Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2025031 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date24 Dec 1935
Filing date2 Jan 1930
Priority date2 Jan 1930
Publication numberUS 2025031 A, US 2025031A, US-A-2025031, US2025031 A, US2025031A
InventorsAlgeo John S, Williams John J
Original AssigneeHazel Atlas Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glass container and closure therefor
US 2025031 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 24, 1935. J. s. ALGEO ET AL GLASS CONTAINER AND CLOSURE THEREFOR Filed Jan. 2, 1930 3nventor5 JZhn ,Algeo John J "fljilliam-r Patented Dec. 24. 1935 GLASS CONTAINER AND CLOSURE THEREFOR John S. Algeo and John J. Williams, Wheeling, W. Va., assignors to Hazel-Atlas Glass 00., Wheeling, W. Va., a corporation of West Virginia Application January 2, 1930, Serial No. 418,065

3 Claims.

The invention relates to glass containers and metallic closures therefor, and the objects of the invention are to improve the construction of closures and containers, to improve the sealing efliciency of the closures, to reduce the cost of manufacture of the closures and the complete package, to facilitate the sealing of the container by an improved arrangement of centering the closure on the container prior to scaling, to reduce the amount of sealing medium employed with the closure, to provide a closure which is adapted for vacuum sealing or otherwise, to provide a closure which is easily removable and which after removal retains a full reseal value, and to otherwise and generally improve containers and closures therefor. I

The numerous and material advantages of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art, from the following detailed description, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing; in which Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of the closure.

Figure 2 is a similar view, but showing the closure in its initial centered position on a container; and v Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2, but showing the closure moved to sealing position.

Referring to the drawing more in detail, numeral I refers generally to a glass container, provided with the usual annular flange 2 below the mouth thereof.

Numeral 3 refers to the top of the closure, which has a depending portion 4, of slightly greater diameter than the external diameter of the container mouth, so that it will easily fit over and receive the container mouth. An annular flange extends outwardly from the depending portion 4, and forms a shoulder or abutment for the upper end of the gasket 6. It should be noted here that the shoulder construction, spaced below the top of the cap, reduces the amount of rubber or other sealing medium used in the gasket.

Depending from the flange 5, is the skirt 1, which extends downwardly the full length of the gasket, and is then curved in slightly as indicated by numeral 8, to hold the gasket in place before it is positioned on the container. It will be noted that the flange 5 is of substantially the thickness of the gasket, so that when the gasket is in place in the skirt its inner face is substantially flush with the depending portion 4 of the cap.

The finish of the glass container includes a together with the cap drops freely over this cylindrical portion of the finish. This part of the finish, the cap and the gasket, are all designed so that the cap and gasket will drop freely over the finish, thereby becoming accurately centered, without any effort on the part of the operator.

The very material saving in time in placing andcentering the caps on the containers, and the a subsequent increased efliciency in the sealing operation, will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

The finish further comprises an annular bead I0 arranged immediately below the cylindrical portion 9 of the finish. When the cap has been dropped into its centered position, as shown in Figure 2, the gasket rests lightly upon the finish bead l0, and the sealing operation is now in order. The closure is adapted for vacuum sealing or otherwise; and when the container is to be sealed it is only necessary to apply suflicient pressure to force the gasket over the bead Ill; it being understood, of course, that if the container is to be vacuum sealed, the air will first be exhausted, and the plunger or other device for sealing the container will operate in a vacuumizer.

When the cap is forced into sealing position, so that the gasket is compressed and locked over the bead, the cylindrical portion 9 of the finish is received within the reduced upper portion of the cap; the top of the cap contacting with or almost contacting with the mouth of the container. The final position of the parts is shown in Figure 3. While we have shown the sealing and locking bead III as having a rounded surface, it is to be understood that the invention, contemplates a locking head of any desired outline in cross-section; and for different containers different shaped beads may be employed. Locking shoulders are very old and well known in the art; an example thereof being shown in the patent to Fenn No. 843,802, Feb. 12, 1907; and of course, no claim is made broadly to a locking shoulder per se While locking shoulders have been known and in commercial use for many years, the present invention constitutes a very desirable improvement over all such devices. In such prior sealing devices, the common form of glass finish employed, consisted'of a frusto conical surface which began at the mouth of the container, and which flared surface usually terminated with a sharp shoulder, over which the gasket locked. Such old structures possessed a very serious and inherent disadvantage, in that great carehad to be exercised in properly centering the caps before sealing; and, of course, if the caps were not properly centered they would not be properly sealed. It is apparent why this difliculty was present in the old forms, as the cap or gasket had to be positioned on the downwardly flaring finish which started immediately at the mouth of the container, and the cap had to be placed exactly level on this inclined surface. But in accordance with the present invention, the finish includes a cylindrical portion over which the cap is dropped and automatically centered, and a locking bead below the centering portion of the finish. The saving of time in placing the caps on the containers, and the greater efilciency in the sealing operations, is at once apparent.

It is believed the numerous advantages of the invention will be apparent from the foregoing description. As regards the metallic cap structure, it is of extreme simplicity, does not involve any waste of material, and hence is relatively inexpensive in manufacture. Also by reducing the diameter of the upper portion of the cap and thereby forming an abutment for the upper side of the sealing gasket, a very material saving is made in the amount of sealing medium employed. While it is not new broadly to provide a cap with a reduced upper portion, yet it is believed to be new in this particular type of cap, and posesses new and very desirable functions. A cap of the general type of the present invention is shown in the British patent to Holmes, No. 4251 of 1887; but it will be noted that in such cap it is essential that the gasket extend the full depth of the cap.

As regards the combined container and closure, the advantages thereof will also be apparent. As stated hereinbefore, the upper cylindrical portion of the glass finish is of slightly less diameter than the inner diameter of the gasket, so that the cap will readily drop over this portion of the finish and thereby automatically center itself. This portion need not be cylindrical; for example, it

-could taper inwardly from the top toward the bottom. .The only essential being that it is of less diameter than the gasket so that the gasket will drep over it and center itself; which, of course, is not true where this portion ofthe glass finish tapers outwardly, as in the prior art. The ease and quickness with which. the caps are thuscentered on the container by dropping over the upper portion of the finish and resting on the head portion of the finish, results in a very material saving of time in this step of the sealing operation. And it also results in a much higher sealing efliciency, for the construction is such that the cap must be properly centered and,hence the cap will be correctly forced into-sealing position.

While in the prior practices in which there was a downwardly flaring finish followed by the locking edge, as shown in the Fenn patent referr d to hereinbefore, great care was necessary to properly center the cap on the flared portion; arid, of...

course, if it was not properly centered, are sub;- sequent sealing operation might be a failure. The automatic centering of the caps on the locking bead is one of the material features of the present invention, and the many advantages thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

After having thus been automatically centered, the only thing necessary to do to effect the sealing, is to apply sufficient pressure to the cap to force the gasket over the locking head. The cap is easily removed by inserting a coin between the edge of the skirt and the usual flange 2, and applying the necessary pressure; or, any of the usual tools may be employed for removing the cap. After removal, the cap retains full reseal value, and can be merely replaced on the upper portion of the finish, or can be forced over the locking bead by hand in some finish designs; it being understood that the specific design of the locking bead may be varied to suit various conditions.

Having fully described the invention, what we claim is:

1. A glass container and a preformedclosure therefor, the glass container having a cylindrical centering portion at its mouth, a bead on the glass container adjacent to the mouth but below the cylindrical portion, said bead forming an abrupt ledge, the preformed closure including a top and a depending skirt, a gasket rectangular in cross-section arranged within said skirt, gasket retaining means on the lower edge of the skirt, the inner diameter of said gasket being slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical portion of the finish so that the closure andgasket will drop freely over the cylindrical centering portion of the container and be automatically centered thereon, the closure resting on the abrupt ledge formed by the bead, prior to the sealing operation.

2. A glass container and a preformed closure therefor, the finish of said glass container including a cylindrical centering portion at the mouth of the container, a locking bead having a curved surface arranged'below the cylindrical portion and forming an abrupt ledge, the preformed closure including a top, a skirt, and a gasket arranged in the skirt, the inner diameter of the gasket being slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical portion of the finish so that the closure and gasket will drop freely over the cylindrical portion of the finish and rest on the abrupt ledge formed by the head of the finish, prior to the sealing operation.

3. A glass container and a preformed closure therefor, the finish of said glass container including a cylindrical centering portion at the mouth of the container and alocking portion below the cylindrical portion forming an abrupt ledge, the preformed closure including a top, an annular porton depending from said top and of slightly greater diameter than the cylindrical portion of the finish, a flange extending outwardly from said depending portion, a skirt depending from said flange, a flange extending inwardly from the lower end of the skirt, a gasket rectangular in cross-section arranged in said skirt and extending from the first-mentioned flange to the second-mentioned flange, the inner diameter of the gasket being slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical portion of the finish so that the closure will freely drop over said cylindrical finish and rest on the abrupt ledge formed bythe locking portion prior to the sea in opera-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441918 *31 Mar 194518 May 1948Owens Illinois Glass CoClosure
US2540007 *4 Sep 194830 Jan 1951Ball Brothers CoSide-seal closure for containers
US2562548 *22 Mar 194831 Jul 1951Anchor Hocking Glass CorpClosure cap and package
US2633262 *30 Dec 194931 Mar 1953Anchor Hocking Glass CorpClosure cap
US2670868 *26 Mar 19512 Mar 1954Anchor Hocking Glass CorpSealed glass container
US2871654 *14 Apr 19543 Feb 1959Bulova Watch Co IncWaterproof watch-case
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/346
International ClassificationB65D81/20, B65D43/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2543/00527, B65D2543/00092, B65D2543/00972, B65D2543/00277, B65D43/0222, B65D2543/00898, B65D81/2015, B65D2543/00537
European ClassificationB65D43/02S5E