for movement as described, for example, in United States patent publication 2008/0165280. By applying the digital shifting to the subframes that constitute a single full color frame image, the amount of digital shifting required to reduce color breakup is typically only a few pixels even when the detected movement speed is high, this is in contrast to typical digital image stabilization where fast movements result in accumulating shifts of the frame image so that the image effectively moves outside of the display field of view or the amount of digital stabilization that can be applied is limited. Figures 111a and 111b illustrate this embodiment. Figure 111a shows how sequentially displayed subframe images, 11102, 11104, and 11108 would be perceived by the user when there is substantial movement, wherein the different colors associated with the subframes are separately visible along the edges of objects, evenly spaced across the field of view in the direction of movement. In contrast, figure 111b shows how the visibility of the subframes is changed when the subframes are digitally shifted to compensate for the detected movement and thereby reduce the separation between the subframes across the field of view, and as a result the user perceives a series of full color frame images 11120 with reduced color breakup. As shown in figure 111b, the full color frame images are not image stabilized or digitally shifted in response to the detected movement.

[000513] In embodiments, movement direction and speed of the head- mounted display is detected by the IMU sensor immediately prior to the display of each full color frame image. If the movement speed is above a predetermined threshold, the sequentially displayed color subframes associated with each full color frame are digitally shifted relative to one another so that they are displayed in an aligned position within the display field of view. The magnitude of the shift corresponds to the speed of the detected movement and the direction of the shift is counter to the detected direction of movement.

[000514] In an example, the movement of the head-mounted display is detected immediately prior to display of a first subframe associated with a full color frame image. The first subframe associated with the full color frame image can then be displayed without a shift. The second subframe can be shifted by an amount and direction that compensates for the movement that occurs between the display of the first and second subframes and then is displayed. The third subframe can be shifted by an amount and direction that compensates for the movement that occurs between the display of the first subframe and the third subframe and is then displayed. The movement of the head-mounted display is then detected again to determine the shifts to be applied to the subframes associated with the next full color frame image.

Alternatively, the subframes can be shifted by an amount that compensates for a portion of the movement that occurs between the subframes.

[000515] In a further example, the direction and speed of movement of the head-mounted display is detected immediately prior to the display of a reference subframe. Subsequent subframes are then shifted to compensate for movement that occurs between the time the reference subframe is displayed and the time that the subsequent subframe is displayed. Wherein the time that the reference subframe is displayed and the time that the subsequent subframe is displayed may be up to 5 frame times.

[000516] An advantage of this embodiment is illustrated by examining the effective frame rates associated with the color breakup and the blur of the image. If the full color image is displayed with an image frame rate of 60 frames/sec, the subframes would typically be displayed at a subframe rate of 180 frames/sec to provide three subframes for each image frame. The described system and method effectively shifts the subframes so that they are positioned on top of one another, so the color breakup is reduced to an amount that corresponds to 180 frames/sec. At the same time, the blur perceived by the user between image frames corresponds to 60 frames/sec since each of the subframes is derived from the same full color frame image. [000517] In further embodiments, the digital shifting of the subframes that is based on detected movement immediately prior to the display of each full color frame image can be combined with digital image stabilization that is applied between the full color frame images.

[000518] In yet further embodiments, the method of digital shifting of subframes is combined with the method of increasing frame rate with a simultaneous reduction in image resolution. These two methods of reducing color breakup operate on different aspects of the image processing associated with displaying an image in a head mounted display, as such they can be independently applied in either order in the image processing system associated with the processor.

[000519] In yet another embodiment, the head mounted display includes a camera for detecting the eye movements of the user (e.g. as described herein) relative to the movement of the head mounted display. The eye camera can be used to measure the speed of eye movement and the direction of eye movement. In embodiments, the resolution of eye cameras can be relatively low (e.g. QVGA or VGA) so that the frame rate can be relatively high (e.g. 120 frames/sec) without introducing bandwidth limitations. The detected eye movements relative to the head-mounted display can be used to determine when to apply methods to reduce color breakup including, for example, increasing the frame rate and digitally shifting the subframes as has been previously described herein. For example, if the detected eye movement is above a predetermined angular speed, the resolution of the displayed images can be reduced and the subframe rate can be increased. In another example, the detected eye movement can be used to determine the amount and direction of digital shifting applied to subframes within an image frame prior to display of the subframes. In yet another example, measured eye movements can be used in combination with detected movements of the head-mounted display to determine the amount and direction of digital shifting applied to subframes within an image frame prior to display of the subframes. The amount and direction of digital shifting applied to the subframes can be in correspondence to the difference between the detected movements of the head mounted display and the detected eye movements of the user. Where the detection of a condition where the user's eye is moving one direction and the head mounted display is moving in an opposing direction represents a situation where particularly bad color breakup can occur. In this case, combined methods for reducing color breakup are advantageous.

[000520] In another yet further embodiment, when movement of the head- mounted display or eye movement is detected above a predetermined threshold, the images are changed from color sequentially displayed full color images to monochrome images. The monochrome images can be comprised of combined image content from each of the color sequential subframes associated with each full color image frame. Where the monochrome images can be grey scale or luma images wherein the luma code values (Y) for each pixel can be calculated for example as given in Equation 1 below as taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grayscale and as referenced to the CIE 1931 standard for digital photography:

[000521] Y = 0.2126R + 0.7152G + 0.0722B Equation 1

[000522] where R is the red code value for the pixel, G is the green code value for the pixel and B is the blue code value for the pixel. Alternatively, monochrome images can be comprised of single color images such as the green subframe image, and this image can be displayed either with a single color or preferably with simultaneous application of all the sequential colors (e.g. red, green and blue) so that the applied illumination onto the reflective image source is white light and as a result, the displayed image appears as a grey scale image.

[000523] Several more specific examples are provided below.

[000524] Example 1:

[000525] For a 26 deg display field of view and a 1280 pixel horizontally wide image, a pixel occupies 0.020 deg within the display field of view. If the frame rate of the full color images is 60 Hz, with three color sequential subframes images, the subframe time is 0.006 sec. The rotational speed of the head mounted display needed to produce one pixel of color breakup is then 3.6 deg/sec. If the number of horizontal pixels in the display field of view is reduced to 640 pixels and simultaneously the frame rate of the full color images is increased to 120 Hz, with three color sequential subframes images, the subframe time is reduced to 0.003, the size of a pixel is increased to 0.041 deg and the rotational speed to produce one pixel of color breakup is 14.6 deg/sec.

[000526] Example 2:

[000527] For a 26 deg display field of view and a 1280 pixel horizontally wide image, a pixel is 0.020 deg within the display field of view. If the smallest size that the user can detect for color breakup is one pixel wide, then a rotational speed of over 3.6 deg/sec is required if the subframe rate is 180 Hz, before color breakup is detected by the user. Even though the color breakup is an analog effect, the user's eye does not have the resolution to detect the color fringes that are present during movement below this speed. So below this rotational speed, color breakup management is not required.

[000528] Example 3:

[000529] For a 26 deg display field of view and a 1280 pixel horizontally wide image, a pixel is 0.020 deg within the display field of view. If the user can detect color breakup as small as one pixel wide, then a rotational speed of 3.6 deg/sec will require a shift of the subframes relative to each other of one pixel if the subframe rate is 180 Hz, to align the subframes so that color breakup is not visible to the user. If the user rotates their head at 15 deg/sec, then the subframes will require a shift of 4 pixels relative to one another to align the subframes so that color breakup is not visible. If the image frame begins with the display of the red subframe image, then no digital shifting is required for the red subframe image. A 4 pixel shift is required for the green subframe image. And, an 8 pixel shift is required for the blue subframe image. The next red subframe associated with the next image frame would then be effectively shifted 12 pixels relative to the previous red subframe within the field of view.

[000530] Each of the color breakup reduction technologies described herein may be used in combination with each of the other color breakup reduction

technologies.

[000531] The inventors appreciated that fitting see-through computer displays into certain head-worn form factors is a challenge, even when reduced in size as described herein. A further advantage that is provided by an optics module that includes multiply folded optics is that twists can be introduced at the fold surfaces to modify the orientation of different portions of the optics module relative to each other. This can be important when the optics module needs to fit into a thin curved glasses frame, a visor or a helmet where the increased width associated with the upper portion of the multiply folded optics module can make it more difficult to fit into structures that are not parallel to the combiner. As such, another aspect of the present invention relates to twisting certain optical components within the see-through computer display such that the optical components better fit certain form factors (e.g. glasses) yet continue to perform as high quality image displays. In embodiments, optics systems with dual mirror systems to fold the optical path (e.g. optical systems described herein with respect to figures 6, and 93 through 106) are provided such that the image production module (e.g. upper module), which includes a first image light reflective surface, is turned about a first optical axis leading from the upper module to the lower module and in a direction to fit the upper module more compactly into a frame of a head-worn computer. At the same time, to avoid distorting the image provided to the eye of the user, the image delivery optics (e.g. lower module), which includes a second image light reflective surface, is turned about a second optical axis that leads to the user's eye and in the opposite direction relative to the image, thereby introducing a compound angle between the first image light reflective surface and the second image light reflective surface. Provided that the first and second optical axes are

perpendicular to one another in the non-twisted state, the distortion in the image associated with the twist about the first axis is compensated by a twist of the same angular magnitude about the second axis so that the image presented to the eye of the user is undistorted by the twisting.

[000532] Figure 112 illustrates a head-worn computer with see-through displays in accordance with the principles of the present invention. The head-worn computer has a frame 11202 that houses/holds the optics modules in position in front of the users eyes. As illustrated in figure 112, the frame 11202 holds two sets of optical modules 11204 and 11208 each of which have upper and lower optics modules. Optics module 11204 is non-twisted and is presented to illustrate the difficulty in fitting the non-twisted version into the frame. One will note that the dotted box, which represents the outer bounds of the optics module 11204 doesn't fit within the bounds of the frame 11202. Fitting optics module 11204 into the frame 11202 would normally require that the frame 11202 become thicker, from front to back, which would lead to more offset of the glasses form factor from the face of the user, which is less desirable and is less compact. In contrast, optics module 11208 is a twisted optics module, where the upper module is twisted (or rotated) to better fit into the confines of the frame 11202 as shown in Figure 112. Figure 113 shows a more detailed illustration of the twists imparted within multiply folded optics in optics module 11208. Upper module 11214 is twisted relative to the lower module 11218 along optical axis 934 to better fit into the frame 11202, It is this twist which enables optics module 11208 to better fit within the frame 11202 as shown in Figure 112 and as a result frame 11202 can be thinner and more compact than if non-twisted optics modules were used. To avoid distorting the image provided to the user, a second twist is required to introduce a compound angle between the first reflecting surface 11225 in the upper module 11214 and second reflecting surface 11226 in the lower optics module 11218. The second twist is imparted to the second reflecting surface about the optical axis 933 and in an opposite direction relative to the image from the twist in the upper module 11214. In this way, the effects of the increased width of the upper portion of the multiply folded optics can be reduced when fitting the optics module into a curved structure such as glasses frames, a visor frame or a helmet structure. Where it is preferred, but not required that the optical axis 934 be perpendicular to the optical axis 933 so that the magnitude of the angular twist imparted to the first reflecting surface 11225 can be the same as the twist imparted to the second reflecting surface 11226 to provide an image to the user's eye that is not distorted due to the twisting.

[000533] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the

configuration of the optics and electronics in a head-worn frame such that the frame maintains a minimal form factor to resemble standard glasses. In embodiments, a see through optical display with multiply folded optics to provide a reduced thickness (e.g. as described herein) may be mounted in the frame. In embodiments, the multiply folded optical configuration may be twisted at the fold surfaces (e.g. as described herein) to better fit the optics into the frame. In embodiments, the electronics that operate the displays, processor, memory, sensors, etc. are positioned between, above, below, on a side, etc. of the optical modules and oriented to provide a reduced thickness in the frame to match the thickness of the optics. Orienting the board can be

particularly important when the board includes large components that limit the width of the board, such as for example the processor chip. For example, an electronics board or components on the electronics board may be mounted in a vertical orientation between and/or above the optical modules to reduce the thickness of the electronics board as mounted into the frame. In another configuration the board may be mounted between the optical modules at a height near the top of the optical modules to minimize the height of the glasses frame. In yet another configuration the board may be mounted such that it extends over the optical modules to minimize the thickness of the frame. In further embodiments, the board may be mounted in an angled configuration to enable the thickness and height of the frame to be reduced simultaneously. In embodiments, the electronics may be divided between multiple boards. For example, a longer board over a shorter board where the space between the optical modules is used for the lower board. This configuration uses some of the space between the eyes for some of the electronics.

[000534] Figure 114 illustrates a top view and front view of a configuration including optical modules 11208, electronics board 11402 and a heat sink 11404. The board 11402 is mounted in a vertical orientation to maintain a thin frame portion that sits across the user's brow. As illustrated, the optical modules 11208 include upper modules 11214 and a second reflecting surface 11226 in front of the user's eye. The upper module may have a flat reflecting surface and the upper 11214 may be turned or twisted with respect to the second reflecting surface 11226 as described herein. The second reflecting surface 11226 may be a partial mirror, notch filter, holographic filter, etc. to reflect at least a portion of the image light to the eye of the user while allowing scene light to transmit through to the eye.

[000535] Figure 115 illustrates a front view of a configuration that includes optics illustrated in figure 114; however, the electronics board 11402 is mounted in the space between the optical modules at a height that is similar to the height of the optical modules. This configuration reduces the overall height of the frame.

[000536] Figure 116 illustrates a front view of a configuration that includes optics illustrated in figure 114 and 115. The electronics layout in this configuration is done with multiple boards, 11402, 11602 and 11604. The multiple board configuration allows the boards to be thinner from front to back thereby enabling the brow section of the frame to be thinner. A heat sink 11404(not shown in figure 116) may be mounted on the front face between the optical modules. This configuration also causes the heat to be drawn in a direction away from the user's head. In embodiments, the processor, which is a main heat generator in the electronics, is mounted vertically (e.g. on board 11604) and the heat sink 11404 may be mounted in front such that it contacts the processor. In this configuration, the heat sink 11404 causes heat to spread to the front of the device, away from the user's head. In other embodiments, the processor is mounted horizontally (e.g. on board 11602 or 11402). In embodiments, the board(s) may be tilted (e.g. 20 degrees) from front to back to create an even thinner brow section.

[000537] Another aspect of the present invention relates to concealing the optical modules such that a person viewing the user does not clearly see the optical modules, electronics or boards. For example, in configurations described herein, the optical modules include lenses that hang below the top of the brow section of the head- worn device frame and the electronics board(s) hang down as well so that the see- through view is partially blocked. To conceal these features and thereby provide the head worn computer with the appearance of conventional glasses, an outer lens may be included in the glasses frame so that it covers a portion of the frame that contain the optical modules or electronics, and the outer lens may include a progressive tint from top to bottom. In embodiments, the tint may have less transmission at the top for concealment of a portion of the frame that includes the optical modules or electronics board while having higher transmission below the concealment point such that a high see-through transmission is maintained.

[000538] Aspects of the present invention provide multiply folded optics to reduce the thickness of the optics modules along with vertically oriented or angled electronics to reduce the mounted thickness of the electronics and progressively tinted outer lenses to conceal a portion of the optics or electronics. In this way, a head worn computer is provided with a thinner form factor and an appearance of conventional glasses.

[000539] Another aspect of the present invention relates to an intuitive user interface mounted on the HWC 102 where the user interface includes tactile feedback to the user to provide the user an indication of engagement and change. In embodiments, the user interface is a rotating element on a temple section of a glasses form factor of the HWC 102. The rotating element may include segments such that it positively engages at certain predetermined angles. This facilitates a tactile feedback to the user. As the user turns the rotating element it 'clicks' through it's predetermined steps or angles and each step causes a displayed user interface content to be changed. For example, the user may cycle through a set of menu items or selectable applications. In embodiments, the rotating element also includes a selection element, such as a pressure-induced section where the user can push to make a selection.

[000540] Figure 117 illustrates a human head wearing a head-worn computer in a glasses form factor. The glasses have a temple section 11702 and a rotating user interface element 11704. The user can rotate the rotating element 11704 to cycle through options presented as content in the see-through display of the glasses. Figure 118 illustrates several examples of different rotating user interface elements 11704a, 11704b and 11704c. Rotating element 11704a is mounted at the front end of the temple and has significant side and top exposure for user interaction. Rotating element 11704b is mounted further back and also has significant exposure (e.g. 270 degrees of touch). Rotating element 11704c has less exposure and is exposed for interaction on the top of the temple. Other embodiments may have a side or bottom exposure.

[000541] As discussed above, a specially designed lens may be used to conceal portions of the optics modules and/or electronics modules. Figure 119 illustrates an embodiment of one such lens 11902. Two lenses, 11902 are illustrated with Base 6 and 1.3mm thickness but other geometries with, for example, different curvatures and thicknesses can be used. The lenses 11902 are shaped to look like conventional glasses lenses with features including magnetic mounting attachment and special tinting in portions of the lenses 11902 where opaque structures such as electronics are located behind the lenses.

[000542] The lenses 11902 includes blind holes 11904 for the mounting of a magnetic attachment system (not shown). The magnetic attachment system may include magnets, magnetic material, dual magnets, opposite polarization magnets, etc. such that the lenses 11902 can be removed and remounted to the head-worn computer (e.g. HWC 102). In the magnetic attachment system, the lenses 11902 are held by magnetic force into the frame of the HWC. The magnets can be inserted into the blind holes 11904 or inserted into the frame of the HWC in corresponding matching positions. As long as either the lens 11902 or the matching position on the frame of the HWC includes a magnet and the other position has a similar sized piece of magnetic material or another magnet oriented to attract the lens 11902 and hold it in the frame of the HWC. To this end, the frame of the HWC can provide guidance features to position the lens 11902 in front of the optics modules in the HWC. Where the guidance features can be a ridge or flange that the lens is seated in so the lens 11902 cannot move laterally when held in place by the magnetic attachment system. In this way, the function of the magnetic attachment system is simply to hold the lenses 11902 in place, while the guidance features position the lenses 11902. The guidance features can be robustly made to hold the lenses 11902 in place when dropped or subjected to impact even when the force provided by the magnetic attachment system is relatively low, so that the lenses 11902 can be easily removed by the user for cleaning or replacement. Where easy replacement enables a variety of lenses with different optical features (e.g.

polarized, photochromic, different optical density) or different appearance (e.g. colors, level of tinting, mirror coating) to be changed out by the user as desired.

[000543] Figure 119 also illustrates an example of how the lens 11902 may be tinted to conceal or at least partially conceal certain optical components (e.g. the non-see-through components or opaque components) such as, electronics, electronics boards, auxiliary sensors such as an infrared camera and/or other components. As illustrated, the blind holes 11904 may also be concealed or at least partially concealed by the tinting. As illustrated in Figure 119, a top portion 11908, approximately 15mm as illustrated, may be more heavily tinted (e.g. 0 to 30% transmission) or mirrored to better conceal the non-see through portions of the optics and other components. Below the top portion 11908, the lens 11902 may have a gradient zone 11909 where the tinting level gradually changes from top to bottom and leads into the lower zone 11910. The lower zone 11910 includes the area where the user primarily views the see- through surrounding and this zone may be tinted to suit the viewing application. For example, if the application requires a high see through, the lower zone 11910 may be tinted, between 90% and 100% transmissive. If the application requires some see- through tint, than the lower area may be more heavily tinted or mirrored (e.g. 20% to 90%). In embodiments, the lower area 11910 may be a photochromic layer, an electrochromic layer, a controllable mirror or other variable transmission layer. In embodiments, the entire lens or portions thereof may have a variable transmission layer such as a photochromic layer, electrochromic layer, controllable mirror, etc. In embodiments, any of the areas or whole lens 11902 may include polarization.

[000544] Another aspect of the present invention relates to cooling the internal component through the use of micro-holes sized such they are large enough to allow gas to escape but small enough to not allow water to pass through (e.g. 25μιη, 0.2mm, 0.3mm, etc.). The micro-holes may be included in a heat sink, for example. The heat sink, or other area, may be populated with hundreds or thousands of such micro- holes. The micro-holes may be laser cut or CNC holes, for example, that are small enough to keep large droplets of water out of the device but allow air to exchange through the heat sink. Besides increasing surface area of the heat sink, they also have matching holes on the underside of the frame to enable convective cooling where cool air is pulled in from the bottom as the heat raises from the top, like a chimney and as such, the heat sink with the micro-holes is preferably located on the top or side of the frame of the HWC. In embodiments, the micro-holes are aligned in the troughs formed by the fins on the top of the heat sink. This causes the exiting air to flow through the troughs thereby increasing the heat transfer from the fins. In embodiments, the micro- holes may be angled such that the length of the hole in the heat sink material is increased and the air flow can be directed away from the head of the user. In addition, the micro-holes may be of a size to cause turbulence in the air flow as it passes through the micro-holes. Where, turbulence substantially increases the heat transfer rate associated with the air flow through the heat sink. In embodiments, the heat

management system of the HWC 102 is passive, including no active cooling systems such as fans or other energized mechanical cooling systems to force air flow through the micro-holes. In other embodiments, the heat management system includes energized mechanical cooling, such as a fan or multiple fans or other systems to force air movement through the HWC and the micro-holes.

[000545] Another aspect of the present invention relates to finding items in the surrounding environment based on similarity to items identified. Augmented reality is often rigidly defined in terms of what is included and how it is used, it would be advantageous to provide a more flexible interface so people can use augmented reality to do whatever they want it to do. An example is to use the HWC camera, image analysis and display to designate items to be found. Figure 122 shows an illustration of an image 12210 of a scene containing an object that the user would like the HWC to assist in looking for the object as the user moves through the environment. In this example, the user has circled the object 12220 that is being looked for, where in this case the object is a cat. The HWC then analyses the circled region of the image for shapes, patterns and colors to identify the target to be searched for. The HWC then uses the camera to capture images of the scene as the user moves about. The HWC analyses the images and compares the shapes, patterns and colors in the captured images of the scene and compares them to the shapes, patterns and colors of the target. When there is a match, the HWC alerts the user to a potential find. The alert can be a vibration, a sound or a visual cue in an image displayed in the HWC such as a pointer, a flash or a circle that corresponds to the location of the potential find in the scene. This method provides a versatile and flexible augmented reality system wherein an item is described visually and a command of "find something like this" is given to the HWC. Examples of ways to identify an object to be searched for include: circle an item in a previously captured image that is stored on the HWC (as shown in Figure 122); point to an item in a physical image held in front of the camera in the HWC; point to an item in the live image provided by the camera in the HWC and viewed in the see-through display of the HWC, etc. Alternately, text can be input to the HWC with a command of "find wording like this", e.g. a street sign or an item in a store and the HWC can then search for the text as the user moves through the environment. In another example, the user can indicate a color with a command of "find a color like this". The camera used to search for the item can even be a hyperspectral camera in HWC to search for the item using infrared or ultraviolet light to thereby augment the visual search that the user is conducting. This method can be extended to any pattern that the user can identify for the HWC such as sounds, vibrations, movements, etc. and the HWC can then use any of the sensors included in the HWC to search for the identified pattern as the target. As such the finding system provided by the invention is very flexible and can react to any pattern that can be identified by the sensors in the HWC, all the user has to do is provide an example of the pattern to look for as a target. In this way the finding system assists the user and the user can do other things while the HWC looks for the target. The finding system can be provided as an operating mode in the HWC where the user selects the mode and then inputs the pattern to be used as the search target by the HWC. Examples of items that can be searched for include: household objects, animals, plants, street signs, weather activity (e.g. cloud formations), people, voices, songs, bird calls, specific sounds, spoken words, temperatures, wind direction shifts as identified by wind sound relative to the compass heading, vibrations, objects to be purchased, brand names in stores, labels on items in a warehouse, bar codes or numbers on objects and colors of objects to be matched. In a further embodiment, the rate of searching (e.g. how often an analysis is conducted) can be selected by the user or the rate can be automatically selected by the HWC in response to the rate of change of the conditions related to the target. In a yet further embodiment, the sensors in the HWC include a rangefinder or a camera capable of generating a depth map to measure the distance to an object in an image captured by the camera. The HWC can then analyze the image along with the distance to determine the size of the object. The user can then input the size of the object to the finding system as a characteristic of the target pattern to enable the HWC to more accurately identify potential finds.

[000546] Another aspect of the present invention relates to assisting a person in reading text that is presented in a physical form, such as a book, magazine, on a computer screen or phone screen, etc. In embodiments, the camera on the HWC can image the page and the processor in the HWC can recognize the words on the page. Lines, boxes, or other indicators may be presented in the HWC to indicate which words are being captured and recognized. The user would then be viewing the page of words through the see-through display with an indication of which words have been recognized. The recognized words can then be translated or converted from text that is then presented to the user in the see-through display. Alternately, the recognized words can be converted from text to speech, which is then presented to the user through the head worn speakers, headphones, visual displays, etc. This gives the user a better understanding of the accuracy associated with the text recognition relative to the translated text or converted speech.

[000547] In a further aspect of the invention, a magnetic attachment structure is provided for the combiner to enable the combiner to be removable. In the optics associated with a HWC 102 such as for example the optics shown in Figure 6, it is important that the combiner 602 be accurately positioned and rigidly held below the frame of the HWC and the upper optical module 202 located inside the frame. At the same time, the combiner 602 can become damaged so that it needs to be replaced, or it may need to be cleaned periodically so that it is advantageous for the combiner to be removable. Figure 123 shows an illustration of a cross section of a single combiner 12360 with the magnetic attachment structure as shown from the side to show the angle of the combiner 12360. Figure 124 shows an illustration of two combiners 12360 with magnetic attachment structures attaching the combiners 12360 to the frame of the HWC 12350 as shown from the front of the HWC. The combiner 12360 has two or more pins 12365 that are attached to the combiner 12360 such that the pins have parallel axes. The pins 12365 are shown as being inserted into holes drilled through the combiner 12365 and attached in place with adhesive such as UV cured adhesive. The pins 12365 are made of a magnetic material such as for example 420 stainless steel. The pins 12365 extend into parallel bores in the frame of the HWC 12350 so that the combiner 12360 is fixedly held in place relative to the frame of the HWC 12350. The attachment and bend of the pins 12365 establish the angle between the combiner 12360 and the optics in the frame of the HWC 12350. A magnet 12370 is bonded into the frame of the HWC 12350 such that the pin 12365 attracted by the magnet 12370 and thereby the pin 12365 and the attached combiner 12360 are held in place relative to the frame of the HWC 12350. The magnet 12370 is selected so that the force exerted by the magnet 12370 onto the pin 12365 is strong enough to hold the combiner 12360 in place during normal use, but weak enough that removal of the combiner 12350 is possible by the user. By having the pins 12365 and associated bores parallel, the combiner 12350 can be easily removed for cleaning, or replaced if damaged. To provide a more rigid and repeatable connection between the combiner 12360 and the frame of the HWC 12350, the pins can fit into an extended tight bore in the frame of the HWC 12350. In addition, the pins 12365 can include a flange as shown that seats onto an associated flat surface of the frame of the frame 12350 or a flat surface of the magnet 12370 to further establish the angle of the combiner 12360 and the vertical position of the combiner 12360. In a preferred embodiment, the magnet 12370 is a ring magnet and the pin 12365 extends through the center of the ring magnet. The magnet 12370 can also be included in an insert (not shown) that further includes a precision bore to precisely align and guide the pin 12365. The insert can be made of a hardened material such as a ceramic to provide a bore for the pin 12365 that is resistant to wear during repeated removal and reinstallation of the combiner 12360. The pins can be accurately positioned within the combiner through the use of a jig that holds the pins and the combiner. The holes for the pins in the combiner are then made larger than the pins so there is a clearance to allow the combiner and pins to be fully positioned by the jig. An adhesive such as a UV curing adhesive is then introduced to the holes and cured in place to fasten the pins to the combiner in a position that is established by the jig. In a further embodiment, the combined structure of the pins 12365 and the combiner 12350 are designed to break if subjected to a high impact force, to thereby protect the user from injury. Where the pin 12365 or the combiner are designed to break at a previously selected impact force that is less than the impact force required to break the frame of the HWC 12350 so that the combiner 12350 with the attached pins 12365 can be simply replaced when damaged. In yet a further embodiment, by providing a method for easily replacing the combiners 12360, different types of combiners can also be provided to the user such as: polarized combiners, combiners with different tints, combiners with different spectral properties, combiners with different levels of physical properties, combiners with different shapes or sizes, combiners that are partial mirrors or combiners that are notch mirrors, combiners with features to block faceglow as previously described herein.

[000548] Another aspect of the present invention relates to securely linking HWC's 102 such that files, streams, feeds, data, information, etc. can be securely shared. HWC's 102 may be on local area networks, wide area networks, cell networks, WiFi networks, close proximity networks, etc. or may otherwise be connected with devices to enable sharing. In embodiments, intuitive methods are deployed to enable the wearer of a HWC to identify a person or device for sharing. Once identified, information may be transferred between devices and/or confirmation of proper identification may be made before any information is transferred.

[000549] Figure 125 illustrates a generalized form of network topology 12500, which may be deployed in connection with linking and sharing methods as is discussed in more detail herein. In figure 125, each device in the network 12500 (e.g. each HWC 102) is represented as a node 12502 and 12504. In this embodiment, each node 12502 and 12504 may communicate directly with any other node 12502 and 12504. Each node may also communicate indirectly; through another node. In embodiments, there is a master node 12504 that routes all communications and may have higher bandwidth than the slave nodes 12502. The network 12500 may be a self healing ad hoc network, WiFi network, cell network, local network, wide area network, close proximity network, etc. Any node 12502 and 12504 may link and/or share information with any other node 12502 and 12504 of the network 12500.

[000550] Figure 126 illustrates an embodiment of a sharing interface presented in the FOV 12608 of a HWC 102. The sharing interface may have a representation of a file or stream 12602 that is capable of being shared along with several options for sharing method 12604 (e.g. share via SMS message, text message, email, social network, posting, direct file transfer, etc.). The sharing interface may also interoperate with a user interface to allow the wearer of the HWC to select the file or stream 12602 and sharing option 12604. In this embodiment, a cursor 12610 is illustrated to indicate that an external user interface, gesture, eye tracking control, etc. may be used to assist the wearer with selecting items within the FOV 12608.

[000551] Figure 127 illustrates a method of identifying a person with whom a wearer of a HWC 102 may want to link or share information. In this embodiment, there are three people 12702a, 12702b, and 12702c within an identified sharing zone 12702 (e.g. an area identified by a GPS or other triangulation established zone(s)). The sharing zone may be indicative of a predetermined area that provides confidence that anyone in the zone is in close enough proximity to one another that they can identify one another for linking and/or sharing. Once identified as being in the sharing zone 12702, identification of the people's viewing angles 12704 may be established. This is to find two viewing angles that are substantially aligned and opposite to determine if two people are looking at one another. For example, person 12702a and person 12702c have substantially aligned and opposite viewing angles so the system may assume that, since they are in the sharing zone and apparently looking at one another, if one of the two has initiated a share command (e.g. via sharing option 12604) that the two intend to share information and/or become linked.

[000552] In embodiments, the viewing angle of a person 12704 may be determined by an electronic compass in the HWC, through examination of camera images, or otherwise. The substantial alignment and opposite nature of the viewing angles 12704 may be determined by comparing each person's individual viewing angles 12704 as determined by internal electronic compasses in the HWCs. In an embodiment, it may be determined by determining each person's viewing angle 12704 through a determination of environmental images captured by the two people when the environment is a known environment such that a comparison of the images and the known features in the environment can be made. In another embodiment, the HWCs may take images to form an understanding if the desired sharing pair are looking at one another by estimating the person's direction in the image.

[000553] Once substantial alignment and opposite directionality of the two people is established, user information of the two people 12708 may be obtained such that device identification 12710 (e.g. IP address, hardware serial number, security code, etc.) may be obtained. In embodiments, user information may not be required and device identification may be obtained.

[000554] In embodiments, after the device ID 12710 is retrieved for the receiving device, of the pair of devices, an indication confirming the interaction may be presented in the FOV 12714 of the sender's HWC 102. The sender may then interact with the indication (e.g. through an external UI, gesture, eye movement, wink, etc.). For example, the user may use an external user interface, as described herein elsewhere, to interact with the content in the FOV 12714 with a cursor. In embodiments, the sender may gesture (e.g. a thumbs up sign) and the gesture may be captured and interpreted by the sender's HWC 102 as an indication confirming the interaction with the receiver.

[000555] Figure 128 illustrates another embodiment where linking and sharing partners are established. In this embodiment, a sender 12804 may capture facial images, or other biometric information, of potential recipients 12802 in the area by scanning the area. The facial images may be processed remotely or locally to obtain facial recognition information from a database 12808 when it is available. Once the people are recognized, assuming at least one is in the facial recognition database 12808, user information 12810 and device ID 12812 may be obtained. Each of the recognized people may be represented in the FOV 12818 of the sender's HWC 102. In

embodiments, the recognized people may be presented in a facial recognition pallet 12814, through augmented reality where identifications are augmented in a way that identifies the people as the sender views them through the FOV 12818 or otherwise presented. Once presented with user and/or device information, the sender can select one or more of the people to link to and/or share with through techniques described herein.

[000556] Figure 129 illustrates another embodiment where linking and sharing partners are established. In this embodiment, the range of acceptable recipients may be in very close proximity and a near field communication (NFC) zone 12902 may be established and anyone within the NFC zone 12902 may be identified, or an attempt may be made to identify anyone in the zone. Once identified, user information and/or device information may be retrieved such that they can be presented to the sender in his FOV 12912. In embodiments, the identified people may be represented in a NFC pallet 12914, through augmented reality where identifications are augmented in a way that identifies the people as the sender views them through the FOV 12912, or otherwise presented. Once presented with user and/or device information, the sender can select one or more of the people to link to and/or share with through techniques described herein.

[000557] Figure 130 illustrates a linking/sharing embodiment that includes the sender communicating a request for identifications within the proximity of the sender (a "proximity request") 13002. The proximity request 13002 may be sent through a communication protocol that has a restricted distance (e.g. NFC request) such that the only recipients of the request are in close proximity to the sender. In other embodiments, the proximity request 13002 may require confirmation of the location of the potential recipients (e.g. a GPS location) to confirm that the potential recipients are in the proximity of the sender. Once the potential recipients' devices respond to the proximity request 13002, user information 13004 and/or device information 13008 may be obtained and presented in the FOV 13012 of the sender. In embodiments, the presentation and sender interactions with the content in the FOV may be as described herein. Figure 130 illustrates a position or AR map of the region with the identified people and/or devices.

[000558] Figure 131 illustrates another embodiment of share/linking. In this embodiment, a recipient and/or sender may gesture 13102 to indicate the desire to share/link. The other's HWC sensor (s) (e.g. camera) may capture the gesture and then it may be interpreted as an appropriate share/link gesture. People or groups may have preset gestures that indicate acceptable sharing. The sharing gestures may be securely maintained and periodically changed to maintain security. The gestures may be complicated motions including several different motions. Similar to the other embodiments described herein elsewhere, once identified, user and/or device information may be obtained and indications of same may be presented in the FOV 13114 for interaction. Once the link is established, as with the other embodiments described herein, the user may transfer files/streaming information or make other transfers by activating items in the HWC FOV user interface (e.g. by using a gesture, external user interface, etc.), gesturing (e.g. making a throwing motion to indicate the transfer, etc.

[000559] Figure 132 illustrates another embodiment of share/linking. In this embodiment, a recipient and/or sender may make a voice command 13202 to indicate the desire to share/link. The other's HWC sensor(s) (e.g. microphone) may capture the voice command 13202 and then it may be interpreted as an appropriate share/link gesture. People or groups may have preset voice commands that indicate acceptable sharing. The sharing voice commands may be securely maintained and periodically changed to maintain security. In embodiments, voice recognition may be used to identify the person making the voice command. This may be of particular need in a secure environment. Similar to other embodiments described herein elsewhere, once identified, user and/or device information may be obtained and indications of same may be presented in the FOV 13214 for interaction.

[000560] Figure 133 illustrates another embodiment of share/linking. In this embodiment, a recipient and/or sender may send a light signal 13302 to indicate the desire to share/link. The other's HWC sensor(s) (e.g. camera) may capture the light signal 13302 and then it may be interpreted as an appropriate share/link gesture. People or groups may have preset light signals 13302 that indicate acceptable sharing. The light transmission may be coded to be read automatically by the other party. The sharing light signals 13302 may be securely maintained and periodically changed to maintain security. Similar to the other embodiments described herein elsewhere, once identified, user and/or device information may be obtained and indications of same may be presented in the FOV 13314 for interaction.

[000561] Figure 134 illustrates another embodiment of share/linking. In this embodiment, a recipient and/or sender may read RFID or other short-range identification markers 13402 to indicate an acceptable person for sharing/linking. Similar to the other embodiments described herein elsewhere, once identified, user and/or device information may be obtained and indications of same may be presented in the FOV 13114 for interaction.

[000562] The linking and sharing embodiments described herein may be used to establish secure and known nodes in a communication network. For example, users may want to share photos, videos, files, data, information, streams,

communications, etc., and the users may want to be sure that they know who they are sharing with so they may use a technique or combination of techniques described herein. In combat situations, users may want to share similar types of information but want to also keep the sharing from any enemy combatants so the security provided by the identification and confirmation techniques described herein may have added security value. Feeds from drones, mDoppler information as described herein, other combatants' camera views, etc. may be shared via techniques and combination of techniques described herein.

[000563] Another aspect of the present invention relates to shadowing digitally presented content in an FOV of a HWC such that the content appears to have substantially similar lighting as objects in the surrounding environment that the wearer can view through the FOV.

[000564] Figure 135 illustrates a digital object 13502 presented in connection with a digital shadow 13504 in a FOV 13508 of an HWC 102. The digital shadow 13504 is positioned such that the wearer of the HWC 102 perceives that it is associated with the digital object 13502 and that the lighting conditions in the surrounding environment are causing the shadow from the object. In embodiments, the GPS location, compass heading, time of year and time of day relating to the HWC's position may be known and the shadow may be positioned and sized based thereon such that the object appears to be lit by the sun. In other embodiments, the lighting conditions in the environment may be evaluated (e.g. through imaging of the

environment) such that the lighting conditions in the environment can be mimicked. For example, a camera in the HWC 102 may image the environment and a processor, either onboard or remote from the HWC 102, may interpret the general position of the dominate lighting to then determine position of the digital shadow 13504. In situations, there may be more than one light source (e.g. in an auditorium, stadium, inside a building, on a lighted street, etc.) and the several light sources may cause several shadows to be cast by objects in the environment. To make a more realistic image, in embodiments, the digital shadow may be several shadows indicative of the several light sources. In embodiments this may include determining shadow effects at a certain position in the environment because the digital object 13502 is positioned in the FOV 13508 to be perceived by the wearer at the certain position in the environment. This may be accomplished by deciphering images taken in connection with certain positions in the environment. In embodiments, the artificial lighting systems may be of known or predictable positions and the digital shadow may be positioned based on the known or predictable positions.

[000565] An aspect of the present invention relates to providing tactile feedback in a HWC 102. In embodiments, the tactile feedback is indicative of a sensor system output. The sensor may be in the HWC 102, associated with the HWC 102, associated with another device or system, etc. In embodiments, the HWC 102 is worn by a person in a vehicle (e.g. a car, truck, motorcycle, etc.) and the sensor system in the vehicle feeds information to the HWC 102 and the HWC 102 responds by providing tactile feedback (e.g. a vibration in the HWC102).

[000566] In embodiments, the HWC 102 may have a vibration system that vibrates to alert the wearer of certain sensed conditions. In embodiments, the vibration system (e.g. an actuator that moves quickly to cause vibration in the HWC 102) may be mounted in a side arm. In embodiments, the vibration system may be capable of causing different vibration modes that may be indicative of different conditions. For example, the vibration system may include a multi-mode vibration system, piezoelectric vibration system, variable motor, etc, that can be regulated through computer input and a processor in the HWC 102 may send control signals to the vibration system to generate an appropriate vibration mode. In embodiments, the HWC 102 may be associated with other devices (e.g. through Bluetooth, WiFi, etc.) and the vibratory control signals may be associated with sensors associated with the other device. For example, the HWC 102 may be connected to a car through Bluetooth such that sensor(s) in the car can cause activation of a vibration mode for the vibration system. The car, for example, may determine that a risk of accident is present (e.g. risk of the driver falling asleep, car going out of its lane, a car in front of the wearer is stopped or slowing, radar in the car indicates a risk, etc.) and the car's system may then send a command, via the Bluetooth connection, to the HWC 102 to cause a vibratory tone to be initiated in the HWC 102.

[000567] Figure 136 illustrates a vehicle alert system that provides tactile response through a HWC 102 to sensor indications. In embodiments, sensor feedback relating to the automotive experience may originate from sensor systems in the vehicle 13604, HWC 102, or elsewhere. The vehicle 13604 may have, for example, radar 13608, range detectors, cameras, sound sensors, moisture sensors, IMU control sensors, skid sensors, fault sensors, internet based remote sensors, etc. and each of these sensor system may, alone or in combination, cause an alert, alarm, or other indication that is converted into a tactile response in the HWC 102. The vehicle 13604A may receive a communication from another vehicle 13604B that may produce an indication that is converted into a tactile response in the HWC 102. The vehicle 13604 may use its sensor system to sense alignment in the road, position with respect to environmental objects (e.g. lines 13610, other vehicles 13604, signs, buildings, walls, etc.), etc. The tactile response in the HWC 102 may be deployed through a vibration 13602 in the HWC 102, as described herein elsewhere. The vibration may be developed in a temple/ear-horn of the HWC 102, both temples/ear-horns, the section above the wearer's eye(s) (e.g.

independently, at the same time or selectively). In embodiments, the tactile response may occur when the vehicle senses itself drifting out of a lane, another vehicle is in its 'blind spot,' the collection of sensors indicates erratic driving or sleepy driving, there is a sensor error, another vehicle is approaching quickly with respect to the speed of the vehicle, etc. In embodiments, the HWC 102 on-board sensors (i.e. integrated with the HWC 102) may be used in connection with the driving experience to provide tactile feedback. For example, many of the vehicle sensor systems can be augmented , duplicated, or replaced by the sensors in the HWC 102. The HWC 102 may have an IMU to sense and interpret movements looking for erratic driving, camera(s) looking for hazards, range finders watching for collision risks, etc. In embodiments, the tactile feedback may be provided in levels, intensities, patterns, etc., depending on the type of alert. For example, a collision alert may cause an intense response on both sides of the HWC 102, a blind spot alert may cause a slight tactile feedback on the blind side of the vehicle, a temperature alert may be a short burst, an erratic driving alert may escalate over time, etc.

[000568] The HWC 102 may detect the wearer's heart rate and provide tactile or visual alerts based on same. For example, the HWC 102 may have a heart monitor in one or both ear-horns, nose-bridge or other point that contacts the skin. The HWC 102 may check heart rate or blood pressure through eye imaging technologies, such as those described herein elsewhere. The HWC 102 may have imaging capabilities (e.g. an IR light and IR camera that is positioned to monitor blood flow through the skin of the wearer's forehead or other area proximate the HWC 102. The heart rate, pressure or other detected heath indication may produce a tactile or visual (e.g. through the HWC 102 display) during the automotive experience.

[000569] In embodiments, eye imaging and tracking technologies (e.g. those described herein elsewhere) may be used in connection with the automotive experience. For example, eye imaging may be used to understand if the driver is getting tired or falling asleep. This may be done by imaging and interpreting images relating to the eye lids, color (e.g. redness) of the sclera, pupil dilation, etc. Eye imaging may also be used to interpret blood toxicity level, blood alcohol level, blood drug level, driving under the influence, which may involve comparison to a standard, etc. Eye imaging may also be used to understand where the user is looking and/or focusing. In the event that the HWC 102 interprets the eye imaging as an indication that the driver is not looking at the road or otherwise distracted (e.g. based on eye direction, focal plane being too close, eye movement pattern, etc.) a tactile or visual alert may be initiated. In embodiments, a prediction of driver distraction may cause other sensor alerts to be adjusted. For example, if it is predicted that the driver is distracted, a collision alert may be initiated earlier or it may come more intensely than if it seemed that the driver was paying attention.

[000570] In embodiments, the HWC 102 may predict whether the HWC 102 is being worn by a driver, front seat passenger, or back seat passenger. For example, the HWC may use an integrated camera to capture an image in front of the wearer and then interpret the image looking for certain identifying objects. The driver is in front of driver controls (e.g. steering wheel, speedometer, other instruments, etc.) and the driver is in a certain position with respect to the vehicle (e.g. on the left side in the front in the U.S.). The HWC 102 may deploy certain functions differently for the driver. For example, content displayed may be displayed only in certain limited situations and it may be presented towards the sides of the displays to reduce driver distraction. The HWC 102 tactile feedback from the vehicle systems may only be for the driver because the driver is the only one that can control the vehicle. However, in embodiments a passenger may also or alternatively receive an alert from a sensor system to assist to the driver. For example, the passenger may receive a tactile or visual indication of driver sleepiness, distraction, erratic driving, etc. so the passenger is alerted to help or stop interacting with the driver (e.g. stop talking or otherwise distracting the driver).

[000571] User identification (e.g. through eye imaging, or HWC 102 personal settings/user login information, etc.) and seat position may also be used to set the vehicle's systems. For example, if it is determined that a HWC 102 is being worn by a driver and the personal vehicle preferences for the driver are known, the vehicle preferences may be set automatically. This may cause the seat, steering wheel, driving mode, mirror positions, lighting system, locking preferences, etc, to be set automatically based on the user identification and seat position. [000572] In embodiments, vehicle sensor information may be visual displayed in proximity to the vehicle's mirrors or other natural view-point for the type of information the driver may be interested in. For example, since the driver normally looks at the vehicle's mirrors to look for other vehicles and objects other sensor feedback information (e.g. blind spot alert) may be displayed only when the wearer can view a mirror through the see through display and then the content may be virtually connected to the mirror such that the driver perceives the information to be connected to the mirror (e.g. by using the mirror, portion of the mirror, edge of the mirror, etc. as a marker for the content position in the FOV of the HWC 102). In embodiments, the displayed content may augment the view of the mirror or replace what the driver can see in the mirror. The augmented view may cause the mirror to appear larger than normal so additional imagery or other content can be displayed in connection with the mirror to the driver.

[000573] In embodiments, the vehicle's image capture process may be initiated when the driver looks in a particular pre-determined direction (e.g. as determined by his sight heading or HWC compass heading, eye imaging, etc.). Several cameras may initiate capture when the driver looks in a particular direction and the camera images may be stitched together for presentation in the HWC 102 displays.

[000574] In embodiments, displayed content may be positioned proximate or over the top of controls or gauges. For example, the vehicle may have a gauge cluster and augmented content may be positioned to appear when the user is looking at the gauge cluster (e.g. as determined through eye imaging).

[000575] In embodiments, sensors in the HWC 102 may be used to record events that occurred in a vehicle. For example, if the vehicle gets into an accident the sensors may record the wearer's head speed, camera images, etc. The sensors may also be used to establish traffic or roadway conditions and the information may be communicated to a server through a network connection.

[000576] In embodiments, the HWC 102 may be used to visualize customizable features of a vehicle. For example, in a car showroom, a wearer may augment the view of a vehicle to illustrate the exterior (e.g. color, wheels, tires, custom parts, etc.) or interior (seat type, fabric types, covering types, colors, etc.). In

embodiments, the view may not be an augmented view; it may be a virtual view where the entire vehicle or portion thereof is presented as digital content and the wearer can select various customizable portions for alteration.

[000577] In embodiments, a system may compare the HWC 102 compass heading to the vehicle's compass heading, or the GPS heading, and adjust the auto- driving system (e.g. auto braking or collision avoidance) or auto-alert system (e.g.

collision warning) accordingly. For example, if the driver is looking out the side window, the auto-driving system may be configured to be more sensitive and/or respond quicker because the fact that the two compass headings do not align may be interpreted as an indication that the driver is distracted. This may result in the car's cameras being operated at a faster frame rate, the threshold time to take action may be shorter, the action may be more aggressive, etc.

[000578] In embodiments, a GPS destination may be indicated to the user by an augmented reality marker that is visible in the glasses. The augmented reality marker may then highlight where the destination is before the user gets there even if the user has to turn their head to see it.

[000579] In embodiments, the display(s) in the HWC 102 may be turned off when the car is moving and turned back on when the car stops. This may be done for the driver only (e.g. in a situation where the driver is identified as the driver through technologies described herein). In embodiments, the information that would have otherwise been displayed while the driver was driving may be selectable or otherwise displayable after the vehicle stops (e.g. as determined by a vehicle feedback system or the HWC sensors). For example, a smart email manager could present a summarized view of email or other information when stopped to make it easier to scan what has come in while driving. This may also save on battery life since the display would be off much of the time.

[000580] In embodiments, the vehicle or the HWC 102 may have a thermal camera facing forward and information from the thermal camera may be presented visually (e.g. augmented reality indicating the area of interest, a content message, etc.) or through tactile feedback (e.g. as illustrated herein). This may be used to identify hot spots such as animals or people near the road. It can also be used to identify cold spots, which can be very important when near freezing to help identify potential areas of black ice on the road such as on bridges. This may include special settings on the thermal camera (e.g. cooling the thermal camera to below freezing). In embodiments, this would be done when the ambient conditions are near freezing to avoid condensation on the cover glass of the thermal camera. This may be used to increase sensitivity near freezing.

[000581] In embodiments, the HWC 102 may communicate wirelessly with the vehicle's self-monitoring system to identify performance measurements, settings, fluid measurements, faults, problems, etc. In embodiments, as the driver walks around looking at the car, the areas of interest may be highlighted (e.g. through an augmented reality image, content message, etc.). In embodiments, a description of problems and suggested courses of action may be included. For example, the tire pressure light may be on, and the HWC 102 display may show which tire is low. Another example is where the coolant temperature is or has been high and when the driver opens the hood the HWC 102 displays display content that highlights the radiator cap, the fan belt, and/or the water pump. Another example is where, at a maintenance interval, the areas of the car that need attention are highlighted when the user looks at the car. This may include messaging to indicate what needs to be done.

[000582] Another aspect of the present invention relates to calibrating the position of content that is displayed in a see-through display of a HWC 102. When displaying content in a head-worn see-through display in an augmented reality situation it is important to have a proper alignment between the wearer's see-through view of the environment and the content that is intended to augment some aspect of the

environment. There are a number of things that can cause a mis-alignment. The FOV of the camera in the HWC 102 may not be aligned with the FOV of the see-through display, for example. In embodiments, the calibration technology may overlay captured environment images with the see-through view of the same environment and the alignment of objects, edges, etc. may be evaluated to establish a calibration factor that can be used to adjust the display position in an effort to better align the image with the environment. In embodiments, the captured image may be enhanced so it is easier to see how it overlays the environment view. In embodiments, one or more objects, edges, etc. in the captured image may be enhanced to assist with the comparison.

Embodiments of the calibration technology involve factory type or fixtured calibration. Other embodiments relate to on-person calibration.

[000583] Figure 137 illustrates a calibration embodiment in accordance with the principles of the present invention. In this example, the wearer of the HWC 102 can see through the display to see an object in the environment 13702. The object in the see-through view is the object that will be used in connection with the calibration. While the HWC 102 is positioned such that the object in the environment is visible through the see-through display, a camera on the HWC 102 captures an image of the object 13704. It is the relative placement of these two images that may be of interest in the calibration routine. If the image can be placed over the real world object while the HWC 102 stays in position than a positional calibration factor can be established. The calibration factor can then be used whenever content is to be displayed such that the content aligns with the see-through view of the environment. This may be especially important when the content presented is supposed to be positionally attached to something in the see-through view to augment something in the view.

[000584] It may be important to maintain positional alignment of the HWC 102 while capturing the image of the environment and overlaying the captured image in the see-through view so the two can be compared. In embodiments, sensors in the HWC 102 may be used to verify that such positional alignment was maintained in the process. In embodiments, the sensors may be used to predict the HWC 102 movements in order to use the predicted movement in the comparison process. For example, if the camera, IMU, eCompass, etc. in the HWC 102 detect that the HWC 102 has moved a certain amount between the environment image capture and the see-through view comparison, the movement amount may be used to shift the image capture by a respective amount to make the comparison.

[000585] A step in the calibration process involves comparing the objects in the captured environment image with the environment view itself. In embodiments, the comparison is facilitated by displaying the captured image at the same time the object of interest can be viewed through the see-through display. As illustrated above, if the HWC 102 moves between the time the image is captured and displayed for comparison, the internal sensors on the HWC 102 may be used to compensate for the movement. Capturing the combined image through the see-through display may involve capturing the image directly or indirectly. As indirect capture technique is illustrated in figure 137. In this example, a camera on the HWC 102 is used to capture the combined image as a reflection off of the wearer's eye 13708. This reflection is sometimes referred to as glint. The glint, in this example, includes a somewhat distorted reflected view of the combined image. This glint capture can then be analyzed for alignment attributes. The glint should have attributes indicative of the object as seen through the see-through display and the object as captured and displayed.

[000586] In embodiments, to increase the ability to make the alignment comparison, the object of interest in the captured image 13704 may be enhanced such that it is easier to see and image. It may be enhanced to make the object brighter, higher in contrast with respect to areas in the image, a different color, a non-visible color (e.g. IR), etc.

[000587] Continuing with the example illustrated in figure 137, after the combined image is captured, the respective objects, lines, images, etc. can be compared for alignment attributes (e.g. horizontal alignment, vertical alignment, skew, rotation, etc.) and a calibration factor can be established that reflects the movement needed for proper alignment 13710. Once the calibration factor is established it can be used to position new content when displayed. In embodiments, the position change does not need to occur on each content presentation, the display FOV may be shifted such that whenever content is subsequently presented it is presented in an adjusted position FOV. The image 13712 illustrates how the glint shows an overlapping displayed content with the environment viewed object. In embodiments, the calibration process may be done periodically, upon request, randomly, or at other times. In embodiments, the

environment image capture, image display and combined image capture happen in very fast sequence to minimize negative effects from HWC 102 movements.

[000588] As disclosed above, the combined image may be captured with a direct capture technique. For example, the HWC 102 may be fixtured such that it does not move (e.g. at the factory, in the store, at home, etc.), the captured environment image may be displayed and a camera may be positioned to view through the see- through display to capture the combined image. This may be done as part of an initial set up, for example, to initially calibrate the on-board camera and display. The direct combined image capture process involves capturing the combined image directly through the see-through display. The indirect combined image capture process involves capturing the combined image off a reflective surface (e.g. the wearer's eye, a reflective surface placed to reflect the combined image light, a reflective surface placed where the wearer's eye would normally be, etc.).

[000589] In another embodiment, a camera is used to capture an image of the surrounding environment through the see-through display at essentially the same time that an image of the same environment is taken by a camera positioned in the HWC 102 but not through the see-through display. These images can then be overlaid for alignment attributes in the calculation of a positional calibration factor.

[000590] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the physical location at which digital content is going to be presented to a person wearing a HWC 102. In embodiments, content is presented in a FOV of a HWC 102 when the HWC 102 is at a physical location that was selected based on personal information particular to the wearer of the HWC 102. In embodiments, the physical location is identified by a geo-spatial location and an attribute in the surroundings proximate the geo-spatial location. The attribute may be something that more precisely places the content within the environment located at the geo-spatial location. The attribute may be selected such that content appears in a hallway, office, near a billboard, rooftop, outside wall, object, etc. Personal information relating to the person may be stored such that it can be retrieved during a process of determining at what physical location in the world certain digital content should be presented to the person. In embodiments, the content may relate to the physical location. In other embodiments, the content does not necessarily relate to the physical location. In instances where the physical location is selected based on personal information and the content does not relate to the location, the location may have been selected because the location is of the type that the person may spend more time viewing or interacting with content of the type to be presented.

[000591] In embodiments, a method of presenting digital content in a FOV of a HWC 102 may include identifying that the HWC 102 has arrived at a physical location, wherein the physical location is pre-determined based on personal information relating to the person wearing the HWC, and presenting the digital content in relation to an attribute in the surroundings where the attribute was pre-selected based on the personal information. The personal information may relate to personal attributes, demographics, behaviors, prior visited locations, stored personal locations, preferred locations, travel habits, etc. For example, the person wearing the HWC 102 may frequent a venue often (e.g. a place of work), and the system may present content to the person when he arrives at the venue. The type of content may also be particular to the venue, or other location selection criteria, such that the person is more apt to view and/or interact with the content. The content, for example, may relate to services or products relating to the person's work and as such the system may present the content at or near the person's place of work under the assumption that the person is going to be more interested in content relating to his work when he is at or near his place of work. In another example, content may be presented to the person when the person is passing by a sports complex because the person is generally characterized as being interested in sports. This presentation may be based on the assumption that the person may be more interested in content presented in connection with a venue that he finds interesting.

[000592] In embodiments, the placement of the digital content may be based on the selection of an environment's attribute, which was selected based on personal information relating to the person wearing the HWC 102. The personal information may suggest that the person would be more apt to interact with content if it is presented indoors, outdoors, in a room, in a hallway, on a blank wall, over a TV, near a table, near a chair, near a vehicle, while sitting, while standing, while walking, etc. For example, a 50 year old man may be more apt to interact with content that is presented in an area where he will likely be sitting, while a 17 year old man may be more apt to interact with content while he is moving. This may cause the system to choose an internal wall of a building for the presentation to the 50 year old and an external wall of the building for the presentation to the 17 year old. The 50 year old may be more apt to interact with content presented near an entrance to his place of work and the 17 year old may be more apt to interact with content when presented proximate a vehicle. Each of these attributes near the geo-spatial location are eligible candidates for the presentation of the content and the selection of the one(s) to be used may be based on the personal information known about the person wearing the HWC 102.

[000593] Figure 138 illustrates a content presentation technology in accordance with the principles of the present invention. Figure 138 illustrates a person entering a location proximate to his place of work 13802. This location has been preselected 13804 as a physical location for the presentation of digital content in the HWC 102 based on stored personal information 13808. The physical location may be further refined by identifying a wall, object or other more specific location for the presentation of the content. For example, a work wall 13814 proximate to the geo-spatial location of work 13802 may be identified for placement of the content presentation 13812 to be viewed within the FOV of the HWC 13810. The wall may then be used as a virtual marker or a virtual marker or physical marker may be identified on the wall such that the HWC 102 identifies the marker and then presents the content proximate the marker. A virtual marker may be based on physical markers, objects, lines, figures, etc. For example, the intersection of a top edge and side edge of a doorway at the place of work may be used as a virtual marker and the digital content in the FOV of the HWC 102 may be presented proximate the intersection. A virtual marker may also be established at some point distant from an object (e.g. a foot from the intersection). A virtual marker may also be set based on the person's physical location and the sight heading of the HWC 102 (e.g. as determined by an eCompass on the HWC). For example, once the person arrives at the physical location that was pre-selected based on the person's personal information, the content may be displayed in the FOV of the HWC 102 when the HWC 102 is aligned with a predetermined direction. So, for example, if the person is standing in a hallway and then looks north the content may be displayed. In

embodiments, the HWC 102 identifies a physically present attribute in the surroundings and then associates the content with the attribute such that the content appears locked to the attribute from the person's perspective. For example, the person, once at the physical location, looks north and then the HWC 102 performs an analysis of the surroundings in the north direction (e.g. by imaging the surroundings with an onboard camera) to select a physical attribute to be used as a virtual marker. In embodiments, the physical marker may be pre-determined. For example, the doorway in a particular hallway may be presented as the object to key off of when setting the virtual world- locked position of the digital content. In embodiments, the physical attribute is selected based on a pre-determined criteria. For example, the system may have a list of priority placements such as being proximate a painting, picture, television, doorway, blank wall, etc., and the head-worn computer may review the physical location and select one of the priority placements for the virtual placement of the digital content.

[000594] As illustrated in figure 138, the physical location of the content presentation may be dependent upon personal information particular to the person wearing the HWC 102. For example, personal information, such as gender, height, weight, age, date of birth, heritage, credit history, etc. may be used as a selection criteria for the physical location. If the person is male, aged 50, the physical location may be selected from a set of locations that generally suits a man of that age. It could be that a male of that age does not generally interact with content when it is presented proximate his home, so the home location may be eliminated from the selection. It could also be that a male of that age tends to interact with content when he is taking public transportation so locations relating to public transportation may be given a higher priority in the physical location selection process. Similarly, a male that is 17 years of age may typically interact with content when he is home so the home location may be rated high when making the selection of physical location.

[000595] As illustrated in figure 138, the physical location of the content presentation may be dependent upon demographic information particular to the person wearing the HWC 102. For example, demographic information, such as statistically inferred information relating to a population, may be used in the selection of the physical location. If it is determined that the person is in a population of people that moves often, votes a particular way, is within a certain age range, etc. physical locations for the presentations of the content may be dependent thereon.

[000596] As illustrated in figure 138, the physical location of the content presentation may be dependent upon behavior information particular to the person wearing the HWC 102. For example, if the person tends to spend money at particular establishments, eat at particular venues, drive a certain type of car, play certain sports, work particular hours, etc., the tendencies or behaviors may influence the physical location for the content presentation.

[000597] In embodiments, a person's movements may be traced to identify the areas of general or particular interest to the person. The traced movements may indicate a place of work or workday place of interest, evening or home locations, driving habits, transportation habits, store locations and identities, etc. and the traced movements may influence the physical location for the content presentation. The movements may be traced by tracing GPS movements, IMU movements, or other sensor feedback from the HWC 102 or other device, for example.

[000598] In embodiments, external user interfaces and gestures as described herein elsewhere may be used to interact with the content and/or assist in the positioning of the content. For example, the content may be set to appear when a user is at a particular location based on the user's personal traits or information and the user may then use an external user interface to interact with the content to reposition the content within the environment, for posting at another environment, sharing the content, storing the content for later viewing, etc. The content, for example, may appear in proximity to a doorway, as illustrated in figure 138, and the user may use an external interface or gesture to move the content from its pre-set position to an alternate position (e.g. another wall, another location on the same wall, an internal wall, an external wall, an office wall, personal wall, etc.).

[000599] In embodiments, the display presentation technologies as described herein elsewhere may be used in connection with the presentation

technologies based on physical placement based on personal information. For example, the content may be presented at a physical location selected based on the person's personal information and the content may be presented to be viewed at a particular focal plane such that the user perceives it in focus when the user looks at a distance associated with the focal plane. The content may also be presented when the person is at the physical location; however, the content presentation may further be based on obstacle management technologies. In the event that the user is proximate the physical location where the content is to be presented, an evaluation of obstacles in the area may be completed and then the content presentation may be altered based on any obstacles that obscure the user's view of the content presentation location.

[000600] In embodiments, the content presented at a physical location based on personal information may further be positioned in the FOV of the HWC 102 based on sensor information as described herein elsewhere. For example, the sensor may indicate that the person is moving and the content may be re-positioned within the FOV, out of the FOV, or removed entirely, based on the detected movement. In the event that the person is deemed to be moving forward quickly, for example, it may be assumed that the person wants the center of the FOV clear so the content may be shifted towards the side of the FOV. The content may be of a type that is sensor dependent, or not sensor dependent, and it may be presented with other content that is of the opposite dependency. In embodiments, the content position may move depending on the sight heading and if the sight heading is rapidly moving the position of the content in the FOV may move but the positioning may also be damped, as described herein elsewhere. The physical location presentation based on personal information may be presented in a 'side panel' such that it is presented when the person looks to the side or turns his head to a side when the person is at the physical location.

[000601] In embodiments, eye imaging and sight heading technologies as described herein elsewhere may be used in connection with the physical location content presentation based on personal information. For example, the content may be ready for presentation once the person has reached the physical location identified but the presentation may be conditioned on the person looking in a particular direction. The direction may be indicative of the person's eye heading or sight heading.

[000602] Another aspect of the present invention relates to providing a user interface for a participant, such as a friend or other affiliated person, such that the participant can send content to a wearer of a HWC 102 to be presented at a physical location selected by the participant. The user interface may be a selectable criteria presented when the participant is sending content to a friend. For example, the participant may want to send a video to a friend from the participant's phone, HWC, or other computing system, and the participant may select an option to have the content presented at a point in time when the friend is in proximity to a physical location.

Similar to other embodiments disclosed herein elsewhere, the user interface may further provide for the selection of an attribute or attribute type to target a more particular area proximate the geo-spatial location. For example, the friend may indicate in the user interface that the content is to be delivered in an office, internal wall, external wall, etc. proximate the geo-spatial location. In embodiments, a particular attribute may be targeted, such as a particular wall or near a particular window. In other embodiments, the attribute may be a type of attribute, such as a non-specific wall or doorway. Setting a type of attribute allows flexibility in that the HWC 102 can then select the particular attribute for placement of the content. The placement selection may be based on a priority set by the sending participant or user, for example. The presentation process may further involve presenting the content influenced by the recipient's personal information or other information as disclosed herein. For example, the participant may select to send the video to a friend with a presentation setting such that the content is presented near the person's place of work, coffee shop, or other location on the way to the place of work.

[000603] Figure 139 illustrates a presentation process that involves providing a content sender participant with a user interface 13908 such that the sender can select presentation location criteria. The criteria may include a map, a list of common locations (e.g. work, home, etc.), address entry, point of interests, prior visited locations of the recipient, etc. The criteria may further include suggested or required particular content placements, such as outside, inside, in a hall, in an office, in a room, near an elevator, near a door, above a building, on a sidewalk, on a street, proximate a vehicle, etc. The suggested or required placements may modify the geo-spatial request such that, for example, the particular suggestion may be used in connection with the geo-spatial request.

[000604] Embodiments of the present invention may involve a computer implemented process that involves receiving a personally selected geo-spatial location from a sender of digital content for the presentation of the digital content in a

recipient's head-worn see-through display; and presenting, based on data indicative that the user is near the geo-spatial location, the digital content in the head-worn see- through display such that the digital content is perceived by the recipient to be associated with a physical attribute proximate the geo-spatial location. In embodiments, the personal selection may be facilitated through the use of a user interface with menu selections. The menu selections may include an indication of the recipient's frequented locations. The digital content relates to the selected geo-spatial location. For example, the digital content may be an advertisement and it may relate to a sale at a location proximate the presentation location. In embodiments, the digital content may not relate to the selected geo-spatial location. For example, a friend may have sent the recipient a virtual gift or personal message and the friend would prefer to have the recipient see, read and/or interact with the content at a pre-determined location.

[000605] In embodiments, the method further includes presenting the digital content when the head-worn computer is aligned in a pre-selected direction. For example, the sight heading, as described herein elsewhere, may align with a pre-set vector or place seen from the geo-spatial location and then the content may be presented. In embodiments, the step of presenting further includes presenting the digital content when an eye of the user is predicted to be aligned in a pre-selected direction. For example, the user's eye heading, as described herein elsewhere, such as through the use of eye imaging, may align with a pre-set vector or place seen from the geo-spatial location and then the content may be presented.

[000606] In embodiments, the user may select the digital content with an external user interface or gesture, as described herein elsewhere, to re-position or otherwise interact with the digital content. In embodiments, the step of presenting may further include identifying a potentially obstructive view object, as described herein elsewhere, and altering the digital content to indicate the potentially obstructive view. In embodiments, the step of presenting may include altering a position of the content presentation based on sensor feedback, as described herein elsewhere. For example, the sensor feedback may be indicative of the user moving forward quickly so the content may be shifted towards an edge of the FOV of the HWC to provide the user with a more clear view of his surroundings. In embodiments, the step of presenting may also include presenting the content at a location based on the recipient's personal information, or on other information as described herein.

[000607] Another aspect of the present invention relates to a user presetting preferred content receipt physical locations based on the type of content received. A HWC 102 user may preset physical locations, including geo-spatial locations and particular locations in proximity to the geo-spatial location, for the presentation of certain types of content. For example, the user may set a location near or at his place of work for the presentation of work content. The user may set nutrition and exercise content for presentation at the gym or home or while out dining. This technology provides the user with a way of organizing the presentation of content such that the user will be more apt to review and/or interact with the content and thus the content may be of more use to the user.

[000608] Figure 140 illustrates various locations where a user may want certain types of content presented in the see-through display of the HWC 102. The user may select work 14002, home 14012, a vehicle 14004, a road 14008, a gym 14010, etc. and each location may be associated with a content type. The content may or may not relate specifically to the location and one type of content may be selected to be presented at multiple locations.

[000609] In embodiments, a computer implemented process in accordance with the principles of the present invention involves establishing a plurality of content presentation settings wherein each of the plurality of settings includes an indication of a physical location where a recipient desires a type of digital content to be presented in the recipient's head-worn see-through display; and presenting content intended for delivery to the recipient when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is proximate one of the plurality of physical locations when the content type corresponds to the type of digital content to be presented at the physical location based on the content presentation setting.

[000610] In embodiments, the plurality of content presentation settings may be established through the recipient's selections on a settings user interface. The plurality of content presentation settings may be established based on the recipient's prior interactions with digital content. The presented content may relate to the physical location where presentation is made; the presented content may not relate to the physical location where presentation is made. The indication of physical location may includes a geo-spatial location and an object attribute type. The object attribute type may be a specific object's attribute. The step of presenting may also include presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute. The step of presenting may also include presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute. The process may also include receiving an indication that the recipient has selected the content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content. The step of presenting may also include identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the content to indicate the potentially obstructive view. The step of presenting may further include altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback. The sensor feedback may be indicative of the user moving forward. The step of presenting may also include presenting based on the recipient's personal information. The step of presenting may also include presenting based on a sender's location specific presentation request.

Embodiments of the present invention involve processes described herein elsewhere.

[000611] Another aspect of the present invention relates to providing supplemental content to provide hints, guidance, and/or directions to a physical location where primary content may be presented. There are situations where content is scheduled to be presented to the wearer of a HWC 102 when the wearer enters a region or physical location or looks towards a physical location and there are times when it is useful to provide additional information outside or inside of the region to provide the wearer with indications that the primary content may be presented. The supplemental content may indicate that the wearer has a personal message waiting to be viewed, an advertisement waiting to be viewed, or other information waiting to be viewed.

[000612] Figure 141 illustrates hint content 14102 and primary content 14104. The hint content, or supplemental content, may be set to be presented to the wearer of a HWC 102 when the wearer enters a physical location or region. The hint content may then provide guidance, directions or other indications relating to the primary content 14104. The hint content 14102 may be presented at locations proximate a location where the primary content 14104 is to be presented or the hint content 14102 may be set to be presented at locations remote to the location at which the primary content 14104 is set to be presented. For example, the wearer may be walking down a street and look up a the side of a building where he will see presented to him in his HWC 102 display virtual hint content 14102 that provides him with an indication that the primary content 14104 is nearby and ready to be presented once he gets to or looks at the associated pre-set physical location or environmental attribute.

[000613] In embodiments, a computer operated process may involve predetermining a physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content, wherein the primary virtual content is presented in a see-through head-worn display; and pre-determining a position for each of a plurality of directionally

informative content, wherein each of the plurality of directionally informative content is associated with a different physical environment position and indicates to a person wearing the see-through head-worn computer in what direction the primary virtual content will be found. The step of pre-determining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content may involve determining the physical environmental position based on personal information relating to the person. The step of pre-determining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content may involve determining the physical environmental position based on a content sender's requested delivery criteria. The step of predetermining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content may involve determining the physical environmental position based on the person's pre-set content delivery preferences. In embodiments, each of the plurality of directionally informative content may include video content. In embodiments, each of the plurality of directionally informative content may include an image. The physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content may include a geo- spatial position, environment attribute type, specific environment attribute, etc. In embodiments, the primary virtual content relates to the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content. In other embodiments, the primary virtual content does not relate to the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content. The primary virtual content may be presented when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is proximate the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content. The step of presenting may also include presenting the content when data indicates that the head- worn see-through display has an eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute. The step of presenting may also includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has a sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute. In embodiments, the process may also include receiving an indication that the recipient has selected the primary virtual content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content. In embodiments, the step of presenting may also include identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the primary virtual content to indicate the potentially obstructive view. The step of presenting may also include altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback. The sensor feedback may be indicative of the user moving forward. Embodiments of the present invention involve processes described herein elsewhere.

[000614] Another aspect of the present invention relates to sending a group message to a plurality of recipients where the message is presented to each of the group's recipients when each individual recipient enters a respective physical location. The physical location at which the message is presented may be based in part on the sender's preferences and in part on the recipient's preferences. As described herein, sender's and recipient's may have physical location presentation preferences and the system may reconcile these preferences before presenting the content. In a group message situation, in embodiments, a server may be involved in reconciling the sender's presentation preferences and each of the recipient's preferences.

[000615] Figure 142 illustrates a group message 14210 being sent to a plurality of recipients 14212. The group message is communicated through a server 14202 and the server reconciles a set of sender presentation preferences with a set of recipient presentation preferences for each of the group of recipients.

[000616] In embodiments, a computer operated process may involve receiving content to be delivered to a plurality of recipients, wherein each recipient of the plurality of recipients has a preference for the physical location at which the content is to be presented in the recipient's see-through head-worn display and a sender of the content has a preference for the physical location at which the content is to be presented to each recipient of the plurality of recipients; identifying a final physical location for the presentation of the content for each recipient of the plurality of recipients, wherein the final physical location is based on both the recipient's preference and the sender's preference; and causing the content to be presented to each recipient of the plurality of recipients when each recipient is proximate the final physical location identified for the recipient. In embodiments, the sender's preference overrides the recipient's preference. In embodiments, the recipient's preference overrides the sender's preference. In embodiments, the final physical location represents a location that is within acceptable positions identified for the recipient and is a priority position for the sender. In embodiments, the physical location preference for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients is established based on personal information relating to the at least one recipient. In embodiments, the physical location preference for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients is established based on the at least one recipient's selections. In embodiments, the physical location preference for the sender is established based on the sender's selection in a user interface. The physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients may include a geo-spatial position. The physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients may include an environment attribute type. The physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients may include an environment attribute. The content may or may not relate to the physical location for at least one recipients of the plurality of recipients. The content may be presented when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is proximate the final physical location for each of the recipients of the plurality of recipients. In embodiments, the step of presenting may also include presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has an eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute. The step of presenting may also include presenting the content when data indicates that the head- worn see-through display has a sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute. The process may also include receiving an indication that at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients has selected the content with an external user interface to reposition the digital content. In embodiments, the step of presenting may also include, for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients, identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the primary virtual content to indicate the potentially obstructive view. The step of presenting may also include altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback. The sensor feedback may be indicative of the user moving forward. In embodiments, the content also has a presentation location preference and the step of identifying the final presentation location for each recipient of the plurality of recipients may also include presenting based on the content presentation location preference. Embodiments of the present invention involve processes described herein elsewhere.

[000617] Figure 143 illustrates a system that reconciles recipient

preferences 14204, sender preferences 14208 and content preferences 14302 when a group message is sent and/or when content is shared. The shared content 14304 may be associated with its own location presentation settings or preferences. When it is sent to the share recipients 14308 it may go through a server system where the various preferences are reconciled before the locations for the presentation of the share content 14304 for each respective recipient is set. Content preferences 14302 may be set by an owner of the content or other party interested in the content such that the content is presented in association with certain physical location and possibly not presented with other physical locations. For example, the content may be a restaurant advertisement and the content preferences may include preferred locations proximate the actual restaurant and restrictions so the advertisement is not presented in connection with certain areas because those areas are not of the quality associated with the restaurant.

[000618] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the activation of a marker recognition system for a HWC 102. The marker recognition activation process includes identifying when the HWC 102 is physically proximate a location where content is to be presented in the HWC 102. This process can save power by reducing the amount of time the marker recognition system is active. As described in connection with other embodiments described herein, content may be set to be presented to a HWC 102 when the HWC 102 is proximate a physical location. Further embodiments may involve identifying to the HWC 102 at what location(s) it should expect to find markers for the presentation of content. With the locations pre-identified to the HWC 102 the HWC 102 can activate the marker recognition system when proximate the pre- identified locations.

[000619] In a further embodiment, a haptic alert may be presented to the user when the HWC nears a geospatial location that has associated content to be presented to the user. The haptic alert can be in the form of a vibration, electric stimulus or a change of the displayed image such as a flash, etc. [000620] Figure 144 illustrates a marker recognition activation system according to the principles of the present invention. Content is set to be presented to the HWC 102 at a physical location 14402, as described herein. A marker recognition activation zone 14404 is established for the HWC 102 such that the HWC 102 activates the marker recognition system when the HWC 102 is within the zone. The HWC 102 may deactivate the marker recognition system when the HWC 102 leaves the activation zone.

[000621] In embodiments, a computer operated process may involve presetting a geo-spatial location where content will be displayed to a user of a see-through head-worn display; establishing a region proximate the geo-spatial location; and causing a marker recognition system of the head-worn see-through display to activate when data indicates that the see-through head-worn display is within the region, wherein the marker recognition system monitors a surrounding environment to identify a marker that will act as a virtual anchor for the presentation of the content. In embodiments, the marker may be a pre-established physical attribute. In embodiments, the marker is a priority marker selected from a plurality of markers, wherein the priority marker was identified by scanning the surrounding environment in a search for the plurality of markers. In embodiments, the geo-spatial location may be selected based on personal information known about the user. In embodiments, the geo-spatial location may be selected based on a presentation preference setting established by the user. In embodiments, the geo-spatial location may be selected based on a preference of a sender of the content. In embodiments, the geo-spatial location may be selected based on a preference setting of the content. In embodiments, the content may or may not relate to the geo-spatial location. In embodiments, the content may have been sent by another user characterized as a friend of the user through a known affiliation. The content may be a text message, image file, video, etc. In embodiments, informational content may presented to the user in the see-through head-worn display to indicate to the user that primary content is queued for presentation and will be presented when the user goes to the presentation. The informational content may also include an indication of a direction in which the user will be presented with the content.

Embodiments of the present invention involve processes described herein elsewhere.

[000622] Figure 145 illustrates preloaded HWC 102 content 14502 associated with a tag, metadata, etc. 14504 that indicates to the HWC 102 at what physical location to present the content. The tag 14504 may have pre-reconciled preferences based on the recipient's preferences 14204, sender preferences 14208 and content preferences 14302.

[000623] Another aspect of the present invention relates to confirming that content intended to be presented in a HWC 102 when the HWC 102 is proximate a physical location is actually presented and/or viewed. Senders of content tend to be interested to know if the content was delivered, presented, viewed, interacted with, etc. This may be important to advertisers, businesses, individuals, etc. With content intended to be delivered at a point in the future and dependent on the user being proximate a physical location it may be even more important to have a presentation confirmation system in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

[000624] Figure 146 illustrates a presentation confirmation system in accordance with the principles of the present invention. The content is presented to the user 14308 of the HWC 102 when the user 14308 arrives at the pre-determined physical location 14902 and then a confirmation of the presentation is sent to a server or other computing system. Once communicated from the HWC 102, the confirmation may be passed on to the sender or other interested party to confirm that the content was presented at the intended location.

[000625] Figure 147 illustrates a confirmation system in accordance with the principles of the present invention. The content is presented to the user 14308 of the HWC 102 when the user 14308 arrives at the pre-determined physical location 14902. The sight heading or eye heading or persistence of either is then recorded and communicated 14702 from the HWC 102 as a confirmation.

[000626] In embodiments, a computer operated process may involve presetting a geo-spatial location where content will be displayed to a user of a see-through head-worn display; establishing a region proximate the geo-spatial location; presenting to the user in the see-through head-worn display the content when data indicative that the head-worn see-through display has entered the region; and causing a presentation confirmation to be communicated to a server based on the fact that the content was presented in the head-worn see-through display. In embodiments, the user's identity may be verified through biometric information such that the presentation confirmation represents a confirmation that the content was presented to a verified user. The user's identity may have been identified through eye imaging. In embodiments, the step of presenting to the user may also involve presenting when data indicative that the head- worn see-through display was aligned with a pre-established sight heading. The step of presenting to the user may also include presenting when data indicative that the user's eye was aligned with a pre-established eye heading. The presentation confirmation may be communicated from the server to a sender of the content. The sender may be a person characterized as a friend of the user through an known affiliation, an advertiser, etc. The presentation confirmation may include a persistence statistic indicative of how long the person viewed the content. The persistence statistic may be based on a recorded sight heading relating to the head-worn see-through display. The persistence statistic may be based on a recorded eye heading relating to the user's eye position. In embodiments the geo-spatial location may be selected based on personal information known about the user. The geo-spatial location may be selected based on a

presentation preference established for the user. The geo-spatial location may be selected based on a presentation preference of a sender of the content. The geo-spatial location may be selected based on a preference setting relating to the content.

Embodiments of the present invention involve processes described herein elsewhere.

[000627] Another aspect of the present invention relates to determining a distance between a head-worn display and an object in the environment and then presenting content in the head-worn display based on the determined distance. There are many situations where one would like to display content in a head-worn see- through display at a perspective, size, and focus such that the person wearing the head- worn display has a perspective that the content is at a particular location in the environment. As described herein elsewhere, there are times when one wants to align digital content with a object in the environment proximate to the user, but it can be difficult to estimate how far away the object is from the user. It can be important to make a good estimation of distance to the object such that any proximately associated content appears in the correct perspective and focus. In embodiments, known objects in the environment proximate the user are recognized to assist with the distance determination. For example, a HWC 102 may have access to a database of objects (e.g. on-board, server based, etc.) and the camera on the HWC 102 may be activated to look for any appearance of the objects when it is desirable to display content that is intended to have the appearance that the content is proximate an object in the environment. Once the camera system recognizes one or more known objects, an evaluation of how far each object is from the user may be done based on the known objects known physical dimensions. The physical dimensions may be used as a reference when reviewing the size of the objects in the image.

[000628] Figure 148 illustrates a situation where there is an object 14804 in the environment proximate the user of a HWC 102. The user can see through the display in the HWC 102 and see the object 14804 in the field of view 14802 of the display. A camera mounted on the HWC 102 captures an image of the object 14804. The image is then processed (e.g. on-board the HWC 102, at a server, etc.) where the object 14804 is recognized as a known object with known dimensional and/or perspective information 14810. The known object and dimensional and/or perspective information 14810 may be found in a database 14808 of such information. Once the object is identified as known a comparison of its image captured dimensions may be compared with the known object dimensions 14808 such that an estimate of the object's distance from the HWC 102 can be made.

[000629] In embodiments, the known objects may be pre-identified and they may be generalized, standard, generic, specific, etc. For example, the known objects may be a doorway, mailbox, window, window frame, house siding, brick, light switch, light post, telephone poll, road sign, speed limit sign, reflector, road reflector, vehicle, building, tile, head size, inter-pupil distance, etc.

[000630] With the distance to the known object estimated, the digital content may be presented in the field of view of the head-worn display such that it appears in a focal plane in relation to the object in the environment. In embodiments, the focal plane may be defined by a convergence plane, a perspective viewing angle, object size, focal distance, etc. For example, with the distance to the object estimated, the content may be presented such that the content's size is based on the distance, so the further away the object is, the smaller the content will appear. As another example, with the distance to the object estimated, the content may be presented in a similar perspective or angle as the object. As another example, the content may be presented at a position in the head-worn display field of view based on an estimated convergence of the user's eye's, which is based on the distance. As another example, the content may be presented such that it comes into proper focus when the user's eye focuses at the distance or other related distance. As another example, the content may be presented based on one or more of the factors of size, convergence, perspective, focal distance, etc. [000631] By way of further example, if the object in the environment is a light switch and the light switch has a cover plate, the HWC 102 system may recognize the cover plate as a standard sized cover plate and may look up the dimensions of the cover plate. Then the system may make a comparison of the size of the plate in the image and the standard physical size of the plate and make an estimate of distance. Then the HWC 102 may present content in the head-worn display field of view where the content's size is altered to appear relatively sized with respect to the plate at the distance.

[000632] Another aspect of the present invention relates to estimating distances from a head-worn computer based on the distance between known objects in an environment. As illustrated herein, known object dimensions can be used to estimate distance and assist with the contextual presentation of content in an augmented reality view using a see-through head-worn display. Similarly, many objects in the environment have known or standardized distances between them. Light poles along a road, for example, are generally separated by a standard distance. Imaging the separation and comparing the separation to a known, standardized, generalized, etc. distance can be used to understand distances into the environment. One may want content to appear to be in between the two poles, for example, and with the distance estimated, the content may be positioned, sized, focused accordingly. The objects may be light poles, telephone poles, buildings, sidewalk segments, etc.

[000633] Another aspect of the present invention relates to presenting content in a see-through head-worn display based on an estimation of a distance to a known object in the environment when the object is imaged at an off-normal perspective. The process may involve capturing an image of an object in an

environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display, recognizing the object as a known object with known physical dimensions, recognizing that the object is not at a normal angle (i.e. not parallel to the image capture device) in the image, analyzing the image of the object in relation to the known physical dimensions to determine an approximate off-normal angle of the object in the image, determine an approximate distance between an image capture device used to capture the image of the object and the object based on the known physical dimensions as applied using a model based on the off-normal angle of the object in the image, and displaying content in the head-worn display at a position apparently proximate the object and at a focal plane relative to the approximate distance.

[000634] In embodiments, the captured images of objects in the

environment may not be captured 'straight-on' and the amount of off-angle capture will change the appearance of the object. For example, it may be keystoned, of a perspective view, etc. In embodiments, once the object is recognized as a known object and it is recognized that it is off-angle, the object's image may be normalized or straightened such that it's dimensions can be compared to it's standard dimensions in the process of estimating the distance to the object.

[000635] Figure 149 illustrates a situation where the object 14804 in the environment is viewed through the field of view 14802 and also captured at an off-angle. The object 14804 appears at a perspective angle and it also appears keystoned. Image processing may be used to estimate the shapes normal view and also assess its dimensions for the distance estimation. In embodiments, to assist in the object recognition, object artifacts 14904 may be assessed. In a further embodiment, an associated object 14902 (e.g. the pole holding the stop sign) may be used to assist in the object's recognition. In embodiments, the artifact 14904 or associated object 14902 may be used for the distance estimation. For example, once one recognizes that the object is a stop sign one might use the sign post for the distance estimation because it does not appear as distorted because of its basic shape. One might also use its physical dimensions as they relate to the primary object for the distance determination. For example, stop signs are generally mounted at a standard height and the distance of the pole from the ground to the sign may be used in the distance estimation.

[000636] Another aspect of the present invention relates to using the 'pose' or perspective view angle of an object in the environment for alignment, shaping, sizing, and/ or other adaptation of digital content presented in the field of view of the head- worn display such that the content appears to properly fit into the see-through scene. It can be difficult to place, arrange, shape, size and focus augmented reality content as an overlay in an unfamiliar see-through environment. In embodiments, the HWC 102 looks for known objects in the environment in an attempt to properly characterize the positional pose of the object such that digital content can be adapted to fit the scene. For example, a light switch plate may be recognized as a known object with known dimensions and the HWC 102 system may recognize that the plate is at an off-normal angle from the capture system. The perspective view of the plate, including keystoning, may be determined such that the content can be adapted to fit into the same or related perspective, which may include modifying the content's shape, perspective shape, keystone, size, focus plane, etc. such that it appears to match the scene from the user's perspective.

[000637] Figure 79 illustrates a situation where the object 14804 is being viewed through the see-through display field of view 14802 at a non-normal angle such that the object 14804 appears in a perspective view. In this embodiment, the object 14804 is a known and recognized object with known dimensions. The object is imaged and the image is processed to understand, with comparison to the known dimensions, the nature of the perspective view. Then, the content can be manipulated or chosen to match the perspective view of the object from the user's perspective. The object may be adapted to larger, smaller, greater angle, less angle, etc. depending on the intended reference surface and then the perspective aligned content 7902 can be presented in the field of view in relation to the object such that the content appears consistent with the user's perspective of the object in the scene.

[000638] In embodiments, a recognized known object may be selected as a reference when selecting a surface for content association. For example, in an unfamiliar scene, the HWC 102 may be assessing where to place certain content, such as a wall. When making the assessment, it may be important to select a reference that provides perspective viewing angles, so the HWC 102 may look for known objects. This can be especially useful in situations where wall lines are not available for analysis. Once the HWC 102 recognizes a known object and recognizes a related surface suitable for content association, the process of selecting the related surface and adjusting the content to suit the scene can be executed.

[000639] Another aspect of the present invention relates to confirming a distance estimation by imaging and evaluating the known object. As disclosed herein elsewhere, there are situations where the content is going to be presented at a distance based on a geo-spatial location. When the geo-spatial location of the head-worn computer and the geo-spatial location of the desired content association are both known, the content can be manipulated such that it appears to fit the scene at that distance. As described herein elsewhere, an issue arises when, for example, the user does not have an unobstructed view of the geo-spatial location for the content presentation. In embodiments, the HWC 102 may confirm that the user has an unobstructed view of the geo-spatial location by recognizing a known object at or near the distance prescribed by the difference in geo-spatial locations and determining a distance to the object. For example, if content is to be presented to appear to be at a distance of 100 feet from the user at an angle in front of the user, the HWC may look for objects in the prescribed direction and then use the technologies described herein to determine distance to the objects in an assessment of the unobstructed view. If a known object is on a surface that appears to be blocking the user's view of the prescribed geo-spatial location for the presentation association, then obstructed view techniques (as described herein elsewhere) may be used to alter the presentation of the content.

[000640] Another aspect of the present invention relates to minimizing distance estimation errors when assessing a distance from a head-worn computer to an object in the environment when the distance assessment is based on a known object's physical dimensions. It is possible that when the HWC 102 recognizes an object as a known object with known physical properties that it got it wrong and the system made the wrong association between the image of the object and the object identification. In embodiments, to minimize this problem, more than one object is recognized and a statistical model is used to assess the multiple distances to the multiple objects. For example, effectively, a map of the known object distances may be developed analyzed for anomalies and the anomalies may then be removed or minimized. For example, objects in the environment will be connected through various materials in the environment and if the map is completed and one or more of the objects does not fit an expected shape than the one or more objects may be disregarded or minimized in the evaluation.

[000641] The process for determining distances to objects may recognize that different objects will be linked through physical structures in the environment. The process may involve identifying multiple objects that are linked into a pattern to identify which objects should be included in a statistical analysis. In embodiments, this may be in the form of identifying a pattern of perceived sizes of similar objects that imply a pattern of distances for the objects. For example, the objects can be identified to be on the same plane or on the same line. This pattern recognition provides the intelligence to improve the accuracy of the distance inference in this method. So, for example, if you are looking at telephone poles on a straight road, you can tell that the poles are all linked since they are in a line. The distances to each pole should then be progressively farther away based on height. If one doesn't fit into the pattern, then it likely is a short pole or the pole is located in a depression. Since it may be difficult to determine why this object doesn't fit the pattern, it should be ignored in calculations of distance and presentation focal planes.

[000642] As another example, if three light switches are on the same plane, and the one that appears to be in the middle is the largest (or it calculates as being located the closest), then it is likely a physically larger size. Since this object is apparently an object without a known set of dimensions, it may be ignored in the calculation of distance and the other two may be used to determine distances.

[000643] As another example, if the floors of a building, as viewed from outside of the building, are being used to determine distance, and the top floors appear to be closer than the bottom floors, this is likely because they have higher ceilings. In this case, the top floors may be eliminated from the calculation of distance. Alternately, a new pattern may be identified with multiple objects included. For example, distance calculations could include the lower floors in one group and the upper floors in another group.

[000644] In embodiments, image analysis may also suggest when one object is in front of another and if the distance calculations suggest otherwise, one or both of the objects may be disregarded as distance markers. For example, objects floating on a non-moving body of water will all be at the same height. As a result, any object that appears to be in front of another object should calculate to be closer than the other object. If the one in front calculates to be farther away than one or both of the objects is probably not a known object with known dimensions and either one or both should be disregarded.

[000645] Moving objects tend not to be good for marking non-moving surface distances and one aspect of the invention removes moving objects from consideration even when they are known objects with known physical dimensions. In embodiments, multiple frames of the environment may be captured and analyzed to determine if a known object is in motion. If it is in motion and the process is attempting to identify distance to a non-moving object or surface, the moving object may be disregarded from the distance calculation. [000646] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the use of non- visible light in connection with medical procedures where the non-visible light is used in the presentation of an AR layer presented in a see-through display of a head-worn computer during the medical procedures. The non-visible light can be used to show what the patient looks like in the non-visible light by imaging the reflection of the non- visible light, converting the image to visible light content and presenting the content over a see-through view of the patient. The see-through view of the patient may be seen under conventional visible lighting conditions such that the medical professional can see the body under the visible light with the visible light reality view augmented with the non-visible light view. These technologies can be used to help identify certain areas of the body, guide a procedure to or around certain areas of the body, diagnose disease or other known conditions, etc. while the medical professional is with the patient.

[000647] Figure 151 illustrates an AR see-through view of a combined visible and non-visible lighted view of material in accordance with the principles of the present invention. The FOV 15104 is a field-of-view of a see through display of a HWC 102. A medical professional wearing the HWC 102 can see through the display to obtain the see through view of the material 15102. The see-through view is based on visible light in the surroundings. The medical professional can also see a feature of the material that is not otherwise noticeable if only viewed under visible lighting conditions. The feature appears when it is lit with non-visible spectrum light, but can only be captured with a non-visible spectrum image capture system of the same non-visible spectrum (e.g. an NIR camera if NIR light is used to irradiate the material). The captured non-visible image is then converted into a visible light based image through image processing (e.g. on board the HWC 102 or remote from the HWC 102) in real time and then the visible light based image is presented in the FOV 15104 at a position such that it is perceived as an overlay on the subject material. Alignment of the AR layer may be important for certain medical procedures and technologies described below and herein elsewhere may be used to improve the placement accuracy.

[000648] A method used in connection with a HWC 102 may involve irradiating a portion of a human body with non-visible light and visible light; causing a medical professional to view the portion of the human body as illuminated by the visible light through a computer display positioned on the head of the medical professional; capturing reflections of the non-visible light from the portion of the human body with a non-visible image capture device; and converting the captured reflections into visible light based content and presenting the visible light based content as an augmented reality overlay in the computer display such that the medical professional perceives the visible light based content as overlaying the portion of the human body.

[000649] During a medical procedure, the non-visible lighting may be provided in a number of different ways. It may be presented by separately mounted lights in the area of the patient. In embodiments, the non-visible light may be emitted from a solid-state light source mounted on the HWC 102. An advantage to having the light source on the HWC 102 is that the light can be directed to the area where the medical professional is looking and the radiation can be directed onto the same side of the body as the medical professional. The non-visible light may be NIR, IR, Near-UV, UV, etc.

[000650] In embodiments, the non-visible light capture system may be adapted to capture thermal radiation from portions of the body in a similar way as was as described herein relating to supplemental non-visible light capture. For example, a head-worn computer equipped with a thermal imaging camera may be used during a medical procedure to produce a thermal content AR overlay. Another useful example is when the thermal camera equipped head-worn computer is used to image faces or other body parts, even in a low resolution mode, to assess the apparent body temperature of people in an attempt to diagnose high body temperatures. The head-worn computer could be worn in a crowd of people or at a checkpoint to identify people that might be running a temperature and therefore might be ill. In embodiments, the thermal monitor may be used in conjunction with facial recognition to more accurately identify people that may be ill. In embodiments, the recognition process may only be used to recognize that it is a face, and not to verify the identity of the person from facial features, such that it is known that the temperature being recorded is that of a face. Once it is known that it is a face, or other body part, reference to normal and non-normal facial temperatures can be made. AR overlay content may then be presented in the head-worn computer see-through display such that persons identified as having high facial temperatures can be identified.

[000651] In embodiments, multiple different wavelengths or wavelength bands of non-visible light are used to irradiate the subject body portion and the head- worn computer has capture systems adapted to capture the multiple different wavelengths for image processing and presentation in the see-through display. For example, the head-worn computer may have a NIR and UV emitters and it may further be adapted to capture the NIR and UV reflections from the subject body portion. Each wavelength band may be captured and image processed to generate visible light content such that each non-visible wavelength band can be presented as visible light content in the see-through display as an augmented reality layer. The multiple different wavelengths or bands may be within a category of non-visible light (e.g. two or more bands within the NIR spectrum), within separate categories of non-visible light (e.g. one or more bands from the UV and one or more bands from the NIR), etc. The multiple different wavelengths may be from the NIR, IR, UV, near UV, etc.

[000652] In embodiments, supplemental visible light at a particular wavelength or band may be provided to irradiate the subject body part. For example, it may be desirable to enhance the cells, tissues, or other body portions that highly reflect a particular color, like blue, or red, and that particular color may be emitted from the head-worn computer to increase the particular color irradiation of the body part. In embodiments, a supplemental band of visible light may be emitted from the head-worn computer in addition to one or more bands of non-visible light emitted from the head- worn computer for supplemental visible light enhancement along with non-visible light AR overlay(s) in the see-through display.

[000653] In embodiments, the visible and non-visible technologies described herein may be used for procedure guidance, medical diagnosis, discovery of materials of interest, such as indicators of pathogens in blood or serum, tissue condition discovery, etc.

[000654] In embodiments, a high-speed camera may be mounted on the head-worn computer to capture and analyze a body portion's small motions or fast color changes during a medical procedure. The high-speed camera may be a visible light camera or a non-visible light camera. For example, the camera may be capable of 330fps at 672x380, 180fps at 720p, 120fps at 1080p to capture blood flow color shift in body portions. See http://people.csail.mit.edu/mrub/papers/vidmag.pdf and http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2013/seeing-the-human-pulse-0620 for reference on a type of high-speed camera that may be used in such a manner.

[000655] In embodiments, the portion of the human body may be an external portion. For example, a medical practitioner may be preparing to draw blood from a patient and the non-visible light AR overlay may provide indications of where it is most appropriate to draw from. Blood vessels may, for example, be highlighted in the overlay so the medical practitioner can target a larger or otherwise more appropriate blood vessel for the procedure. The non-visible AR overlay of the external body portion may also highlight skin conditions. For example, some skin portions may appear to look differently when lit under deep blue, near UV, UV, NIR or IR and the overlay may provide a helpful guide to diagnosing skin disorders or other disorders that can be diagnosed through skin inspections.

[000656] In embodiments, the portion of the human body may be an internal portion. For example, in an emergency situation, where the person has an injury, the non-visible light AR overlay may provide insight regarding the injury, which may include a cut in the body.

[000657] In embodiments, the portion of the human body may be an open cavity viewed during a surgical procedure.

[000658] In embodiments, the reflections of the non-visible light may be analyzed for a known condition. The known condition may be a blood condition, vascular condition, organ condition, cell condition, cancer condition or other medical condition. For example, the blood vessels of the person may be analyzed (as described herein elsewhere) for a known presence of a drug, alcohol, etc. The blood vessels may be highlighted for more pronounced visibility during a medical procedure. Cells or tissue may be analyzed through an evaluation of the reflected non-visible light.

[000659] In embodiments, the reflections of the non-visible light are presented for medical procedure guidance. The guidance may be general procedure guidance, internal procedure guidance, external procedure guidance, etc.

[000660] In embodiments, an in-line eye-imaging camera for capturing an image of an eye of the medical professional to identify the direction the medical professional is looking (as described herein elsewhere) may be included in the HWC 102 optical system. The in-line eye imaging may be used to enhance image quality or alignment of the AR layer in the direction in which the medical professional is looking.

[000661] In embodiments, a surrounding environment imaging system that is arranged to capture the surrounding environment in-line with the optical axis of the medical professional's surrounding environment view (as described herein elsewhere) may be included in the HWC 102. The in-line environment capture system may be used to better align the AR overlay with the body portion from an in-line perspective of the medical professional.

[000662] In embodiment positional instruments may be included in the head-worn computer to accurately assess its position during a medical procedure. For example, the head-worn computer may have positional cameras to assess the position of the head-worn computer with respect to known elements in the surroundings. A camera may, for example, be pointed upward and a pre-set pattern may be provided above the medical professional to provide a reliable reference from which to assess position and movements. An on-board IMU may also assist in position determination by assessing relative movements. An on-board e-compass may also assist in position determination by assessing the compass heading of the head-worn computer. Cameras may also be used to capture other elements in the surrounding environment, including the body or body portion to assist in the position determination. In embodiments, the positional assessment is used when determining where in the field of view of the see- through display to position the AR overlay such that it creates the proper perspective for the medical professional wearing the head-worn computer.

[000663] The non-visible light AR overlay may have attributes that are controllable and there may be several layers included in the overlay where each one or portion thereof may be selected and controllable. The control may be provided through an eye imaging control system, IMU motion determined control system, gesture control system, voice control system (e.g. as those control systems are described herein elsewhere), etc. The control systems may be serviced by an aid of a primary medical professional (e.g. a nurse). In embodiments, a command may be set to clear all content from the see-through display to quickly provide the medical professional with a clear view of the surrounding environment without having to look through or around digital content in the display that would otherwise be present.

[000664] Another aspect of the present invention relates to using a head- worn computer with a see-through display in a medical setting to automatically recognize a patient for confirmation of the patient's identity, medical needs, medical history, present procedure, present medicines required, medicine itself that is intended to be delivered to the patient, etc. Mistakes in the delivery of medical care based on a misunderstanding of identity or need can be devastating and the system and methods of identification confirmation according to the principles of the present invention can greatly reduce such mistakes.

[000665] In embodiments, a head-worn computer with a see-through display may be worn by a medical professional and used to confirm the identity of a patient throughout the medical services to be delivered to the patient. The head-worn computer may have a camera that captures the face or other identifying indicia of the patient. The captured image (s) may then be processed (e.g. either on-board the head- worn computer or remote from the head-worn computer) to match attributes to a known person's identity. This computer-matched identity can then be used to confirm the name, birth date, gender, ethnicity, etc. of the patient and provide digital content in the see-through display that confirms to the medical professional the identity and/or confirmation. This process may be repeated whenever the medical professional leaves and re-appears with the patient to avoid problems with proper identification.

[000666] In embodiments, the patient may wear an indication of identity (e.g. a wrist band) and the indication may be read by the head-worn computer (e.g. through image capture, bar code recognition, etc.) such that the worn indication can be matched with the facial recognition.

[000667] In embodiments, the automatic patient identification may be performed prior to providing the patient with any medicine or performing any procedure on the patient. For example, before medicine or procedure is administered or otherwise provided to the patient, the head-worn computer may facilitate a confirmation of the patient's identity, confirm that the medicine that is about to be provided is in fact the one that was ordered (e.g. through bar code or other auto- recognition of a label on the medicine). Once confirmed, the head-worn computer may record or otherwise monitor or warn the medical provider during the administration of the medicine or procedure. In a surgical or medical procedure situation, the head-worn computer may be used to monitor the procedure, compare the steps being taken to a prescription, standard or other instructions, and then record, advise, warn or otherwise provide feedback to the medical professional.

[000668] Facial recognition may also be used to confirm a patient's identity such that the patient's information can then be securely retrieved and presented in the see-through display. The information may include current biometric information (e.g. blood pressure, pulse, blood oxygen level, EKG information, respiration information, etc.), personal history information (e.g. known allergies, prior procedures, known disorders and conditions, etc.), current drug information indicating what drugs the patient is currently taking, drug interaction warnings, etc.

[000669] In embodiments, the head-worn computer may assist a medical practitioner in the mixing, dispensing and labeling of medications. For example, a pharmacist may wear a head-worn computer with a see-through display and the head- worn computer may further have sensors and image capture and processing systems such that the head-worn computer can read a prescription and monitor, record and assist the pharmacist in the preparation of the medicine and labeling the medication.

[000670] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the secure access to patient information through the use of a head-worn computer. In addition to the use of facial recognition for patient verification, the head-worn computer may verify that the medical professional wearing it is eligible to review the information. In embodiments, eye imaging verification, as described herein elsewhere, may be used to verify the identity of the medical professional wearing the head-worn computer and the verified identity may then be matched with a listed medical professional or organization that is permitted to see the information. The step of personal identity verification may be done periodically or when there is any indication that the head-worn computer has been removed from the medical professionals head (e.g. IMU movements consistent with the removal).

[000671] Another aspect of the present invention relates to organ or body part recognition through the use of head-worn computing for the confirmation, recordation, guidance, etc. of medical procedures. For example, it has become standard practice to physically mark a patient's body to confirm the body part that requires the planned procedure (e.g. marking the right leg with a pen). With the head- worn computing systems illustrated herein, the head-worn computer can be worn by a medical professional and constantly monitor a procedure, from pre-op to operation to post-op. For example, if the prescribed procedure relates to the right-side kidney of a patient, the prescription can be loaded into the system and the head-worn computer sensors (e.g. camera) can be used to recognize what the medical professionals are doing and ensure that they are targeting the correct kidney and the correct procedure by providing visual cues in the see-through display, audio cues, tactile cues, etc. [000672] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the use of head- worn computing for the secure visualization of diagnosed conditions. As discussed herein, a head-worn computer may be worn by a medical professional during a medical procedure to securely view imagery of the patient's body, external or internal, may be lighting, either visible or non-visible, may be captured to assist with the procedure or diagnose a condition. In embodiments, the images may be processed internally on the head-worn computer or they may be communicated to another computing platform for processing. The image processing may involve comparing portions of the images with known images to further the guidance or diagnosis process. For example, at a stage in an operation procedure, cells, tissue, organ or other portion of the patient's body may be imaged and the image may be processed for the presence of certain known or unknown portions. The results, and/or information relating to the results, of the image processing may then be presented in the see-through display of the head-worn computer. This real time feedback on the procedure and/or diagnosis can help the medical practitioner during the procedure, helping with early and directed assistance.

[000673] Another aspect of the present invention relates to providing a medical professional with secure assistance by securely providing imagery captured by the sensors (e.g. camera images captured after eye image medical professional identity verification and/or patient facial recognized verification) on the head-worn computer during a medical procedure. For example, imagery may be sent to a remote expert and the expert may then be able to provide feedback to the medical professional in real time during the procedure. The expert may be presented visually in the see-through display of the medical professional to make the interaction more impactful. The expert may also provide other visuals to be presented to the medical professional in the see- through display. For example, the expert may send exemplary information to show the medical professional what a medical device or body portion is suppose to look like during or following the procedure.

[000674] Another aspect of the present invention relates to the diagnosis of medical conditions based on eye imagery taken on a patient through the use of head- worn computing and eye-imaging technologies such as those disclosed herein elsewhere. In embodiments, patient motion, as determined through motion sensors on the head-worn computer may also be used in determining medical conditions of the patient. In embodiments, the patient eye imagery and/or motion measurements and patterns may be communicated to a medical professional for diagnosis. In embodiments, the eye imagery is taken with a high-speed camera such that small motion and color changes in the eye can be monitored for the diagnosis. In

embodiments, supplemental visible light and/or non-visible light may be directed towards the eye such that reactions can be noted. As described herein elsewhere, the visible and non-visible light reflections from the eye may also be processed for absorption, reflection, etc. in the diagnosis.

[000675] In embodiments, an image may be presented in the see-through display to cause the wearer to focus on the image while a diagnosis test it run.

[000676] In embodiments, a person wearing the head-worn computer may be inspected remotely through eye-imaging and motion detection. For example, a soldier may be wearing the head-worn computer and ask for medical assistance from a remote medical professional or other person. The head-worn computer may then go into a diagnosis mode and perform medical condition diagnosis. Similarly, a remote person may request a medical examination of someone in the field and the glasses may then go into the diagnosis mode and return results. In situations, the diagnosis mode may be periodic or it may be triggered by sensed events, such a loud noise, signature motion indicative of an abrupt move, bright flash, etc.

[000677] Another aspect of the present invention relates to aligning displayed content within the see-through head-worn display such that it properly aligns with a human body portion during a medical procedure. When using a head-mounted display that provides a displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of a body part of a patient, it is important to be able to align the displayed image accurately within the see-through view. To this end, the systems in accordance with the principles of the present invention provide a device that is attached to a body part of the patient that can be detected by the head mounted display and used as a reference point to align the displayed images to. The invention provides one or more small light(s) that can be attached to a body part of the patient wherein the light provides a wavelength that can be detected by one or more camera(s) that are included in the head mounted display.

[000678] Figure 153 shows a schematic illustration of a small light 15360 suitable for use in the present invention. The attaching of the small light 15360 to a body part can be done with adhesive tape 15210, other adhesive that is compatible with human skin, strap or other mounting device. A small battery 15220 can be included with the small light 15360 or a remote power source connected by wires can be used to power the small light. An LED 15230 or other small light source is included on the side opposite the adhesive tape 15210. The displayed image can then be aligned relative to the small light 15360 and the head-mounted display can automatically adjust the position of the displayed image presented to the user so that the alignment of the displayed image is maintained constant relative to the body part of the patient. Where the displayed image can include an X-ray image, MRI image, a thermographic image, a chemical distribution image, a blood flow image, a blood pressure image, a diagram of physical structures, a diagram associated with a procedure, a hyper-spectral image, a dual spectral image, etc.

[000679] The small light 15360 can emit at any wavelength that can be captured by the camera in the head-mounted display. In a preferred embodiment, the small light 15360 emits infrared light that can be detected by the camera but cannot be seen by the user in the see-through view (e.g. 850nm), so the user is not distracted by light from the small light 15360 as seen in the see-through view of the body part.

Alternatively, the small light 15360 can provide a relatively narrow visible wavelength (e.g. 440-470nm) and the optics associated with the see-through view in the head mounted display can include a notch filter coating that blocks the narrow wavelength associated with the small light 15360. In this way, the user is blocked from seeing the light, so the user is not distracted by the light associated with the small light 15360. In this case the camera can be a visible wavelength camera and the user will see a see- through view of the body part 15355 in the visible wavelengths minus the narrow wavelengths associated with the small light 15360 and overlaid by the displayed image.

[000680] Figure 153 shows an illustration of a patient 15350 with several small lights 260 attached to a body part 15355 (three small lights are shown because the body part includes two independently moveable sections, but two small lights would be sufficient if the body part had only one moveable section). Small lights 260 can be attached to the body part of the patient prior to taking medical images (e.g. X-ray images or MRI images) of the body part 15355 and left attached to the body part 15355 for subsequent viewing with the head mounted display. Since the small light 15360 will include metal portions, spots 15460 associated the small lights will be easily visible in X-ray or MRI images. The user can then view the body part 15355 with the head mounted display and align spots 15460 in the displayed medical image 15520 with spots 15562 associated with the small lights 260 as seen in the see-through view. By attaching the small lights 260 to the body part 15355 prior to capture of a medical image 15470 and then leaving the small lights 260 attached during viewing with the head mounted display, a high degree of accuracy can be obtained between the displayed medical image 15520 and the body part 15355.

[000681] Figure 154 shows an illustration of an X-ray image 15470 wherein an outline of the body part 15475 is visible along with spots 15460 associated with the small lights 260. Figure 155A shows an illustration of an infrared image 15510 captured by an infrared camera in the head mounted display wherein infrared light from the small lights 260 produces easily distinguishable spots 15562. These spots 15562 are used to identify the positions of the small lights 260 on the body part 15355. When the spots 15460 in the medical image 15470 are aligned to the spots 15562 in the captured image 15510 of the body part 15355, an accurate alignment of the medical image 15470 to the body part 15355 is provided so the user can view the medical image overlaid on the see-through view of the patient 15350.

[000682] The captured image 15510 can be displayed in the head mounted display along with an overlaid version of the medical image 15470 so the user can move to manually align the spots 15460 in the medical image to the spots 15562 in the captured image 15510. Alternatively, the head mounted display can automatically identify the spots 15460 in the medical image 15470 and the spots 15562 in the captured image 15510 and then reposition and resize the displayed medical image 15520 to align the displayed medical image 15520 to the body part 15355 as seen by the user in the see-through view. Figure 155B shows the displayed medical image 15520 wherein an outline of the body part 15475 can be seen along with spots 15560 from the small lights 260. Figure 156 shows an illustration of a see-through view 15680 as seen by the user that includes a see-through view of the patient 15350 with an overlaid displayed medical image 15520 that has been aligned to the body part 15355 based on the detected locations of the small lights 15360. In this case, the camera needs to be capable of detecting infrared light in the wavelengths emitted by the small lights 15360 and the user sees a see-through view of the body part 15355 in the visible wavelengths overlaid by the displayed medical image 15520.

[000683] Alignment of the displayed medical image 15520 to the see- through view of the patient 15680 can be done manually by the user moving their head to position the displayed medical image 15520 over the body part 15355 and spots associated with the small lights 15360. For example, the user can move their head to align the spots 15560 in the displayed medical image 15520 to the corresponding spots 15562 in the captured image 15510 that is displayed the see-through view. In this case, the displayed medical image 15520 is displayed in a fixed position relative to the field of view of the head mounted display and the captured image 15510 is displayed as a live video image that changes with movements of the user's head and associated changes in the camera's field of view relative to the patient 15350. The user can then indicate to the head mounted display that the displayed medical image is aligned by for example pushing a button or issuing an audible command. Subsequent movements by the user can then be tracked relative to the locations of the small light as determined within subsequent captured images and the position of the displayed medical image 15520 within the display field of view in the head mounted display can be automatically changed in correspondence to the movements to maintain alignment of the displayed medical image 15520 to the body part 15355.

[000684] In addition, the head mounted display can automatically align the displayed medical image 15520 to the body part 15355 if two or more small lights 260 are attached to the body part 15355. In this case the camera can capture one or more images 15510 of the body part 15355 with the two or more small lights 260 to determine the locations of the small lights 260 in the user's see-through view. Image processing can then be used to identify the locations of the small lights 260 in the medical image 15470 and in the one or more captured images 15510 of the body part 15355. The displayed medical image 15520 can then be moved within the displayed field of view and resized as needed to align the spots 15560 associated with the small lights 260 in the medical image 15470 to the locations of the small lights within the user's see-through field of view as determined from the identified spots 15562 in the captured images 15510. This alignment process can be done continuously as the camera captures video and the locations of the small lights are determined for each frame in the video to maintain alignment of the displayed image to the body part as the user moves around the patient.

[000685] In a further embodiment, two or more small lights are attached to a patient adjacent to an entrance point for an endoscope or other medical device that is used internal to the patient's body to mark the entry point and the end of the endoscope includes an inertial tracking device. Augmented reality images are then presented to the user in a head mounted display that include a visual indication of the path taken by the medical device inside the patient's body. The advantage of the invention is that the user is provided with an accurate visual indication of the location of the end of the medical device and the path followed by the end of the medical device as it moves inside the patient's body.

[000686] Figure 157 shows an illustration of this embodiment. To insert a medical device such as an endoscope into a patient's body 15710, a small incision 15721 is made through which the medical device 15716 is inserted. Small lights 15717 and 15719 are attached to the patient's body 15710 adjacent to the small incision 15721. Where the small lights 15717 and 15719 include adhesive 15210, a battery 15220 and a light 15230 as shown in Figure 153. The small lights 15717 and 15719 emit light at wavelengths that can be detected by a camera in the head mounted display. The camera then captures images 15815 of the patient's body 15710 wherein spots 15817 and 719 associated with locations of the small lights 15717 and 15719 are determined as shown in Figure 158 and used to consistently orient an augmented reality image as displayed to the user relative to the patient's body as the user moves around the patient's body 15710. By using the camera in a video mode, images 15815 including spots 15817 and 719 are captured continuously. By measuring the relative location of the spots 15817 and 719 within the camera's field of view, the movement of the user relative to the patient's body 15710 can be determined.

[000687] The medical device 15716 includes electronics 15715 and an end 15718 that moves inside the patient's body 15710 where, the end 15718 includes an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to measure the movement of the end 15718 inside the patient's body 15710. The IMU can include multiple accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers. A suitably compact IMU is the MPU-9250 which is 3X3Xlmm in size and can be obtained from Invensense located in San Jose, CA. The IMU can be powered by a small battery or by wires connected to the electronics 15715. The measured movement of the end 15718 as determined by the IMU can be communicated wirelessly or through wires connected to the electronics 15715. The measured movement can be expressed in terms of X, Y and Z or distance and direction, this information is used to track the movement of the end 15718 as it passes through the patient's body 15710 and identify a path followed by the end 15718. Data related to the measured movement of the end 15718 is then used to generate an augmented reality image that includes a graphic of the path followed by the end 15718. The augmented reality image is communicated to the head mounted display where it is aligned in correspondence to the relative locations of small lights 15717 and 15719.

[000688] Figure 159 shows an illustration of an augmented reality image

15920 that includes spots 15917 and 15919 associated respectively with small lights 15717 and 15719. Spots 15917 and 15919 are aligned to the patient's body 15710 by aligning respectively to the relative locations of spots 15817 and 719 within the images 15815 captured by the camera. Thereby the graphic 15921 of the path followed by the end 15718 is accurately aligned to the patient's body 15710. The graphic of the path followed by the end 15718 is updated continuously from measured movements of the end 15718 and determined relative locations of the small light 15717 and 15719 as determined from the captured images 15815 and the associated spots 15817 and 719.

[000689] Figure 160 shows an illustration of the view 16080 seen by the user through the head mounted display. The patient's body 15710 can be seen in the see-through view and the displayed augmented reality image 15920 shows the graphic

15921 of the path followed by the end 15718. Wherein, the graphic 15921 of the path followed by the end 15718 is aligned to the patient's body by aligning spots 15917 and 15919 to the small lights 15717 and 15719 as determined from images 15815 that are continuously captured by the camera in the head mounted display. Thereby, as the user moves around the patient's body 15710, the augmented reality image 15920 is reoriented to maintain a constant alignment of the graphic 15921 of the path followed by the end 15718 that is inside the patient's body 15710.

[000690] Although embodiments of HWC have been described in language specific to features, systems, computer processes and/or methods, the appended claims are not necessarily limited to the specific features, systems, computer processes and/or methods described. Rather, the specific features, systems, computer processes and/or and methods are disclosed as non-limited example implementations of HWC. All documents referenced herein are hereby incorporated by reference.

Illustrative Methods, Systems, User Interfaces, Displays, Computers, Optics, and Modules [000691] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs. 15 through 20.

1. A method, comprising:

• Monitoring forces exerted on a writing surface end of a hand-held device over a

period of time;

• Identifying a discrete force event during the period of time based on the monitored forces, the discrete force event including a sudden and substantial increase in force;

• Causing a user interface process to be executed in the event the discrete force event exceeds a predetermined threshold.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the hand-held device includes an IMU to determine motion of the hand-held device.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the motion is used to in coordination with an image of a writing surface to determine a stroke pattern.

4. The method of clause 2, wherein the motion is used to predict a gesture, wherein the gesture is used to control an aspect of a graphical user interface.

5. The method of clause 2, wherein the motion causes a selection of a user interface mode.

6. The method of clause 1, the force is identified using a piezo-electric device.

7. The method of clause 1, the hand-held device is in communication with a HWC.

8. The method of clause 1, the user interface process is a selection of an item.

9. The method of clause 1, the user interface process produces a menu associated with a right- side click.

10. The method of clause 1, the user interface process produces a result associated with a double click. 11. A method, comprising:

• Monitoring forces exerted on a writing surface end of a hand-held device over a period of time;

• Identifying a discrete force event during the period of time based on the monitored pressures, the discrete pressure event including a sudden and substantial increase in force;

• Causing a user interface process to be executed in the event the discrete force event substantially matches a predetermined force signature.

12. A method, comprising:

• Monitoring forces exerted on a writing surface end of a hand-held device over a period of time;

• Identifying a change in a force trend during the period of time based on the monitored forces;

• Causing an instrument stroke parameter to be changed in the event the change in the force trend exceeds a predetermined threshold.

13. The method of clause 12, wherein the instrument stroke parameter is a line width.

14. The method of clause 12, wherein the instrument stroke parameter is a graphical user interface tip type.

15. The method of clause 12, wherein the event change occurs in the event that the force trend exceeds the predetermined threshold for a predetermined period of time.

16. The method of clause 12, wherein the event change occurs in the event that the force trend exceeds the predetermined threshold and remains within a predetermined range of the predetermined threshold for a period of time.

17. A method, comprising:

• Monitoring forces exerted on a writing surface end of a hand-held device over a period of time; • Identifying a change in a force trend during the period of time based on the monitored forces;

• Causing an instrument stroke parameter to be changed in the event the change in the force trend substantially matches a predetermined force trend signature.

[000692] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs. 15 through 20.

1. A user interface, comprising:

• An outer housing adapted to be hand-held in a writing position, wherein the outer housing includes a writing surface end;

• The writing surface end including a camera, a ball lens and a positioning system

adapted to maintain a predetermined distance between the ball lens and a writing surface substantially independent of a writing angle of the outer housing, wherein the camera images the writing surface through the ball lens;

• An integrated IMU adapted to monitor the outer housing's motion and to predict, from the outer housing's motion, a movement of the ball lens across the writing surface; and

• A microprocessor adapted to intake data from the camera and the IMU and determine a written pattern.

2. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the outer housing is in the shape of a pen.

3. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the microprocessor communicates the data to a HWC.

4. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the microprocessor communicates the written pattern to a HWC.

5. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the microprocessor is further adapted to, following a determination that the outer housing is not in a writing position, capture outer housing motions as gesture control motions to control a software application operating on a HWC. 6. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the outer housing further comprises a positioning system force monitor and wherein the force monitor sends to the microprocessor data indicative of the force being applied on the positioning system.

7. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the microprocessor further determines a UI mode of operation for the user interface.

8. The user interface of clause 1 wherein the outer housing further comprises a quick launch interface, wherein the quick launch interface, when activated, launches a predetermined software application in a HWC.

9. A user interface, comprising:

• An outer housing adapted to be hand-held in a writing position, wherein the outer housing includes a writing surface end;

• The writing surface end including a positioning system adapted to maintain a

predetermined distance between an internal lens adapted to view a writing surface and a writing surface, substantially independent of a writing angle of the outer housing; and

• An IMU adapted to monitor motion of the outer housing, wherein the motion is

interpreted as a gesture control for a software application operating on a HWC.

10. A user interface, comprising:

• An outer housing adapted to be hand-held in a writing position, wherein the outer housing includes a writing surface end;

• The writing surface end including a positioning system adapted to maintain a

predetermined distance between an internal lens adapted to view a writing surface and the writing surface, substantially independent of a writing angle of the outer housing; and

• A force monitoring system adapted to monitor a force applied at the writing surface end, wherein the monitored force applied will cause a graphical user interface operation change. [000693] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs. 15 through 20.

1. A user interface, comprising:

• A hand-held housing including a surface-interaction end and an IMU, wherein the IMU monitors a position of the hand-held housing and wherein the user interface is adapted to change an interface mode based on a comparison of the position with a predetermined position threshold.

2. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the surface-interaction end includes an optical system adapted to capture images from a writing surface.

3. The user interface of clause 2, wherein the images are processed to determine a writing pattern.

4. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the surface-interaction end includes a force monitor adapted to monitor force applied to the surface-interaction end.

5. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the change in interface mode is from a mouse to a wand.

6. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the change in interface mode is from a pen to a wand.

7. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the predetermined position threshold is one of a plurality of predetermined position thresholds.

8. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the comparison predicts that the hand-held housing is in a writing position.

9. The user interface of clause 1, wherein the comparison predicts that the hand-held housing is in a wand position. 10. A method, comprising:

• Automatically collecting contextual information from one or more input sources relating to a pen position;

• Comparing the contextual information to a predetermined indication of user intent; and

• In response to a substantial match between the contextual information and the

predetermined indication, changing a user interface function associated with the pen.

11. An optical pen, comprising:

• A hand-held housing including a surface-interaction end and an optical system

adapted to image a writing surface, wherein the optical pen is adapted to change its interface mode to a writing interface mode when the optical system detects a writing surface within close proximity to the surface-interaction end.

[000694] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs 15 through 20.

1. An optical pen, comprising:

• A hand-held housing including a user interface mode selection interface;

• wherein upon activation of the user interface mode selection interface, the optical pen is adapted to cause a HWC to launch a software application and to select a user interface mode for the optical pen that is adapted to interoperate with the software application.

2. The pen of clause 1, wherein the software application is a communication application and the selected user interface mode is a writing mode.

3. The pen of clause 2, wherein the communication application is an email application.

4. The pen of clause 2, wherein the communication application is a messaging application.

5. The pen of clause 2, wherein the communication application is a texting application. 6. The pen of clause 1, wherein the software application is a note application and the selected user interface mode is a writing mode.

7. The pen of clause 1, wherein the software application is a social networking application and the selected user interface mode is a writing mode.

8. The pen of clause 1, wherein the software application is a social networking application and the selected user interface mode is a wand mode.

9. A method, comprising:

• receiving, at a hand-held user interface, an indication that a quick application launch button has been activated;

• launching a predetermined application that correlates with the launch button settings; and

• causing the hand-held user interface to activate a predetermined user interface mode in accordance with the predetermined application.

10. A method, comprising:

• receiving, at a hand-held user interface, an indication that a quick application launch button of an optical pen has been activated;

• presenting, in a display of a head-worn computer, a plurality of applications; and

• causing, upon receipt of a selection command at the hand-held user interface, the head-worn computer to launch an application from the plurality of applications.

11. The method of clause 10, wherein the selection command is based on a force detected by a force monitor at a writing surface end of the hand-held user interface.

12. The method of clause 10, wherein the hand-held user interface operates in a wand mode following the activation of the quick application launch button.

13. The method of clause 10, wherein the hand-held user interface operates in a mouse mode following the activation of the quick application launch button, wherein the hand-held user interface images a writing surface to provide an indication of a desired cursor movement. [000695] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs. 15 through 20.

1. A device, comprising:

• a housing supporting a quick application launch interface and a capacitive touch

interface, wherein both the quick application launch interface and the capacitive touch interface are in communication with a head-worn computer; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband.

2. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises an IMU to monitor movement of the device, and wherein the movement of the device is used to generate gesture control for a software application operating on the head-worn computer.

3. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display, wherein the display provides information relating to a software application operating on the head-worn computer.

4. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display, wherein the display provides information relating to the head- worn computer.

5. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a fitness monitor wherein fitness information is collected and communicated to the head-worn computer for display to the user.

6. The device of clause 1, wherein the capacitive touch interface is adapted to communicate control signals to a software application operating on the head-worn computer.

7. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a quick launch interface adapted to launch, when activated, a predetermined software application on the head- worn computer.

8. A device, comprising: • a housing supporting a quick application launch interface and a capacitive touch interface, wherein both the quick application launch interface and the capacitive touch interface are in communication with a head-worn computer; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband, the watchband clip being further adapted to rotate with respect to the watchband.

9. A device, comprising:

• a strap supporting a quick application launch interface and a capacitive touch interface, wherein both the quick application launch interface and the capacitive touch interface are in communication with a head- worn computer; and

• the strap being mechanically configured to attach to a watch body and function as a watchband.

[000696] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs 15 through 20.

1. A device, comprising:

• a housing supporting an IMU wherein motion measurements from the IMU are

communicated to a head-worn computer and interpreted for gesture control of a GUI of the head-worn computer; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband.

2. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display, wherein the display provides information relating to a software application operating on the head-worn computer.

3. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display, wherein the display provides information relating to the head-worn computer. 4. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a fitness monitor wherein fitness information is collected and communicated to the head-worn computer for display to the user.

5. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a capacitive touch interface, wherein the capacitive touch interface is adapted to communicate control signals to a software application operating on the head- worn computer.

6. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a quick launch interface adapted to launch, when activated, a predetermined software application on the head- worn computer.

7. A device, comprising:

• a strap supporting an IMU wherein rotational measurements from the IMU are

communicated to a head-worn computer and interpreted for gesture control of a graphical user interface operating on the head- worn computer; and

• the strap being mechanically configured to attach to a watch body and function as a watchband.

[000697] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs. 15 through 20.

1. A device, comprising:

• a housing supporting a visual display wherein the visual display communicates with a head- worn computer and the visual display provides an indication of a current application executing on the head- worn computer; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband.

2. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises an IMU to monitor movement of the device, and wherein the movement of the device is used to generate gesture control for a software application operating on the head-worn computer. 3. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a fitness monitor wherein fitness information is collected and communicated to the head-worn computer for display to the user.

4. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a quick launch interface adapted to launch, when activated, a predetermined software application on the head- worn computer.

5. The device of clause 1, wherein the capacitive touch interface is adapted to communicate control signals to a software application operating on the head-worn computer.

6. A device, comprising:

• a strap supporting a visual display wherein the visual display communicates with a head- worn computer and the visual display provides an indication of a current application executing on the head- worn computer; and

the strap being mechanically configured to attach to a watch body and function as a watchband.

[000698] In some implementations, user interfaces may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and illustrated in Figs 15 through 20.

1. A device, comprising:

• a housing supporting a personal performance monitoring sensor the sensor adapted to communicate performance data to an HWC; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband.

2. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a HWC user interface for controlling an aspect of a software application operating on the HWC.

3. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises an IMU for monitoring motion of the device, wherein the motion is interpreted as a gesture control command for controlling an aspect of a software application operating on a HWC. 4. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display that displays information relating to a software application operating on a HWC.

4. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a display that displays information relating to the performance data.

5. The device of clause 1, wherein the device further comprises a quick launch interface adapted to launch a predetermined software application on the HWC.

6. A device, comprising:

• a strap supporting a personal performance monitoring sensor, the sensor adapted to communicate performance data to a head-worn computer; and

• the strap being mechanically configured to attach to a watch body and function as a watchband.

7. A device, comprising:

• a housing supporting a personal performance monitoring sensor the sensor adapted to monitor a human performance condition of a wearer of the device; and

• the housing being mechanically connected to a watchband clip, the watchband clip adapted to be removably and replaceably attached to a watchband.

[000699] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 37 through 39.

1 , A method, comprising:

• Comparing a position of a reflected image of an eye of a person wearing a head-worn computer with dimensions of a field of view of a content display of the head-worn computer to determine a position of the eye with respect to the field of view;

• Establishing a virtual target line in a direction that intersects the eye and the field of view; and

• Displaying content at the intersection of the virtual target line and the field of view. 2. The method of clause 1, wherein the reflected image is captured by a camera located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along an optical path in-line with delivery optics adapted to present an image to the eye of the person.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the reflected image of the eye of the person travels along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics.

4. The method of clause 3, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

5. The method of clause 3, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

6. The method of clause 5, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

7. The method of clause 5, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

[000700] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 37 through 39.

1 , A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A first camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a first eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer to determine a position of the first eye, wherein the first camera is positioned to capture the reflected image of the first eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the first eye;

• A second camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a second eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer to determine a position of the second eye; • A processor adapted to determine a vergence statistic describing a position of the first and second eyes with respect to one another, wherein the vergence statistic is used to estimate a focal plane at which the user is focused; and

• The processor further adapted to present content in at least one of the first and second display based on the estimated focal plane.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the first camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the first eye.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

4. The computer of clause 2, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

7. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor presents content in both the first and second displays such that the person perceives a 3D image.

[000701] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 37 through 39.

1. A head-worn computer, comprising:

• A first camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a first eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer to determine a position of the first eye, wherein the first camera is positioned to capture the reflected image of the first eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the first eye;

• A second camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a second eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer to determine a position of the second eye;

• A processor adapted to determine a vergence statistic describing a position of the first and second eyes with respect to one another, wherein the vergence statistic is used to estimate a direction in which the user is looking; and

• The processor further adapted to present content in at least one of the first and second display based on the estimated direction.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the first camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the first eye.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

4. The computer of clause 2, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

7. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor presents content in both the first and second displays such that the person perceives a 3D image.

[000702] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 37 through 39. 1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A camera adapted to capture a plurality of reflected images of a eye of a person

wearing the head-worn computer to determine a plurality of positions of the eye, wherein the camera is positioned to capture the reflected images of the eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the eye; and

• A processor adapted to determine a rate of position change statistic describing a rate of positional change of the eye based on the plurality of reflected images, the processor further adapted to remove content from a field of view of a see-through display if the rate of positional change exceeds a predetermined threshold.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the first camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the first eye.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

4. The computer of clause 2, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

7. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor presents content in both the first and second displays such that the person perceives a 3D image.

[000703] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 37 through 39. 1. A head-worn computer, comprising:

• A camera adapted to capture a plurality of reflected images of a eye of a person

wearing the head-worn computer to determine a plurality of positions of the eye, wherein the camera is positioned to capture the reflected images of the eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the eye; and

• A processor adapted to identify a movement pattern from the plurality of reflective images of the eye, wherein the processor is further adapted to determine if the movement pattern matches a pre-defined user control movement pattern; and

• The processor further adapted to control a software application resident on the head- worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the pre-defined user control movement pattern is a wink.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the pre-defined user control movement pattern is a blink.

4. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the pre-defined user control movement pattern is an eye movement pattern.

5. The computer of clause 1, wherein the camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the eye.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

7. The computer of clause 5, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface. 8. The computer of clause 7, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

9. The computer of clause 7, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

[000704] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 37 through 39.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A camera adapted to capture a plurality of reflected images of a eye of a person

wearing the head-worn computer to determine a plurality of positions of the eye, wherein the camera is positioned to capture the reflected images of the eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the eye;

• A processor adapted to identify a pupil reaction pattern from the plurality of reflective images of the eye, wherein the processor is further adapted to determine if the pupil reaction pattern matches a pre-defined health condition pattern; and

• The processor further adapted to communicate a health alert in response to a match.

2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a lighting system adapted to irradiate the eye with light during a period of time when the plurality of reflected images are being captured such that the processor identifies the pupil reaction during a known lighting condition.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the eye.

4. The computer of clause 3, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera. 5. The computer of clause 3, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

7. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

[000705] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 37 through 39.

1. A head-worn computer, comprising:

• A camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the camera is positioned to capture the reflected images of the eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the eye; and

• A processor adapted to identify the person as a known user from reflective image of the eye, wherein the processor is further adapted to transmit data verifying the person as a known user to another computing facility as a step in a secure file transfer procedure.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor transmits the reflective image of the eye to a server for the verification.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the eye.

4. The computer of clause 3, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera. 5. The computer of clause 3, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

7. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

[000706] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 37 through 39.

1. A head-worn computer, comprising:

o A camera adapted to capture a reflected image of a eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the camera is positioned to capture the reflected images of the eye from an optical path that is in-line with an image-light path through delivery optics that are adapted to present an image to the eye;

o A processor adapted to present advertisement content in a display of the head- worn computer; and

o The processor further adapted to:

• cause the camera to capture a plurality of reflected images of the eye during the presentation of the advertisement content;

• calculate a persistence statistic indicative of how long the person's eye was

aligned with the advertisement content based on the plurality of captured reflected images; and

• communicate the persistence statistic to a advertisement assessment system.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the persistence statistic is used as a conversion indication.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor interacts with a server to calculate the persistence statistic. 4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor transmits the reflective image of the eye to a server for the verification.

5. The computer of clause 1, wherein the camera is located proximate an image display system, wherein the image display projects image light along the optical path in-line with the delivery optics adapted to present an image to the eye.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the image display is a reflective display and the reflected image of the eye of the person reflects off of the image display prior to being captured by the camera.

7. The computer of clause 5, further comprising a reflective surface positioned between the image display and the camera, wherein the camera captures the reflected image of the eye of the person after it reflects off of the reflective surface.

8. The computer of clause 7, wherein the image display is a front lit reflective image display.

9. The computer of clause 7, wherein the image display is an emissive display.

[000707] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head worn computer, comprising

• A housing adapted to be worn on the head of a user, wherein the housing is adapted to hold an optical system;

• The optical system adapted to present digital content to a visual field of the user, when the user is wearing the head worn computer, the optical system also adapted to be transmissive such that the user can view a surrounding environment through the optical system; • The optical system further comprised of a DLP positioned to provide image light from a position in the housing that is above the user's eye into an optical system that directs the image light to the user's eye; and

• The housing further comprising a light absorber positioned in proximity to a DLP "off state light path to collect and absorb the "off pixel light.

[000708] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility positioned along a side of the platform and adapted to produce

polarized illumination light, with a first polarization state, along an optical axis directed away from a front surface of the platform and towards a substantially flat polarized reflective surface that reflects the illumination light such that the front surface of the platform is substantially uniformly illuminated;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect

portions of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

• a quarter wave retarder positioned over the plurality of multi-positional mirrors and between the substantially flat polarized reflective surface and the platform, so that the polarization state of the image light is opposite of the polarized illumination light, and as a result the image light is transmitted by the substantially flat polarized reflective surface.

2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer. 3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

11. The computer of clause 1 , further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state. [000709] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility positioned along a side of the platform and adapted to produce a cone of illumination light into a solid optic along an optical axis directed away from a front surface of the platform and towards a substantially flat total internal reflection surface of the solid optic where the illumination light is reflected such that the front surface of the platform is substantially uniformly illuminated; and

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a portion of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis that is incident upon the total internal reflection surface at an angle whereby the image light is substantially transmitted and the optical axis is in-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror. 6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

11. The computer of clause 10, further comprising a second solid optic positioned to redirect the off-line optical axis to a position proximate a second side of the platform, creating a vertically compact head- worn computer.

12. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000710] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. head- worn computer, comprising • an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility adapted to produce a narrow bandwidth of visible illumination light to substantially uniformly illuminate the platform;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a portion of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with a holographic mirror;

• the holographic mirror adapted to reflect a substantial portion of the narrow

bandwidth of the image light directly, without further reflections, towards an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

• the holographic mirror further adapted to transmit substantially all visible spectrum light other than the narrow bandwidths of the image light to provide high

transmissivity of light from a surrounding environment.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is positioned at an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

4. The computer of clause 3, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

5. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

6. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

7. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility. 8. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

9. The computer of clause 8, further comprising a solid optic positioned to redirect the off-line optical axis to a position proximate a second side of the platform, creating a vertically compact head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000711] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi-positional mirrors;

b. a lighting facility adapted to produce a narrow bandwidth of visible illumination light to substantially uniformly illuminate the platform;

c. wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a portion of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with a notch mirror;

d. the notch mirror adapted to reflect a substantial portion of the narrow bandwidth of the image light directly, without further reflections, towards an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

e. the notch mirror adapted to transmit substantially all visible spectrum light other than the narrow bandwidth of the image light to provide high

transmissivity of light from a surrounding environment. 2. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the notch mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible light bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the notch mirror transmits a majority of

surrounding environment light incident on the notch mirror.

4. The computer of clause 2, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

5. The computer of clause 2, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

6. The computer of clause 2, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

8. The computer of clause 7, further comprising a solid optic positioned to redirect the off line optical axis to a position proximate a second side of the platform, creating a vertically compact head-worn computer.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000712] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c. 1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility adapted to produce a narrow bandwidth of visible illumination light to substantially uniformly illuminate the platform;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a portion of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with a partially mirrored surface, wherein the partially mirrored surface includes a patterned reflective portion adapted to reflect the narrow bandwidth of visible light and a transmissive portion adapted to transmit substantially all other bandwidths of visible light; and

• the mirror positioned at an angle greater than 45 degrees from a front plane of the plurality of multi-positional mirrors wherein the patterned reflective portion is further adapted to reflect a substantial portion of image light directly, without further reflections, towards an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the partially reflective surface is a holographic mirror.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

4. The computer of clause 3, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

5. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

6. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility. 7. The computer of clause 3, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

8. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000713] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising;

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility positioned along a side of the platform and adapted to produce a cone of illumination light along an optical axis directed away from a front surface of the platform and towards a substantially flat surface that substantially reflects the illumination light such that the front surface of the platform is substantially uniformly illuminated;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a portion of the illumination light, forming image light that is subsequently transmitted by the substantially flat surface and the image light is on an optical axis in-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

• an eye imaging camera positioned to capture an image of the eye of the person by capturing a portion of light reflected from the eye along the optical axis and reflecting off of a plurality of mirrors in a second state. 2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

11. The computer of clause 1 , further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000714] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising;

• an eye imaging camera positioned to capture an image of an eye by capturing light reflected from the eye along an optical axis in the head- worn computer and reflecting off of a plurality of mirrors in an "off state;

• a processor transmitting commands to the camera to periodically capture images; and

• the processor further adapted to permit continued access to a secure computing

resource in the event that a comparison of the captured images to a known person's eye image confirms that the known person is wearing the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein light reflected off of the plurality of mirrors in an "on" state is directed on an optical axis in-line with the eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

4. The computer of clause 3, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees. 5. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

7. The computer of clause 5, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

8. The computer of clause 5, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

9. The computer of clause 5, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

10. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

11. The computer of clause 1 , wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility.

[000715] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising: • an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors corresponding to pixels in an image;

• a lighting facility positioned along a side of the platform and adapted to produce a cone of illumination light along an optical axis directed away from a front surface of the platform and towards a substantially flat surface that substantially reflects the illumination light such that the front surface of the platform is substantially uniformly illuminated;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has an "on" state to reflect a portion of the illumination light along a first optical axis that is on-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer thereby providing bright image pixels and an "off state to reflect a portion of illumination light along a second optical axis off-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer thereby providing dark image pixels; and

• wherein the second optical axis terminates with a light suppression facility adapted to prevent light incident onto the light suppression facility from reaching the eye of the person.

2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror. 6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000716] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

• wherein the optical axis includes, between the image light production facility and the eye of the person, a combiner that reflects a majority of the image light while transmitting a majority of surrounding environment visible light incident on the combiner.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the combiner is a holographic mirror positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the combiner is a notch mirror positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors have a second state positioned to reflect portions of the illumination light on an optical axis off-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer, wherein the off-line optical axis terminates at a light absorption facility. 11. The computer of clause 1 , further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000717] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 3b through 5a, Figs. 6 through 8, and Figs. 9 through 12c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• an image light production facility including a platform including a plurality of multi- positional mirrors;

• a lighting facility positioned along a first side of the platform and adapted to produce a cone of illumination light into a solid optic along an optical axis directed away from a front surface of the platform and towards a substantially flat surface of the solid optic that reflects the illumination light such that the front surface of the platform is substantially uniformly illuminated;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has an "on" state to reflect a portion of the illumination light along a first optical axis that is on-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer thereby providing bright image pixels and an "off state to reflect a portion of illumination light along a second optical axis off-line with an eye of a person wearing the head-worn computer thereby providing dark image pixels; and

• an angled surface in the solid optic that transmits bright image pixel light while

reflecting dark image pixel light , such that light from the "off state mirrors is redirected toward a second side of the platform, thereby establishing a vertically compact system.

2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A holographic mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly, without further reflections, towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer. 3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the angle is greater than 45 degrees.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the holographic mirror is adapted to reflect a plurality of visible bandwidths of light and transmit substantially all other visible bandwidths other than the plurality of reflected visible bandwidths of light.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the holographic mirror transmits a majority of surrounding environment light incident on the holographic mirror.

6. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a quantum dot illumination facility.

7. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a narrow bandwidth of light with a light emitting diode lighting facility.

8. The computer of clause 4, wherein the lighting facility produces a diffuse cone of light with a backlit illumination facility.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising:

• A notch mirror in-line with the optical axis in-line with the eye of the person wearing the head- worn computer and positioned on an angle with respect to a front surface of the platform to reflect the image light directly towards the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer.

10. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera positioned to image the eye of the person wearing the head-worn computer by capturing light reflected off a subset of the plurality of mirrors wherein the subset of the plurality of mirrors are in a second state.

[000718] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 13a through 14c. 1. A head worn computer, comprising

• A housing adapted to be worn on the head of a user, wherein the housing is adapted to hold an optical system;

• The optical system adapted to present digital content to a visual field of the user, when the user is wearing the head worn computer, the optical system also adapted to be transmissive such that the user can view a surrounding environment through the optical system; and

• The optical system enclosing an effects lighting system positioned to provide the wearer of the HWC with peripheral lighting effects in coordination with digital content presented.

[000719] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 13a through 14c.

1. A computer display stray-light suppression system for a head- worn computer, comprising:

• An eye cover including an elastic material with a perimeter, wherein the perimeter is formed to substantially encapsulate an eye of a person; and

• The eye cover including a magnetic attachment system adapted to removably and replaceably attach to a perimeter of the head- worn computer to suppress light emitted from a computer display in the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the magnetic attachment system includes a magnet of a first polarization attached to the eye cover and a magnet of a second polarization attached to the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the magnetic attachment system includes a magnet attached to the eye cover.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the magnetic attachment system includes a magnet attached to the head-worn computer. 5. The computer of clause 1, wherein the eye cover is adapted to cover one eye of the person.

6. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the eye cover is adapted to cover both eyes of the person.

7. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a processor in the head- worn computer adapted to detect when the eye cover is attached to the head- worn computer.

8. The computer of clause 7, wherein the processor changes a lighting condition of the head-worn computer when the eye cover is attached to the head- worn computer.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a front cover adapted to cover a front lens of the head-worn computer to suppress stray light from escaping the front lens.

10. The clause of claim 9, wherein the front cover substantially covers one front lens of the head-worn computer.

[000720] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 5b through 5e and Figs. 8a through 8c.

1. A head worn computer, comprising

• A housing adapted to be worn on the head of a user, wherein the housing is adapted to hold an optical system;

• The optical system adapted to present digital content to a visual field of the user, when the user is wearing the head worn computer, the optical system also adapted to be transmissive such that the user can view a surrounding environment through the optical system;

• The optical system further comprised of a DLP positioned to provide image light from a position in the housing into an optical system that directs the image light to the user's eye; and • The housing further comprising a light absorber positioned in proximity to a DLP "off state light path to collect and absorb the "off pixel light.

[000721] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 5b through 5e and Figs. 8a through 8c.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• a housing including an mounting platform adapted to hold a see-through optics

facility in front of an eye of a person when the person is wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the see-through optics facility also functions as a computer display for the person;

• an image light production facility supported by the mounting platform, including a mirror support platform including a plurality of multi-positional mirrors on a front surface of the platform;

• a lighting facility positioned adjacent to the mirror support platform and adapted to produce a cone of illumination light along an optical axis directed away from the multi-positional mirrors and towards a substantially flat partially reflective surface, wherein the substantially flat partially reflective surface is angled to reflect the illumination light such that the multi-positional mirrors are substantially uniformly illuminated;

• wherein each of the multi-positional mirrors has a first state positioned to reflect a first portion of the illumination light, forming image light, on an optical axis in-line with the see-through optics facility, and a second state positioned to reflect a second portion of the illumination light, forming dark light, on an optical axis off-line with the see-through optics facility and in-line with a light absorption facility;

• wherein the image light and the dark light are substantially transmitted by the partially reflective surface; and

• the light absorption facility is positioned to terminate the off-line optical axis within the housing and adapted to prevent dark light from being reflected to the eye of the person. 2. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a solid optic that reflects a substantial portion of the illumination light, and transmits a substantial portion of the image light and the dark light.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the substantially flat partially reflecting surface is a surface internal to the solid optic.

4. The computer of clause 3 wherein the substantially flat partially reflecting surface includes a thin air gap so that the substantially flat partially reflecting surface reflects the illuminating light by total internal reflection and transmits the image light.

5. The computer of clause 2, wherein the substantially flat partially reflecting surface is a reflective polarizer.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the solid optic is a matched wedge set and the reflective polarizer is positioned between the matched wedges.

7. The computer of clause 2 wherein the solid optic includes a corrective wedge with an exit surface that is oriented perpendicular to the in-line optical axis, so the image light is substantially unrefracted and the dark light is refracted away from the optical axis in-line with the see-through optics facility.

8. The computer of clause 7, further comprising a redirection wedge to redirect the dark light to a position in proximity with a side of the mirror support platform.

9. The computer of clause 8 wherein the redirection wedge includes a thin air gap to provide total internal reflection of the dark light.

10. The computer of clause 1 wherein the light absorption facility comprising a mask to block scattered light from the light absorption facility from entering the see-through optics facility.

11. The computer of clause 1 wherein the light absorption facility comprising a absorptive light trap at the end of a tunnel. 12. The computer of clause 1 wherein the lighting facility includes a structure to collimate the cone of illumination light.

13. The computer of clause 5, further comprising a wave polarization facility positioned between the plurality of mirrors and the reflective polarizer.

14. The computer of clause 1, wherein the see-through optics facility comprises a holographic mirror adapted to reflect narrow bands of the image light directly, without further reflections, to the eye of the person and transmit light from the environment.

15. The computer of clause 1, wherein the see-through optics facility comprises a notch mirror adapted to reflect narrow bands of the image light directly, without further reflections, to the eye of the person and transmit light from the environment.

16. The computer of clause 1, wherein the lighting facility is an LED lighting facility.

17. The computer of clause 1 wherein the lighting facility further comprises a filter adapted to provide narrow bands of illumination light.

18. The computer of clause 1, wherein the lighting facility is a quantum dot lighting facility.

19. The computer of clause 1, wherein the see-through optics facility comprises a TIR optic adapted to internally reflect the image light in one or more reflections to a transmission position where the image light transmits from the TIR optic to the eye of the person.

20. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera, wherein the eye imaging camera is positioned adjacent to the light absorption facility, such that light from the eye of the person that is reflected off of a plurality of the multi-positional mirrors that are in the second state, can be captured by the camera to provide an image of the eye of the person. [000722] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 5b through 5e and Figs. 8a through 8c.

1. A head- worn computer display, comprising:

o A reflective display including a plurality of multi-positional micro-mirrors;

o An illumination system adapted to produce illumination light and project the

illumination light in a direction away from the reflective display and towards a first side of a reflective surface such that the reflective surface reflects the illumination light in a direction towards the reflective display to generate image light;

o image delivery optics with an eyebox wherein the image light is provided to a user's eye; and

o A processor adapted to control the reflective display such that each of the plurality of multi-positional micro-mirrors is positionally controlled between an on-state and an off -state to reflect the illumination light in at least one of two directions:

a first direction in-line with the image light delivery optics adapted to present on- state light as the image light to the user's eye in the eyebox; and

a second direction in-line with a dark-light trap at a side of the image delivery optics adapted to capture at least a portion of off-state light and prevent the at least a portion of the off-state light from entering the eyebox.

2. The display of clause 1, wherein the reflective surface is partially reflective and partially transmissive.

3. The display of clause 2, wherein the image light passes through the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface.

4. The display of clause 2, further comprising a multi-piece solid optic wherein the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface is positioned within the multi-piece solid optic.

5. The display of clause 2, wherein the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface is a reflective polarizer film. 6. The display of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging camera, wherein the eye imaging camera is positioned to capture images of the eye of the user, wherein the eye imaging camera and the image light delivery optics have a common optical axis within the eyebox.

7. The display of clause 6, wherein light associated with the image of the user's eye is reflected by a second side of the reflective surface before being captured by the eye imaging camera.

8. The display of clause 1, wherein the image light delivery optics are see-through such that the user's eye is provided with a see-through view of a surrounding environment proximate the user and image light.

9. The display of clause 8, wherein the image light delivery optics includes a notch filter, wherein the notch filter reflects a greater portion of image light in comparison to the portion of visible light reflected that is associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment.

10. The display of clause 9 wherein the notch filter reflects a majority of image light and transmits a majority of visible light associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment

11. The display of clause 1 , wherein the image light delivery optics includes a

holographic filter, wherein the holographic filter reflects at least a portion of image light to the eye of the user.

12. The display of clause 1, wherein the image light delivery optics includes a combiner element positioned to reflect at least a portion of the image light to the eye of the user and to transmit at least a portion of light associated with the see-through view of the surrounding environment to the eye of the user.

13. The display of clause 12, wherein the combiner element is angled at greater than 45 degrees from horizontal. 14. The display of clause 12, wherein the combiner element is adapted to accept the image light at an angle less than 45 degrees from a front surface of the combiner.

[000723] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 24 through 27.

1. A method, comprising:

• Reflecting a portion of image light off of an angled reflective surface directly towards a position of an eye of a person wearing a HWC; and

• Suppressing stray image light that is transmitted through the angled reflective surface by absorbing the stray light before it escapes the confines of the HWC.

[000724] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

I . A method, comprising:

• Receiving, at a camera internal to a head-worn computer, at least a portion of a

reflected image of an eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the image of the eye is reflected off of a no-power state mirror of a DLP reflective display.

[000725] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An image source for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A DLP positioned to reflect on-pixel light in-line with transfer optics adapted to

present the on-pixel light to an eye of a user as image light, the DLP further positioned to reflect off-pixel light in-line with a dark light trap; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye-image light originating as a reflection from the eye of the user, wherein, prior to being captured by the camera, the eye-image light reflects off of a plurality of mirrors of the DLP and then off of a reflective surface positioned to reflect the eye -image light towards the camera. 2. The method of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light is reflected off of off-pixel mirrors of the DLP.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light is reflected off of no-power- pixel mirrors of the DLP.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the reflective surface is a partially reflective and partially transmissive surface.

5. The method of clause 4, wherein the reflection and transmission properties are polarization dependent.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light is captured by the camera simultaneously with image light being transferred to the eye of the user.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein a subset of mirrors of the DLP are dedicated to reflect eye -image light.

[000726] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. ??.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light through a partially reflective and partially transmissive surface that is in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection off of the eye, wherein the camera is further positioned to capture the eye -image light after it reflects off of the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera captures the eye-image light after it traveled an optical path that is the same as the optical path for the image light in the transfer optics. 3. The system of clause 2, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

4. The system of clause 2, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark light trap is positioned to capture off-pixel light.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

[000727] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light through a partially reflective and partially transmissive surface that is in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection off of the eye, wherein the camera is further positioned to capture the eye -image light after it reflects off of the partially reflective and partially transmissive surface and at least one additional surface such that eye -image light path is folded to accommodate a placement of the camera.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera captures the eye-image light after it traveled an optical path that is the same as the optical path for the image light in the transfer optics.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display. 4. The system of clause 2, wherein the at least one additional surface includes a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark light trap is positioned to capture off-pixel light.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

8. The system of clause 1, wherein the head- worn display is a see-through display.

[000728] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection off of the eye, wherein the camera is further positioned in a dark- light trap.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera captures the eye-image light after it traveled an optical path that is the same as the optical path for the image light in the transfer optics.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

4. The system of clause 2, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display. 5. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark light trap is positioned to capture off-pixel light.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

8. The system of clause 1, wherein the head- worn display is a see-through display.

9. The system of clause 1, wherein the dark- light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess.

[000729] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection off of the eye, wherein the eye-image light travels in-line with an optical path traveled by the image light in the transfer optics; and

• A processor adapted to control both the display and the camera, wherein the processor causes the display to produce image light at the same time as causing the camera to capture eye-image light.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display.

4. The system of clause 4, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap. 5. The system of clause 1 , wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is a see-through display.

8. The system of clause 1, wherein the dark- light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess.

[000730] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user, the display including a set of positionally adjustable mirrors;

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection off of the eye, wherein the eye-image light travels in-line with an optical path traveled by the image light in the transfer optics; and

• Wherein a subset of the set of positionally adjustable mirrors is used to project the image light to the transfer optics and another subset of the positionally adjustable mirrors is used to reflect the eye -image light to the camera.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display.

4. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a DLP. 6. The system of clause 1 , wherein the head- worn display is a see-through display.

7. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark-light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess.

[000731] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user;

• An IR light source positioned to illuminate the eye; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection of the IR light off of the eye, wherein the eye -image light travels in-line with an optical path traveled by the image light in the transfer optics.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display.

4. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is a see-through display.

8. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark- light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess. [000732] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b.

1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce image light, the display positioned to project the image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user;

• A structured-light source positioned to illuminate the eye, wherein the structured-light source produces a predetermined pattern of light; and

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection of the structured-light off of the eye, wherein changes in the captured reflections of the pattern of light as compared to the predetermined pattern of light are interpreted as changes in direction of the eye.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display.

4. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is a see-through display.

8. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark- light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess.

[000733] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 28a through 36b. 1. An eye-imaging system for a head- worn display, comprising:

• A display adapted to produce content-image light, the display positioned to project the content-image light in-line with transfer optics adapted to present the content-image light to an eye of a user;

• A camera positioned to capture eye -image light that originates as a reflection of light off of the eye, wherein the eye-image light represents the content-image light as reflected by an outer surface of the eye; and

• A processor adapted to analyze the eye-image light, wherein the analysis assesses a sharpness of the eye-image light as an indication of sharpness of the content-image light.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye-image light follows an optical path that does not involve the display.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the eye -image light follows an optical path that involves the display.

4. The system of clause 1, wherein the camera is positioned in a dark light trap.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is a front lit reflective display.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is a see-through display.

8. The system of clause 4, wherein the dark- light trap includes a recess and the camera is positioned inside of the recess.

[000734] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 67.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising: • A see-through optical system adapted to visually present digital content to an eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the person can see a surrounding environment through the see-through optical assembly, the see- through optical system further comprising:

o An image source adapted to generate display light based on the digital content; and

o A partially reflective combiner adapted to provide at least the following:

Reflecting at least a first portion of the display light toward the user's eye such the person perceives the digital content as an image;

Transmitting at least a second portion of the display light toward a light trap;

Reflecting at least a first portion of light received from the

surrounding environment toward a camera; and,

Transmitting a portion of the light received from the surrounding environment toward the user's eye to provide the see-through view of the surrounding environment.

The computer of clause 1 , wherein the display light is polarized to a first state and the camera is positioned behind a polarizer adapted to absorb the first polarized state.

The computer of clause 2, wherein the light received from the surrounding environment is transmitted through the polarizer such that the camera images the surrounding

environment.

The computer of clause 2, wherein the camera is positioned proximate the light trap.

The computer of clause 4, wherein the camera is positioned within the light trap.

The computer of clause 1 , wherein the reflective combiner is further adapted to be electronically controllable such that the see-through transparency of the combiner, from the person's perspective, can be adjusted. The computer of clause 6, wherein the reflective combiner is automatically controlled to increase the see-through transparency when no digital content is being displayed. The computer of clause 6, wherein the reflective combiner is automatically controlled to increase the see-through transparency based on a duty cycle coordinated with a display content duty cycle. The computer of clause 6, wherein the reflective combiner is automatically controlled to increase the see-through transparency based on a duty cycle adapted to set an average see- through transparency. The computer of clause 6, wherein the reflective combiner is user controlled to increase the see-through transparency. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A see-through optical system adapted to visually present digital content to an eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the person can see a surrounding environment through the see-through optical assembly, the see through optical system further comprising:

o A partially reflective combiner adapted to reflect, towards the eye, display light based on the digital content; and

o A camera positioned to capture light from the surrounding environment that is reflected off a surface of the partially reflective combiner, wherein the surface is coaxially aligned with a forward facing position of the eye. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A see-through optical system adapted to visually present digital content to an eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer, wherein the person can see a surrounding environment through the see-through optical assembly, the see through optical system further comprising:

o A partially reflective combiner adapted to reflect, towards the eye, display light based on the digital content, wherein the partially reflective combiner is in-line with an optical axis that provides the eye with the see through view of the surrounding environment; and

o Wherein the partially reflective combiner includes an electronically

controllable surface to regulate a see through transparency percentage of the partially reflective combiner.

[000735] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 68 through 71.

1. An optical system for a head- worn computer, comprising:

• A polarized light source positioned within the head- worn computer and adapted to project polarized light towards a partially reflective partially transmissive surface such that the polarized light reflects through a field lens and towards a reflective display, wherein the polarized light is converted to a different polarization state after reflecting off a surface of the reflective display, forming image light; and

• Wherein the image light is then transmitted through the field lens and then through the partially reflective partially transmissive surface to an eye image display optical system adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user wearing the head- worn computer.

2. An optical system for a head- worn computer, comprising:

• An upper optical module adapted to convert illumination into image light by

illuminating a reflective display through a field lens, wherein the image light is transmitted back through the field lens, then through a partially reflective partially transmissive surface and into a lower optic module adapted to present the image light to an eye of a user wearing the head-worn computer; and

• The upper optical module being positioned within a housing for the head-worn

computer and having a height of less than 24mm, as measured from the reflective display to the bottom edge of the rotationally curved partial mirror.

3. An optical system for a head- worn computer, comprising:

• A polarized light source including a lens with positive optical power positioned in the head- worn computer within an upper optical assembly provides illumination light, wherein the illumination light is projected away from a reflective image source and towards a partially reflective partially transmissive surface and wherein the lens converges the illumination light into a small area in a central region of the partially reflective partially transmissive surface to prevent the illumination light from impinging on sidewalls of the upper optical assembly and thereby reduce scattering;

• The partially reflective partially transmissive surface positioned to reflect the

polarized light through a field lens and towards the reflective display, wherein the field lens expands the illumination light to illuminate an active area of the reflective image source; and

• An eye image display optical assembly positioned to receive image light reflected from the reflective display, through the field lens and through the partially reflective partially transmissive surface and present the image light to an eye of a user wearing the head-worn computer.

[000736] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein.

1. A method, comprising:

• Measuring a brightness of a portion of content displayed in a head-worn display with a sensor in a light trap proximate the head-worn display; and

• Adjusting the brightness of the displayed content based on the measured brightness as compared with a pre-determined display brightness setting.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the brightness is adjusted by adjusting the brightness of a light source used to illuminate a reflective display.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the adjustment compensates for an electrical fluctuation in power delivered to the reflective display.

4. The method of clause 1, further comprising: measuring a brightness of a surrounding environment proximate the head- worn display. 5. The method of clause 4, wherein the brightness of the displayed content is further adjusted with respect to the brightness of the surrounding environment.

6. The method of clause 5, wherein the brightness of the displayed content is further adjusted by comparing the brightness of the surrounding environment to a pre-determined surrounding's brightness setting.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the portion of the content relates to a position of a user's eye indicative of a sight line for the user.

8. The method of clause 1 , wherein the brightness of the portion of content is measured by capturing light reflected from a user's eye.

9. A method for determining a measure of brightness of an image displayed to a user in a head- worn display that includes a reflective image source, comprising:

• During the display of the image to the user, measuring a brightness of a portion of light that is not displayed to the user by measuring a brightness of light that is reflected from the image source into a light trap;

• Determining a relative portion of the image that includes dark image content and the relative portion of the image that includes bright image content;

• determining a relationship between the measured brightness of light that is not

displayed and the relative portion of the image that includes dark image content; and

• determining a measure of the brightness of the image displayed to the user in

correspondence to the relative portion of the image that includes bright image content and the determined relationship.

10. The method of clause 9 further comprising:

• determining a brightness of light in an environment proximate the head- worn display; and

• adjusting the brightness of the image in relation to the brightness of light in the

environment and the determined measure of the brightness of the image displayed to the user. 11. The method of clause 9 further comprising:

• determining a brightness of light from an environment proximate the user of the head- worn display; and

• adjusting the brightness of the image displayed to the user in relation to the

determined brightness of light from the environment and the determined measure of the brightness of the image displayed to the user.

[000737] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 72 through 78.

1. A triplet beam splitter optic, comprising:

• two or more beam splitter prisms with non-optically flat matching surfaces;

• an optically flat beam splitter plate with a partially reflective surface; and

• an index matching material that joins the beam splitter prisms to the beam splitter plate to provide a beam splitter element with an optically flat partially reflective surface.

2. The optic of clause 1 wherein the two or more beam splitter prisms include more surface(s) with an optical structure.

3. The optic of clause 2 wherein the optical structure provides optical power.

4. The optic of clause 1 wherein the two or more beam splitter prisms and the beam splitter plate have refractive indices that are within 0.1 of each other.

5. The optic of clause 1 wherein the partially reflective surface is a reflective polarizer.

6. The optic of clause 5 wherein the reflective polarizer is a wiregrid polarizer.

7. The optic of clause 1 wherein the two or more beam splitter prisms and the beam splitter plate are plastic. 8. The optic of clause 1 wherein the two or more beam splitter prisms are molded to a first shape that has low birefringence and the matching surfaces are then machined.

9. The optic of clause 8 wherein the index matching material fills in the machined texture of the beam splitter prisms.

10. A head-mounted display that includes a reflective image source and a beam splitter prism, comprising:

• two or more plastic prisms;

• a plastic partially reflective beam splitter plate; and

• an index matching material that joins the plastic prisms on either side of the beam splitter plate and joins one of the plastic prisms to the reflective image source.

11. The display of clause 10 wherein one or more of the plastic prisms includes a surface with optical power.

12. The display of clause 10 wherein one or more of the plastic prisms includes a surface with an optical structure.

13. The display of clause 12 wherein the optical structure collimates, converges, diverges, diffuses, partially absorbs, redirects or polarizes a light that is incident upon the surface.

[000738] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 84c through 90.

1. A display assembly for a head mounted display comprising:

• a light source;

• a reflective image source;

• one or more lenses;

• a combiner that redirects light reflected by the reflective image source for viewing by a user's eye and provides a see-through view of an environment; and

• a segmented partially reflective layer that redirects light from the light source

towards the reflective image source and transmits light reflected by the reflective image source, wherein the segmented partially reflective layer includes at least one fiat segment.

2. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer includes multiple fiat segments.

3. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer includes one or more curved segments.

4. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer includes a reflective polarizer film and the reflective image source includes a quarter wave retarder.

5. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer includes a multiple polarizer comprising a reflective polarizer and an absorptive polarizer and the reflective image source includes a quarter wave retarder.

6. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer is positioned between the reflective image source and the lens.

7. The display of clause 1 wherein the segmented partially reflective layer is positioned between the lens and the combiner.

8. The display of clause 1 further comprising a trim polarizer between the lens and the combiner and at least one of the lenses is a plastic lens.

9. The display of clause 8 further comprising a half wave retarder between the trim polarizer and the combiner.

10. The display of clause 5 wherein the reflective polarizer is laminated to the absorptive polarizer and the reflective polarizer encompasses a smaller area than the absorptive polarizer.

11. The display of clause 10 wherein the reflective polarizer encompasses less than 80% of the area of the absorptive polarizer. 12. The display of clause 10 wherein the reflective polarizer encompasses less than 50% of the area of the absorptive polarizer.

13. The display of clause 5 wherein the reflective polarizer is supported by a transparent carrier film and the absorptive polarizer is a separate film.

[000739] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 91-92.

1. An image production optical assembly, comprising:

• A light source, wherein the light source is positioned to irradiate a segmented surface;

• The segmented surface including a first segment that is partially reflective and

partially transmissive section and a second segment that is transmissive, the first segment positioned to reflect the light from the light source in a direction to uniformly irradiate a reflective display; and

• The second segment positioned to transmit light from the light source such that the light does not irradiate the reflective display.

[000740] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A compact optics module for a head mounted display including a reflective liquid crystal image source comprising:

• a polarized light source that shares a first optical axis with the reflective liquid crystal image source along which the light source provides polarized illuminating light to the reflective liquid crystal image source which then converts the polarized illuminating light to polarized image light;

• a beam splitter;

• at least one lens element;

• a combiner;

• wherein the reflective liquid crystal image source and the polarized light source are positioned opposite one another along a common first optical axis that passes through the beam splitter; • wherein the beam splitter is angled to reflect the polarized image light along a second optical axis that is common to the lens element and passes through the combiner;

• wherein the combiner reflects the polarized image light and simultaneously transmits unpolarized light from a surrounding environment along a third optical axis that proceeds to a user's eye to provide a displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of the surrounding environment; and

• the first optical axis is perpendicular to both the second and third optical axes.

2. The assembly of clause 1, wherein the combiner transmits over 50% of the unpolarized light from the environment.

3. The assembly of clause 2, wherein the combiner is a partial mirror.

4. The assembly of clause 2, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

5. The assembly of clause 1, further comprising a rear optical element comprising a protective plate or a prescriptive optic.

6. The assembly of clause 1, further comprising a camera positioned adjacent to the beam splitter with a field of view along the second optical axis for capturing images of the user's eye from a perspective directly in front of the user's eye.

7. A method for providing a compact optics module for a head mounted display comprising:

• providing illumination light from a light source along a first optical axis and toward a reflective image source;

• Reflecting the illuminating light from the reflective image source and thereby

providing image light along the first optical axis;

• providing an angled beam splitter on the first optical axis to redirect the image light along a second optical axis; and

• passing the image light through one or more lens elements along the second optical axis to provide image light over a field of view; and • providing an angled combiner on the second optical axis to redirect the image light and transmit unpolarized light from the environment thereby providing a view of a displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of the environment along a third optical axis, wherein the first optical axis is perpendicular to both the second and third optical axes.

8. The method of clause 7, wherein the combiner transmits over 50% of the unpolarized light from the environment.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein the combiner is a partial mirror.

10. The method of clause 8, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

11. The method of clause 7, further comprising; capturing images of a user's eye from a perspective directly in front of the user's eye with a camera positioned adjacent to the angled beam splitter and aligned along the second optical axis.

[000741] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A compact optics module for a head mounted display with reduced stray light comprising:

• a reflective image source;

• a polarized light source illuminating the reflective image source;

• an angled partial reflector to redirect image light from the reflective image source towards a lens element with at least one diffractive surface;

• a combiner to redirect the image light along with transmitted light from the

environment toward a user's eye,

• wherein the lens element and combiner provide the image light over a field of view that is viewable by the user's eye; and

• an absorptive polarizer adjacent to the lens element oriented to absorb incident

illumination light and transmit image light. 2. The module of clause 1, wherein the light from the environment is unpolarized and the combiner transmits over 50% of the unpolarized light from the environment.

3. The module of clause 1, wherein the polarized light source is angled and positioned adjacent to the angled partial reflector.

4. The module of clause 13, wherein the polarized light source further comprises a turning film to redirect the illumination light directly toward the reflective image source.

5. The module of clause 1, wherein the angled partial reflector redirects the image light by 90 degrees.

6. The module of clause 1, wherein the angled partial reflector redirects the image light by more than 90 degrees.

7. The module of clause 1, wherein the lens element comprises more than one lens element.

8. The module of clause 1, wherein the reflective image source comprises an LCOS or a FLCOS.

9. The module of clause 1, wherein the combiner redirects the image light by 90 degrees.

10. The module of clause 1, wherein the combiner redirects the image light by more than 90 degrees.

11. The module of clause 2, wherein the combiner is a partial mirror.

12. The module of clause 2, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

13. The module of clause 1, further comprising a rear optical element comprising a protective plate or a prescriptive optic. 14. The module of clause 1, further comprising a camera positioned adjacent to the angled partial reflector with a field of view along the second optical axis for capturing images of the user's eye from a perspective directly in front of the user's eye.

[000742] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A compact light source for a head mounted display that includes an angled reflector, comprising:

• a reflective image source;

• a planar light source positioned behind the angled reflector that provides illumination light,

• wherein illumination light reflected by the reflective image source provides image light;

• a lens element;

• wherein the angled reflector redirects the image light toward the lens element;

• a combiner that refiects image light and transmits more than 50% of incident light from the environment toward a user's eye; and

• a turning film positioned between the planar light source and the angled reflector that redirects the illumination light toward the reflective image source.

2. The source of clause 1, further comprising an absorbing polarizer adjacent to the lens element that is oriented to absorb incident illumination light and transmit incident image light.

3. The source of clause 1, further comprising a diffuser between the planar light source and the angled reflector.

4. The source of clause 1, further comprising a polarizer between the planar light source and the angled reflector.

5. The source of clause 1, further comprising a light guide and a reflector.

6. The source of clause 1, further comprising one or more edge lit LEDs. [000743] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A compact optics module for a head mounted display including a DLP image source comprising:

• a polarized light source providing illumination light;

• a flat reflective polarizer to reflect the illumination light toward the DLP image source and transmit image light, wherein the illumination light is provided at an angle to the DLP;

• a quarter wave retarder to change the polarization state of the illumination light as it is reflected by the DLP image source thereby providing image light;

• at least one light trap to absorb a portion of off-state image light;

• a lens element to provide a viewable field of view of on-state image light in image displayed by the DLP image source; and

• a combiner to reflect the on-state image light toward a user's eye and provide a see- through view of a surrounding environment.

2. The module of clause 1, wherein the lens element includes at least one diffractive surface.

3. The module of clause 2, further comprising an absorptive polarizer adjacent to the lens element and oriented to absorb incident illumination light and transmit image light.

4. The module of clause 1, wherein the flat reflective polarizer is adjacent the lens element; and the compact optics module further comprises a second flat reflective polarizer that transmits illumination light and reflects image light toward the lens element.

5. The module of clause 4, wherein the light source is positioned behind the second flat reflective polarizer.

6. The module of clause 4, wherein the flat reflective polarizer extends beyond the lens element surface. 7. The module of clause 1, wherein the process of reflecting the illumination light and reflecting the on-state image light provide a multiply folded optical path that reduces the thickness and height of the optics module.

8. The module of clause 1 , wherein the see-through view of the environment includes unpolarized light and the combiner transmits over 50% of the unpolarized light.

9. The module of clause 8, wherein the combiner is a partial mirror.

10. The module of clause 8, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

11. The module of clause 1 , further comprising a rear optical element comprising a protective plate or a prescriptive optic.

[000744] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A compact optics module for a head mounted display including a DLP image source comprising:

• a light source that provides illumination light directly onto the DLP image source;

• the DLP image source providing reflected image light comprised of on-state light and off-state light;

• at least one light trap at the side of the optics module to absorb the off-state light;

• a field lens provided at a distance from the DLP image source that is sufficient for direct illumination;

• a power lens to provide a viewable field of view comprised of the image light;

• a fold mirror to reflect the on-state light provided by the DLP image source toward the power lens; and

• a combiner to reflect on-state light toward a user's eye to provide a displayed image and simultaneously provide a see-through view of a surrounding environment.

2. The module of clause 1 , wherein the combiner is a partial mirror. 3. The module of clause 1, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

4. The module of clause 1, wherein the illumination light and the image light are unpolarized.

5. The module of clause 1, wherein the fold mirror is a partial reflector; and

the compact optics module further comprises a camera positioned behind the fold mirror such that the camera shares an optical axis with the optics module so that images of the user's eye can be captured from the perspective of directly in front of the eye.

6. The module of clause 5, wherein the fold mirror is a reflective polarizer and the image light and the light captured by the camera are both polarized but with opposite polarization states.

7. The module of clause 1 , wherein the see-through view of the environment includes unpolarized light and the combiner transmits over 50% of the unpolarized light.

8. The module of clause 7, wherein the combiner is a partial mirror.

9. The module of clause 7, wherein the combiner is a notch mirror.

10. The module of clause 1, further comprising a rear optical element comprising a protective plate or a prescriptive optic.

[000745] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A see-through head mounted display with controllable light blocking comprising:

• an optics module that provides image light in correspondence to a displayed image;

• a flat combiner to reflect the image light while simultaneously transmitting more than 50% of incident light from the environment, along an optical axis that proceeds to the user's eye to provide a view of the displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of the environment; and

• a controllable light blocker positioned adjacent to the flat combiner that controllably blocks light from the environment so it is not incident on the combiner.

2. The display of clause 1, wherein the image light is polarized and the light from the environment is unpolarized.

3. The display of clause 1, wherein the optics module includes a reflective liquid crystal image source.

4. The display of clause 1, wherein the optics module includes a DLP image source.

5. The display of clause 1, wherein the image light proceeds along a multiply folded optical axis in the optics module to provide an optics module with reduced thickness and height.

6. The display of clause 5, wherein at least one of the folds of the optical axis occurs in a plane that is perpendicular to the optical axis that proceeds to the user's eye.

7. The optics module of claim 1, wherein the flat combiner is a partial mirror.

8. The optics module of claim 1, wherein the flat combiner is a notch mirror.

9. The optics module of claim 1, further comprising a rear optical element comprising a protective plate or a prescriptive optic.

[000746] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 93-106b.

1. A see-through head mounted display with controllable light blocking comprising: • an optics module that provides image light in correspondence to a displayed image, wherein the optics module includes an angled partially reflective surface positioned to reflect the image light towards a flat combiner;

• the flat combiner positioned to reflect the image light while simultaneously

transmitting more than 50% of incident light from the environment, along an optical axis that proceeds to the user's eye to provide a view of the displayed image overlaid onto a see-through view of the environment; and

• an eye imaging camera positioned to image the user's eye through the angled partially reflective surface.

2. The display of clause 1, wherein the eye imaging camera is further positioned to capture an image of the eye reflected off of the flat combiner.

3. The display of clause 1, wherein the eye imaging camera is further positioned to directly view the flat combiner through the angled partially reflective surface.

4. The display of clause 1, wherein the optics module includes a DLP image source.

5. The display of clause 1, wherein the optics module includes an LCoS image source.

6. The display of clause 1, wherein the optics module includes an emissive image source.

7. The display of clause 1, wherein the image light proceeds along a multiply folded optical axis in the optics module to provide an optics module with reduced thickness and height.

8. The display of clause 5, wherein at least one of the folds of the optical axis occurs in a plane that is perpendicular to the optical axis that proceeds to the user's eye.

9. The display of clause 1, wherein the flat combiner is a partial mirror.

10. The display of clause 1, wherein the flat combiner is a notch mirror. [000747] In some implementations, optics may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 112-113.

1. A thinner see-through head- worn computer display, comprising:

• An image light production optical module with an upper and a lower portion of the module:;

• wherein the upper module includes a first flat refiective surface arranged to refiect image light produced by an image display, from the upper module to the lower module along a first optical axis;

• wherein the lower module includes a second flat reflective surface arranged to refiect image light to a user while simultaneously providing the user with a see-through view of a surrounding environment and the reflected image light proceeds along a second optical axis to the user;

• wherein the upper module is twisted about the first optical axis to change the fit of the optical module into a frame associated with the see-through head- worn computer display and thereby enable the frame to be thinner; and

• the lower module is twisted a corresponding amount about the second optical axis to introduce a compound angle between the first reflective surface and the second reflective surface to reduce distortion within the image due to the twisting.

2. The display of clause 1 wherein the first optical axis is perpendicular to the second optical axis.

3. The display of clause 1 wherein the frame connects the see-through head- worn computer display within glasses.

4. The display of clause 1 wherein the frame connects the see-through head- worn computer display within a visor.

5. The display of clause 1 wherein the frame connects the see-through head- worn computer display within a helmet. [000748] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59a through 59d.

1. A method, comprising:

• Receiving an mD signature indicative of a projectile flight path;

• Identifying a beginning trace marker and a termination trace marker;

• Presenting in a HWC's FOV digital content representative of the projectile flight path, wherein the beginning trace marker and termination trace marker provide a world- lock perspective for a wearer of the HWC such that the digital content appears to remain referenced to the environment independent of a position of the HWC.

2. The method of clause 1, further comprising:

• Confirming a distance from the HWC to a point in the environment associated with the beginning trace marker, wherein the confirmation is used to confirm the HWC is positioning the beginning trace marker with a correct environmental position.

[000749] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59a through 59d.

1. A method, comprising:

• Receiving an mD signature indicative of a human presence at a location in an

obscured environment;

• Establishing a virtual location marker in a position that is visually available to a

person wearing a HWC, wherein the virtual marker provides an indication of the location in the obscured environment; and

• Generating an avatar as a representation of the human presence and presenting the avatar in a field of view of the HWC, wherein the presentation of the avatar is positioned in the field of view by visually associating the avatar with the location marker such that the avatar appears to remain at the location marker location, as perceived by a person wearing the HWC, independent of the HWC's viewing angle. 2. The method of clause 1, further comprising: establishing an identity of the human presence and presenting an indication of the identity in the field of view.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the indication is a color of the avatar.

4. The method of clause 2, wherein the identity is of an enemy combatant.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the human presence at the location in the obscured environment moves within the obscured environment; and the virtual location marker moves to continue to provide the indication of the location in the obscured environment.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein an mD radar that established the mD signature is remotely located from the person wearing the HWC.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein an mD radar that established the mD signature is proximate to the person wearing the HWC.

8. A method, comprising:

• Viewing a human presence through a field of view of a head worn computer in an environment until the human presence enters an obscured location in the environment;

• Receiving an mD signature indicative of the human presence at the obscured location;

• Establishing a virtual location marker at a position that is visually available to a

person wearing the head worn computer, wherein the virtual marker provides an indication of the obscured location;

• Generating an avatar as a representation of the human presence and presenting the avatar in a field of view of the head worn computer, wherein the presentation of avatar is positioned in the field of view by visually associating the avatar with the location marker such that the avatar appears to remain at the location marker location, as perceived by a person wearing the HWC, independent of the head worn computer's viewing angle.

[000750] In some implementations, secure file transfer may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 125-135. 1. A method, comprising:

• Identifying a second HWC in close proximity to a first HWC;

• Determining that the first and second HWC's have viewing angles that are

substantially aligned, of opposite direction and positioned such that they are predicted to be facing each other; and

• Causing information to be shared between the first and second HWC.

[000751] In some implementations, secure file transfer may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 125 through 135.

1. A method, comprising:

• Establishing a geo-position of a head-worn computer;

• Establishing a viewing direction of a person wearing the head-worn computer; and

• Displaying a computer generated object in association with a computer generated shadow in a field of view of the head- worn computer, wherein the direction of the computer generated shadow is based on the established geo-position and viewing direction such that the direction of the computer generated shadow appears to follow a natural shadow in a surrounding environment as viewed by the person through the field of view.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein a time of day is established and the direction of the shadow is further based on the time of day.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein a day in a year is established and the direction of the shadow is further based on the day in the year.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the surrounding environment is inspected to determine if the surrounding environment is an exterior environment.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the viewing angle is established based on an electronic compass in the head-worn computer. 6. A method, comprising:

• Capturing an image of an environment in proximity to a viewing angle of a person wearing a head-worn computer;

• Analyzing the image to determine a direction of a naturally formed shadow in the environment; and

• Displaying a computer generated object in association with a computer generated shadow in a field of view of the head- worn computer, wherein the direction of the computer generated shadow appears to align with the direction of the naturally formed shadow in the environment.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the image of the environment is captured by a camera on the head- worn computer.

8. The method of clause 6, wherein the direction of the naturally formed shadow is determined by determining a position of a light source.

9. A method, comprising:

• Capturing an image of an environment in proximity to a viewing angle of a person wearing a head-worn computer;

• Analyzing the image to determine a direction of a naturally formed shadow in the environment, wherein the environment has multiple light sources producing multiple shadows for individual objects in the environment; and

• Displaying a computer generated object in association with a plurality of computer generated shadows in a field of view of the head-worn computer, wherein the direction of the computer generated shadow appears to align with the direction of the naturally formed shadows in the environment.

10. A method, comprising :

• Capturing an image of an environment in proximity to a viewing angle of a person wearing a head-worn computer;

• Analyzing the image to determine a direction of a naturally formed shadow in the environment, wherein the environment has multiple light sources producing multiple shadows for individual objects in the environment; and • Displaying a computer generated object in association with a computer generated shadow in a field of view of the head- worn computer, wherein the direction of the computer generated shadow appears to align with a dominant direction of a naturally formed shadow among the plurality of shadows in the environment.

[000752] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59 through 66.

1. A method of presenting an indication of another person's ("other person") known location to a person wearing a see-through display of a head-worn computer ("first person"), comprising:

• Receiving geo-spatial coordinates corresponding to the other person's location;

• Receiving geo-spatial coordinates corresponding to the first person's location;

• Receiving a compass heading for the first person that is indicative of a direction in which the first person is looking;

• Generating a virtual target line between a see-through visual plane of the head-worn computer and other person such that the target line describes a distance and angle between the other person's location and the first person's location; and

• Presenting, in a field of view of the head-worn computer, digital content to augment the first person's view of an environment through the see-through display of the head- worn computer, wherein the digital content is positioned within the field of view along the virtual target line such that the first person perceives the digital content in a position within the environment that represents the other person's known location.

2. The method of clause 1 wherein the geo-spatial coordinates corresponding to the other person's location and the first person's location include altitude, longitude, and latitude.

3. The method of clause 1 wherein the compass heading for the first person is an based on an electronic compass in the head- worn computer.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the compass heading for the first person is based on images of the environment captured by a camera in the head- worn computer. 5. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial coordinates corresponding to the other person's location indicates that the other person is behind an object that obstructs the first person's view of the other person; and wherein the digital content indicates that a clear view is not available.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein a remote server is used to generate the target line.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the target line is generated local to the head- worn computer.

[000753] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59 through 66.

1. A method of presenting an indication of another person's ("other person") known location to a person wearing a see-through display of a head-worn computer ("first person"), comprising:

• Generating, based on the other person's known location, a virtual target line that describes a distance and angle between a see-through visual plane of the head-worn computer and other person;

• Identifying an obstacle that potentially interferes with the first person's view of the other person's known location; and

• Presenting, in a field of view of the head-worn computer, digital content in-line with the virtual target line that is indicative of the other person's known location and indicative of an understanding that the known location may be in an obstructed view.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of identifying the obstacle includes assessing a map of objects in an area proximate the virtual line to identify a potential intersection of the virtual line with a mapped object. 3. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of identifying the obstacle includes using a range finder to identify an object that is present at a shorter distance than the distance prescribed by the virtual line.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content is presented at a focal plane associated with the distance prescribed by the virtual line.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content is indicative of a general area of where the other person is located.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content is indicative of a general area of where the other person is located and indicative that the general area is relatively close to the other person.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content is indicative of a general area of where the other person is located and indicative that the general area is not relatively close to the other person.

[000754] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59 through 66.

1. A method, comprising:

• Receiving a geo-spatial position of first and second persons, both of which wearing head-worn computers with see-through displays;

• Presenting content in the first person's see-through display content indicative of the second person's location, wherein the content is aligned with a virtual target line that connects the first person and second person; and

• Maintaining the virtual target line and content position until receiving an indication that the second person has moved, wherein the indication of the move is based on a motion sensor in the second person's head- worn computer, wherein the motion sensor communicates motion data to a remote service. 2. The method of clause 1, wherein the virtual target line is calculated remotely and communicated to the first person's head- worn computer.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the virtual target line is calculated at the first person's head- worn computer.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the motion data is communicated in a peer-to-peer network to the first person's head- worn computer.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the motion data is communicated to a central server.

6. The method of clause 1 , wherein the motion sensor is an IMU and is activated for the method when GPS data is unavailable.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein each of the head- worn computers includes an IMU, GPS sensor, wireless communication system and an in-line eye imaging system.

8. The method of clause 7, wherein the eye imaging system provides for user verification and secure communications.

[000755] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59 through 66.

1. A method, comprising:

• Establishing a group movement tactical plan directing the general direction for the group of individuals to traverse an environment, each of the individuals wearing a head-worn computer that identifies the geo-spatial location of the head-worn computer, each head-worn computer having a see-through display;

• Receiving a geo-spatial location from one of the group of individual's head- worn computer; and • Presenting directional content to the one of the group of individual's see-through display indicative of the tactical plan based on the individual's geo-spatial location.

2. The method of clause 1, further comprising presenting content to the one of the group of individual's see-through display indicative of a geo-spatial position of at least one other of the persons of the group.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the directional content includes navigation instructions per the technical plan customized for the individual's location.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the tactical plan is a military plan.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the tactical plan is an emergency plan.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the tactical plan is a group activity plan.

[000756] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 59 through 66.

1. A method, comprising:

• Monitoring a plurality of head- worn computers for indications of a health condition for each of the people wearing the head-worn computers within an environment;

• Receiving an data from one of the plurality of head- worn computers indicating that a person has the health condition; and

• Presenting content in a see-through display of one of the other head-worn computers, wherein the content indicates a geo-spatial position of the person with the health condition.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the health condition indicates a life-threatening situation. 3. The method of clause 1, wherein the health condition is measured by the person's motion based on an IMU in the head-worn computer.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the health condition is measured by a walking parameter as measured by an IMU in the head-worn computer.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves understanding if there is a clear view of the geo-spatial position of the other person and if there is not, presenting information indicative that there is an obstructed view.

[000757] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 59 through 66.

1. A method, comprising:

• Tracking a path of a person as the person moves through an environment, wherein the tracking involves both tracking the path and tracking event notifications provided by the person; and

• Presenting an indication of the path to a second person when the second person is proximate the path, wherein the presenting includes presenting a visual indication of the path and event notifications in a see-through head- worn computer display of the second person.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the event notification is an indication that an area has been searched.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting includes presenting an augmented reality view of the path and event notification.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the path is maintained at a remote location and indications of the path are transmitted to any one of a plurality of pre-designated people that become proximate the path. 5. The method of clause 1, wherein the event notification presentation includes an indication that the location of the event notification is in an obstructed location.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presentation further includes presenting navigation information to indicate to the second person where the path is located.

[000758] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising:

presenting digital content in a field of view of a see-through head worn optica! system at a position that is dependent on feedback from a sensor, wherein the sensor provides information relating to a speed of forward motion of a person wearing the see-through head worn optical system.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the sensor is at least one of a GPS sensor, I U, and accelerometer.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the position is shifted from a neutral position to a position towards a side edge of the field of view as the forward motion increases.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the position is shifted from a neutral position to a position towards a top or bottom edge of the field of view as the forward motion increases.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the position shifts based on a threshold speed of the forward motion.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the position shifts linearly based on the speed of the forward motion.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the position shifts non-lineariy based on the speed of the forward motion. 8. The method of clause 1, wherem the position shifts outside of the field of view.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein the content is no longer displayed and will be displayed again once the forward motion slows.

10. A method , comprising :

Positioning content within a field of view of a see-through head worn optical system in line with either a sight heading or movement heading depending on the speed of forward motion of the head worn optical system, wherein the presentation will be in line with the sight heading when the speed is below a predetermined speed value and in line with the movement heading when the speed is above the predetermined speed value.

11. A method, compr sing:

* Presenting a first content in a field of view of a see-through head worn optical system, wrherein the first content is posi tioned dependent on a sight heading of the head worn optical system; and

* Presenting a second content in the field of view of the see-through head worn optical system at the same time the first content is presented, wherem the second content is positioned dependent on a movement heading of the head worn optical system,

[000759] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising:

Presenting a motion dependent digital content at a first position within a field of view of a see-through head-worn display, wherein the first position is dependent on a speed of forward motion of the head- worn display; and

Presenting an object dependent digital content at a second position within the field of view, wherein the second position is dependent on a sight heading of the head-wom displ ay, wherein when the sight heading is indicative of alignment of the see-throug head-worn display with an object in the environment the object dependent digital content is presented.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the speed of forward motion is greater than a predetermined threshold indicative of a vehicle movement and the first position is proximate an edge of the field of view.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the speed of forward motion is indicative of a walk ing speed and the first position is proximate an edge of the fiel d of view.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the speed of forward, motion is indicative of a substantially stationary person and the first position is a neutral position.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial position of the head-worn display is known and used in determining the alignment of the display with the object.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein an eye heading is used in conjunction with the sight heading in determining the alignment of the display with the object.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the eye heading is determined by imaging an eye of a person wearing the head-worn display by viewing the eye at a position that is coaxial with a see through view of the eye.

8. The method of clause 6, wherein the eye heading is determined by imaging eye glint.

9. The method of clause 1, wherein the object dependent digital content is virtually locked to the object in the environment such that the object dependent digital content appears to remain positioned proximate the object in the environment as the see-through head-worn display moves.

10. The method of clause 1 , wherein the motion dependent digital content and the object dependent digital content are removed from the field of view when an alert is identified. 11. The method of clause 1 , wherein at least one of the motion dependent digital content and the object dependent digital content are moved at a dampened rate when the sight heading changes at a speed greater than a preset threshold.

12. The method of clause 1, further comprising the presentation of side panel digital content, wherein the side panel digital content is displayed when the see-through head-worn sight heading is indicati ve of a person that is wearing the see-through head-worn turning their head to a side.

13. The method of clause 1, further comprising the presentation of side panel digital content, wherein the side panel digital content is displayed when an eye heading is indicative of a person that is wearing the see-through head- worn shifting their eye to a side.

[000760] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising:

• Presenting forward-motion position dependent content at a position within a field of view of a head-worn see-through display;

• Sensing that the head-worn see-through display is moving forward at a speed in

excess of a threshold indicative of a fast forward speed; and

• Repositioning the content to an upper edge of the field of view such that the content provides less distraction to a user of the head- worn display while the head- worn display is moving forward in excess of the threshold.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is part of a head-worn computer including a speed sensor that provides the indication of forward speed.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the content is further position controlled through an external user interface and the speed based position control overrides the external user interface. 4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the repositioning to the upper edge of the field of view involves positioning the content such that it appears to be positioned outside of the field of view above the upper edge.

5. The method of clause 1 further comprising, presenting sight-heading dependent content that is not motion position dependent.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the head-worn display is part of a head-worn computer that includes a GPS sensor, IMU, and eCompass, wherein each of the GPS sensor, IMU and eCompass are used in the determination of the head-worn display's forward speed and the head- worn display's speed changes and heading.

7. The method of clause 1, further comprising, sensing a sight heading of the head- worn display to determine assess the potential that the user of the head-worn display is a driver of a vehicle and in response to a high likelihood that the user is the driver modifying the extent of the repositioning.

8. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting the content at a position within the field of view of the head-worn see-through display involves producing image light at a front-lit reflective display.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark light trap.

10. The method of clause 8, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

11. The method of clause 8, wherein the head-worn see-through display includes an eye imaging system.

[000761] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising: • Presenting content at a position within a field of view of a head-worn see-through display; and

• Repositioning the content within the field of view based on a changed sight-heading of the head- worn display, wherein the repositioning occurs at a speed; and

• Wherein the speed of the repositioning is damped and creates a misalignment of the content with a position consistent with the changed sight-heading if the sight-heading changes at a rate above a predetermined threshold.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the rate of change of the sight-heading is indicative of a high rate of change of head direction.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the rate of change of the sight-heading is indicative of a high rate of back and forth head direction.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the misalignment is not perceived by a user of the head-worn see-through display due to the sight-heading rate of change.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the speed of the repositioning is further dependent on an eye -heading rate of change.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting the content at a position within the field of view of the head-worn see-through display involves producing image light at a front-lit reflective display.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark light trap.

8. The method of clause 6, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

9. The method of clause 6, wherein the head-worn see-through display includes an eye imaging system.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the user interacts with the content with an external user interface. [000762] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising:

• Buffering content for triggered presentation in a field of view of a see-through head- worn display;

• Establishing a trigger at a sight-heading of the see-through head-worn display,

wherein the trigger sight-heading is represented by an angle relative to a forward facing direction for a user of the head- worn see-through display and wherein the trigger sight-heading is outside of the field of view; and

• Presenting at least a portion of the buffered content in the field of view when an edge of the field of view intersects with the trigger sight heading.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves presenting the buffered content in a side panel format that appears, from a user's perspective, to appear when the user turns the user's head to the side.

3. The method of clause 1 , wherein the content can be retrieved by the user by turning the user's head past the trigger sight-heading.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the content can be removed from the field of view by turning the user's head forward of the trigger sight-heading.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting the buffered content at a position within the field of view of the head-worn see-through display involves producing image light at a front-lit reflective display.

6. The method of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark light trap.

7. The method of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS. 8. The method of clause 5, 5herein the head- worn see-through display includes an eye imaging system.

9. The method of clause 1 , wherein the user interacts with the content, when presented, with an external user interface.

[000763] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 40 through 49.

1. A method, comprising:

• Buffering content for triggered presentation in a field of view of a see-through head- worn display;

• Establishing a trigger at an eye-heading of the see-through head- worn display,

wherein the trigger eye-heading is represented by an angle relative to a forward facing direction for a user of the head-worn see-through display and wherein the trigger eye- heading is outside of the field of view; and

• Presenting the buffered content in the field of view when a user's eye aligns with the eye -heading.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves presenting the buffered content in a side panel format that appears, from a user's perspective, to appear when the user turns the user's eye to the side.

3. The method of clause 1 , wherein the content can be retrieved by the user by turning the user's eye past the trigger sight-heading.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the content can be removed from the field of view by turning the user's eye forward of the trigger sight-heading.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting the buffered content at a position within the field of view of the head-worn see-through display involves producing image light at a front-lit reflective display. 6. The method of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark light trap.

7. The method of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

8. The method of clause 5, wherein the head- worn see-through display includes an eye imaging system.

9. The method of clause 1 , wherein the user interacts with the content, when presented, with an external user interface.

[000764] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 40 through 49.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

• A see-through display adapted to present content to an eye of a user wearing the head- worn computer and adapted to provide the user with a see-through view of an environment proximate the user;

• A processor adapted to control a position of the content within a field of view of the see-through display; and

• A sensor system adapted to sense a condition of the head- worn computer, wherein the sensor system provides sensor data to the processor and the processor controls the position of the content within field of view of the see-through display based on the sensor data.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the condition of the head- worn computer is a speed of movement of the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the position of the content position is regulated as follows:

• The content position is not adjusted when the speed of movement is indicative of a speed below a threshold; and • The position of the content is moved from a neutral position to a position closer to an outer edge of the field of view of the see-through display when the speed is above the threshold.

4. The computer of clause 2, wherein the position of the content is further dependent on a magnitude of the speed of movement, wherein the higher the magnitude of the speed the greater a distance the processor will move the content from a neutral position.

5. The computer of clause 2, wherein the processor is further adapted to predict a user activity based on the condition of the head- worn computer and wherein the position of the content is further based on the predicted activity.

6. The computer of clause 5, wherein the prediction of the activity is that the user is moving in a vehicle.

7. The computer of clause 5, wherein the prediction of the activity is that the user is walking.

8. The computer of clause 5, wherein the prediction of the activity is that the user is running.

9. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye imaging system adapted to determine a position of the eye of the user, wherein the content position is further determined based on the position of the eye.

10. The computer of clause 9, wherein the eye imaging system is adapted to capture images of the eye of the user, wherein light associated the images of the eye travel along an optical path that is at least partly in-line with an optical path followed by light associated with the content presented to the eye of the user, such that the images of the eye are captured from a position directly in front of the eye and the position of the eye is determined from the captured images of the eye. 11. The computer of clause 1 , further comprising an eye imaging system adapted to monitor a movement of the eye of the user, wherein the content position is further determined based on the movement of the eye of the user.

12. The computer of clause 11, wherein a rate of content position change is reduced when there is a rapid eye movement.

13. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a change of direction sensor system adapted to monitor a movement of head- worn computer, wherein the content position is further determined based on the movement of the head-worn computer.

14. The computer of clause 13, wherein a rate of position change of the content is reduced when there is a rapid movement.

15. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor is further adapted to position a second content in relation to an object in the environment, such that the second content maintains a relative position with the object in the environment irrespective of the condition of the head-worn computer.

16. The computer of clause 3, further comprising a sight heading sensor to monitor a direction the user is looking, wherein the content position is further determined based on the direction the user is looking.

17. The computer of clause 16, further comprising a direction of movement sensor to monitor a direction the user is moving, wherein the content position is further determined based on the direction the user is moving and the direction the user is looking.

18. The computer of clause 17, wherein the content is positioned in the field of view in correspondence to the direction the user is moving when the speed of movement is below a predetermined threshold and a rate of change in sight heading is below a second

predetermined threshold. 19. The computer of clause 17, wherein the content is positioned in the field of view in correspondence to the sight heading when the speed of movement is above a predetermined threshold and a rate of change in sight heading is below a second predetermined threshold.

20. The computer of clause 4, wherein at a higher magnitude of speed of movement, the content is moved beyond edge of the field of view of the see-through display.

[000765] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 57a and Fig. 58 .

1. A method, comprising:

• Collecting eye heading information from a plurality of head- worn computers that come into proximity with an object in an environment, wherein the eye heading information is collected from each of the plurality of head- worn computers by capturing an image of an eye of a wearer of the head-worn computers through an optical path internal to content display optics of each head-worn computer;

• Developing a crowd profile based on the eye heading information such that a

perception of the crowd's interest for the object is described; and

• Providing feedback of the crowd's interest to an entity that has an interest in the object.

2. A method, comprising:

• Collecting eye heading information from a plurality of head- worn computers that come into proximity with an object in an environment, wherein the eye heading information is collected from each of the plurality of head- worn computers by capturing an image of an eye of a wearer of the head-worn computers through an optical path internal to content display optics of each head-worn computer; and

• Providing a map of the environment with an indication of how many of the plurality of head- worn computers apparently looked at the object, as understood by examining the eye heading information from the plurality of head- worn computers.

3. A method, comprising: • Collecting a plurality of eye headings from a head-worn computer, wherein each of the plurality of eye headings is associated with a different pre-determined object in an environment, wherein the eye heading information is collected from each of the plurality of head-worn computers by capturing an image of an eye of a wearer of the head-worn computers through an optical path internal to content display optics of each head- worn computer;

• Examining the plurality of eye headings to determine if the eye heading aligned with a pre-determined object; and

• Developing a wearer observation preference profile based on the examination.

[000766] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 50 through 56.

1. A method, comprising:

• Comparing a position of a reflected image of an eye of a person wearing a head-worn computer with dimensions of a field of view of a content display of the head-worn computer to determine a position of the eye with respect to the field of view;

• Establishing a virtual target line in a direction that intersects the eye and the field of view; and

• Displaying content at the intersection of the virtual target line and the field of view.

2. A method, comprising:

• Storing a timing interval for an eye image capture;

• Capturing an image of an eye of a person wearing a head-worn computer at a time prescribed by the stored timing interval; and

• Establishing a health condition of the person through an interpretation of the captured eye image.

[000767] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 50 through 56.

1. An eye-imaging system, comprising: • A camera positioned in a head- worn computer, wherein the camera is further positioned to capture eye-image light that originate as reflections from an eye of a user;

• An IR light source positioned in the head- worn computer such that it irradiates the eye of the user with IR light; and

• The camera adapted to capture the IR light as the reflections from the eye of the user.

2. The system of clause 1, further comprising an IR reflecting surface positioned to reflect the IR light into an optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the head- worn computer includes a display adapted to generate image light, wherein the image light is projected into the optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

4. The system of clause 3, wherein the IR reflecting surface is adapted to also transmit visible light and is positioned such that the image light is transmitted through the IR reflecting surface.

5. The system of clause 3, wherein the display is a reflective display and the IR reflecting surface is further adapted to reflect display illumination light towards the reflective display.

6. The system of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

7. The system of clause 6, wherein substantially all of the display illumination is incident the reflective between 45 degrees and 135 degrees relative to a front surface of the reflective display.

8. The system of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is a DLP.

9. The system of clause 8, wherein the illumination light is generated at a position adjacent to the reflective display. 10. The system of clause 8, further comprising a dark-light trap positioned to capture off- pixel light.

[000768] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 50 through 56.

1. An eye-imaging system, comprising:

• A camera system positioned in a head-worn computer, wherein the camera system is further positioned to capture eye-image light that originates as reflections from an eye of a user;

• The camera system adapted to capture both visible light and IR light; and

• An IR light source positioned in the head- worn computer such that it irradiates the eye of the user with IR light to produce at least a portion of the reflections from the eye of the user.

2. The system of clause 1, further comprising an IR reflecting surface positioned to reflect the IR light into an optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the head- worn computer includes a display adapted to generate image light, wherein the image light is projected into the optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

4. The system of clause 3, wherein the IR reflecting surface is adapted to also transmit visible light and is positioned such that the image light is transmitted through the IR reflecting surface.

5. The system of clause 3, wherein the display is a reflective display and the IR reflecting surface is further adapted to reflect display illumination light towards the reflective display.

6. The system of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS. 7. The system of clause 6, wherein substantially all of the display illumination is incident the reflective between 45 degrees and 135 degrees relative to a front surface of the reflective display.

8. The system of clause 5, wherein the reflective display is a DLP.

9. The system of clause 8, wherein the illumination light is generated at a position adjacent to the reflective display.

10. The system of clause 8, further comprising a dark-light trap positioned to capture off- pixel light.

11. The system of clause 3, wherein the display is an emissive display.

[000769] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 50 through 56.

1. An eye-imaging system, comprising:

• A camera system positioned in a head-worn computer, wherein the camera system is further positioned to capture eye-image light that originates as reflections from an eye of a user;

• An structured-light light-source positioned in the head- worn computer such that it irradiates the eye of the user with a pattern of light to produce at least a portion of the reflections from the eye of the user; and

• A processor adapted to analyze changes in the pattern of light through a comparison of the pattern of light with the pattern of light as reflected from the eye of the user, wherein the changes are interpreted as positional changes of the eye of the user.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the head- worn computer includes a display adapted to generate image light, wherein the image light is projected into the optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the display is a reflective display. 4. The system of clause 3, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

5. The system of clause 4, wherein substantially all display illumination is incident the reflective between 45 degrees and 135 degrees relative to a front surface of the reflective display.

6. The system of clause 3, wherein the reflective display is a DLP.

7. The system of clause 6, wherein the illumination light is generated at a position adjacent to the reflective display.

8. The system of clause 7, further comprising a dark- light trap positioned to capture off- pixel light.

9. The system of clause 2, wherein the display is an emissive display.

10. The system of clause 1, wherein the pattern of light is a grid.

11. The system of clause 1 , wherein the pattern of light is generated with a diffractive optic.

[000770] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 50 through 56.

1. An eye-imaging system, comprising:

• A camera system positioned in a head-worn computer, wherein the camera system is further positioned to capture eye-image light that originates as reflections from an internal portion of an eye of a user;

• A light-source positioned in the head- worn computer such that it irradiates the internal portion of the eye of the user with a known amount of light to produce the reflections from the internal portion of the eye of the user; and • A processor adapted to analyze a light absorption statistic based on a comparison of the known amount of light and the reflections from the internal portion of the eye of the user.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the light-source is an IR light source.

3. The system of clause 1, wherein the light source is positioned to direct light into an optical path that directs the light into a pupil of the eye of the user to irradiate a back portion of the internal portion of the eye such that the reflections are directed back out of the eye.

4. The system of clause 1, wherein the absorption statistic is used to assess a health condition of the user.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the health condition is a blood alcohol indication.

6. The system of clause 1, wherein the health condition is a blood glucose indication.

7. The system of clause 1, wherein the health condition is a controlled substance concentration indication.

8. The system of clause 1, wherein the head- worn computer includes a display adapted to generate image light, wherein the image light is projected into an optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

9. The system of clause 8, wherein the display is a reflective display.

10. The system of clause 9, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

11. The system of clause 10, wherein substantially all display illumination is incident the reflective between 45 degrees and 135 degrees relative to a front surface of the reflective display.

12. The system of clause 8, wherein the reflective display is a DLP. 13. The system of clause 12, wherein the illumination light is generated at a position adjacent to the reflective display.

14. The system of clause 12, further comprising a dark-light trap positioned to capture off-pixel light.

15. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

[000771] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 50 through 56.

1. An eye-imaging system, comprising:

• A camera system positioned in a head-worn computer, wherein the camera system is further positioned to capture eye-image light that originates as reflections from an eye of a user; and

• A processor adapted to cause the camera system to capture the eye-image light a

plurality of times, wherein an interval of time between the plurality of times is based on a one of a plurality of reasons for capturing the eye-image light.

2. The system of clause 1, wherein the one of the plurality of reasons is security.

3. The system of clause 2, wherein the interval of time is based on an indication that the user has mounted the head- worn computer.

4. The system of clause 2, wherein the interval of time is based on an indication that the head-worn computer is attempting to access a pre-determined computer resource.

5. The system of clause 1, wherein the one of the plurality of reasons is health.

6. The system of clause 2, wherein the interval of time is relatively short to assess a health condition of the user due to a type movement of the user. 7. The system of clause 6, wherein the type of movement is indicative of user physical exertion.

8. The system of clause 2, wherein the interval of time is relatively long to assess a long- term condition of the user.

9. The system of clause 1, wherein the head- worn computer includes a display adapted to generate image light, wherein the image light is projected into an optical path in-line with the eye of the user.

10. The system of clause 9, wherein the display is a reflective display.

11. The system of clause 10, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

12. The system of clause 11, wherein substantially all display illumination is incident the reflective between 45 degrees and 135 degrees relative to a front surface of the reflective display.

13. The system of clause 9, wherein the reflective display is a DLP.

14. The system of clause 13, wherein the illumination light is generated at a position adjacent to the reflective display.

15. The system of clause 13, further comprising a dark- light trap positioned to capture off-pixel light.

16. The system of clause 1, wherein the display is an emissive display.

[000772] In some implementations, eye imaging may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 57 and 58.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing, from a camera in a head-worn computer, an image of a person in an

environment; b. Processing the image to determine a sight heading of the person in the environment by estimating a relative sight heading of the person and referencing the relative sight heading to a compass heading of the head-worn computer;

c. Estimating a geospatial location for the person in the environment based on the

geospatial position of the head-worn computer; and

d. Establishing an object sight line that originates at the estimated geospatial location for the person in the environment and intersects with an object in the environment.

A method, comprising:

a. Capturing, from a camera in a head-worn computer, an image series of a person in an environment;

b. Processing the image series to determine a series of sight headings of the person in the environment by estimating, at each portion in the series, a relative sight heading of the person and referencing the relative sight heading to a compass heading of the head- worn computer;

c. Estimating a geospatial location at each portion in the series for the person in the environment based on the geospatial position of the head- worn computer; and d. Establishing a series of object sight lines that originates at the corresponding

estimated geospatial locations for the person in the environment and intersects with an object in the environment to generate a persistence statistic.

A method, comprising:

a. Capturing, from a camera in a head-worn computer, an image series of a person at a location in an environment;

b. Processing the image series to determine a series of sight headings of the person in the environment by estimating a series of relative sight headings of the person and referencing the series of relative sight headings to a compass heading of the head- worn computer;

c. Estimating a geospatial location for the person in the environment based on the

geospatial position of the head-worn computer; and

d. Establishing a series of object sight lines that originate at the estimated geospatial location for the person in the environment and intersects with an object in the environment to generate a persistence statistic. [000773] In some implementations, vehicle presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 136.

1. A metho d , comprisin g :

a. Communicatively connecting a head- worn computer with a vehicle warning system; and

b. Causing the head- worn computer to produce tactile feedback when the vehicle

warning system produces a warning signal.

[000774] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 137.

1. A method of calibrating a head- worn see-through display, comprising:

a. Capturing an image, from a camera secured to the head-worn see-through display, of an object in an environment proximate the head- worn see-through display;

b. Enhancing an aspect of the object to make the object more apparent, forming an

enhanced object;

c. Displaying the enhanced object in the head-worn see-through display;

d. Capturing an image of light transmitted by and through the head- worn see-through display towards the wearer, forming a pre-calibration augmented reality image;

e. Determining a degree of overlap between the enhanced object with the object in the environment by comparing a position of the enhanced object with a position of the object in the environment as indicated in the pre-calibration augmented reality image; and

f. Establishing a calibrated position for augmented reality content to be displayed in the head- worn see-through display based on the degree of overlap.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the pre-calibration augmented reality image is captured by capturing light reflected off of the wearer's eye.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the pre-calibration augmented reality image is captured by capturing light at a position indicative of the wearer's eye. 4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the pre-calibration augmented reality image is captured by capturing light reflected off a surface at a position indicative of the wearer's eye.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the degree of overlap is determined by respective edges of the enhanced object and the object in the environment.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the degree of overlap is determined by an area of overlap between the enhanced object and the object in the environment.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the calibration position is used to position digital content that is displayed in the head-worn see-through display when the digital content is intended to be positionally associated with an identified object in the environment.

8. The method of clause 1 , wherein the steps of (a) through (f) are periodically re-run to form a new calibrated position.

9. The method of clause 1, wherein the steps of (a) through (f) are automatically re -run to form a new calibrated position.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the steps of (a) through (f) are re-run upon request to form a new calibrated position.

11. A method of calibrating a head- worn see-through display, comprising:

a. Enhancing an environment image captured by a camera secured to the head-worn see- through display to increase the visibility of an object in the environment image;

b. Displaying the enhanced environment image in the head- worn see-through display and capturing a combined image as viewed through the head- worn see-through display that includes both the displayed enhanced image and an object in a surrounding environment;

c. Determining a degree of overlap between the enhanced image and the object in the surrounding environment by examining the combined image; and

d. Establishing a position calibration factor for augmented reality content displayed on the head-worn see-through display. [000775] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 138.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Retrieving personal information relating to a user of a head- worn computer;

b. Selecting a geo-spatial location for digital content to be presented to the user based at least in part on the personal information;

c. Selecting a physical attribute proximate the geo-spatial location based at least in part on the personal information; and

d. Presenting, based on data indicative that the user is near the geo-spatial location, the digital content in a see-through display of the head- worn computer such that the digital content is perceived by the user to be associated with the physical attribute.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the personal information is demographic information.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the personal information is behavioral information.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the personal information is travel information.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content relates to the selected physical location.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content does not relate to the selected physical location.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the digital content when the head- worn computer is aligned in a pre-selected direction.

8. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the digital content when an eye of the user is predicted to be aligned in a pre-selected direction.

9. The method of clause 1, further comprising: selecting the digital content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content. 10. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the digital content to indicate the potentially obstructive view.

11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback.

12. The method of clause 1, wherein the sensor feedback is indicative of the user moving forward.

[000776] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

Receiving a personally selected geo-spatial location from a sender of digital content for the presentation of the digital content in a recipient's head- worn see-through display; and

Presenting, based on data indicative that the user is near the geo-spatial location, the digital content in the head- worn see-through display such that the digital content is perceived by the recipient to be associated with a physical attribute proximate the geo-spatial location.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the personal selection was facilitated through the use of a user interface with menu selections.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the menu selections include an indication of the recipient's frequented locations.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content relates to the selected geo-spatial location.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the digital content does not relate to the selected geo-spatial location. 6. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the digital content when the head- worn computer is aligned in a pre-selected direction.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the digital content when an eye of the user is predicted to be aligned in a pre-selected direction.

8. The method of clause 1, further comprising: selecting the digital content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content.

9. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the digital content to indicate the potentially obstructive view.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback.

11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the sensor feedback is indicative of the user moving forward.

12. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting based on the recipient's personal information.

[000777] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Establishing a plurality of content presentation settings wherein each of the plurality of settings includes an indication of a physical location where a recipient desires a type of digital content to be presented in the recipient's head- worn see-through display; and b. Presenting content intended for delivery to the recipient when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is proximate one of the plurality of physical locations when the content type corresponds to the type of digital content to be presented at the physical location based on the content presentation setting.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the plurality of content presentation settings was established through the recipient's selections on a settings user interface.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the plurality of content presentation settings was established based on the recipient's prior interactions with digital content.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the presented content relates to the physical location where presentation is made.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the presented content does not relate to the physical location where presentation is made.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the indication of physical location includes a geo- spatial location and an object attribute type.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the object attribute type is a specific object's attribute.

8. The method of clause 6, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head- worn see-through display is sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

9. The method of clause 6, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head- worn see-through display is eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

10. The method of clause 1, further comprising: receiving an indication that the recipient has selected the content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content. 11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting further includes identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the content to indicate the potentially obstructive view.

12. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback.

13. The method of clause 12, wherein the sensor feedback is indicative of the user moving forward.

14. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting based on the recipient's personal information.

15. The method of clause 14, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting based on a sender's location specific presentation request.

[000778] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Pre-determining a physical environment position for the presentation of primary

virtual content, wherein the primary virtual content is presented in a see-through head- worn display; and

b. Pre-determining a position for each of a plurality of directionally informative content, wherein each of the plurality of directionally informative content is associated with a different physical environment position and indicates to a person wearing the see- through head-worn computer in what direction the primary virtual content will be found.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of pre-determining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content involves determining the physical environmental position based on personal information relating to the person. 3. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of pre-determining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content involves determining the physical environmental position based on a content sender's requested delivery criteria.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of pre-determining the physical environment position for the presentation of the primary virtual content involves determining the physical environmental position based on the person's pre-set content delivery preferences.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein each of the plurality of directionally informative content includes video content.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein each of the plurality of directionally informative content includes an image.

7. The method of clause 1 , wherein the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content includes a geo-spatial position.

8. The method of clause 7, wherein the physical environment position for the

presentation of primary virtual content includes an environment attribute type.

9. The method of clause 7, wherein the physical environment position for the

presentation of primary virtual content includes an environment attribute.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the primary virtual content relates to the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content.

11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the primary virtual content does not relate to the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content.

12. The method of clause 1 , wherein the primary virtual content is presented when data indicates that the head- worn see-through display is proximate the physical environment position for the presentation of primary virtual content. 13. The method of clause 12, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has an eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

14. The method of clause 12, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has a sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

15. The method of clause 1, further comprising: receiving an indication that the recipient has selected the primary virtual content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content.

16. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the primary virtual content to indicate the potentially obstructive view.

17. The method of clause 12, wherein the step of presenting further includes altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback.

18. The method of clause 17, wherein the sensor feedback is indicative of the user moving forward.

[000779] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Receiving content to be delivered to a plurality of recipients, wherein each recipient of the plurality of recipients has a preference for the physical location at which the content is to be presented in the recipient's see-through head-worn display and a sender of the content has a preference for the physical location at which the content is to be presented to each recipient of the plurality of recipients; b. Identifying a final physical location for the presentation of the content for each recipient of the plurality of recipients, wherein the final physical location is based on both the recipient's preference and the sender's preference; and

c. Causing the content to be presented to each recipient of the plurality of recipients

when each recipient is proximate the final physical location identified for the recipient.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the sender's preference overrides the recipient's preference.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the recipient's preference overrides the sender's preference.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the final physical location represents a location that is within acceptable positions identified for the recipient and is a priority position for the sender.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the physical location preference for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients is established based on personal information relating to the at least one recipient.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the physical location preference for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients is established based on the at least one recipient's selections.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the physical location preference for the sender is established based on the sender's selection in a user interface.

8. The method of clause 1, wherein the physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients includes a geo-spatial position.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients includes an environment attribute type. 10. The method of clause 8, wherein physical location for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients includes an environment attribute.

11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the content relates to the physical location for at least one recipients of the plurality of recipients.

12. The method of clause 1, wherein the content does not relate to the physical location for at least one recipients of the plurality of recipients.

13. The method of clause 1, wherein the content is presented when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display is proximate the final physical location for each of the recipients of the plurality of recipients.

14. The method of clause 13, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has an eye heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

15. The method of clause 13, wherein the step of presenting further includes presenting the content when data indicates that the head-worn see-through display has a sight heading aligned with a selected object attribute.

16. The method of clause 1, further comprising: receiving an indication that at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients has selected the content with an external user interface to re-position the digital content.

17. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes, for at least one recipient of the plurality of recipients, identifying a potentially obstructive view object and altering the primary virtual content to indicate the potentially obstructive view.

18. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting further includes altering a position of the presentation based on sensor feedback.

19. The method of clause 18, wherein the sensor feedback is indicative of the user moving forward. 20. The method of clause 1, wherein the content also has a presentation location preference and the step of identifying the final presentation location for each recipient of the plurality of recipients is further based on the content presentation location preference.

[000780] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Pre-setting a geo-spatial location where content will be displayed to a user of a see-through head-worn display;

b. Establishing a region proximate the geo-spatial location; and

c. Causing a marker recognition system of the head-worn see-through display to activate when data indicates that the see-through head-worn display is within the region, wherein the marker recognition system monitors a surrounding environment to identify a marker that will act as a virtual anchor for the presentation of the content.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the marker is a pre-established physical attribute.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the marker is a priority marker selected from a plurality of markers, wherein the priority marker was identified by scanning the surrounding environment in a search for the plurality of markers.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on personal information known about the user.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a presentation preference setting established by the user.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a preference of a sender of the content. 7. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a preference setting of the content.

8. The method of clause 1, wherein the content relates to the geo-spatial location.

9. The method of clause 1, wherein the content does not relate to the geo-spatial location.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the content is sent by another user characterized as a friend of the user through a known affiliation.

11. The method of clause 10, wherein the content is a text message.

12. The method of clause 10, wherein the content is a video.

13. The method of clause 1, wherein informational content is presented to the user in the see-through head- worn display to indicate to the user that the content is queued for

presentation.

14. The method of clause 13, wherein the informational content is presented outside of the region.

15. The method of clause 14, wherein the informational content further includes an indication of a direction in which the user will be presented with the content.

[000781] In some implementations, personal content locations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs 139 through 147.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Pre-setting a geo-spatial location where content will be displayed to a user of a see- through head-worn display;

b. Establishing a region proximate the geo-spatial location; c. Presenting to the user in the see-through head-worn display the content when data indicative that the head- worn see-through display has entered the region; and d. Causing a presentation confirmation to be communicated to a server based on the fact that the content was presented in the head-worn see-through display.

2. The method of clause 1 , wherein the user's identity was verified through biometric information such that the presentation confirmation represents a confirmation that the content was presented to a verified user.

3. The method of clause 2, wherein the user's identity was identified through eye imaging.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the step of presenting to the user further comprises presenting when data indicative that the head-worn see-through display was aligned with a pre-established sight heading.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting to the user further comprises presenting when data indicative that the user's eye was aligned with a pre-established eye heading.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the presentation confirmation is communicated from the server to a sender of the content.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the sender is a person characterized as a friend of the user through a known affiliation.

8. The method of clause 1, wherein the presentation confirmation includes a persistence statistic indicative of how long the person viewed the content.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein the persistence statistic is based on a recorded sight heading relating to the head-worn see-through display.

10. The method of clause 8, wherein the persistence statistic is based on a recorded eye heading relating to the user's eye position. 11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on personal information known about the user.

12. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a presentation preference established for the user.

13. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a presentation preference of a sender of the content.

14. The method of clause 1, wherein the geo-spatial location was selected based on a preference setting relating to the content.

[000782] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 151.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Irradiating a portion of a human body with non- visible light and visible light; b. Causing a medical professional to view the portion of the human body as illuminated by the visible light through a computer display positioned on the head of the medical professional;

c. Capturing reflections of the non-visible light from the portion of the human body with a non-visible image capture device;

d. Converting the captured non- visible light into visible light content; and

e. Presenting the visible light content as an augmented reality overlay in the computer display such that the medical professional perceives the visible light content as overlaying the portion of the human body.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the non- visible light may be emitted from a solid- state light source mounted on a head-worn platform.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein, both the visible light and non- visible light are emitted from light sources mounted on a head-worn platform. 4. The method of clause 1, wherein, the reflections of the non- visible light are analyzed for a known condition.

5. The method of clause 4, wherein the known condition is at least one of a blood condition, vascular condition, organ condition, cell condition, and cancer condition or other medical condition.

6. The method of clause 1 , wherein the visible light content is presented for medical procedure guidance.

7. The method of clause 1, further comprising an in-line eye -imaging camera for capturing an image of an eye of the medical professional to identify the direction the medical professional is looking.

8. The method of clause 1, further comprising a surrounding environment imaging system that is arranged to capture the surrounding environment in-line with the optical axis of the medical professional's surrounding environment.

9. The method of clause 1, wherein the visible light content includes a controllable attribute and the controllable attribute is controlled through an external user interface.

10. The method of clause 1, wherein the visible light content includes a controllable attribute and the controllable attribute is controlled through a gesture interface.

11. The method of clause 1 , wherein the visible light content includes a controllable attribute and the controllable attribute is controlled through IMU detection interface adapted to detect pre-determined head motions of the medical professional.

[000783] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 151.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A forward-facing camera adapted to capture images of an environment proximate the head- worn computer; b. A processor adapted to cause the camera to capture an image of a person's face, wherein the processor is further adapted to initiate a facial recognition process based on the image to verify that the person is a known medical patient with a scheduled known medical procedure; and

c. The processor further adapted to display an indication that the person is the known person with the scheduled known medical procedure in a see-through display of the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the facial recognition process is performed remote from the head- worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the facial recognition process is performed by the processor.

4. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye -imaging system adapted to verify an identity of a person wearing the head- worn computer to maintain confidential the displayed indication.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the person wearing the head- worn computer is verified as a medical professional.

[000784] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 151.

1 , A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A forward-facing camera adapted to capture images of an environment proximate the head- worn computer;

b. A processor adapted to cause the camera to capture an image of a body part of a medical patient, wherein the processor is further adapted to initiate a body part recognition process based on the image to verify that the body part is a correct body part for a scheduled medical procedure; and

c. The processor further adapted to display an indication that the body part is the correct body part for a scheduled medical procedure in a see-through display of the head- worn computer. 2. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the body part recognition process is performed remote from the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the body part recognition process is performed by the processor.

4. The computer of clause 1, further comprising an eye -imaging system adapted to verify an identity of a person wearing the head- worn computer to maintain confidential the displayed indication.

5. The computer of clause 4, wherein the person wearing the head- worn computer is verified as a medical professional.

[000785] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 151.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. An eye imaging system adapted to capture an image of an eye of a person wearing the head- worn computer;

b. A processor adapted to initiate a personal verification process based on an image captured by the eye imaging system, wherein the personal verification process verifies that the person wearing the head-worn computer is a medical professional permitted to view medical information relating to a medical patient; and

c. The processor further adapted to present in a see-through display of the head-worn computer the medical information relating to the medical patient.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the personal verification process is performed remote from the head-worn computer.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the personal verification process is performed by the processor. 4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the medical information relates to a medical procedure.

[000786] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 151.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. An imaging system adapted to capture at least one bandwidth of non-visible light; b. A lighting system adapted to emit at the least one bandwidth of non- visible light; c. A processor adapted to cause the lighting system to irradiate a body part during a medical procedure and causing the imaging system to capture non- visible light reflected from the body part;

d. The processor further adapted to convert the captured non- visible light into visible light content and then present the visible light content as an augmented reality body part overlay in a see-through display of the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the at least one bandwidth of non- visible light is at least two bandwidths of non- visible light and wherein each of the at least two bandwidths is converted into a different visible color in the visible light content.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the at least one bandwidth of non- visible light is NIR.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the at least one bandwidth of non- visible light is IR.

5. The computer of clause 1, wherein the at least one bandwidth of non- visible light is UV.

6. The computer of clause 1 , wherein the body part is an internal body part viewed during a medical procedure. [000787] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Fig. 151.

1. A head-worn computer, comprising:

a. A forward facing thermal imaging system;

b. A processor adapted to initiate a thermal image capture of a plurality of people

proximate the head- worn computer;

c. The processor further adapted to initiate an excess temperature screening process to identify at least one of the plurality of people as apparently running a body temperature above a normal human body temperature; and

d. The processor further adapted to present a positive screening indication relating to the at least one of the plurality of people in a see-through display of the head-worn computer.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the processor is further adapted to take input from a user of the head- worn computer to initiate the thermal image capture.

3. The computer of clause 1, wherein the excess temperature screening process is performed remote from the head-worn computer.

4. The computer of clause 1, wherein the excess temperature screening process is performed by the processor.

[000788] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 152 through 160.

1. A method of aligning augmented reality content in a see-through head-worn display with a human body portion, comprising:

a. Detecting a light source that is positioned on the human body portion as a reference point for the human body portion;

b. Establishing a field of view position, within the see-through display, that is along a line of sight that intersects an eye of a person wearing the see-through head- worn display and the light source; c. Establishing a content position reference that describes the positional relation between the light source and imaged content of the human body portion; and

d. Displaying the imaged content within the field of view at a position that aligns the field of view position and the content position reference.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of detecting the light source involves capturing an image of the human body potion with a camera that is in-line with an optical path described by the eye's view through the see-through display.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the light source produces infrared light.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the light source produces visible light.

5. The method of clause 4 wherein the see-through display includes a notch filter adapted to absorb the visible light such that the person wearing the see-through display does not see the visible light.

6. A method of aligning augmented reality content in a see-through head- worn display with a human body portion, comprising:

a. Imaging the human body portion during a pre -procedure diagnostic imaging process with the presence of a light emitting marker attached to the human body portion such that the light emitting marker is present in a resulting pre-procedure diagnostic medical image;

b. Capturing an image of the light emitting marker during a medical procedure from the perspective of the see-through head-worn display; and

c. Presenting the pre-procedure diagnostic medical image at a position in the see- through head-worn display that aligns the captured image of the light emitting marker during the medical procedure with the light emitting marker imaged during the pre- procedure diagnostic imaging process.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the pre-procedure diagnostic is at least one of an X- Ray, MRI, and CAT Scan. 8. A method of aligning augmented reality content in a see-through head- worn display with a human body portion, comprising:

a. Presenting light-emitter marked medical image AR content in the see-through head- worn display; and

b. Presenting a person wearing the see-through head- worn display with a user interface to manually position the content to align with a related light emitter on the human body portion, such that the person can align the content with the human body portion from the person's perspective.

9. The method of clause 8, wherein the user interface is voice activated.

10. The method of clause 8, wherein the user interface head-movement activated.

11. The method of clause 8, wherein the user interface is an external device.

12. The method of clause 8, wherein the content is automatically repositioned to account for movements in the see-through head- worn display after the content has been initially manually positioned.

13. A method of aligning augmented reality content in a see-through head- worn display with a human body portion during an endoscopic procedure, comprising:

a. Marking an endoscope entrance point on the human body portion with a light emitting marker;

b. Reading positional information from an position monitoring system proximate an end of an endoscope during the endoscopic procedure; and

c. Displaying AR content in the see-through head-worn display that is aligned with the light emitting marker and indicative of a position of the endoscope end relative to the light emitting marker.

14. The method of clause 13, wherein the AR content includes an indication of a path that the endoscope traveled during the endoscopic procedure. [000789] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 148 through 150.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing the object as a known object with known physical dimensions;

c. Analyzing the image of the object in relation to the known physical dimensions to determine an approximate distance between an image capture device used to capture the image of the object and the object; and

d. Displaying content in the head-worn display at a focal plane relative to the

approximate distance.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the focal plane is defined by a convergence plane.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the focal plane is defined by a perspective viewing angle.

4. The method of clause 1 , wherein the focal plane is defined by a size relative to the object.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the focal plane is defined by a distance at which the content comes into focus for a person wearing the head-worn display.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the image capture device is mounted proximate the head-worn display.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the known object is an object with a standard physical size.

8. The method of clause 1, wherein the known object is at least one of a doorway, mailbox, window, window frame, house siding, brick, light switch, light post, telephone poll, road sign, speed limit sign, reflector, road reflector, vehicle, building, tile, head size, and inter-pupil distance.

9. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of a plurality of objects in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing a distance between the plurality of objects as a known physical

dimension;

c. Analyzing the image of the plurality of objects in relation to the known distance between the plurality of objects to determine an approximate distance between an image capture device used to capture the image of the plurality of objects and at least one of the plurality of objects; and

d. Displaying content in the head-worn display at a focal plane relative to the

approximate distance between the image capture device and the at least one object.

10. The method of clause 9, wherein the distance between the plurality of objects is a standard distance.

11. The method of clause 9, wherein the plurality of objects includes telephone poles, light poles, and buildings.

12. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing the object as a known object with known physical dimensions;

c. Recognizing that the object is not at a normal angle in the image;

d. Analyzing the image of the object in relation to the known physical dimensions to determine an approximate off-normal angle of the object in the image;

e. Determine an approximate distance between an image capture device used to capture the image of the object and the object based on the known physical dimensions as applied using a model based on the off-normal angle of the object in the image; and f. Displaying content in the head- worn display at a position apparently proximate the object and at a focal plane relative to the approximate distance. A method, comprising :

a. Capturing an image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing the object as a known object with known physical dimensions;

c. Recognizing that the object is not at a normal angle in the image;

d. Analyzing the image of the object in relation to the known physical dimensions to determine an approximate off-normal angle of the object in the image; and

e. Displaying content in the head-worn display at a position apparently proximate the object, wherein the content appears to have physical dimensions consistent with the off-normal angle of the imaged object. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of a plurality of objects in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing each of the plurality of objects as known object with known physical dimensions;

c. Analyzing the image of each of the plurality of objects in relation to the known

physical dimensions of each one to determine a distance to each object;

d. Establishing that one of the plurality of objects distance determination appears to not fit a physical environment reconstruction model including the other of the plurality of objects;

e. Removing the one object that appears not to fit the model from consideration as a distance marker, establishing a confirmed set of markers; and

f. Presenting content in the head-worn display at a focal plane relative to the confirmed set of markers. A method, comprising :

a. Capturing more than one image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Identifying that the object is moving in the environment by comparing the objects position in the more than one image; and

c. Removing the object from consideration as a distance marker when presenting content in the head-worn display, wherein the content is presented at a focal plane at a distance from the head- worn display. [000790] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 148 through 150.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn see-through display;

b. Recognizing the object as a known object with known physical dimensions;

c. Recognizing that the object is not at a normal angle in the image;

d. Analyzing the image of the object in relation to the known physical dimensions to determine an approximate off-normal angle of the object in the image; and

e. Displaying content in the head-worn display at a position apparently proximate the object, wherein the content appears to have physical dimensions consistent with the off-normal angle of the imaged object.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of capturing the image is accomplished through the use of a camera mounted proximate the head- worn see-through display.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of recognizing the object as a known object involves accessing a remote database of object attributes.

4. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of analyzing the image involves analyzing the image at a server remote from the head- worn see-through display.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of displaying content involves determining a distance between the head- worn see-through display and the object and presenting the content at a focal plane consistent with the determined distance.

6. The method of clause 5, wherein the distance determination involves assessing a size of the object as captured with the known object's size attributes.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of displaying involves generating an image with a front lit reflective display. 8. The method of clause 7, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark trap stray light management system.

9. The method of clause 7, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

10. The method of clause 7, further comprising an in-optic eye imaging system.

[000791] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 148 through 150.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing an image of a plurality of objects in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Recognizing each of the plurality of objects as known objects with known physical dimensions;

c. Analyzing the image of each of the plurality of objects in relation to the known

physical dimensions to determine a distance to each object;

d. Establishing that one of the plurality of object's distance determination appears to not fit a physical environment reconstruction model including the other of the plurality of objects;

e. Removing the one object that appears not to fit the model from consideration as a distance marker, establishing a confirmed set of markers; and

f. Presenting content in the head-worn display at a focal plane relative to at least on of the confirmed set of markers.

2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of capturing the image is accomplished through the use of a camera mounted proximate the head- worn see-through display.

3. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of recognizing the object as a known object involves accessing a remote database of object attributes. 4. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of analyzing the image involves analyzing the image at a server remote from the head- worn see-through display.

5. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves making a distance determination by assessing a size of at least one of the set of objects as captured with the known object's size attributes.

6. The method of clause 5, wherein the distance determination involves assessing a size of the object as captured with the known object's size attributes.

7. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves generating an image with a front lit reflective display.

8. The method of clause 7, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark trap stray light management system.

9. The method of clause 7, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

10. The method of clause 7, further comprising an in-optic eye imaging system.

[000792] In some implementations, medical presentations may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 148 through 150.

1. A method, comprising:

a. Capturing more than one image of an object in an environment proximate a person wearing a head-worn display;

b. Identifying that the object is moving in the environment by comparing the object's position in the more than one image; and

c. Removing the object from consideration as a distance marker when presenting content in the head-worn display, wherein the content is presented at a focal plane at a distance from the head- worn display. 2. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of capturing the image is accomplished through the use of a camera mounted proximate the head- worn see-through display.

3. The method of clause 1, further comprising identifying the object as a known object.

4. The method of clause 3, wherein the step of presenting involves making a distance determination by assessing a size of the object as captured with the known object's size attributes.

5. The method of clause 4, wherein the distance determination involves assessing a size of the object as captured with the known object's size attributes.

6. The method of clause 1, wherein the step of presenting involves generating an image with a front lit reflective display.

7. The method of clause 6, wherein the reflective display is a DLP with a dark trap stray light management system.

8. The method of clause 6, wherein the reflective display is an LCoS.

9. The method of clause 6, wherein the head-worn display further comprises an in-optic eye imaging system.

[000793] In some implementations, display techniques may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 107 through 111b.

1. A method for reducing color breakup in a head-mounted display that provides color sequential displayed images with a number of pixels in each displayed image to a user at a frame rate, comprising:

a. selecting a predetermined threshold for a speed of movement of the head-mounted display;

b. detecting a speed of movement of the head mounted display; and c. wherein if the detected speed of movement is above the threshold, the number of pixels in each displayed image is reduced with a simultaneous corresponding increase in frame rate to thereby reduce color breakup while maintaining a bandwidth associated with displaying the images.

2. A method for reducing color breakup in a head-mounted display that provides color sequential displayed images with a number of pixels in each displayed image to a user at a frame rate, and the head-mounted display includes an eye camera, comprising:

a. selecting a predetermined threshold for a speed of eye;

b. detecting a speed of eye movement with the eye camera; and

c. wherein if the detected speed of eye movement is above the threshold, the number of pixels in each displayed image is reduced with a simultaneous corresponding increase in frame rate to thereby reduce color breakup while maintaining a bandwidth associated with displaying the images.

3. A method for reducing color breakup in a head-mounted display including an eye imaging camera and an inertial measurement unit, that provides color sequential displayed images with a number of pixels in each displayed image to a user at a frame rate, comprising: a. selecting a predetermined threshold for a speed of eye;

b. selecting a predetermined threshold for a speed of movement of the head mounted display;

c. detecting a speed of eye movement with the eye camera;

d. detecting a speed of movement of the head mounted display with the inertial

measurement unit; and

e. wherein if the detected speed of eye movement or the detected speed of movement of the head mounted display are above their respective thresholds, the number of pixels in each displayed image is reduced with a simultaneous corresponding increase in frame rate to thereby reduce color breakup while maintaining a bandwidth associated with displaying the images.

4. The method of clause 3 further comprising:

wherein if the detected speed of eye movement or the detected speed of movement of the head mounted display are above their respective thresholds, the number of pixels in each displayed image is reduced with a simultaneous corresponding increase in frame rate, or digitally shifting the subframe images relative to each other by a number of pixels that corresponds to the detected difference in speed of movement and in reverse direction between the eye movement and the movement of the head mounted display so that the subframe images are aligned with each other within each full color image to thereby reduce color breakup while maintaining a bandwidth associated with displaying the images.

[000794] In some implementations, configurations of a head-worn computer may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 114 through 118.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A multi-board electronics configuration wherein at least one board is mounted

vertically between two see-through optical modules;

b. A processor mounted on the vertical board; and

c. A heat sink mounted between the two see-through optical modules and in thermal connection to the processor such that heat is transferred from the processor to the heat sink and substantial portion of the heat is drawn away from a user's head.

2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the two optical modules include multiply folded optics wherein a lower reflective surface is adapted to reflect at least a portion of an image light associated with a displayed image directly towards an eye of the user while transmitting light from a surrounding environment proximate the user to provide a see-through view of the surrounding environment.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein the multiply folded optics include at least two flat reflective surfaces that are twisted with respect to one another such that an upper optical module fits within a frame of the head-worn computer and the displayed images provided by the two optical modules are aligned to one another.

4. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a progressively tinted lens, wherein the progressively tinted lens has low transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of a portion of the upper optical module and has high transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of the lower optical module, thereby providing at least partial concealment of the upper optical module and high transmission through the lower module to provide a see- through view of the surrounding environment.

5. The computer of clause 1, further comprising a progressively tinted lens, wherein the progressively tinted lens has low transmission at a portion that is positioned in the multi- board electronics and has high transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of the lower optical module, thereby providing at least partial concealment of the upper optical module and high transmission through the lower module to provide a see-through view of the surrounding environment.

6. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A temple portion mechanically connected to a brow portion, the brow portion

securing a see-through optical module;

b. A rotating user interface element mounted on the temple portion, the rotating user interface element producing tactile feedback in response to user rotation and engagement at a preset angle; and

c. Wherein the rotating user interface element causes a graphical user interface

interaction.

7. The computer of clause 6, wherein the graphical user interface interaction includes a selection of an application.

8. The computer of clause 6, wherein the graphical user interface interaction includes a selection of a menu item.

9. The computer of clause 6, wherein the rotating user interface element produces a series of tactile clicks in response to user rotation.

10. The computer of clause 6, wherein the optical module includes multiply folded optics, wherein a lower reflective surface is adapted to reflect at least a portion of image light directly towards an eye of the user while transmitting light from a surrounding environment proximate the user to provide a see-through view of the surrounding environment. 11. The computer of clause 9, wherein the multiply folded optics include at least two flat reflective surfaces that are turned with respect to one another such that an upper optical module fits within a frame of the head-worn computer.

12. The computer of clause 6, further comprising a progressively tinted lens, wherein the progressively tinted lens has low transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of a portion of the upper optical module and has high transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of a lower optical module, providing at least partial concealment of the upper module and high transmission through the lower module.

13. The computer of clause 6, further comprising a progressively tinted lens, wherein the progressively tinted lens has low transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of a portion of an electronics board and has high transmission at a portion that is positioned in front of the lower optical module, providing at least partial concealment of the electronics board and high transmission through the lower module.

[000795] In some implementations, configurations of a head-worn computer may be described in the following clauses or otherwise described herein and as illustrated in Figs. 119 through 124.

1. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A see-through computer display, wherein a user can see a surrounding

environment through the see-through computer display and see computer generated content;

b. The see-through computer display positioned in the head- worn computer such that an opaque portion of the see-through computer display is above a pupil of the user and below a brow line of the user when wearing the head-worn display; c. A tinted lens positioned to conceal at least a portion of the opaque portion of the see-through computer, wherein the tinted lens includes an upper area for concealment that is low in transmission and a lower area for the see-through view that is high in transmission; and

d. The tinted lens including a magnetic attachment system adapted to facilitate

removal and replacement of the lens from the head- worn computer. 2. The computer of clause 1, wherein the see-through display includes a multiply folded optical arrangement, wherein the optical arrangement is twisted such that an upper portion follows a head-wrapping form of the head-worn computer while still maintaining an image light optical path in line with an eye of the user.

3. The computer of clause 2, wherein an electronics board adapted to operate at least a portion of the head- worn computer is positioned vertically and is at least in part concealed by the upper area of the tinted lens.

4. A head- worn computer, comprising:

a. A computer display positioned to be viewed by a user of the head-worn computer; b. Electronics, including a processor, adapted to operate the computer display; and c. A heat sink arranged to transfer heat generated by the processor to an external surface, wherein the heat sink further includes a plurality of micro-holes of a size to allow a gas to transfer to the external surface while not allowing a liquid to flow through any of the plurality of micro-holes, wherein the micro-holes are positioned to facilitate the transfer of heat from the processor.

5. A compact optics module for a head mounted display that includes an eye imaging camera comprising:

a. a reflective image source;

b. a polarized light source that illuminates the reflective image source;

c. an angled partial reflector that transmits illuminating light and redirects the image light reflected towards an absorptive polarizer and a lens element that converges the image light;

d. a combiner that redirects the image light, along with transmitted light from the

environment, toward a user's eye to provide a field of view including a displayed image and a see-through view of a surrounding environment that is viewable by the user's eye; and

e. wherein the eye imaging camera is positioned adjacent to the angled partial reflector to capture light reflected by the user's eye.

6. The computer of clause 1 wherein the eye imaging camera is pointed toward the lens element. 7. The computer of clause 1 wherein the eye imaging camera is pointed toward the angled partial reflector.

8. The computer of clause 1 wherein the light captured by the eye imaging camera is the same polarization state as the displayed image.

9. The computer of clause 1 wherein the polarized light source includes a turning film to direct the illuminating light towards the reflective image source.

10. The computer of clause 1 wherein the lens element includes a diffractive surface.

11. The computer of clause 1 wherein the absorptive polarizer is oriented to absorb incident illuminating light.

12. The computer of clause 1 wherein the reflective image source is an LCOS or an FLCOS.

13. The computer of clause 1 wherein the reflective image source is a DLP.

14. A method for searching for a user identified pattern using a head worn computer that includes sensors, comprising:

a. the user selecting a search mode;

b. the user identifying a target pattern that is detectable by the sensors;

c. the HWC gathering data with the sensors and analyzing the data to compare patterns in the data to the target pattern; and

d. the HWC alerting the user when a potential match occurs between a pattern in the gathered data and the target pattern.

15. The method of clause 14 wherein the sensor is a camera that captures images of the environment surrounding the user and the target pattern is a portion of an image indicated by the user.

16. The method of clause 15 wherein the portion of an image is an object shape. 17. The method of clause 15 wherein the portion of an image is a color.

18. The method of clause 15 wherein the user indicates the target pattern by pointing to a portion of an image.

19. The method of clause 15 wherein the user indicates the target pattern by circling a portion of an image.

20. The method of clause 14 wherein the sensor is a camera that captures images of the environment surrounding the user and the target pattern is text.

21. The method of clause 20 wherein the environment is a retail setting or a warehouse.

22. The method of clause 20 wherein the text is associated with navigation.

23. The method of clause 15 wherein the camera is an infrared or ultraviolet camera.

24. The method of clause 14 wherein the user identifies the target pattern from previously captured data.

25. The method of clause 14 wherein the user identifies the target pattern from live data being captured by the sensors on the HWC.

26. The method of clause 14 wherein the sensor is a microphone that captures sound in the surrounding environment and the target pattern is a target sound.

27. The method of clause 26 wherein the target sound is a spoken word and the user identifies the target sound by speaking the word.

28. The method of clause 26 wherein the user identifies the target sound from a previously captured audio recording. 29. The method of clause 26 wherein the user identifies the target sound from a previously captured audio recording.

30. The method of clause 14 wherein the sensors includes a rangefmder or a camera capable of providing a depth and the target pattern includes a size of an object.

31. A head- worn computer including a frame with see-through display optics and a removable combiner comprising:

a. a combiner that is partially reflective;

b. two or more parallel pins, made from a magnetic material, that are rigidly attached to the combiner;

c. magnets attached to a frame of the head-worn computer in positions that correspond to the pins, that attract the pins so that the pins slide into matching bores in the frame to position the combiner below the frame; and

d. wherein the strength of the magnets is selected to be strong enough to hold the

combiner in position during use but weak enough to enable the combiner to be removed.

32. The computer of clause 31 wherein the pins are designed to break under impact.

33. The computer of clause 31 wherein the combiner is designed to break from the pins under impact.

34. The computer of clause 31 wherein the magnets are ring magnets and the pins extend through the magnets.

35. The computer of clause 31 wherein the magnets are contained within inserts that include bores to guide the pins.

36. The computer of clause 31 wherein the pins are attached to the combiner using a jig and adhesive.

[000796] While only a few embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that many changes and modifications may be made thereunto without departing from the spirit and scope of the embodiments described above and in the following claims. All patent applications and patents, both foreign and domestic, and all other publications referenced herein are incorporated herein in their entireties to the full extent permitted by law.

[000797] The methods and systems described herein may be deployed in part or in whole through a machine that executes computer software, program codes, and/or instructions on a processor. The present invention may be implemented as a method on the machine, as a system or apparatus as part of or in relation to the machine, or as a computer program product embodied in a computer readable medium executing on one or more of the machines. In embodiments, the processor may be part of a server, cloud server, client, network infrastructure, mobile computing platform, stationary computing platform, or other computing platform. A processor may be any kind of computational or processing device capable of executing program instructions, codes, binary instructions and the like. The processor may be or may include a signal processor, digital processor, embedded processor, microprocessor or any variant such as a co-processor (math co-processor, graphic co-processor, communication coprocessor and the like) and the like that may directly or indirectly facilitate execution of program code or program instructions stored thereon. In addition, the processor may enable execution of multiple programs, threads, and codes. The threads may be executed simultaneously to enhance the performance of the processor and to facilitate simultaneous operations of the application. By way of implementation, methods, program codes, program instructions and the like described herein may be

implemented in one or more thread. The thread may spawn other threads that may have assigned priorities associated with them; the processor may execute these threads based on priority or any other order based on instructions provided in the program code. The processor, or any machine utilizing one, may include memory that stores methods, codes, instructions and programs as described herein and elsewhere. The processor may access a storage medium through an interface that may store methods, codes, and instructions as described herein and elsewhere. The storage medium associated with the processor for storing methods, programs, codes, program

instructions or other type of instructions capable of being executed by the computing or processing device may include but may not be limited to one or more of a CD-ROM, DVD, memory, hard disk, flash drive, RAM, ROM, cache and the like. [000798] A processor may include one or more cores that may enhance speed and performance of a multiprocessor. In embodiments, the process may be a dual core processor, quad core processors, other chip-level multiprocessor and the like that combine two or more independent cores (called a die).

[000799] The methods and systems described herein may be deployed in part or in whole through a machine that executes computer software on a server, client, firewall, gateway, hub, router, or other such computer and/or networking hardware. The software program may be associated with a server that may include a file server, print server, domain server, internet server, intranet server, cloud server, and other variants such as secondary server, host server, distributed server and the like. The server may include one or more of memories, processors, computer readable media, storage media, ports (physical and virtual), communication devices, and interfaces capable of accessing other servers, clients, machines, and devices through a wired or a wireless medium, and the like. The methods, programs, or codes as described herein and elsewhere may be executed by the server. In addition, other devices required for execution of methods as described in this application may be considered as a part of the infrastructure associated with the server.

[000800] The server may provide an interface to other devices including, without limitation, clients, other servers, printers, database servers, print servers, file servers, communication servers, distributed servers, social networks, and the like. Additionally, this coupling and/or connection may facilitate remote execution of program across the network. The networking of some or all of these devices may facilitate parallel processing of a program or method at one or more location without deviating from the scope of the disclosure. In addition, any of the devices attached to the server through an interface may include at least one storage medium capable of storing methods, programs, code and/or instructions. A central repository may provide program instructions to be executed on different devices. In this implementation, the remote repository may act as a storage medium for program code, instructions, and programs.

[000801] The software program may be associated with a client that may include a file client, print client, domain client, internet client, intranet client and other variants such as secondary client, host client, distributed client and the like. The client may include one or more of memories, processors, computer readable media, storage media, ports (physical and virtual), communication devices, and interfaces capable of accessing other clients, servers, machines, and devices through a wired or a wireless medium, and the like. The methods, programs, or codes as described herein and elsewhere may be executed by the client. In addition, other devices required for execution of methods as described in this application may be considered as a part of the infrastructure associated with the client.

[000802] The client may provide an interface to other devices including, without limitation, servers, other clients, printers, database servers, print servers, file servers, communication servers, distributed servers and the like. Additionally, this coupling and/or connection may facilitate remote execution of program across the network. The networking of some or all of these devices may facilitate parallel processing of a program or method at one or more location without deviating from the scope of the disclosure. In addition, any of the devices attached to the client through an interface may include at least one storage medium capable of storing methods, programs, applications, code and/or instructions. A central repository may provide program instructions to be executed on different devices. In this implementation, the remote repository may act as a storage medium for program code, instructions, and programs.

[000803] The methods and systems described herein may be deployed in part or in whole through network infrastructures. The network infrastructure may include elements such as computing devices, servers, routers, hubs, firewalls, clients, personal computers, communication devices, routing devices and other active and passive devices, modules and/or components as known in the art. The computing and/or non-computing device (s) associated with the network infrastructure may include, apart from other components, a storage medium such as flash memory, buffer, stack, RAM, ROM and the like. The processes, methods, program codes, instructions described herein and elsewhere may be executed by one or more of the network infrastructural elements. The methods and systems described herein may be adapted for use with any kind of private, community, or hybrid cloud computing network or cloud computing environment, including those which involve features of software as a service (SaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), and/or infrastructure as a service (IaaS).

[000804] The methods, program codes, and instructions described herein and elsewhere may be implemented on a cellular network having multiple cells. The cellular network may either be frequency division multiple access (FDMA) network or code division multiple access (CDMA) network. The cellular network may include mobile devices, cell sites, base stations, repeaters, antennas, towers, and the like. The cell network may be a GSM, GPRS, 3G, EVDO, mesh, or other networks types.

[000805] The methods, program codes, and instructions described herein and elsewhere may be implemented on or through mobile devices. The mobile devices may include navigation devices, cell phones, mobile phones, mobile personal digital assistants, laptops, palmtops, netbooks, pagers, electronic books readers, music players and the like. These devices may include, apart from other components, a storage medium such as a flash memory, buffer, RAM, ROM and one or more computing devices. The computing devices associated with mobile devices may be enabled to execute program codes, methods, and instructions stored thereon. Alternatively, the mobile devices may be configured to execute instructions in collaboration with other devices. The mobile devices may communicate with base stations interfaced with servers and configured to execute program codes. The mobile devices may communicate on a peer- to-peer network, mesh network, or other communications network. The program code may be stored on the storage medium associated with the server and executed by a computing device embedded within the server. The base station may include a computing device and a storage medium. The storage device may store program codes and instructions executed by the computing devices associated with the base station.

[000806] The computer software, program codes, and/or instructions may be stored and/or accessed on machine readable media that may include: computer components, devices, and recording media that retain digital data used for computing for some interval of time; semiconductor storage known as random access memory (RAM); mass storage typically for more permanent storage, such as optical discs, forms of magnetic storage like hard disks, tapes, drums, cards and other types; processor registers, cache memory, volatile memory, non-volatile memory; optical storage such as CD, DVD; removable media such as flash memory (e.g. USB sticks or keys), floppy disks, magnetic tape, paper tape, punch cards, standalone RAM disks, Zip drives, removable mass storage, off-line, and the like; other computer memory such as dynamic memory, static memory, read/write storage, mutable storage, read only, random access, sequential access, location addressable, file addressable, content addressable, network attached storage, storage area network, bar codes, magnetic ink, and the like. [000807] The methods and systems described herein may transform physical and/or or intangible items from one state to another. The methods and systems described herein may also transform data representing physical and/or intangible items from one state to another.

[000808] The elements described and depicted herein, including in flow charts and block diagrams throughout the figures, imply logical boundaries between the elements. However, according to software or hardware engineering practices, the depicted elements and the functions thereof may be implemented on machines through computer executable media having a processor capable of executing program

instructions stored thereon as a monolithic software structure, as standalone software modules, or as modules that employ external routines, code, services, and so forth, or any combination of these, and all such implementations may be within the scope of the present disclosure. Examples of such machines may include, but may not be limited to, personal digital assistants, laptops, personal computers, mobile phones, other handheld computing devices, medical equipment, wired or wireless communication devices, transducers, chips, calculators, satellites, tablet PCs, electronic books, gadgets, electronic devices, devices having artificial intelligence, computing devices, networking equipment, servers, routers and the like. Furthermore, the elements depicted in the flow chart and block diagrams or any other logical component may be implemented on a machine capable of executing program instructions. Thus, while the foregoing drawings and descriptions set forth functional aspects of the disclosed systems, no particular arrangement of software for implementing these functional aspects should be inferred from these descriptions unless explicitly stated or otherwise clear from the context. Similarly, it will be appreciated that the various steps identified and described above may be varied, and that the order of steps may be adapted to particular applications of the techniques disclosed herein. All such variations and modifications are intended to fall within the scope of this disclosure. As such, the depiction and/or description of an order for various steps should not be understood to require a particular order of execution for those steps, unless required by a particular application, or explicitly stated or otherwise clear from the context.

[000809] The methods and/or processes described above, and steps associated therewith, may be realized in hardware, software or any combination of hardware and software suitable for a particular application. The hardware may include a general- purpose computer and/or dedicated computing device or specific computing device or particular aspect or component of a specific computing device. The processes may be realized in one or more microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded microcontrollers, programmable digital signal processors or other programmable device, along with internal and/or external memory. The processes may also, or instead, be embodied in an application specific integrated circuit, a programmable gate array, programmable array logic, or any other device or combination of devices that may be configured to process electronic signals. It will further be appreciated that one or more of the processes may be realized as a computer executable code capable of being executed on a machine-readable medium.

[000810] The computer executable code may be created using a structured programming language such as C, an object oriented programming language such as C++, or any other high-level or low-level programming language (including assembly languages, hardware description languages, and database programming languages and technologies) that may be stored, compiled or interpreted to run on one of the above devices, as well as heterogeneous combinations of processors, processor architectures, or combinations of different hardware and software, or any other machine capable of executing program instructions.

[000811] Thus, in one aspect, methods described above and combinations thereof may be embodied in computer executable code that, when executing on one or more computing devices, performs the steps thereof. In another aspect, the methods may be embodied in systems that perform the steps thereof, and may be distributed across devices in a number of ways, or all of the functionality may be integrated into a dedicated, standalone device or other hardware. In another aspect, the means for performing the steps associated with the processes described above may include any of the hardware and/or software described above. All such permutations and

combinations are intended to fall within the scope of the present disclosure.

[000812] While the disclosure has been disclosed in connection with the preferred embodiments shown and described in detail, various modifications and improvements thereon will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art.

Accordingly, the spirit and scope of the present disclosure is not to be limited by the foregoing examples, but is to be understood in the broadest sense allowable by law. [000813] The use of the terms "a" and "an" and "the" and similar referents in the context of describing the disclosure (especially in the context of the following claims) is to be construed to cover both the singular and the plural, unless otherwise indicated herein or clearly contradicted by context. The terms "comprising," "having," "including," and "containing" are to be construed as open-ended terms (i.e., meaning "including, but not limited to,") unless otherwise noted. Recitation of ranges of values herein are merely intended to serve as a shorthand method of referring individually to each separate value falling within the range, unless otherwise indicated herein, and each separate value is incorporated into the specification as if it were individually recited herein. All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., "such as") provided herein, is intended merely to better illuminate the disclosure and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the disclosure unless otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element as essential to the practice of the disclosure.

[000814] While the foregoing written description enables one of ordinary skill to make and use what is considered presently to be the best mode thereof, those of ordinary skill will understand and appreciate the existence of variations, combinations, and equivalents of the specific embodiment, method, and examples herein. The disclosure should therefore not be limited by the above described embodiment, method, and examples, but by all embodiments and methods within the scope and spirit of the disclosure.

[000815] All documents referenced herein are hereby incorporated by reference.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2017070417A1 *21 Oct 201627 Apr 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Control of grazing angle stray light
US922923311 Feb 20145 Jan 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Micro Doppler presentations in head worn computing
US922923421 Feb 20145 Jan 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Micro doppler presentations in head worn computing
US928672829 May 201415 Mar 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US929800111 Mar 201429 Mar 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Optical configurations for head worn computing
US929800217 Nov 201429 Mar 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Optical configurations for head worn computing
US929800717 Mar 201429 Mar 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US931683328 Feb 201419 Apr 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Optical configurations for head worn computing
US93668678 Jul 201414 Jun 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Optical systems for see-through displays
US936686826 Sep 201414 Jun 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US937762528 Feb 201428 Jun 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Optical configurations for head worn computing
US940039024 Jan 201426 Jul 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Peripheral lighting for head worn computing
US94015405 Aug 201426 Jul 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US942361219 Nov 201423 Aug 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Sensor dependent content position in head worn computing
US942384218 Sep 201423 Aug 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Thermal management for head-worn computer
US94360065 Dec 20146 Sep 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US944840926 Nov 201420 Sep 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US949480030 Jul 201515 Nov 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US952385617 Jun 201520 Dec 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US952919227 Oct 201427 Dec 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US95291955 Jan 201527 Dec 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US952919917 Jun 201527 Dec 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US95327145 Nov 20143 Jan 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US95327155 Nov 20143 Jan 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US95389155 Nov 201410 Jan 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US954746519 Feb 201617 Jan 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Object shadowing in head worn computing
US957532110 Jun 201421 Feb 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Content presentation in head worn computing
US95942464 Dec 201414 Mar 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.See-through computer display systems
US981090617 Jun 20147 Nov 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.External user interface for head worn computing
US981115228 Oct 20147 Nov 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
US981115928 Oct 20147 Nov 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Eye imaging in head worn computing
USD74396322 Dec 201424 Nov 2015Osterhout Group, Inc.Air mouse
USD75155231 Dec 201415 Mar 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Computer glasses
USD7531145 Jan 20155 Apr 2016Osterhout Group, Inc.Air mouse
USD79240028 Jan 201618 Jul 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Computer glasses
USD79463718 Feb 201615 Aug 2017Osterhout Group, Inc.Air mouse
Classifications
International ClassificationG06F3/01, G06F3/048
Cooperative ClassificationG02B2027/0187, G02B2027/0138, G02B2027/0125, G02B27/0172, G02B2027/014, G02B27/017, G06F3/013, G06F3/011, G06F1/163, G06F3/03545, G06F3/0488
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
2 Sep 2015121Ep: the epo has been informed by wipo that ep was designated in this application
Ref document number: 15737082
Country of ref document: EP
Kind code of ref document: A1
18 Jul 2016NENPNon-entry into the national phase in:
Ref country code: DE
5 Aug 2016REEP
Ref document number: 2015737082
Country of ref document: EP