Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3895798 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date22 Jul 1975
Filing date17 Sep 1973
Priority date17 Sep 1973
Publication numberUS 3895798 A, US 3895798A, US-A-3895798, US3895798 A, US3895798A
InventorsClifford J Collins
Original AssigneeClifford J Collins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game device including game board and punch cards for simulating athletic games such as football
US 3895798 A
Abstract
Game including board simulating a playing field, such as a football field, and including punch cards selected by the players for each play, there being a plurality of offensive cards and a plurality of defensive cards from which selections are made. The punches on the offensive cards are arranged in accordance with established rules to closely follow the actual game, such as football, and the punches on the defensive cards are arranged in areas according to rules such that the probability of success of each play is closely related to the success of the play in an actual game. The particular offensive play provided by each card is obvious to a player by viewing the punches in the cards, and also the defensive represented by each card can be determined by the player, so that the players on offense and defense can use skill in selecting plays and effective defenses, as in the actual game. In addition to a game simulating football, games can be provided in accordance with the invention which simulate other athletic games played on a field or court, such as basketball.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Collins [451 July 22,1975

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-l-larry G. Strappello Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Foorman L. Mueller [76] Inventor: Clifford J. Collins, 812 Highland,

Oak Park, Ill. 60304 [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Sept. 17, 1973 Game including board simulating a playing field, such as a football field, and including punch cards selected [21] Appl' 397667 by the players for each play, there being a plurality of offensive cards and a plurality of defensive cards from 273/85 R; 733/94 R which selections are made. The punches on the offen- [51] Int. Cl. A63f 9/14 sive cards are arranged in accordance with established [58] Field of Search.... 273/85 R, 93 R, 93 C, 94 R, rules to closely follow the actual game, such as foot- 273/131 C, 134 CB, 134 CA, 134 CF, 134 ball, and the punches on the defensive cards are ar- 152-1 ranged in areas according to rules such that the probability of success of each play is closely related to the [56] References Cited success of the play in an actual game. The particular UNITED STATES PATENTS offensive play providedvby each card is obvious to a 834,189 10/1906 Chadbourne 273/152.1 Player by Yiewing the punches in the cards and 2,260,467 10 1941 Le May 273/94 R the defenslva represented by each card can be deter- 3,263,999 8/1966 McCoy 273/152.1 mined y the p y so that the P y on Offense and 3,375,007 3/1968 Meyer 273/94 R defense can use skill in selecting plays and effective 3,492,000 l/1970 Board 273/94 R X defenses, as in the actual game. In addition to a game 3,545,758 12/1970 Payne, I t 273/94 R simulating football, games can be provided in accor- 3,547,441 12/1970 Thornton 273/94 R dance with the invention which simulate other hl games played on a field or court, such as basketball.

11 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures a z Q3 PATENTED JUL 2 2 I975 FIG. l0

FIG. 9

FIG. l2

FIG. 11

HJKLMN DEFFFG JKLM BCDEEEGHJKLMN B EFGHJKL EFGHJKLMN BCDEFG BCDEEFGHJKLM CDEFFFGHJKLM DEFGGGG EFGHHHHHJK FGHJJJJUJKLMN HJKKKKKKKLM .65432lO 23456789W Q M5 PATENTED JUL 2 2 I975 S'riEET FIG. l4

lllllll ullll GAME DEVICE INCLUDING GAME BOARD AND PUNCH CARDS FOR SIMULATING ATHLETIC GAMES SUCH AS FOOTBALL BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to games, such as a simulated football game, which can be played by play ers indoors at a game table, and which uses a game board and punch cards representing offensive and defensive plays which can be selected and interrelated to determine the result of a play.

Many games utilizing boards and other devices have been proposed, and some such games are commercially available, which can be played indoors by persons seated at a game table or the like, and which simulate outdoor games requiring athletic skill, such as football. Although games which are available require some skill to play and to achieve successful results, the skill involved has been minimal and has not been closely related to the skill involved in the play of the actual athletic game. In some games, the success of the plays is left solely to chance, or the skill involved in playing has nothing at all to do with the athletic skill involved in the playing an actual game.

Games have been proposed wherein plays are provided by the position of punches in punch cards, and wherein a card representing an offensive play is related to a card representing a defensive play to determine what happens in the play. Such games have generally been relatively complex and have required substantial time and effort for the players to familiarize themselves with the game. The nature of the play produced by different cards has not been readily apparent from the positions of the punches on the card. Also, in some cases complex and expensive equipment has been required which has resulted in the game being too expensive for use by a large number of people. Further, the games which have been proposed using punch cards have not been closely related to the actual game, such as a football game. That is, the types of plays which can be used have been quite limited, and the skill involved in selecting plays has not been directly related to the results achieved by the plays.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a game device including a game board for indicating the current condition of the game on a field or court, and offensive and defensive punch cards which can be selected and interrelated to indicate the result of a particular play.

Another object of the invention is to provide a simulated athletic game including offensive cards having punches thereon positioned to indicate patterns of movement of offensive players, and defensive cards having punches thereon indicating various positions of defensive players, wherein by skillful selection of offensive and defensive cards a game can be played providing results closely simulating the actual athletic game.

A further object of the invention is to provide a simulated football game having offensive cards which closely simulate plays actually used, and defensive cards which operate in combination with the offensive cards to provide a gain on the play which is closely related to that which can be expected in actual play.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a simulated football game having a game board and punch cards representing plays which can be used for various types of plays, including kicks, runs and passes, as used in an actual football game.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a simulated basketball game having punch cards representing various offensive and defensive plays as used in an actual game.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates the game board of the game device;

FIGS. 2-10 illustrate punch cards used in the play of the game of football;

FIG. 11 is a chart illustrating the position of punches used in offensive cards for passing plays;

FIG. 12 is a chart illustrating zones in which punches may be placed in defensive cards; and

FIGS. 13-17 illustrate punch cards used in the play of the game of basketball.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION In FIG. 1 there is shown a game board 10 for use with a football game in accordance with the invention. This board is laid out like a football field with a 50-yard marker in the center and further markers extending to the zero or goal lines, as on a football field. Goal posts 12 are shown along the goal lines. The 10-yard markers (10, 20, 30, 40, 50) are shown by double lines, and 5- yard markers are shown therebetween by single lines. The board 10 may have openings 14 therein just below the center in which pins can be positioned to mark the ball position. Above these openings, a second row of openings 15 is provided which may be used for a first down marker. A pin can be used in an opening 15 to mark a position 10 yards down field to indicate the distance that must be gained for a first down. Alternately, a bridge member may be provided for insertion in openings ten spaces apart to simulate the first down marker used on a football field.

On the lower left side of the board 10 is a series of openings 16 in which a pin may be positioned to mark the score of one team, which is indicated as the visitor score. Above this is another row of openings 18 in which a pin maybe positioned to indicate the number of the play. Still above this, four openings 19 are provided which may receive a pin to mark the number of time outs taken by the visiting team. On the lower right side of the board are four openings 20, numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 in which a pin may be positioned to mark the down, as in the known football game. On the upper right hand side of FIG. 1, the board 10 has rows of openings 22 and 23 to indicate the score of the home team and the number of time outs taken by this team. These can be lettered so that they will be easily read by the player for the home team when seated across the board from the visitor player. Also four openings 24 are provided to indicate the quarter of the game.

FIGS. 2-7 show punch cards used in the play of the game, with the cards shown by FIGS. 2, 4, 5 and 7 being offensive cards, and the cards shown by FIGS. 3 and 6 being defensive cards. In the play of the game, each player may have a set of offensive cards and a set of defensive cards, or, to reduce the number of cards and the cost of the game, the same sets of offensive cards and defensive cards can be used by both players, with the person on offensive using the offensive cards and the person on defensive using the defensive cards.

All of the cards have a double line 30 near the bottom of the card which indicates the position from which the play starts. This is generally called the line of scrimmage in football. Back of the line 30, space may be provided representing 15 yards, and in front of the line 30, space is provided which represents 65 yards. Also back of the line 30 is a box' 32 which is referred to as the quarterback zone. The cards have punches 31 therein whichare positioned at different yard lines, and different positions along the lines, to indicate particular offensive and defensive plays.

In all offensive plays (FIGS. 2, 4, and 7), the ball starts from the punch immediately back of the line 30, in the zone 32. The offensive cards have further punches which indicate the position and movement of the offensive player having the ball. Similarly, the punches in the defensive cards represent positions of the defensive players during a play. There are substantially more punches in the defensive cards (FIGS. 3, 6) than defensive players on a football team, because the punches represent the positions of the defensive players at various times during the play. There is never a defensive punch in the quarterback zone32 so the quarterback is in effect protected as long as he stays in the zone 32.

FIG. 2 represents a running play in which the quarterback receives the ball just back of the line 30, and moves back one position (yard) as indicated by the two punches in the box 32 directly back of the line 30. The quarterback runs in the path shown by the punches, dropping back one line and to the left, out of the box 32, and then moving forward and to the right and left in the path shown by the punches. Alternately, the quarterback could hand off from the position one step back of the line 30 to another player who is immediately to the left and back of the quarterback, with this player then taking the path shown by the punches.

Assuming that the card shown in FIG. 3 is selected by the defense, the play shown in FIG. 2 will continue until the punch 34 is reached. At this point, the punch 34 is aligned with the punch 35 on the defensive card of FIG. 3, indicating that there is a defensive player at this position who stops the play. As is apparent from the line markers on the card shown in FIG. 2, this represents a 7-yard gain. This gain is indicated on the board by moving the pin in the openings 14 seven spaces in the direction of the offensive player. If the defensive card of FIG. 3 has not had a punch at the position 35, the play would have continued to the position of punch 36 on the'card of FIG. 2, since this is the next position at which there is an aligned punch in the defensive card of FIG. 3, indicated as punch 37. In such case, the run would have continued for a 39-yard gain.

FIG. 4 shows another card which provides a different offensive play. As shown in the box 32 of FIG. 4, the quarter-back drops back three steps behind the line 30 after receiving the ball and then pitches it out to a runner at the position shown by punch 38. This runner then follows the path shown by the punches down the field. In the event that the same defensive card shown by FIG. 3 is used with the offensive card shown in FIG. 4, this play would continue to the position of punch 40 on FIG. 4. The punch 40 is aligned with punch 41 on the defensive card of FIG.'3, which indicates that there is a defensive man at this position. Accordingly, the play shown by the offensive card of FIG. 4, when used with the defensive card of FIG. 3, results in a 25-yard gain.

The card of FIG. 5 represents a pass play. In this play, the quarterback drops back three steps within the zone defined by box 32, and then moves further back as shown by the punches to a passing block represented by the four punches 46. The pass receiver is represented by a receiving block of seven punches, indicated at 48. This block is formed by two rows of three punches each, positioned on the 26 and 27 yard lines, and a single punch on the 25 yard line. Considering the use of the defensive card shown by FIG. 6 with the offensive card for a pass play shown by FIG. 5, there is no defensive punch aligned with the offensive punches back of the box 32, so that the passer is not tackled prior to passing. However, there is a punch 49 in the card of FIG. 6 which is aligned with one of the punches in the receiving block 48 on the card of FIG. 5. This represents a defensive man in his receiving location, and in such case, the pass play is incomplete. Accordingly, there is no gain on the play.

If there had been two punches on the defensive card of FIG. 6 aligned with punches in the receiving block 48 on the pass play represented by FIG. 5, this would indicate interception of the pass, with the ball turning over to the defensive team. In the event that there had been no defensive punch, such as the punch 49, aligned with a punch in the receiving block 48, the pass would have been complete with the receiver carrying the ball down the field in the path marked. In such case, the play would stop at the position of punch 50 on the card of FIG. 5, since the defensive card of FIG. 6 has a defensive punch 51 which is aligned with the punch 50 in the card of FIG. 5. This would result in a gain of 34 yards on the play.

' The card of FIG. 7 represents a short pass play. In the play represented by this card, the quarterback receives the ball at line 30 and drops back one step within the box 32, and then moves one step to the right to the position shown by punch 52 to throw the ball. As there is a defensive player at this position, as indicated by the punch 53 on the card of FIG. 6, the offensive play is terminated at this position, and the play loses two yards. If there had been no defensive player at the position 53, the pass would have gone to a receiver in the receiving block indicated by the three punches 54, which are on the 1 yard line. The pass receiver would then move down field in the path shown by the punches to the position of punch 56. At this point, the receiver would be stopped as the punch 56 is aligned with punch 57 on the defensive card of FIG. 6, indicating the presence of a defensive player at this position. This would have resulted in an S-yard gain on the play.

As stated above, the presence of two punches in the defensive card aligned with punches in the receiving block can be used to indicate an interception. The positions of punches at the point where a play is stopped can also be used to indicate fumbles and penalties. For example, two aligned punches following the point where a run is stopped can beused to indicate a fumble. This is illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 where the offensive card of FIG. 2 has two punches 38 and 39 following the punch 36, which are aligned with punches 38 and 39 in the defensive card of FIG. 3 following the punch 37.'If the play had continued to the position of punch 36, then the two aligned punches following this point would indicate a fumble.

Similarly, three aligned punches in the offensive and defensive cards following the aligned punches which indicate the position where the play is terminated can indicate a defensive holding-penalty. This is indicated by FIGS. 3 and 4 where the offensive card of FIG. 4 has three punches 42, 43 and 44 following the punch 40 aligned with the three punches 42, 43 and 44 following the punch 41 on the defensive card of FIG. 3. Other arrangements of punches can be 'used to indicate other penalties.

The cards utilized for kickoffs, field goals and other kicks are illustrated by FIGS. 8, 9 and 10. FIG. 8 is a master grid for use in connection with all the kicks, including kickoffs, punts, field goals and points after touchdown. FIG. 9 is a punt return card which shows the path of the runner returning the kick. FIG. 10 shows'a defensive card similar to the defensive cards in FIGS. 3 and 6. In a kicking situation the three cards shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 are placed on top of each other, with the master grid shown in FIG. 8 on top.

In a kicking situation, the person playing the team kicking will select a defensive card and the person representing the team which will return the kick will pick the kick return card. A plurality of different kick return cards will be provided, and as has been stated, a plurality of defensive cards is provided with the game. A singlefpunt and kick master grid card can be used for all kicks.

The punches in the master grid (FIG. 8) back of the quarter-back safety zone 32 indicates the movement of the ball back to the kicker. The master grid has three rows of punches 58 on the 19, 24 and 29 yard lines which are used only in connection with field goals. Punches 59 in a row on the 34 yard line are used for field goals and punts. The rows of punches on the 39, 44, 49 and 54 yard lines, and the single punch on the 59 yard line, are used for all kicks.

The punches 60, 61, and 62 in the cards of FIGS. 8, 9 and 10, are aligned, and this would mark the distance of a field goal, but this position is ignored for punts or kickoffs. The punches 64, 65 and 66 on the cards of FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 are aligned to indicate the distance of any kick. It is apparent from FIG. 8 that if the kick is a punt, the kick travels 49 yards from the line of scrimmage to the location of punch 64. After the distance of the kick is determined by use of the master grid of FIG. 8, themaster gridis removed to determine the distance that the kick is returned from the position of punches 65 and 66. It will be noted from FIGS. 9 and 10 that punch 68 on the card of FIG. 9 is aligned with the punch 69 on the defensive card of FIG. 10. This determines the run back which results from the kick, and in the instance illustrated, the run back is only two yards. I

In the event that the defensive card and the punt return card have punches aligned with one of the punches back of the safety zone on the master grid, this indicates that the kick is blocked. Also, on field goals and extra points, if the defensive card and the kick return card have openings aligned with one of the punches in i the master grid on the nine yard line, this indicates that the field goal or extra point attempt is blocked.

As previously stated, the plays represented by the punched cards are made to simulate actual plays used in the game involved, for instance football, as closely as possible. In running plays, the only requirement is that the punches represent a continuous pattern from the first punch in the quarterback safety zone to the top of the card, which represents the yard line. In pitch out plays, as shown in FIG. 4, the gap between the quarterback who receives the ball and the ball carrier must always be lateral across the field or angling backwards of the field, and not forward. I

In forward pass plays, the position of the passer back of the line of scrimmage, the sizeof the passing block and the size of the receiving block must all be related to the length of the pass. The passing block represents the area occupied by the quarterback just prior to passing, and the receiving block represents the area in which a receiver is able to catch a pass. The following chart shows the relation between these elements which has been found to simulate the action in football pass ing patterns. It is pointed out that certain variations can be made depending on various factors such as the number of punches used in the defensive cards.

Length of Receiving Pass Passing Block Block Yards Size Position Size Quarter- Pitchout Pitchout back (Short) (Long) 2 l A B C l 4 l A B C 2 8 2 B C D 3 l2 2 C D E 5 l6 3 D E F 6, 20 3 E F G 7 24 4 F G H 9 28 4 G H J 10 32 4 H .I K 1 l 36 4 J K L I3 40 4 K L M I4 44 4 L M N 16 48 4 M N I7 52 4 N 18 With respect to the passing block, blocks of two punches can be either two punches deep or two punches wide. Blocks of three punches will be two punches deep with the third punch beside one of the other two punches. Blocks of four punches will be two punches deep and two punches wide.

The passing block position is indicated in the above chart by letters, with the positions represented by the letters being shown in FIG. 11. It will be apparent from FIG. 11 that the quarterback moves further from the position at which he receives the ball for passes of greater distance. The quarterback can make short passes while remaining in the quarterback safety zone, or when in a position closely adjacent to the safety zone.

In addition to quarterback passes, the above chart shows the position of the passer in pitchout pass plays.

The receiving block size varies from a single punch up to blocks having as many as 18 punches. Blocks of two and three punches have the punches side-by-side along the same yard line. Larger blocks have rows of three punches, as indicated by the receiving blocks on the cards of FIGS. 5 and 7. The first row (nearest the line of scrimmage) may have one, two or three punches to provide the desired total number of punches in the receiving block. A row of punches beyond the receivwill be successful, and the number of yards gained on the play, are held close to the actual results obtained in football games. FIG. 12 shows the defensive card divided into six zones. There will be no defensive punches in the quarterback safety zone, as has been stated. In zone I, which is immediately around the quarterback safety zone, there can be a maximum of one defensive punch per yard line, with the total number being any number from to 5. In zone II there can be a maximum of seven defensive punches, but the total for zones I and II can be no more than 9. Also, there can be no more than 3 punches for two consecutive yard lines which extend into zones I and II. Zone III can have from O to 12 punches, and in this zone, as well as in zone IV, from the 7 to the 1 yard lines, there can be a maximum of two punches per yard line. Zone V can have from 25 to 58 punches, and the punches will be distributed so that there are no more than three punches per yard line, except that there can be a maximum of four punches per yard line on the 3 and 4 yard lines. Zone VI which extends from the 56th to the 64th yard line can have from 0 to punches, with no more than three punches per yard line. The total number of punches in a defensive card will be in the range from 50 to 58 punches. The total number of punches decreases as the number of punches in zones I and II increase, with the total number decreasing by one punch for each increase of one punch in Zone I and for each increase of two punches in zones II and III.

In playing the game, the persons playing the home and visitor teams mutually decide which one will kick off, as by flipping a coin as in actual football play. The kickoff can be in accordance with the procedure previously described utilizing punch cards as illustrated in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10. The ball position is marked by placing a pin in the row of holes 14 on the gameboard of FIG. 1, and the first down marker will be used to mark a point 10 yards down the field. The team (player) returning the kickoff will then start offensive plays as has been described in connection with FIGS. 2 to 7. The down will be marked by placing pins in the holes 20, and the plays will be marked by placing pins in the holes 18. In the event that 10 yards is not made on four downs, the ball will turn over to the other team, as in a normal football game. It may be desired to punt on fourth down, in which case the'cards for kicks will be used, as has been described.

A quarter may consist of a given number of plays, such as 27. The quarter which is being played is marked by use of pins in the openings 24. A player may be permitted to call three time outs in a half. A play which is followed by a time out is not recorded as a play, and it may be advantageous to use a time out to allow an additional play before the end of a quarter. Kickoffs and extra point attempts also do not count as plays, since these plays do not consume time in the playing of an actual football game. The scoring can be in accordance with standard football rules, with the scores for the visitor and home teams marked in the rows of openings designated 16 and 22, respectively, on the game board.

As previously stated, the game in accordance with the invention can be used to simulate other athletic games, and punch cards for use in a game simulating basketball are shown in FIGS. 13-17. For basketball, the game board is not required to mark the position of the plays, since each play is a complete offensive play which may lead to a score. However, it is desired to have a board to mark the scores, the quarter or half being played, the number of plays in the quarter or half, and the fouls.

FIG. 13 shows an offensive card and as indicated by the punches on the card the play starts at one end of the court shown at the bottom in FIG. 13, and moves upward toward the goal or basket at the other end. The free throw lines and lanes are marked on the card, as well as the center line. The play can be a continuous line of punches representing one player dribbling the ball, or can have gaps representing passing of the ball from one player to another. At these gaps, passing and receiving blocks can be provided, as in football, although the blocks will normally be smaller. However, as in football, the size of the blocks will be smaller for short passes and larger for long passes.

The defensive cards can be shown in FIG. 14 wherein two punches represent each of the five defensive players. As shown on the card of FIG. 14, the center of the team will be positioned near the opponents goal, the forwards positioned farther away from the goal, and the guards still farther away from the goal. Normally all of the defensive player punches will be on the half of the court adjacent the basket being attacked.

When the offensive card of FIG. 13 is used with the defensive card of FIG. 14, it will be noted that punch of the offensive card is in alignment with punch 72 in the defensive card, which indicates that the ball is stopped at this point, as in football. In basketball, the ball is lost by the offensive team and recovered by the defensive team. If no punches on the defensive card are aligned with the offensive card, the play is successful and a goal ismade. For a normal play, this represents a score of two points for the offensive team.

FIG. 15 shows a second offensive card wherein the play starts at the goal line and moves continuously across the center of the court where it is passed to another player. The second player takes the ball down court and passes to a third player represented by the punches 74 and 75. When the offensive card of FIG. 15 is used with the defensive card of FIG. 14, it will be noted that punch 74 on the offensive card is aligned with punch 76 on the defensive card, so again the play is unsuccessful, and the defensive team takes over.

FIG. 16 shows a second defensive card which is similar to the defensive card of FIG. 14, except in addition to the punches representing the defensive player, additional punches 80 and 81 are provided representing penalties. Punch 81 represents a foul by the defensive against a player who is shooting. When a punch on the offensive card is lined up with this punch, the offensive play stops and the offensive team is given two free throws. Punch 80 represents an offensive foul and if a punch on the offensive card is aligned with this punch, the ball is given to the defensive team. The rules can provide that after a number of plays have occurred in each quarter, the defensive team may be given free throws for offensive fouls, if desired. The punch 82 on the card of FIG. 16 represents the ball going out of bounds, forming a turnover, so that the defensive team again obtains the ball.

FIG. 17 shows a card which can be used for free throws. This card has punches 84 representing the player throwing the free throw, and punches 86 and 87 along the free throw lane, the position of which determines whether or not the free throw is made. A defensive card, such as shown in FIGS. 14 and 16, is used with the free throw card of FIG. 17, and if a punch in the defensive card is aligned with one of the punches 86 and 87 in the free throw card, the free throw is missed. When the defensive card of FIG. 16 is used with the free throw card of FIG. 17, punch 88 of the defensive card is aligned with punch 87 on the free throw card, so that the free throw is missed. If, however, the defensive card of FIG. 14 is used with the free throw card of FIG. 17, the free throw is made as there is no defensive punch aligned with the punches 86 and 87 i along the free throw lane on the free throw card.

It is seen, therefore, that a basketball game can be provided which closely simulates the actual athletic game. As in the football game, the punch cards have punches positioned so that the success of the play is closely related to the success obtained in an actual athletic game. The game has been described for use to simulate football and basketball games, and it is obvious that it can also be used for other games.

I claim:

1. A game device including in combination:

a game board defining a field of play as used in a game involving the advancement of an object on the field of play,

means positioned on said game board to record thereon the results of plays,

a multiplicity of punched playing cards each having a mark thereon representing the position at which play starts,

a first plurality of said cards being offensive cards each having a plurality of punches therein positioned to represent the position and movement of the object on said game board for a particular play, and

a second plurality of said cards being defensive cards each having a plurality of punches therein positioned to represent the positions of defensive players during a particular play,

the alignment of a punch on a selected defensive card with a punch on a selected offensive card when either said offensive card is in aligned position over said defensive card or said defensive card is in aligned position over said offensive card indicating the result of the play to be recorded on said game board,

the punches in said offensive cards being positioned so that the plays closely simulate plays used in a game involving advancement of an object on the field of play and the punches in said defensive cards being positioned so that the possibility of success of the play is substantially the same as in such game.

2. A game device according to claim 1 wherein at least one of said defensive cards represents a pass play and includes at least one punch forming a passing block and a plurality of adjacent punches forming a pass receiving block, and wherein the number of adjacent punches in said pass receiving block increases with the distance between said passing block and said pass receiving block.

3. A game device according to claim 1 wherein the game device is a game of football, and each of said offensive cards and said defensive cards have marks thereon representing the line of scrimmage with punches back of and forward of such line.

4. A game device according to claim 1 wherein the game device is a game of basketball, and wherein said game board defines a basketball court and each of said offensive cards has a mark at one end thereof representing one end of said court, with punches positioned on said card between said one end and the opposite end.

5. A game device which simulates the game of football including in combination:

a game board defining a football field thereon,

means positioned on said game board to record the results of plays thereon,

a multiplicity of punched playing cards each having a first line representing the point at which play starts, with additional lines ahead of and behind said first line, and a defined area behind said first line,

a first plurality of said cards being offensive cards each having a plurality of punches therein positioned to represent the position and movement of the football on said game board for a particular play, each of said offensive cards having one or more punches in said defined area representing the movement of the football in said area, and

a second plurality of said cards being defensive cards each having a plurality of punches therein positioned to represent the positions of defensive players during a particular play,

the alignment of a punch on a selected defensive card with a punch on a selected offensive card when either said offensive card is in aligned position over said defensive card or said defensive card is in aligned position over said offensive card indicating the result of the play to be recorded on said game board,

said defensive cards having no punches in said defined area which can produce an alignment of punches in such area to cause a termination of the play.

6. A game device according to claim 5 wherein said defensive cards have punches therein limited in number and position such that the plays represented by said offensive cards have substantially the same possibility of success as in an actual football game.

7. A game device according to claim 5 wherein each of said defensive cards has a plurality of zones and the number of punches in said zones is between 50 and 58 in number.

8. A game device according to claim 5 wherein at least one of said offensive cards is a pass play and includes at least one punch forming a passing block and a plurality of adjacent punches forming a pass receiving block, and wherein said passing block is positioned behind said first line and wherein the number of adjacent punches in said pass receiving block increases in accordance with the distance between said passing block and said pass receiving block.

9. A game device according to claim 8 wherein the number of punches in said passing block, and the number of punches in said pass receiving block depend upon the distance between said passing block and said passing receiving block.

10. A game device according to claim 5 further including an additional punch card forming a kicking grid, and a plurality of additional punch cards forming kick return patterns, and wherein the alignment of said kicking grid card with one of said kick return cards and a defensive card indicates the length of a kick, and the alignment of punches on said kick return card and said defensive card indicates the length of the kick return.

11. A game device according to claim 10 wherein said punch card forming a kicking grid has punches therein used for different kinds of kicks.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US834189 *22 Nov 190423 Oct 1906Franklin W ChadbourneImplements to be used in playing duplicate whist.
US2260467 *18 May 194028 Oct 1941May Alan B LeGame apparatus
US3263999 *26 Aug 19632 Aug 1966Mccoy Howard MCards with selected window patterns and pack distinguishing indicia
US3375007 *27 Apr 196626 Mar 1968Joseph W. MeyerTable top football game
US3492000 *2 Jun 196727 Jan 1970Richard G BoardGame apparatus comprising decks of superposable play selecting cards
US3545758 *30 Aug 19688 Dec 1970Tudor Metal Products CorpStrategy game device
US3547441 *4 Mar 196915 Dec 1970Richard C ThorntonFootball game with superimposed cards
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4249735 *28 Jun 197810 Feb 1981Eric BromleyElectronic simulated football game and method
US4357014 *5 May 19802 Nov 1982Sanders Associates, Inc.Interactive game and control therefor
US4422639 *10 Nov 198027 Dec 1983Mattel, Inc.Electronic football game
US6068259 *7 Oct 199830 May 2000Dolin; Ty DouglasHockey board game
US7862044 *24 Oct 20084 Jan 2011Flying Pig Games, LLCSimulated football game and a deck of cards for playing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/277
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00041
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4D