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Publication numberUS3719507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date6 Mar 1973
Filing date1 Mar 1971
Priority date1 Mar 1971
Publication numberUS 3719507 A, US 3719507A, US-A-3719507, US3719507 A, US3719507A
InventorsBardeau W
Original AssigneeBardeau W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooking appliance
US 3719507 A
Abstract
This invention relates to a cooking appliance in which a cover section having a lower heat-conductive grilling surface overlies a base section presenting an upper heat-conductive grilling surface, the opposed surfaces being contoured such that they are adapted to mate in overlying relation to define an upper internal cavity for the reception of an article of food to be cooked draining downwardly peripherally through a narrow passage formation into a lower surrounding channel formation open to the atmosphere.
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United States Patent 91 Bardeau COOKING APPLIANCE [76] Inventor: William M. Bardeau, 44 Princess Margaret Blvd., Islington, Ontario, Canada [22] Filed: March 1, 1971 [21] Appl.No.: 119,646

[52] US. Cl. ..99/375, 99/425, 99/446, 99/448 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47j 37/06 [58] Field of Search ..99/372, 374, 375, 384, 422, 99/425, 444, 445, 446

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1929 .laeger ..99/375 1,839,112 12/1931 Mills ..99/375 1,875,482 9/1932 Nanna... ..99/372 1,950,385 3/1934 Butch ....99/375 X 2,719,903 Oertli ..99/372 X 51 March 6, 1973 3,121,385 2/1964 Funke et a1 ..99/374 FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS 725,665 1/1954 Great Britain ..99/375 215,002 11/1956 Australia ..99/375 Primary ExaminerBilly J. Wilhite Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore Attorney-Weldon F. Green [57] ABSTRACT This invention relates to a cooking appliance in which a cover section having a lower heat-conductive grilling surface overlies a base section presenting an upper heat-conductive grilling surface, the opposed surfaces being contoured such that they are adapted to mate in overlying relation to define an upper internal cavity for the reception of an article of food to be cooked draining downwardly peripherally through a narrow passage formation into a lower surrounding channel formation open to the atmosphere.

12 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHAR' 51975 3719597 sum 10F 4 WILLIAM M. BARDEAU Agent I N VEN TOR.

PATENTEDNAR ems SHEET 2 UF 4 INVENTOR. WILLIAM M. BARDEAU Agent PATENTEDHAR e sum 3 OF 4 FIG. '10

- INVENTOR. WlLLlAM M. BARDEAU Aqwlt PATENTEDHAR 81973 SHEET l 0F 4 FIG. 11

INVENTOR. WILLIAM MQBARDEAU BY M Agent COOKING APPuANcn BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to improvements in cooking appliances of the type having a pair of heat-conductive grilling surfaces or platens, one overlying the other, each to be heated to a controlled high temperature and being adapted for application to food items such as hamburger patties, steaks or the like to cook them quickly and evenly from both sides.

It has been observed that with many appliances of the character described, now in use, the cooked food item produced may have charred portions at the edges or on the upper or lower surfaces which spoils the appearance and the taste. Further with many appliances in use substantial amounts of smoke and greasy vapors tend to be generated in the cooking operations, accompanied by splatter and condensation on the surrounding and overhead surfaces.

Then, too, there is a tendency to permit juices and greases to collect on the grilling surfaces or platens which are maintained at high heat increasing the generation of smoke and vapors, splatter and condensation, all of which is unpleasant, unsanitary and inefficient.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore the principal object of this invention to overcome the deficiencies outlined by providing an improved appliance of the character indicated, with which, in the shortest possible time, an operator is capable of consistently turning out tender, savory food items, cooked to the desired degree and having in the case of meats in the form of hamburger patties, steaks and the like an overall browned or caramellized appearance, all without generating any appreciable amount of smoke or greasy vapors and without any substantial splatter.

It is also an important object to provide a cooking appliance of the character indicated, in which juices and greases are continuously drained away from those surfaces at the highest heat and in which all surfaces in contact with the food, juices and greases can be readily exposed for cleaning and scouring.

Still another important object is to provide a highly efficient unit, that is attractive in appearance and easy to operate, and whose essential components may be readily inserted or removed from their supporting structures for repair or replacement.

The principal feature of this invention resides in providing in a cooking appliance, two heat-conductive, separable mating sections adapted to overlie one another and contoured on opposed surfaces to define, in mating relation only, an upper internal food receiving cavity opening downwardly peripherally into a lower drainage channel formation open to the atmosphere through a narrow passage extending between the upper cavity and the lower channel formation.

It will be appreciated that with the structure described a food item to be cooked within the upper internal food receiving cavity will be substantially isolated from the atmosphere and even more so while hot vapors, greases and juices pass downwardly peripherally to the narrow passage formation, the only access opening to the cavity. This arrangement is an important factor in achieving the desired taste and appearance in the cooked food item to be produced.

Moreover, the outer surrounding surfaces of the narrow passage and the channel formation remote from the cavity are at a temperature lower than that within the cavity during the cooking cycle and will have the effect of condensing some of the vapors generated and cooling the juices and greases as therethrough, thereby decreasing the volume of pollutants discharged to the atmosphere.

The channel formation itself serves as a reservoir for the by-products of the cooking cycle and also serves to convey them to a receptacle even more remote from the cavity, if that alternative is desired.

In one embodiment of the invention two separable mating sections are provided in the form of a base presenting an upper heat-conductive platen bounded by a lower channel formation, the surface of the upper platen having a contour such that liquids drain therefrom into the channel formation and a removable cover adapted to mate with the base in overlying relation thereto, the removable cover presenting a lower heat-conductive platen bounded by a depending wall formation, the configuration and extent of the upper platen with its lower channel formation and the lower platen with its depending wall formation respectively, being such, that in overlying mating relation the lower portion of the wall formation registers within but in closely spaced relation to the inner adjacent surface of the lower channel formation, thereby defining an upper internal food receiving cavity located between the upper and lower platens and bounded by the depending wall formation, with the cavity opening downwardly and peripherally to the lower channel formation through the narrow passage defined between the closely spaced lower portion of the depending wall formation and the inner surface of the lower channel formation.

In another embodiment of the invention a portion of the bounding channel formation of the base is replaced by a wall formation upstanding from the base and a corresponding portion of the depending wall formation of the cover is replaced by a bearing surface adapted to bear and seal against the upstanding wall formation when the base and cover are disposed in mating relation. Still another feature of the invention resides in providing a base in which the upper platen has a slight inclination to the horizontal to increase the run-off of greases and juices to the lower channel formation.

Another feature resides in providing a base in which the lower channel formation itself has a slight inclination to the horizontal to increase the flow of condensed vapors, juices and greases away from those portions of the unit at the highest heat and further to provide where desired a discharge port or spout from the lowest point of the inclined channel formation to a remote receptacle, which receptacle may be removable for replacement or for emptying.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Other objects and features will become apparent in the following description of specific embodiments of the invention which is to be read in conjunction with the sheets of drawings in which FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a cooking appliance in form of a dual unit, as it appears from a point above and to the right of the appliance, with the mating secthey pass tions thereof, embodying the invention, shown out of registration to reveal the contours of the opposed surfaces;

FIG. 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the base and cover sections of one pair of the mating sections of FIG. 1 taken along the line 2-2 to FIG. I and with the surrounding supporting structure broken away and with the base and cover arranged in overlying spaced relation;

FIG. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional view showing only one portion of the edges of the base and cover sections of FIG. 2 in mating relation, with the surrounding structure broken away.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a cooking appliance in the form of a dual unit employing a different embodiment of mating sections, again shown out of registration to reveal the contours of their opposed surfaces, and with the upper support structures for the cover sections shown in different attitudes.

FIG. 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the appliance of FIG. 4, with the base and cover sections of each pair of mating sections disposed in overlying relation and taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4 with the surrounding structure broken away.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of still another embodiment of a base section and supporting structure, with the cover section and its support structure removed.

FIG. 7 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the base section of FIG. 6 taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 6 and the vertical cross-sectional view of its cover section in mating relation with the surrounding structure broken away.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view taken from the rear and above of the appliance of FIG. 1 or FIG. 4 and showing only a portion thereof with the rear cover plate of the housing removed to reveal the manner of mounting and supporting the upper housings carrying the upper mating sections or covers.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of still another embodiment of an appliance constructed in accordance with the invention showing the base and cover sections in spaced apart relation to reveal the contours of their opposed surfaces.

FIG. 10 is a vertical cross-sectional view showing the base and cover sections of the appliance of FIG. 9 in mating relation, taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 9 and with the surrounding structure broken away; and

FIG. 11 is a vertical cross-sectional view showing the base and cover sections of the appliance of FIG. 9 in mating relation taken along the line 11-11 of FIG. 9 and with the surrounding structure broken away.

THE DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The appliance 10 illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 8 respectively includes the following: a lower housing 12 preferably having feet or projections 14 at each comer to hold the lower housing above a supporting surface; an upstanding rear housing 16 securely fastened to the lower housing 12; and a pair of identical upper housings 18 each supported for controlled swinging movement over the lower housing 12 and independently of one anotherwithin a frame 20, each frame 20 supported in turn from spring biased hinge formations 22 mounted within the rear housing l6.

Each component for the housings of appliance 10 are made from suitable metal sheeting, deep drawn in a metal forming operation, in a manner well known in this field to form a pan or shell.

The upper sheet metal component or shell 24 of lower housing 12 is formed with a pair of spaced openings therethrough adapted to receive therein and support a pair of base sections 26 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1, with the mating cover sections 28 mounted within corresponding openings in the lower sheet metal components or shells 30 of upper housings 18 and securely anchored therein in a manner so that each may be removed for repair or replacement in the case of any defect.

Each base section 26 and cover section 28 are cast from a suitable metal, preferably aluminum, each casting including a suitable coiled resistance element 30, 32 respectively, of a wattage sufficient to generate the desired surface temperature of the order of 400 F 20. Suitable circuits are also provided for resistance elements 30, 32 including switches and temperature control devices for connection to electrical outlet all in a manner well-known in this field.

Each base section 26 has a thicker annular body portion 34 and an integral thinner peripheral portion 36 as best seen in FIG. 2 of the drawings. The thicker portion 34 accommodates the embedded resistance coil 30 which must supply the necessary heat of the order of 400 F by conduction to its flat upper surface or platen 38.

Throughout the periphery of base section 26 in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3 a channel formation 40 is formed below the flat upper surface of platen 38 to receive juices, greases or any other liquid that may collect upon platen 38.

The outermost flange or wall portion 42 extends upwardly a uniform distance above the surface of platen 38 and serves to support the cover section 28 as will be explained in paragraphs following.

As illustrated a spout 44 may be cast into the base section 26 to lead from the channel formation 40 to a removable receptacle 46 made from sheet metal and mounted to extend along the front wall of the lower housing 12.

Each cover section 28 likewise is provided with a thicker annular body portion 48 and an integral thin flange 50 as best seen in FIG. 2 of the drawings. The thicker portion 48 accommodates the embedded resistance coil 32 for supplying the necessary heat to the lower flat surface of platen 52 by conduction.

Formed integrally with the cover section 28 is a relatively thin depending wall formation 54 located inwardly of the flange 50 and surrounding the flat lower platen 52 and defining therewith a recess opening downwardly, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3.

Each housing 18 and frame 20 are adapted to support its associated cover section 28 over each base section 26 such that a narrow peripheral passage 58 is defined between the inner adjacent surfaces of the wall 54 and channel formation 40 as best seen in FIG. 3. The narrow peripheral passage 58 leads from the upper internal cavity 60 bounded by the spaced platens 38 and 52 and by the upper part of the surrounding depending wall 54 to the peripheral channel formation 40.

In the embodiment of FIGS. I to 3 inclusive the flange 50 of cover section 28 is provided with downwardly extending spaced projections 56 outwardly of wall 54, such that each will bear against the upper surface of lower wall 42, to limit the entry of the depending wall 54 into the channel formation 46, as illustrated in FIG. 3.

- It will not be necessary to use projections 56 in all models. If it is intended to bring the platens 38 and 52 very close together so that bacon slices for example can be cooked in the cavity 60 then the projections 56 can be omitted and the dimensions of the channel formation 40 and depending wall formation 54 selected such that the narrow peripheral passage 58 is always open at the bottom. Such alternative may be observed in the embodiments illustrated in the remaining Figures.

In the alternative, adjustable stops may be introduced for example by providing tapped openings in the flange 50 of cover section 28 into which suitable threaded posts can be inserted to bear against the upper surface of wall 42, the degree of separation between the base, section 26 and cover section 28 being determined by threading the posts into the openings as desired, all in a manner well known in the field.

In all embodiments preferably a thin coating of suitable material will be applied to the platen surfaces 38 and 52 to prevent food and particles of food from sticking to them. Such material must be resistant to scarring, capable of withstanding temperatures of the order of 600 F and be a non-contaminant. The characteristics of polytetrafluoralethylene (PTFE) are well suited for such application and recommended.

As illustrated in FIG. 8 each spring-biased hinge formation 22 supporting identical-frames housings l8 and associated cover section 28 is adapted to be enclosed within the shell components 62, 64 of rear housing 16, as shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings.

The spaced ends 66a and 66b, 66c, 66d of frames 20 are each connected together by a rigid shaft 68a, 68b respectively.

Shafts 68a, 68b in turn are supported for rotation in spaced bearings 70a, 7% and 701:, Illd respectively, all of which are mounted in alignment within the front shell component 62 and below the upper flange thereof.

The upper flange of front shell 62 is provided centrally with a slot 72 to receive the inner adjacent ends 68b, 680 of frames 20 supported in bearings 70b and 700.

Shafts 68a, 68b are provided with pairs of spaced projections or arms 74a, 76b and 74c, Md respectively, corresponding with the spacing of apertured lugs 78a, 78b and 78c, 78d respectively, the latter being mounted to upstand from the inner surface of the lower flange of front shell component 62.

Extending between each apertured lug and arm are extension spring elements 82a, 82b and 82c, 82d

' respectively.

To the left in FIG. 8 housing w and frame 20 are illustrated with cover section 2% in overlying mating relation with the base section 26, exemplified by the illustration in FIG. 3.

In that disposition extension springs 62a, 62b are in tension, but the springs are so calibrated that the restorative forces are insufficient to raise the cover section 28 out of registration with the base section 26.

To the right in FIG. 3 the housing lb and frame 20 and cover section 2% are upstanding, almost at right angles to the horizontal surface of lower housing 12. In that disposition the springs 82c, 62d are capable of exerting sufficient force to maintain the structure in upright disposition, but will readily yield to permit downward displacement under slight pressure exerted by the operator upon the handle sections 86 of the frames 20.

Operation of the Appliance An appliance of the type exemplified by the drawings shown in FIGS. I to 3 inclusive and FIG. 8 is intended to be used for cooking articles in the following manner.

The operator will set the desired surface temperature of platens 38 and 56 through suitable temperature control devices provided in the unit. The circuits then will be energized through suitable switches connecting them through a source of electricity.

As soon as platens 38 and 50 have reached the desired surface temperature (of the order of 400 F in the cooking of meat articles, for example a small steak) food will be placed upon platen 3b of base section 26 whereupon cover section 28 will be lowered to bring lower platen fill into contact with the upper surface of the food.

There will be a tendency for the operator to apply a slight pressure through handle section 66 as the cover section 26 is lowered into mating relation with the base section 26. Also the weight of housing 16 frame 20 and associated cover section 26 will tend to compress the food.

The projections 56, if included, will prevent undue pressure from being applied to the food.

During the cooking cycle the vapors generated within the cavity 60 will escape downwardly through the peripheral narrow passage formation 58 to the atmosphere. Likewise the juices and greases expelled from the food will gather on the surface of the lower platen, flow to its edges and into narrow passage formation 5% which in turn discharges into channel formation 46.

A piece of meat, for example a 4 ounce steak or hamburger patty, can be cooked in the manner described in approximately 40 seconds and will have a savory taste and an overall browned or caramellized appearance, all of which is most appetizing.

It has been observed that during the cooking cycle there tends to be little discharge of vapors or smoke to the atmosphere and since during such cycle the food article is confined to the internal cavity 60 there is no appreciable splatter.

It will be noted that the thinner peripheral portions 36 of base section 26 and the flange 50 and depending wall formation 54 of cover section 28 are remote from the heat sources, the resistance element 30, 32, and will have a temperature lower than the main body of the sections. To some degree the peripheral portions will be cooled by the surrounding atmosphere.

During the cooking cycle vapors escaping from cavity 60 will contact with the cooler surfaces of the narrow peripheral passage formation 58 and the surfaces of the channel formation 40 will tend to condense and flow along with the juices and greases also passing downwardly into the surrounding channel formation 46.

Moreover, it will be understood that with such structure, food deposited in cavity 60 will be substantially isolated from the atmosphere during the cooking cycle as the expanding hot vapors generated and escaping through the peripheral narrow passage formation 58 blockthe entry.

At the same time there must be adequate venting of cavity 60 so that the by-products of the cooking cycle can be continuously removed which can be achieved by altering the dimensions to increase the width of the passage 58. It has been found that passage widths in the range of between l/32 to 3/32 inch are adequate.

The Embodiment of FIGS. 4 and The appliance 90 embodying the invention illustrated in FIG. 4 differs from appliance of FIGS. 1 to 3 inclusive in the following respects.

Instead of having a pair of separate base sections, the two base sections are combined into one section 92, which presents a pair of spaced upstanding platens 94 and 96'each surrounded on three sides respectively by a narrow channel formation 98 and 100 and on the fourth side by a common channel formation 102, from which a spout formation 104 projects to a removable receptacle 106 extending along the front wall of lower housing 108.

It will also be observed that in place of a circular configuration, the outline, in plan, of the respective parts is rectilinear, with the cover sections 110 each having a central rectilinear lower platen 112 surrounded by a rectilinear wall formation 114 adapted as in the case of the earlier embodiment to register with the lower platen formation 94, 96 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 5.

In FIG. 5 it will be observed that channel formations 98 and 100 are uniformly sloped in the range of between A to 1 inch per foot to the horizontal as indicated by the broken line 99 to drain to central channel formation 102 and from the latter through spout 104 into receptacle 106.

In all other material respects the structure of appliance 90 of FIGS. 4 and 5 corresponds to the appliance 10 of FIGS. 1 to 3 inclusive and FIG. 8.

The Embodiment of FIGS. 6 and 7 seen in FIG. 7 to increase the run-off of juices and greases.

The surface of lower platen 125 of cover section 126 may likewise be given a slight inclination to correspond with the inclination of the surface of platen 124, as shown in FIG. 7, in order that contact between the platen 124 and food will be maintained during the cooking cycle.

Embodiment of FIGS. 9 to l 1 inclusive Still another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 9 to 11 inclusive. As compared with the earlier embodiments the base section 127 is mounted directly on lower housing 128 and is provided with an upstanding rectangular platen 130 surrounded on three sides only by a narrow channel formation 132 and presenting in place of the channel formation along the fourth side an upstanding wall formation 134 of uniform height.

As in the case of the embodiments of FIGS. 4 to 7 inclusive the channel formation 132 is suitably sloped as seen in FIG. 10 to increase the run-off juices and greases to the drain opening or spout 136 into a lower receptacle 138.

Also preferably the surface of platen 130 is uniformly slightly inclined from front to rear to increase the run-off during the cooking cycle.

Cover section 140 is provided with a central lower platen 142 surrounded by a thin depending wall formation 144 on three sides only, corresponding in extent and location to the lower channel formation 132.

As seen in FIG. 10, along the rear periphery of cover section 140 the depending wall formation 144 is omitted with the rear surface 146 of cover section 146 being adapted to register with the forward vertical surface 150 of the upright wall formation 134 when the base and cover sections are disposed in mating relation as depicted'in FIGS. 10 and 11 and so close the cavity 164 along their juncture.

It will be observed in FIG. 9 that housing 152 for the cover section 140 is supported on pivots 154 between the spaced bars 156 and 158 of supporting frame 160.

The pivot axis of the pivot members 154 is selected such that the combined cover section 140 and housing 152 is in substantial balance and will not swing sharply upon movement from a position in overlying registration with base section 127 upwardly or when moved from an upward position downwardly. With such an arrangement the cover section 152 will swing slightly to accommodate itself to any variance in the thickness of the article of food to be placed within the cavity 164 as illustrated in FIG. 11) of the drawings.

It will be understood that in all other respects the structure of the appliance of FIGS. 9 to 11 inclusive corresponds to the structure of appliance of FIGS. 1 to 3 inclusive and FIG. 8 and that when operated in a similar manner will produce similar results.

Moreover, it will be appreciated that the modifications disclosed in the embodiment of FIGS. 9 to 11 inclusive can be incorporated into the earlier embodiments if desired and vice versa.

Further, it will be understood that the several embodiments of the invention described and illustrated are intended to be illustrative only and that the invention is not limited thereto.

What is claimed is:

1. In a cooking appliance, two heat-conductive separable mating sections adapted to overlie one another and contoured on opposed surfaces to define throughout a range of overlying mating substantially parallel positions a substantially enclosed upper internal food receiving cavity opening downwardly through narrow passage means extending peripherally of said cavity into a lower drainage channel formation opening to the atmosphere upwardly peripherally and outwardly of said cavity, characterized in that one mating section includes a base presenting an upper heat-conductive platen bounded at least throughout a portion of its periphery by said lower drainage channel formation of generally U-shaped cross-section, the surface of said upper platen having a contour such that liquid will drain therefrom into said lower U-shaped channel formation, and the other mating section includes a cover presenting a lower heat-conductive platen and bounded throughout a portion of its periphery by a depending wall formation, the configuration and extent of each said upper platen, lower U-shaped channel formation, lower platen and depending wall formation, respectively, being such that the said platens are disposed in spaced apart relation with said lower portion of said wall formation'registered within and in closely spaced relation to the inner surface of said lower U-shaped channel formation next adjacent said upper platen, throughout the range of overlying mating substantially parallel positions to thereby define said narrow passage means and means swingably supporting said cover over said base for controlled movement throughout the aforesaid range of mating positions to an angled position thereabove to separate said mating sections and open up said cavity and reversely.

2. A cooking appliance according to claim 1 in which said mating section including said base and presenting said upper heat-conductive platen is bounded throughout its periphery by a lower channel formation, and said other mating section including a cover presenting a lower heat-conductive platen is bounded throughout its periphery by a depending wall formation, whereby with said means swingably supporting said cover over said base in overlying mating relation throughout said range of positions said upper internal food receiving cavity is bounded by said upper and lower platens and said depending wall formation, with said cavity opening throughout its periphery to said lower drainage channel formation through the narrow passage means'detined by the closely spaced lower portion of said depending wallformation and inner surface of said lower drainage channel formation next adjacent said upper platen.

3; A cooking appliance according to claim ii in which said mating section comprising said base presenting an upper heat-conductive platen is bounded throughout a portion of its periphery by said lower drainage channel formation and throughout the remainder of its periphery by an upstanding wall formation, and said other mating section comprising a cover presenting a lower heat-conductive platen is bounded throughout a portion of its periphery by a depending wall formation and throughout the remainder of its periphery by a bearing surface, the configuration and extend of each said upper platen, lower channel formation, upstanding wall formation, lower platen, and depending wall formation and bearing surface, being such that in said iii overlying mating relation throughout the range of positions, the lower portion of said wall formation is adapted to register within and in closely spaced relation to the inner surface of said channel formation and said bearing surface is adapted to seal against said upstandin wall formation.

%. An appliance according to claim 3 in which the surface of said upper platen presented by said base is inclined slightly to the horizontal.

5. An appliance according to claim 4 in which the surface of said lower platen presented by said cover is inclined slightly to the horizontal and corresponding to the inclination of the surface of said upper platen presented by said base.

6. An appliance according to claim 3) in which said base is provided with a spout formation leading outwardly from said channel formation, whereby said channel formation may be drained.

7. An appliance according to claim 3 in which said base is provided with a spout formation leading from said channel formation outwardly and said channel formation is slightly inclined to drain towards said spout formation.

8. An appliance according to claim 3 in which said base is mounted upon a lower support structure to extend thereabove and said cover is mounted within an upper support structure to extend therebelow, and said means supporting the cover over said base comprises means hingedly connecting said lower and upper support structures together such that said cover may be raised from a position in overlying mating parallel relation throughout said range of positions to said base to a position thereabove and reversely.

9. An appliance according to claim 8 in which said means hingedly connecting said lower and upper support structures together include spring-biased means urging said base and cover out of overlying mating rela tion.

1b. An appliance according to claim 3 in which said base is mounted upon a lower support structure to extend there-above and said cover is mounted upon an upper support structure to extend therebelow, said upper support structure including a housing for said cover, a frame, pivot means extending generally centrally transversely of said housing pivotally mounting said housing to swing within said frame, and means hingedly connecting said frame and said lower support structure together, the axis of said pivot means and said hinge means being parallel and arranged in spaced rela' tion such that said cover may be raised from a position in overlying matin relation throughout said range of positions to said base to a position thereabove and reversely.

ill. An appliance according to claim 3 in which said platens, channel formation and wall formation have generally curvate configuration in plan.

112. An appliance according to claim 3 in which said platens, channel formation and wall formations have a

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WO2012025338A11 Aug 20111 Mar 2012Jiulai ZhangSloping grill grate for grills and ovens, and grills and ovens comprising such a grate for smoke-free grilling
Classifications
U.S. Classification99/375, 99/446, 99/448, 99/425, 219/525
International ClassificationA47J37/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47J37/0611
European ClassificationA47J37/06B