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Publication numberUS20070254789 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/796,608
Publication date1 Nov 2007
Filing date26 Apr 2007
Priority date28 Apr 2006
Publication number11796608, 796608, US 2007/0254789 A1, US 2007/254789 A1, US 20070254789 A1, US 20070254789A1, US 2007254789 A1, US 2007254789A1, US-A1-20070254789, US-A1-2007254789, US2007/0254789A1, US2007/254789A1, US20070254789 A1, US20070254789A1, US2007254789 A1, US2007254789A1
InventorsLarry Richard Odien
Original AssigneeLarry Richard Odien
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motorized apparatus and method for dynamic balancing exercise
US 20070254789 A1
Abstract
A method and apparatus for achieving dynamic balance exercise by using an elongated board that is tiltable in a longitudinal direction and energized by a set of motor-driven wheels which are connected to oppose the tilting action. A sidewise tilting movement of the board can also be accomplished concurrently with the longitudinal tilting movement to balance the exercise experience and improve the subjects fore-and-aft balance.
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Claims(9)
1. A method for an individual person to achieve dynamic balance exercise, comprising the steps of:
(a) selecting an elongated generally flat balance board having a foot-supporting area on its upper surface at each of its ends;
(b) placing a wheel assembly at about the longitudinal center of and at least partially underneath the balance board to provide a fulcrum for supporting the balance board in a tiltable position above the ground;
(c) placing the person's feet on respective foot-supporting areas of the upper surface of the board so that the person then faces in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board;
(d) moving the person's center of gravity in a direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the balance board to produce a tilting action of the board about the wheel assembly; and
(e) then, in response to that tilting action of the board, drivingly rotating the wheel assembly so as to shift the fulcrum location along the ground in generally the same direction that the person's center of gravity has been moved, so as to oppose that tilting action.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the wheel assembly is selected to include a laterally spaced parallel pair of wheels, and the driving rotation is selectively applied unequally to the two wheels in order to twist the balance board sideways concurrently with the tilting action.
3. A motorized balance board exercise device for a single person, comprising:
(a) an elongated platform having foot-supporting areas at each of its two ends, the foot-supporting areas being adapted to support the person when facing in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the platform;
(b) a wheel assembly underneath and near the longitudinal center of the platform to provide a fulcrum for supporting the platform in a longitudinally tiltable position above the ground;
(c) an electrical motor for selectively applying power to the wheel assembly to move the platform in a direction parallel to its longitudinal axis; and
(d) controls responsive to movement of the platform when thus tilted for selectively energizing the motor in a direction to oppose that tilting action.
4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein the platform is also tiltable about its longitudinal axis relative to the supporting wheel assembly.
5. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein the wheel assembly includes a laterally spaced parallel pair of wheels, and the controls are also selectively operable for applying driving rotation unequally to the two wheels, thereby causing the platform to twist sideways in a horizontal plane concurrently with its longitudinal tilting action.
6. In a dynamic balance exercise device having an elongated platform, the sub-combination comprising:
(a) a wheel assembly positioned at least partially underneath the platform to provide a fulcrum for supporting the platform in a longitudinally tiltable position above ground;
(b) a motor for selectively applying power to the wheel assembly to move the wheel assembly along the ground in a direction longitudinally of the platform; and
(c) controls responsive to changes in the angular position of the platform to energize the motor for applying driving rotation to the wheel assembly.
7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the controls are responsive to a longitudinal tilting action of the platform for energizing the motor to drive the wheel assembly along the ground in a direction toward the end of the platform that has been tilted downward, so as to oppose that tilting action.
8. Apparatus as claimed in claim 6 wherein the wheel assembly includes a laterally spaced parallel pair of wheels, and the controls include a differential drive means to drive the wheels unequally so as to cause the platform to twist sideways in a horizontal plane.
9. Apparatus as in claim 8 wherein the controls further include braking means for selectively braking the two wheels independently so as to control the twisting movement of the platform.
Description
    PRIORITY CLAIM
  • [0001]
    This application claims priority of my Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/795,516 filed Apr. 28, 2006.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The field of this invention is exercise apparatus and methods.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    In recent years many different types of apparatus and machines have been devised for exercising the human body. One kind of exercise that has not received much attention is dynamic balance. In addition to walking and performing various other tasks and exercises, a person who wants to remain healthy will also need to be able to reliably maintain his or her balance, dynamically as well as statically. The present invention deals with dynamic balance.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    The present invention provides a novel method for an individual person to achieve dynamic balance exercise. This is done by using an elongated balance board resting upon a motorized drive mechanism that provides a fulcrum supporting it for dynamic movements in three different planes. A person normally stands on the board facing in a direction generally perpendicular to its longitudinal axis. The board can tilt or pitch in a longitudinal direction. When the person moves or tilts his or her body in either a left or a right direction, that causes the board to tilt longitudinally in the same direction. The motorized drive assembly associated with the board then causes the board to oppose that tilting action, and thus initiates a kind of oscillating or reciprocating movement in which the person will achieve dynamic balance exercise.
  • [0005]
    Thus, the invention provides an apparatus that automatically responds to a longitudinal tilting action or pitch of the elongated board by tending to drive the board in an oppositely oriented tilting movement. Furthermore, the motorized drive mechanism is also able to twist sidewise or yaw in a horizontal plane, and to lean or roll left or right relative to the longitudinal axis of the board (which would normally be the fore-and-aft plane for a person using the apparatus). This then can provide a three-dimensional movement for the person using the board.
  • [0006]
    More specifically, according to the principal feature of the invention the method of achieving dynamic balance exercise is carried out as follows. An elongated generally flat balance board is selected having a foot-supporting area on its upper surface at each of its ends. A wheel assembly is placed at about the longitudinal center of and at least partially underneath the balance board to provide a fulcrum for supporting the balance board in a longitudinally tiltable position above the ground. The person then places his or her feet on respective foot-supporting areas of the upper surface of the board so that he or she then faces in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board. Starting from a horizontal or balanced position of the board, the person then moves his or her center of gravity in a lateral direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the balance board to produce a tilting action of the board about the wheel assembly. In response to that tilting action of the board, a motorized drive mechanism drivingly rotates the wheel assembly so as to shift the wheel assembly and fulcrum location along the ground in generally the same direction that the person's center of gravity had been moved, thus opposing that tilting action.
  • [0007]
    The apparatus of the present invention also provides an opportunity for the user to control movement of the board in a fore and aft direction; that is, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board. This fore and aft movement can be simply a sidewise twisting movement in the horizontal plane of the board, or a left or right leaning movement, or both. Those capabilities are provided by unique drive controls for the wheel assembly in the motorized drive apparatus.
  • [0008]
    Further in accordance with the invention the longitudinal tilting of the board on the platform, and its sidewise twisting movement, can be done concurrently. This not only adds to the dynamics of the exercise experience by the person but also improves the stability in the fore-and-aft plane.
  • DRAWING SUMMARY
  • [0009]
    The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1A, is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention showing subject at rest with embodiment positioned in its stop mode. Subject's body position is vertical and perpendicular to the ground represented by centerline (10);
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1B, is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment showing the subject pressing down with right foot (13) causing the embodiment to travel in the direction (11), to the subject's right. Subject's body position continues to stay perpendicular to the ground represented by centerline (10);
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1C, is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment showing the subject standing in a neutral position vertical (10), and lateral plane (15) intersecting at (62);
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1D, is a frontal view of a preferred embodiment showing the subject pressing down with left foot (14) causing the embodiment to travel in the direction (12), to the subject's left. Subject's body position continues to stay perpendicular to the ground;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1E, is a side view of a preferred embodiment showing the subject standing erect in the fore-aft plane. The subject can also pivot the embodiment using their lower body muscles on its fore-aft plane This applies braking to the back wheel and acceleration to the front wheel FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C, moving the embodiment in a directional arc from center to back, along the ground surface. This directional travel helps the subject correct them self back to a vertical stance in the fore-aft plane (16). It can also be said that if the subject is falling forward, similar forward braking occurs. The motorized drive system is important to this feature. It is necessary for locomotion of embodiment in either a right or left direction to occur, before braking can occur in the fore-aft control feature;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2, is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment showing the platform with its right and left ends (22, 23). Also shown are the batteries (26, 27), and electric hub motor (28);
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3, is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 2. with platform removed to show the frame, and its spring centering assemblies (24, 25), that pivot in a fore-aft plane. Also shown is the end supports (26, 27). Differential sprocket (31), and braking tabs (29, 30), are also illustrated;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 4A, is a frontal view of the preferred embodiment in a neutral position. Right end (32), is level with its opposing end (33). Input arm with single axis wheel (35), connects to the input device of the switching control unit (36);
  • [0018]
    FIG. 4B, is a frontal view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, showing members of the switching control unit in a stopped position. Right end (32), of platform is pressed down to the ground (34). Input control arm (35), is connected by linkage to input device (36). Item (37) shows the reference mark on input device for comparison;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4C, is a frontal view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention positioned to travel in the right direction. Item (32) shows the right end of the platform no longer touching the ground. Reference mark (37) has changed position on the input device (36);
  • [0020]
    FIG. 4D, is a frontal view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention positioned to travel in the left direction. Item (33) shows the left end of the platform having been pressed down. Reference mark (37) has changed position on the input device (36);
  • [0021]
    FIG. 5, is a cutaway side view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, illustrating input devices communicating members. Linkage from input control arm 38, is connected to input device slider (37). Input device-housing (36). Polarity and shut off switches (39, 40) with their corresponding notched timing areas (41, 42). Hall effect detector is shown (43), and its corresponding magnets shown (44, 45, 46). Input devices secondary connection point shown (47), an optional feature that is used to over ride input control arm by connecting to the rotating foot controllers shown FIG. 15 numbers (20,21);
  • [0022]
    FIG. 6 is a lengthwise plan view of the preferred embodiment illustrating the motorized drive system and its members. Item (33), represents the right or left end of platform. Item (28), shows the electric hub motor connecting to differential pinion case (31). Differential pinion gear (48), mates with differential rack gears (49, 50) and braking tabs (51, 52);
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C, are lengthwise plan views of the preferred embodiment showing Three different illustrations of pivoting movement on the embodiments fore-aft plane. Movement illustrates mechanical braking and acceleration of the motorized drive system. FIG. 7B, represents platform in center position represented by centerline (55), and end of platform (33). Braking straps (29, 30), are applying zero (0) friction to drive wheels;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 7A illustrates the preferred embodiment pivoting in a fore-aft plane represented by centerline (55) and end of platform (33). Braking strap (30), is making contact to drive wheel (56) causing braking to wheel (56), wherein acceleration occurs in the motorized drive system's adjacent wheel (57), because of the differential's inherent gearing advantage;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 7C, illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention pivoting in a fore-aft plane in the opposite direction of FIG. 7A, represented by centerline (55), and end of platform (33). Braking strap (29), is making contact to drive wheel (57), causing braking to wheel (57), wherein acceleration occurs in the motorized drive system's adjacent wheel (56), because of the differential's inherent gearing advantage;
  • [0026]
    FIGS. 8A, 8B, 8C, are end views from ground level, of the preferred embodiment of the present invention showing the embodiments platform, pivoting in the fore-aft plane. Platform's change in the fore-aft plane is represented by vertical and horizontal centerlines (58), and center of pivot is shown in item (59);
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 9A, 9B, 9C, are end views from ground level of the preferred embodiment of the present invention showing an exposed view of the spring centering assembly applied to the fore-aft plane. FIG. 9B, illustrates the platform in a level position. It also illustrates centering springs (60, 61), equally applying pressure to assembly, using fifty (50) percent of compression travel;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 9A, illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention, pivoting in a fore-aft plane in a direction reflecting compression of the centering spring (61). Compression spring (61), is using one-hundred (100) percent of its compression travel wherein spring (60), is using zero (0) percent of its compression travel;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 9C, illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention, pivoting in a fore-aft plane in the opposite direction of FIG. 9A. The compression spring (60), is using one-hundred (100) percent of its compression travel wherein spring (61), is using zero (0) percent of its compression travel;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 10, is a top view of preferred embodiment of the present invention, showing subject's feet positioning with their centerlines (17, 18). It also illustrates the lateral axis (19) of the motorized wheel assembly; a lateral/vertical plane (15) about which the longitudinal tilting of the board may occur, and the vertical plane (16) about which the fore-aft movement may occur. Item (64) represents the intersection of the lateral and fore-aft planes and at a vertical point not shown;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 11, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes that uses curved braking straps and external motor with drive chain. The battery placement has also been changed;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 12, is a perspective view of another alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes wherein the differential has been removed and mechanical linkage turns the motorized drive system. This method provides less turning ability than the preferred method;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 13, is a perspective view of still another alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes wherein drive wheels have been widened apart from each other on their axis. The battery locations have changed and the drive motor runs perpendicular to the axis of the ground contacting drive system;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 14, is a perspective view of a further alternate form of the present invention wherein the platform is solid and conceals the ground contacting drive system because, the ground contacting drive system uses smaller wheels and smaller drive motor. Pivoting on the fore-aft plane will turn the embodiment through the use of a skateboard type truck wherein braking to the front and back wheels are not necessary. This alternate form can only travel effectively in one direction because of the truck type steering;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 15, is a perspective view of yet another alternate form of the present invention where the ends (22, 23) pivot on the fore aft plane separate from the middle section and are connected to one another by curved braking straps. The external motor (28), uses a chain drive system to power the differential. Also shown are the rotating foot controllers (20, 21) and the battery location has been changed to accommodate the external motor (26, 27);
  • [0036]
    FIG. 16, is an exposed view of the apparatus FIG. 15, showing the frame assembly that supports the platform. End sections (24, 25) pivot on the fore-aft plane with centering springs (26, 27). Also shown is the chain drive to differential (31), and braking straps (29, 30). This method operates exactly the same as the preferred method but does not require a hub motor assembly; and
  • [0037]
    FIG. 17, is a frontal view of an artistic drawing, which schematically illustrates the principal method of the present invention.
  • ILLUSTRATION OF THE METHOD CONCEPT Drawing FIG. 17
  • [0038]
    Referring now to drawing FIG. 17, one principal feature of the method of the present invention is illustrated there. Artistic license is taken for purpose of illustration, showing some parts in expanded or schematic form, and distances exaggerated for clarity of description. A motorized apparatus 100 includes an elongated board 104 which has foot-supporting areas 112, 110, on its respective ends. The motorized apparatus includes a wheel assembly 120 positioned underneath the board near its longitudinal center. Left and right drive linkages 124 and 122 control the motorized drive for the wheel assembly in response to tilting actions of the board. In FIG. 17 a person 130 is assumed to be in a forward facing position, with head 132, left and right arms 134, 136, and left and right legs 140, 142. The person's center of gravity or mass is indicated by a solid dot 150, which is the centroid of the person. The person by moving his or her legs, or by other motion, may move the centroid left or right, or forward or back.
  • [0039]
    The extended illustration at the right of FIG. 17 shows the person 130 facing forward in a left-leaning position, having moved the centroid 150 to the left. It is seen from dotted lines that the left end of the board 104 has tilted downward. That movement has triggered operation of a left drive linkage 124, which has then caused the wheel assembly to be driven a short distance from its original or previous position as shown by dotted lines.
  • [0040]
    The illustration at the left of FIG. 17 shows response of the board 104 through drive linkage 122 when the centroid 150 of the person's body moves in the other direction, to the right. Again, the wheel assembly has been driven a short distance from its original or previous position as shown by dotted lines.
  • [0041]
    While FIG. 17 shows separate left and right drive linkages 124, 122, in the preferred form of the apparatus as shown in FIGS. 1-10 a single switching control unit (36) (FIGS. 5 and 6) controls the movements in both directions. Though not shown in FIG. 17, the apparatus of the present invention also provides an opportunity for the user to control movement of the board in a fore and aft direction; that is, perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board. This fore and aft movement can be simply a sidewise twisting movement in the horizontal plane of the board, or a left or right leaning movement perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board, or both. Those capabilities are provided by the unique drive controls for the wheel assembly in the motorized drive apparatus.
  • Preferred Embodiment Drawing FIGS. 1 through 10
  • [0042]
    The objective of the present invention is to provide a means in which the subject dynamically uses the muscles in their lower body, and to create a fun activity at the same time. The present invention has a platform in which the subject stands FIG. 10, positioning their feet in a direction, parallel to one another (17, 18) that is parallel to the axis (19) of a ground contacting drive assembly. The ground contacting drive assembly is motor driven FIG. 2, (28) to move the embodiment in either a right or left direction FIGS. 1B and 1D (11, 12).
  • [0043]
    The vertical plane in which the subject stands over the ground contacting drive assembly FIG. 10, defines an intersection (64) of the lateral and fore aft planes. In FIGS. 1B,1C,1D the forces of the subject's lower body controls locomotion of the embodiment by pressing down with either their right or left foot (13, 14) pivoting the platform on the motorized drive system in a lateral plane (15). If the subject decides to lean with their upper body and not use their legs the subject will fail, stopping the apparatus. It is critical that the subject uses only their legs for balance and maintain a vertical position with their upper body (10). Furthermore, the embodiment has a foot-actuated platform in which the subject can manipulate to control different features of the embodiment. The foot controllers allow the subject to balance in a fore-aft plane. This is controlled by, a braking assembly (25, 29) that is directly related to the motor driven portion of the embodiment. FIGS. 8A, 8B, 8C illustrate the fore-aft movement (58), how the subject can slow either the front wheel (56) or back wheel (57) of the drive assembly FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C. The stabilization occurs because of a differential between the drive wheels FIG. 6. When the subject actuates the foot controllers in a fore-aft plane, either the front or back wheel is slowed down FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C (56, 57). The inherent nature of the differential's gearing immediately applies acceleration to the adjacent wheel wherein the apparatus is forced to turn in a directional arc around the ground contacting point of the slowed wheel. This feature allows the subject to move the platform beneath them, in a direction that keeps their center of gravity directly centered above the embodiment FIG. 1E, (10, 63), therefore increasing their stability in the fore-aft plane (16).
  • [0044]
    The following might give a better understanding wherein the subject gains stability in the fore-aft plane. As mentioned earlier, the subject can achieve stability in the lateral plane FIG. 1C (15), by use of the motorized drive system FIG. 2 (28), by pressing the platform down on either the right or left end respectively (22, 23).
  • [0045]
    Furthermore, if the subject starts to fall back or balance on the fore-aft plane FIG. 1E (16), the subject can pivot the embodiment using their lower body muscles on its fore-aft plane. This applies braking to the back wheel and acceleration to the front wheel FIGS. 7A, 7B, 7C, moving the embodiment in a directional arc from center to back, along the ground surface. The front wheel is defined as moving the embodiment as to help the subject correct them back to a vertical stance in the fore-aft plane FIG. 1E (16). It can also be said that if the subject is falling forward, similar forward braking occurs. The motorized drive system is important to this feature. It is necessary for locomotion of embodiment in either a right or left direction to occur, before braking can occur in the fore-aft control feature.
  • [0046]
    FIG. 9A, illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention, pivoting in a fore-aft plane in a direction reflecting compression of the centering spring 61. Compression spring (61), is using one-hundred (100) percent of its compression travel wherein spring (60), is using zero (0) percent of its compression travel.
  • [0047]
    FIG. 9C, illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention, pivoting in a fore-aft plane in the opposite direction of FIG. 9A. The compression spring (60), is using one-hundred (100) percent of its compression travel wherein spring (61), is using zero (0) percent of its compression travel.
  • Alternate Embodiments Drawing FIGS. 11 through 16
  • [0048]
    There are alternate forms of the present invention, wherein the left and right foot controls if desired can be rotated in a plane parallel to the platforms surface FIG. 15 (20, 21). This is to provide adjustments to any of the embodiment's features. One example of adjustment might be to alter the platforms angle in its lateral plane (15) compensating for any irregularities in the grounds surface. This is accomplished by changing the location of the switching controls (36), input device over ride (47). Should the ground level have a slope for example, the subject could compensate for this by rotating the foot controllers (20, 21). This rotation would elevate or drop either end of the platform, respectively, pivoting on its lateral plane (15). A motorized drive system (28, 31) provides locomotion to the embodiment. Its power plant can consist of one or more batteries (26, 27) or a fuel to provide energy to a combustion powered engine. Subject uses lower body to control input devices FIG. 5 (37) that send signals to the switching control unit (36). The switching control unit, controls the speed and direction of the motorized drive system, magnets (43, 39, 40) and switches (39, 40). A frame assembly connects all embodiment members as a unit, allowing them to work with one another respectively, as well as reinforcing the platform on which the subject stands FIG. 3 (26, 27).
  • [0049]
    The following are descriptions of the FIG. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 which represent alternate forms of the present invention:
  • [0050]
    FIG. 11, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes that uses curved braking straps and external motor with drive chain. The battery placement has also changed;
  • [0051]
    FIG. 12, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes wherein the differential has been removed and mechanical linkage turns the motorized drive system. This method provides less turning ability then the preferred method;
  • [0052]
    FIG. 13, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention. Illustrating a solid platform that pivots on the fore-aft and lateral planes wherein drive wheels have been widened apart from each other on their axis. The battery locations have changed and the drive motor runs perpendicular to the axis of the ground contacting drive system;
  • [0053]
    FIG. 14, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention wherein the platform is solid and conceals the ground contacting drive system because, the ground contacting drive system uses smaller wheels and smaller drive motor. Pivoting on the fore-aft plane will turn the embodiment through the use of a skateboard type truck wherein braking to the front and back wheels are not necessary. This alternate form can only travel effectively in one direction because of the truck type steering;
  • [0054]
    FIG. 15, is a perspective view of an alternate form of the present invention where the ends (22, 23) pivot on the fore aft plane separate from the middle section and are connected to one another by curved braking straps. The external motor (28) uses a chain drive system to power the differential. Also shown are the rotating foot controllers (20, 21) and the battery location has been changed to accommodate the external motor (26, 27);
  • [0055]
    FIG. 16, is an exposed view of FIG. 15, showing the frame assembly that supports the platform. End sections (24, 25) pivot on the fore-aft plane with centering springs (26, 27). Also shown is the chain drive to differential (31), and braking straps (29, 30). This method operates exactly the same as the preferred method but does not require a hub motor assembly;
  • [0056]
    While I have described a presently preferred form of the invention in detail in order to compile with the patent laws, it will be understood that the scope of the invention is to be interpreted only in accordance the appended claims.
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US8888669 *10 Nov 201118 Nov 2014Tim DUNEGANExercise apparatus for balance and strength training
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/146, 482/92
International ClassificationA63B21/00, A63B22/16
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/0058, A63B22/16
European ClassificationA63B21/005F, A63B22/16