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Publication numberUS8162878 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/294,006
Publication date24 Apr 2012
Filing date5 Dec 2005
Priority date5 Dec 2005
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCN101484203A, CN101484203B, EP1959842A2, EP1959842A4, US20090149807, WO2007067661A2, WO2007067661A3
Publication number11294006, 294006, US 8162878 B2, US 8162878B2, US-B2-8162878, US8162878 B2, US8162878B2
InventorsMichael John Bonnette, Eric Joel Thor, Douglas James Ball, Debra M. Kozak
Original AssigneeMedrad, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system
US 8162878 B2
Abstract
An exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system which is a cross stream thrombectomy catheter, such as, but not limited to, an Angiojet® catheter with a flexible and expandable balloon, wherein the balloon is formed from and is continuous with the catheter tube which, in part, forms the cross stream thrombectomy catheter, wherein the balloon is deployable and expandable about the distal region of the cross stream thrombectomy catheter to act as an occluder device, and wherein the balloon is located proximal to the fluid jet emanator and inflow and outflow orifices upstream of ablative cross stream flows. The balloon is expandably deployed by the exhaust or back pressure created by the operation of the cross stream flows as generated by the fluid jets of the operating exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system.
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Claims(19)
1. An exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter thrombectomy system for use within a vessel comprising:
a. a manifold including:
(1) a central tubular body;
(2) a high pressure branch including an integral threaded connector port extending angularly from the central tubular body;
(3) an exhaust branch including an integral threaded connector port extending angularly from the high pressure branch; and,
(4) a cavity body, having a hemostatic nut assembly, extending proximally from the central tubular body;
b. a catheter tube formed from a first material, including an exhaust lumen, extending distally from the manifold through a strain relief and toward a distally located tapered tip;
c. a plurality of outflow and inflow orifices on the catheter tube and in communication with the exhaust lumen in close proximity to the tapered tip;
d. a high pressure tube connectively extending from the high pressure branch, through the manifold and through the catheter tube to a fluid jet emanator located distal to the plurality of outflow and inflow orifices, and a fluid distally carried under high pressure from the manifold to the fluid jet emanator;
e. an inflatable thin walled section balloon formed from the first material of the catheter tube and aligned between two sections of full wall catheter tube proximal to the plurality of outflow and inflow orifices, where the outflow and inflow orifices are between the fluid jet emanator and the thin walled section balloon, and the outflow and inflow orifices are in communication with the thin walled section balloon and the emanator through the exhaust lumen; and
f. the exhaust lumen of the catheter tube communicating with the thin walled section balloon, the exhaust lumen and thin walled section balloon of the catheter tube being sustainably pressurized by a proximal exhaust flow of the fluid from the fluid jet emanator and an entrained fluid from the inflow and outflow orifices, the proximal exhaust flow crossing the inflow and outflow orifices between the emanator and the thin walled section balloon and combining with the entrained fluid, and the proximal exhaust flow including the fluid from the fluid jet emanator and the entrained fluid inflating the thin walled section balloon into an expanded configuration.
2. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 1, further including opposed radiopaque marker bands distal and proximal of the thin walled section balloon.
3. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 2, further including support rings adjacent to the thin walled section balloon.
4. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 1, wherein the hemostatic nut assembly engages the cavity body.
5. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 4, wherein the cavity body includes dimples protruding inwardly on the cavity body for engagement with an annular lip on the hemostatic nut assembly.
6. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 1, wherein the thin walled section balloon is deployable and expandable about a distal region of the catheter tube to act as an occlusive device when an exhaust pressure control device is operated.
7. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 1, wherein the fluid jet emanator and inflow and outflow orifices define a location for ablative cross stream flows generated by the fluid from the fluid jet emanator, and wherein the thin walled section balloon is located proximal to the location of such ablative cross stream flows.
8. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 1, wherein the exhaust branch of the manifold includes an exhaust regulator, and the exhaust regulator is configured to cooperate with the proximal exhaust flow to control inflation pressure at the thin walled section balloon.
9. A method of occluding a location in vasculature comprising:
a. providing an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter including:
a manifold comprising a high pressure branch having a high pressure connector, and an exhaust branch,
a full wall catheter tube formed from a first material and having an exhaust lumen, the catheter tube extending distally from the manifold, and the catheter tube includes inflow and outflow orifices in communication with the exhaust lumen,
a high pressure tube communicating with the high pressure connector and extending through the manifold and through the catheter tube to a fluid jet emanator, and a fluid distally carried under high pressure from the manifold to the fluid jet emanator,
an integral, flexible, expandable, and inflatable thin wall section balloon aligned between two sections of the full wall catheter tube, the outflow and inflow orifices are between the fluid jet emanator and the expandable balloon, and the outflow and inflow orifices are in communication with the expandable balloon and the emanator through the exhaust lumen;
b. positioning the balloon at the location in the vasculature; and
c. sustainably inflating the balloon into an expanded configuration by supplying high pressure flow to a fluid jet emanator and restricting the exhaust outflow, wherein sustainably inflating the balloon includes:
directing the high pressure flow proximally through the fluid jet emanator and across one or more of inflow and outflow orifices, the one or more inflow and outflow orifices are between and in communication with the balloon and the fluid jet emanator,
entraining and combining fluid from the one or more of inflow and outflow orifices with the proximal high pressure flow as a proximal exhaust flow, and
delivering the proximal exhaust flow to the balloon for sustainable inflation.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter includes the one or more inflow and outflow orifices situated distally from the balloon, and further comprising:
generating a cross stream ablative jet.
11. The method of claim 10, further comprising:
stopping the cross stream ablative jet and deflating the balloon.
12. The method of claim 11, further comprising:
repositioning the deflated balloon at another location in the vasculature; and,
reinflating the balloon by resupplying high pressure flow and re-restricting the exhaust outflow and generating another cross stream ablative jet.
13. An exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter thrombectomy system comprising:
a. a manifold comprising a high pressure branch having a high pressure connector, and an exhaust branch;
b. a catheter tube formed from a first material and having an exhaust lumen, the catheter tube extending distally from the manifold, and the catheter tube includes inflow and outflow orifices in communication with the exhaust lumen;
c. a high pressure tube communicating with the high pressure connector and extending through the manifold and through the catheter tube to a fluid jet emanator, and a fluid distally carried under high pressure from the manifold to the fluid jet emanator;
d. a thin walled section formed from the first material of the catheter tube located between two sections of thicker walled catheter tube formed from the first material, where the thin walled section is an expandable balloon, the outflow and inflow orifices are between the fluid jet emanator and the expandable balloon, and the outflow and inflow orifices are in communication with the expandable balloon and the emanator through the exhaust lumen; and
e. the exhaust lumen of the catheter tube communicating with the expandable balloon, the exhaust lumen of the catheter tube being sustainably pressurized by a proximal exhaust flow of the fluid from the fluid jet emanator and an entrained fluid from the inflow and outflow orifices, the proximal exhaust flow crossing the inflow and outflow orifices between the emanator and the expandable balloon and combining with the entrained fluid, and the proximal exhaust flow including the fluid from the fluid jet emanator and the entrained fluid sustainably inflating the expandable balloon into an expanded configuration.
14. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 13, further comprising an exhaust regulator.
15. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 14, wherein the exhaust regulator is in the exhaust branch, and the exhaust regulator is configured to cooperate with the proximal exhaust flow to control inflation pressure at the thin walled section balloon.
16. An exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system comprising:
a. a manifold comprising a high pressure branch having a high pressure connector, and an exhaust branch;
b. a catheter tube formed from a first material and having an exhaust lumen, the catheter tube extending distally from the manifold, and the catheter tube includes inflow and outflow orifices in communication with the exhaust lumen;
c. a high pressure tube communicating with the high pressure connector and extending through the manifold and through the catheter tube to a fluid jet emanator, and a fluid distally carried under high pressure from the manifold to the fluid jet emanator;
d. an expandable balloon, the outflow and inflow orifices are between the fluid jet emanator and the expandable balloon, and the outflow and inflow orifices are in communication with the expandable balloon and the emanator through the exhaust lumen; and
e. the exhaust lumen of the catheter tube communicating with the expandable balloon, the exhaust lumen of the catheter tube configured for sustainably pressurizing by a proximal exhaust flow along a composite exhaust path extending from the fluid jet emanator to the expandable balloon, the composite exhaust path configured to receive fluid from the fluid jet emanator and an entrained fluid from the inflow and outflow orifices to form the proximal exhaust flow, the composite exhaust path extends through the inflow and outflow orifices between the emanator and the expandable balloon, the proximal exhaust flow in the composite exhaust path is configured to sustainably inflate the expandable balloon into an expanded configuration.
17. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 16, wherein the expandable balloon is deployable and expandable about a distal region of the catheter tube to act as an occlusive device when an exhaust pressure control device is operated.
18. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 16, wherein the exhaust branch of the manifold includes an exhaust regulator, and the exhaust regulator is configured to cooperate with the proximal exhaust flow to control inflation pressure at the expandable balloon.
19. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system of claim 16, wherein the fluid jet emanator and inflow and outflow orifices define a location for ablative cross stream flows generated by the fluid from the fluid jet emanator, and wherein the expandable balloon is located proximal to the location of such ablative cross stream flows.
Description
CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application is related to application Ser. No. 10/455,096 entitled “Thrombectomy Catheter Device Having a Self-Sealing Hemostasic Valve” filed on Jun. 05, 2003, which is pending.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a thrombectomy catheter, and more particularly, relates to an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system which is a cross stream thrombectomy catheter, such as, but not limited to, an Angiojet® catheter with a flexible and expandable balloon, wherein the balloon is deployable and expandable about the distal region of the cross stream thrombectomy catheter and wherein the balloon is located proximal to the fluid jet emanator and inflow and outflow orifices upstream of ablative cross stream flows. The balloon is expandably deployed by the exhaust or back pressure created by the operation of the cross stream flows as generated by the fluid jets of the operating exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Prior art thrombectomy catheter systems incorporated a manifold and a catheter having a plurality of inflow and outflow orifices involved with ablation jet flow in cooperation with an inflatable occludive balloon. The occlusive balloons, for the most, required elaborate schemes for attachment to the catheter tube which acted as an exhaust tube to carry away particulate and other fluids present in the ablation processes. Often, the balloon would be aligned over and about the catheter/exhaust tube and then secured thereto by adhesive, electronic bonding, or the like. A separate inflation lumen including inflation orifices was often required for communication with and for inflation of the occlusive balloon; or complex schemes requiring the use of moveable components were relied on to expand the occlusive balloon during the thrombectomy procedure. Other expansion methods were used as well.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The general purpose of the present invention is to provide an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system to elegantly stop blood flow in a vessel. Flow cessation optimizes the effectivity of Angiojet® style thrombectomy catheter devices and procedures involving drug infusion, embolization containment, thrombectomy and other procedures, and reduces hemolysis since the amount of blood available to lyse is minimized. This invention utilizes a proximally located balloon with an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter device involving cross stream ablation flows, and, more specifically, utilizes an inflatable balloon formed out of the catheter tube (exhaust tube) of an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter device which is proximally located with respect to cross stream flows and deployed using the back pressure created by the operation of the cross stream flows generated by the fluid jets of the thrombectomy catheter. Although balloons attached to catheters proximal or distal to the inflow and outflow orifices have been suggested in the past, the present invention goes one step further by creating a balloon incorporating the structure of a catheter tube (exhaust tube) of Pebax, polyurethane or other suitable material while using the exhaust pressure of the fluid jets to fill and sustain expansion of the balloon for purposes of proximal protection or occlusion, and in some cases when used in antigrade flow, distal protection. This arrangement minimizes overall general profile, minimizes the number of components and design complexity, minimizes manufacturing cost, and provides an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system which is very easy to use since the balloon is deployed automatically when the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is activated.

Since Angiojet® style thrombectomy catheters remove debris more effectively in stagnant flow, as well as being more effective in other procedures having a stagnant flow, the present invention is useful in several applications. The invention could be used in cooperation with a filter to more effectively remove debris from within and around the filter. The invention could be used to increase the amount of debris/thrombus removed from a particular vessel length. With this in mind, the invention could also minimize any distal or proximal embolization. The invention could be used to deliver drugs more effectively to a stagnant field. The balloon could also be used for centering or positioning a catheter in a vessel. Finally, the invention could be used to break up clots as it is moved through a blocked vessel (modified embolectomy).

According to one or more embodiments of the present invention, there is provided an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system including a manifold and closely associated components, including a hemostatic nut assembly, a self-sealing hemostatic valve, a threaded high pressure connection port, a catheter tube (sometimes referred to as an exhaust tube) connectingly extending from the manifold through a strain relief, a catheter tube tapered tip having a plurality of outflow orifices and inflow orifices in close proximity thereto extending through the sidewalls of the catheter tube, a high pressure tube connectively extending from the threaded high pressure connection port through the manifold and through the catheter tube to a fluid jet emanator located distal to the plurality of outflow orifices and inflow orifices, a first set of support rings spaced along and secured to a distal portion of the high pressure tube, a support ring and the previously mentioned fluid jet emanator spaced along and secured to a distal portion of the high pressure tube, a thin wall section of the catheter tube (herein referred to as the balloon) aligned between the full thickness catheter portions, wherein the full thickness catheter portions align over and about, as well as extending in opposite directions from, the first set of spaced support rings, radiopaque marker bands secured over and about the catheter tube in alignment with the underlying first set of support rings, and a portion of the catheter tube which is in close proximity to the plurality of outflow orifices and inflow orifices, wherein such a portion of the catheter tube aligns over and about the spaced support ring and the previously mentioned fluid jet emanator and is secured thereabout and thereto by radiopaque marker bands.

One significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system, the present invention, is the use of a proximally located balloon (herein called the proximal balloon) on an Angiojet® style thrombectomy catheter, wherein the balloon is of decreased wall thickness and is created from the catheter tube (exhaust tube) itself.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter which is deployed by the back pressure created by operating the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter which is fixed and positioned between two marker bands with underlying support rings or by other suitable means.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter used for the purpose of cessation of fluid flow in a blood vessel or other body conduit.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter used for the purpose of cessation of fluid flow in a blood vessel or other body conduit to maximize the effect of the thrombectomy catheter in terms of debris or tissue removal.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter used for the purpose of cessation of fluid flow in a blood vessel or other body conduit to maximize the effect of the thrombectomy catheter in terms of debris or tissue removal from a distal protection filter wire or a balloon.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter used for the purpose of centering a catheter tube.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is a proximal balloon on an Angiojet® thrombectomy catheter used for the purpose of modified embolectomy.

Another significant aspect and feature of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system is for the purpose of drug delivery to a blood vessel or other body conduit.

Having thus briefly described an embodiment of the present invention and having mentioned some significant aspects and features of the present invention, it is the principal object of the present invention to provide an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other objects of the present invention and many of the attendant advantages of the present invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the figures thereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing the visible components of an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system, the present invention, illustrating major features, components or assemblies of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a segmented exploded isometric view of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system;

FIG. 3 illustrates the alignment of FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c;

FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c together illustrate a cross sectional view in different scales of the components of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system along the lines 4 a-4 a, 4 b-4 b, and 4 c-4 c of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 illustrates the invention connected to ancillary devices; and,

FIG. 6 illustrates the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system in the performance of the method of use of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing the visible components of an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10, the present invention, illustrating major features, components or assemblies of the invention. Such major features, components or assemblies of the invention include a one-piece manifold 12 having a catheter tube 14 extending therefrom and attached thereto, including details as now described. A flexible, expandable and inflatable balloon, herein referred to as the balloon 16, is shown in the deflated position being an integral part of the catheter tube 14, the latter of which can be referred to as an exhaust tube. The balloon 16 is located near the distal end of the catheter tube 14 just proximal to a plurality of inflow orifices 18 a-18 n and a plurality of outflow orifices 20 a-20 n located along and about the distal end of the catheter tube 14. The expanded profile of the balloon 16 is shown in dashed lines as an expanded balloon 16 a. The visible portion of the one-piece manifold 12 includes a central tubular body 24, a high pressure branch 26 including an integral threaded connector port 28 (FIG. 2) extending angularly from the central tubular body 24, an exhaust branch 30 including an integral threaded connector port 32 extending angularly from the high pressure connection branch 26, and a cavity body 34 extending proximally from the central tubular body 24. The catheter tube 14 has a lumen 40 (FIG. 2) and the proximal end of the catheter tube 14 extends through and seals against the interior of a strain relief 36 and through a concentrically located connector 38 such that the lumen 40 communicates with the interior of the manifold 12. The catheter tube 14 extends distally to include a tapered tip 42 whereat the lumen 40 decreases in diameter (see FIG. 4 c) and wherein all parts are flexible. Opposed radiopaque marker bands 46 and 48 are shown located around and about the catheter tube 14 at both sides of the balloon 16, and opposed radiopaque marker bands 50 and 52 are shown located around and about the catheter tube 14 at both sides of the plurality of inflow orifices 18 a-18 n and the plurality of outflow orifices 20 a-20 n. A hemostatic nut assembly 54 aligns to and snappingly and threadingly engages features of the cavity body 34. A threaded high pressure connection port 56 suitably secures to the inner portion of the integral threaded connector port 28 of the high pressure connection branch 26 in cooperation with a connector 58.

FIG. 2 is a segmented exploded isometric view of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10, the present invention, and FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c, the alignment of which is shown in FIG. 3, together illustrate a cross sectional view in different scales of the components of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 excluding the full length of the catheter tube 14, but including a guidewire 60 (FIG. 4 a) such as is incorporated in the use of the invention. FIGS. 4 b and 4 c are illustrated in a scale slightly larger than that of FIG. 4 a for purposes of clarity. The catheter tube 14, which also serves and functions as an exhaust tube, and a high pressure tube 62 are foreshortened and shown as partial lengths for the purpose of clarity.

With reference to FIG. 2 and FIGS. 4 a, 4 b and 4 c together, the instant invention is further described. The manifold 12 includes connected and communicating passageways and cavities including a high pressure branch passageway 64 within the high pressure branch 26 and integral threaded connector port 28, an exhaust branch passageway 66 within the exhaust branch 30 and integral threaded connector port 32 intersecting and in communication with the high pressure branch passageway 64, and a tapered central passageway 68 extending from and through a distally directed threaded connection port 70 integral to the central tubular body 24 and through the central tubular body 24 to and communicating with a cavity 72, which preferably is cylindrical, located central to the cavity body 34. Internal threads 74 (FIG. 4 a) are located about the interior of the cavity body 34 and near the proximal region of the manifold 12 for accommodation of the threaded end of the hemostatic nut assembly 54.

Beneficial to the instant invention is the use of a self-sealing hemostatic valve 76, the shape and functions of which are described in detail in pending application Ser. No. 10/455,096 entitled “Thrombectomy Catheter Device Having a Self-Sealing Hemostasic Valve” filed on Jun. 05, 2003. The self-sealing hemostatic valve 76 is aligned, captured and housed in the distal portion of the cavity 72 at the proximal region of the manifold 12. The cavity 72 is tubular in shape including a tubular cavity wall 78, the threads 74, and an intersecting planar surface 80 which is annular and circular. An orifice 82 located central to the planar surface 80 is common to the cavity 72 and the tapered central passageway 68. The hemostatic nut assembly 54 includes a passageway 86 extending through the general body and through a cylindrical boss 84 having external threads 88. An integral actuator knob 90 is also part of the hemostatic nut assembly 54. The proximal end of the manifold 12 utilizes the internal threads 74 for attachment of the hemostatic nut assembly 54 to the manifold 12 where the external threads 88 of the hemostatic nut assembly 54 rotatingly engage the internal threads 74 of the manifold 12 to cause the cylindrical boss 84 to bear against the self-sealing hemostatic valve 76, thereby causing the self-sealing hemostatic valve 76 to seal against the guidewire 60 and to seal the proximal portion of the tapered central passageway 68 where such sealing is effective during static or actuated states of the invention. Also included in the hemostatic nut assembly 54 is an annular lip 92, best shown in FIG. 2, which can be utilized for snap engagement with dimples 94 (FIG. 2) protruding inwardly from the tubular cavity wall 78 of the cavity body 34.

Also shown is a ferrule 96 which aligns within the passageway 98 of the threaded high pressure connection port 56 the combination of which aligns within a portion of the high pressure branch passageway 64 at the threaded connector port 28. The proximal end of the high pressure tube 62 is utilized to receive high pressure ablation liquids and suitably secures in a center passage of the ferrule 96 to communicate with the passageway 98 of the threaded high pressure connection port 56. The high pressure tube 62 also extends through the high pressure branch passageway 64, through part of the tapered central passageway 68, through coaxially aligned components including lumen 40 in the catheter tube 14, the connector 38 and the strain relief 36, thence through the balance of the length of the lumen 40 in the catheter tube 14 to attach to other components as now described. The high pressure tube 62 extends through support rings 100, 102 and 104 and to the tip 42 where termination of the high pressure tube 62 is provided in the form of a fluid jet emanator 106, described in other applications and patents assigned to the assignee. The high pressure tube 62 also extends through the radiopaque marker bands 46, 48 and 50 and to the fluid jet emanator 106 and the radiopaque marker band 52. The high pressure tube 62 preferably is attached to the support rings 100, 102 and 104 and the fluid jet emanator 106, such as by welding or other suitable means, where the support rings 100, 102 and 104 and the fluid jet emanator 106 function as co-located supports for the catheter tube 14 in the region beneath the radiopaque marker bands 46, 48, 50 and 52. In FIG. 2, the radiopaque marker bands 46, 48, 50 and 52 are shown displaced distally a short distance from the support rings 100, 102 and 104 and the fluid jet emanator 106 for the purpose of clarity and are shown in frictional engagement in their actual position along and about the distal portion of the catheter tube 14 in FIGS. 4 b and 4 c.

The relationships of the radiopaque marker bands 46, 48, 50 and 52 and of the support rings 100, 102 and 104 and the fluid jet emanator 106 to each other and to the catheter tube 14 are shown best in FIGS. 4 b and 4 c. In FIG. 4 b, the balloon 16 is shown contiguous with the catheter tube 14, wherein the balloon 16 is of a reduced wall thickness when compared to the general wall thickness of the catheter tube 14. The wall thickness of the balloon 16 is of suitable thickness to allow inflation of the balloon 16 to expand to meet and seal against the wall of the vasculature in which a thrombectomy procedure, drug delivery procedure or other procedure can take place. The radiopaque marker bands 46 and 48 and the support rings 100 and 102 are shown forcibly contacting the full wall thickness of the catheter tube 14 adjacent to the balloon 16, thereby allowing the full length of the thinner wall of the balloon 16 to be utilized for expansion. Alternatively, a suitable portion of the balloon 16 could also be engaged between the radiopaque marker bands 46 and 48 and the support rings 100 and 102. Expansion of the balloon 16 is shown in dashed lines by the expanded balloon 16 a.

FIG. 4 c shows the positioning of the radiopaque marker bands 50 and 52 around and about the distal portion of the catheter tube 14. The distally located radiopaque marker band 52 is forcibly applied over and about the distal portion of the catheter tube 14 to cause frictional annular engagement of a portion of the catheter tube 14 with all or part of an annular groove 108 of the fluid jet emanator 106. Such frictional engagement is sufficient to place the outer radius surface of the radiopaque marker band 52 (also 46, 48 and 50) in a position lesser than the general and greater outer radial surface of the catheter tube 14, thereby providing, in part, catheter tube 14 having no elements protruding beyond the general outer radial surface thereof for unimpeded and smooth distal or proximal transition of the catheter tube 14 within a vein, artery or the like. A passage 109 is shown central to the fluid jet emanator 106 to accommodate passage of a guidewire.

Structure is provided to nurture and aid introduction of and passage of the distal portion of the catheter tube 14 through blood vessels, arteries and the like to the sites of thrombotic deposits or lesions. The tapered tip 42, as opposed to a rounded and non-tapered tip, can part and more easily penetrate thrombotic deposits or lesions during insertional travel in a distal direction instead of advancing or pushing such thrombotic deposits or lesions distally. The decreasing diameter in a distal direction of the tapered tip 42 also allows for increasing flexibility to negotiate and pass through tortuous paths.

The exhaust tube support rings 100 and 102 in use with the radiopaque marker bands 46 and 48 in the regions surrounding the opposed ends of the balloon 16 are examples of structures offering support or reinforcement along the catheter tube 14 in the regions surrounding the ends of the balloon 16. The exhaust tube support ring 104 and fluid jet emanator 106, in use with the radiopaque marker bands 50 and 52, are other examples of structures offering support or reinforcement along the catheter tube 14. Such support allows the use of thinner wall dimension for the catheter tube 14 to allow for a larger and more effective and efficiently sized lumen 40, as well as contributing to a reduced size outer diameter. Such support also contributes to supportively maintaining the diameter and overall shape of the catheter tube 14 when the catheter tube 14 is pushed or advanced along a vein or vessel, as well as aiding torsional support.

Mode of Operation

Generally, a normal guidewire is deployed in a vessel requiring treatment, or in the alternative, a filter guidewire or balloon occlusion guidewire could be used. After other necessary interventional procedures, the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 is advanced over the guidewire for debris/thrombus removal, drug infusion or other procedures and maneuvered into the appropriate position for treatment. A guide catheter or sheath can be incorporated as necessary to offer assistance in placing the catheter tube 14 of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 within the desired location of the vasculature. The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 is activated, wherein the balloon 16 is automatically and expandingly deployed forming an expanded balloon 16 a and debris or drugs are removed or infused. The balloon 16 can be alternately pressurized and depressurized, wherein the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 may be moved proximally or distally during the procedure to maximize the effect of the system. When the procedure is complete, the balloon 16 generally is deflated sufficiently under normal arterial pressure to be removed safely, or deflation can be aided with a manual syringe attached to an effluent line, or deflation could be aided via use of a roller pump. Further interventions can be executed as normal over the remaining wire or wire device.

More specifically, FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate the mode of operation where FIG. 5 illustrates the invention connected to ancillary devices, and where FIG. 6 illustrates the distal portion of the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 in the performance of the method of use of the present invention. The mode of operation is best understood by referring to FIGS. 5 and 6 along with previously described figures.

The exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 is shown engaged over and about a guidewire 60, wherein the guidewire 60 (previously engaged into a vein or artery) first slidably engages the lumen 40 of the guidewire tube 14 at the tapered tip 42 followed by slidable engagement of the passage 109 of the fluid jet emanator 106, slidable engagement of the tapered central passageway 68, and slidable and sealed engagement with the hemostatic valve 76 to exit from the hemostatic nut assembly 54. A high pressure fluid source 110 and a high pressure fluid pump 112 connect to the manifold 12 via the threaded high pressure connection port 56 and a connector 113. An exhaust regulator 114, such as a roller pump or other suitable device, and a collection chamber 116 connect to the threaded connector port 32 of the exhaust branch 30 by a connector 117, as shown.

FIG. 6 illustrates the exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 in the performance of the method of use of the present invention, with particular attention to the distal portion of the exhaust tube 14 including the flexible tapered tip 42 positioned in a blood vessel 118, artery or the like at the site of a thrombotic deposit or lesion 120 where the blood vessel 118 and the main thrombotic deposit or lesion 120 are shown in cross section. Multiple jet streams of high velocity jet flow 122 of saline (or other suitable fluid) are emitted in a proximal direction from the fluid jet emanator 106 to impinge upon and carry away thrombotic deposits or lesions 120 which have been reduced to particulate form. Alternatively, other fluid jet emanators of different structures can be incorporated within the distal portion of the catheter tube 14 as an alternative to the jet emanator 106 illustrated in this figure to emanate or emit one or more high velocity jet flow(s) 122 proximally along or near the longitudinal axis of the catheter tube 14 to accomplish the same purpose as that described for the fluid jet emanator 106. The high velocity jet flow(s) 122 of saline pass outwardly through the outflow orifice(s) 20 a-20 n in a radial direction creating cross stream jet(s) 124 directed outwardly toward the wall of the blood vessel 118 and are influenced by the low pressure at the inflow orifice(s) 18 a-18 n to cause the cross stream jet(s) 124 to flow distally and circumferentially to impinge on, provide drag forces on, and break up thrombotic deposits or lesions 120 and to, by entrainment, urge and carry along the particles of thrombotic deposits or lesions 120 through the inflow orifice(s) 18 a-18 n, a relatively low pressure region, into the high velocity jet flows 122 where the thrombus 120 is further macerated into microscopic particles, and thence into the catheter tube lumen 40 to pass through the expanded balloon 16 a, and thence further through the lumen 40 for subsequent exhausting. The exhaust outflow is driven by internal pressure which is created by the high velocity jet flow(s) 122 and the fluid entrained through the inflow orifice(s) 18 a-18 n to cause pressurization of the lumen 40 and the balloon 16 and is utilized to several advantages. One advantage of which is that in a no flow situation when distal flow of blood is stopped by inflation of the intervening inflated and expanded balloon 16 a, the particles of thrombotic deposits or lesions 120 are substantially trapped and can be more effectively circulated, recirculated and rediluted until all that remains is saline and minute particles of thrombotic deposits or lesions 120 which are subsequently removed in a proximal direction through the lumen 40 of the catheter tube 14 by promoting flow through the exhaust regulator 114. Another advantage is the utilization of the exhaust outflow and internal pressure which is created by the high velocity jet flow(s) 122 in combination with the restriction of the outflow, such as influenced by the exhaust regulator 114, to cause automatic expansion of the balloon 16 which forcibly impinges and seals against the inner walls of the blood vessel 118. The reduced thickness of the material comprising the balloon 16 allows the balloon 16 to expand sufficiently to become an expanded balloon 16 a restricted by impingement with the wall of the blood vessel 118. Inflation pressure and flows can be influenced by controlling of input pressure fluid at the high pressure fluid pump 112 and by controlling of the exhaust rate at the exhaust regulator 114. The present invention discloses an exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system 10 utilizing the concept of a continuously formed inflatable and expandable balloon being continuously formed of the same material as the catheter (exhaust tube) and automatically inflated by internal pressurization as caused by high velocity jet flows, cross stream jets, and the like. Such a concept can also be applied to other thrombectomy catheters and systems, such as, but not limited to, all AngioJet® catheters including rapid exchange catheters, over-the-wire catheters, and catheters which are pressurized by a fluid flow source.

Various modifications can be made to the present invention without departing from the apparent scope thereof.

EXHAUST-PRESSURE-OPERATED BALLOON CATHETER SYSTEM
PARTS LIST
 10 exhaust-pressure-operated balloon catheter system
 12 manifold
 14 catheter tube
 16 balloon
 16a expanded balloon
 18a-n inflow orifices
 20a-n outflow orifices
 24 central tubular body
 26 high pressure branch
 28 threaded connector port
 30 exhaust branch
 32 threaded connector port
 34 cavity body
 36 strain relief
 38 connector
 40 lumen
 42 tapered tip
 46 radiopaque marker band
 48 radiopaque marker band
 50 radiopaque marker band
 52 radiopaque marker band
 54 hemostatic nut assembly
 56 threaded high pressure connection port
 58 connector
 60 guidewire
 62 high pressure tube
 64 high pressure branch passageway
 66 exhaust branch passageway
 68 tapered central passageway
 70 threaded connection port
 72 cavity
 74 internal threads
 76 self-sealing hemostatic valve
 78 tubular cavity wall
 80 planar surface
 82 orifice
 84 boss
 86 passageway
 88 external threads
 90 actuator knob
 92 annular lip
 94 dimple
 96 ferrule
 98 passageway
100 support ring
102 support ring
104 support ring
106 fluid jet emanator
108 annular groove
109 passage
110 high pressure fluid source
112 high pressure fluid pump
113 connector
114 exhaust regulator
116 collection chamber
117 connector
118 blood vessel
120 thrombotic deposit or lesion
122 high velocity jet flow
124 cross stream jets

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/98.01, 606/159, 606/194, 604/509
International ClassificationA61M31/00, A61B17/22, A61M29/00, A61F2/958
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/10184, A61M25/10182, A61B17/32037, A61M25/104, A61B2017/22067, A61M1/0058
European ClassificationA61B17/3203R, A61M25/10E
Legal Events
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5 Dec 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: POSSIS MEDICAL, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BONNETTE, MICHAEL JOHN;THOR, ERIC JOEL;BALL, DOUGLAS JAMES;REEL/FRAME:017294/0770;SIGNING DATES FROM 20051107 TO 20051108
Owner name: POSSIS MEDICAL, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BONNETTE, MICHAEL JOHN;THOR, ERIC JOEL;BALL, DOUGLAS JAMES;SIGNING DATES FROM 20051107 TO 20051108;REEL/FRAME:017294/0770
7 Jan 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: MEDRAD, INC.,PENNSYLVANIA
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:POSSIS MEDICAL, INC.;REEL/FRAME:022062/0848
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