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Publication numberUS3599353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date17 Aug 1971
Filing date6 Aug 1969
Priority date6 Aug 1969
Also published asDE2010965A1, DE2010965B2, DE2010965C3
Publication numberUS 3599353 A, US 3599353A, US-A-3599353, US3599353 A, US3599353A
InventorsMagidson Herbert
Original AssigneeMagidson Herbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe structure
US 3599353 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 172] 1nventor Herbert Man 1450 Carla e, Beverly Hills, Calif. 90218 [21 Appl. No. 847,979 [22] Filed Aug- 6, 1969 [45] Patented Aug. 17, 19 1 [54] SHOE STRUCTURE 6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52} U.S.Cl 36/1l.5, 12/142 [51] Int. CL A431) 3/12, A43d 9/00 [50] Field Search 12/142; 36/1 1.5

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,588,061 3/1952 Vesely 36/1 1.5 2,760,279 8/1956 Jones et a1. 36/115 Priman Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney Spens1ey, Horn and Lubitz ABSTRACT: A shoe comprised of two plastic sole sections and a method of fabricating same. Upper and lower sole sections of injection-molded plastic are formed, the lower sole section having a hollow, ribbed heel. The bottom surface of the upper sole section is ribbed and adapted to receive footholding straps and to cooperatively engage the lower sole sec tion. The top surface of the upper sole section is covered by a plastic-backed fabric, or other appropriate covering, the covering being secured during the molding process. Footholding straps are disposed through openings in the upper sole section and secured to the bottom surface of the upper sole section.

PATENTED Ausw new 3 3593.353

BY M (2? SHOE STRUCTURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to the field of footwear, and more specifically to that class of footwear wherein a sectioned, plastic sole is utilized.

2. Prior Art The continuous changes occurring in styles of wearing apparel has had an obvious and predictable effect on the shoe industry. In a world which has become increasingly style conscious, the shoe industry has had to produce footwear which can be easily coordinated. Since the clothing styles change, the styles of footwear will necessarily follow. Being dependent upon the public as the ultimate consumer has raised the problem of cost effectiveness. The shoe industry has been faced with a problem which it has heretofore been unable to adequately solve. The problem is to produce a shoe of fashionable quality which can be easily adapted to various styles and, most importantly, one which can be soldat a low price.

The present invention shoe structure has solved those problems not solved by the prior art by a novel combination of modern techniques and materials. The present invention shoe structure utilizes two sections of injection-molded plastic to form the sole of the shoe. The internal surfaces of the joined sole sections are ribbed to reduce the weight of the overall structure while simultaneously giving structural strength. The covering of the insole is typically a plastic-backed fabric or like covering material, the covering being secured during the molding of the upper sole section. Foot-holding straps are mounted by inserting openings in the upper sole section and securing the ends to ribs depending from the bottom surface of the upper sole section, the ribs being adapted for such a purpose.

The resulting shoe structure can be made any color by adding conventional plastic coloring agents. In addition, the present invention shoe structure can be fabricated to any desired shape by modifying the shape of the injection mold. The final product is one which can be adapted to the desires of the ultimate user at a low cost to the user.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a shoe which utilizes sole sections of injection-molded plastic.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a shoe structure which is of lightweight construction.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a shoe structure which utilizes portions of sole section to prevent the foot-holding members from becoming disengaged.

It is still yet another object of the present invention to provide a novel method for fabricating a shoe.

The present invention shoe structure utilizes injectionmoldable plastic to form a sole member comprised of two sections. The plastic can be any conventional thermoplastic which can be injection-molded into a member having the flexibility characteristics of rubber or leather, such as thermoplastic 226 commercially available from the Shell Oil Company. The lower sole section has a frontal end shaped to receive a human foot. The opposite end of the lower sole section is a hollow heel portion, the structure being provided with strength by the inclusion of transversely and longitudinally aligned ribbed members. A sidewall extends upwardly from the outer edge of the lower sole section, the sidewall being adaptedto receive the upper sole section.

The upper sole section is an injection-molded thermoplastic. The insole covering is a'pIastic-backed fabric. The insole covering is secured to the insole during the molding process. The insole covering is fitted into the mold, the peripheral edges-extending into the area which is to be filled by the injected plastic. When the plastic is injected into the mold, the plastic will envelop the edge of the insole covering,

securing it to the upper sole section. The bottom surface of the upper sole section comprises several transversely and longitudinally aligned ribbed members, a number of which are adapted to receive the ends of foot-holding straps. The outer edge of the upper sole member is adapted to be joined to the lower sole member.

Straps are inserted through openings disposed in the insole covering and the upper sole section. The straps enclose the top surface of the upper sole section or otherwise act as members for securing the shoe structure'to a human foot. The ends of the straps are secured to rib members on the bottom surface of the upper sole section. The ends can be secured by stapling the end of the strap to a rib member adapted for such a purpose, or by adapting the end of the strap to be held by a protruding rib member.

The novel features which are believed to be characteristic of the invention, both as to its organization and method or operation, together with further objectives and advantages thereof will be better understood from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawing in which a presently preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated by way of example. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawing is for the purpose of illustration and description only, and is not intended as a definition of the limits of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of a shoe made in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the bottom sole section of the present invention shoe structure;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the upper sole section and insole covering made in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of theupper sole section of the present invention shoe structure;

FIG. 5 is a partial sectional view taken through line 5-5 of FIG. 4; and,

FIG. 6 is'a partial, sectional view of an alternative embodiment of the present invention taken through line 6-6 of FIG.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENTLY PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present invention shoe structure can be best understood by reference to FIG. I wherein an embodiment of the present invention shoe structure is illustrated. The present invention shoe structure is generally referenced by the number 10. The specific shoe style illustrated is not a part of the present invention, the style being for the purpose of example and description only. The present invention shoe structure 10 utilizes a sole comprising two sections of injection-molded plastic. The plastic can be any conventional thermoplastic which can be injection-molded, and which upon setting exhibits the flexibility characteristics of rubber, or leather, such as thermoplastic 226 commercially available from the Shell Oil Company. The lower sole section 11 has a frontal end 12 the top and bottom surfaces of which are substantially coplanar and which is shaped to fit the form of a human foot.

The back end of the lower sole section II is a heel portion 13. It would be obvious to one skilled in the art that the heel 13 could be flat thereby providing a sandal structure. The upper sole section 14 is secured to lower sole section 11 by conventional methods and materials used for the joinder of plastic. The insole covering 15 provides a comfortable surface upon which a user can place her foot. The insole. covering 15 is secured to the top surface of the upper sole section 14 during the injection-molding process. The edge of the insole covering is secured by the lip 16 formed during the molding process. Elongated slots 17 or other conventional openings are disposed in the upper sole section I4. Straps 18 are employed to enclose the insole covering 15 or to otherwise provide means to retain the shoe upon the foot. The straps I8 are disposed through the insole covering and the upper sole section 14 and secured to ribs depending from the lower surface thereof. The straps 18 are typically formed of conventional known materials such as fabric or other like materials.

The fabrication of the lower sole section 11 can be best seen by reference to FIG. 2. The frontal end 12 is adapted to fit the shape of a human foot. The top and bottom surfaces 30 of the lower sole section 11 are substantially coplanar, the specific longitudinal contour being dependent upon the style being implemented. The opposite end of the lower sole section 11 is the heel 13. The heel is hollow to reduce the weight of the overall structure. To provide structural strength, transverse and longitudinal ribs 31 are inserted within the volume of the heel 13. The peripheral edge of the lower sole section 11 extends into an upwardly depending sidewall 32. The sidewall 32 encloses the full extent of the lower sole section 11. The embodiment of the lower sole section 11 illustrated in FIG. 2 has a raised aligning member 33 depending upwardly from the inner extent to the sidewall 32. The aligning member 33 will provide means for maintaining the proper alignment of the upper sole section 14 and lower sole section 11 during the operation wherein the two are connected.

The embodiment shown in FIG. 2 illustrates supporting ridges 34 extending transversely inward from the inner surface of the sidewall 32. The supporting ridges 34 are substantially aligned with the elongated slots 17 disposed in the upper sole section 14. When the straps 18 are in place and secured to the bottom surface of the upper sole section 14, the supporting ridges 34 will insure the cooperative engagement of the two sole sections. The selection of the material for the straps 18 are the method of securing same can negate the need for the supporting ridges 34.

Fabrication of the upper sole section 14 can be best understood by referring to FIG. 3, FIG. 4 and FIG. 5. The upper sole section 14 is fabricated from the same injection-moldable thermoplastic discussed with reference to the lower sole section 11. FIG. 3 illustrates the insole covering 15 being cooperatively engaged by the lip 16 of plastic. The insole covering 15 can be conventional fabric, but it is preferably backed with a flexible plastic.

Prior to injecting the plastic into the mold, the insole covering 15 is inserted into the mold, the outer edge 40 of the insole covering 15 extending approximately one thirty-second of an inch into the area that will be permeated with the injected plastic. When the plastic is injected, the lip 16 will form around the edge 40 thereby securing the insole covering 15 to the top surface of the upper sole section 14. The lip 16 will prevent the edge of the insole covering 15 from fraying or otherwise becoming inadvertently disengaged. The extent to which the insole covering is secured by the lip 16 can be best seen by reference to FIG. 5.

When the upper sole section 14 and lower sole section 11 are connected, the lip 16 will transversely extend beyond the outer edge of the lower sole section 11. The extension of the lip 16 improves the appearance of the present invention shoe structure 10 by taking on the appearance of handmade piping. In addition, the extension can be made any color which would aid in the coordination of the present invention shoe structure with any particular style. The coloring is accomplished by the use of conventional plastic coloring agents.

The bottom surface of the upper sole section 14 can be best seen in FIG. 4. The bottom surface has transverse and longitu dinal rib members 51 depending from the substantially flat surface. The separations between the rib members 51' are sufficient to provide structural strength while at'the same time allowing ample flexibility. The heel ribs 50 extend from the surface to an extent necessary to engage the ribs 31 disposed in the heel portion 13 of the lower sole section 11. On the style illustrated, the depth of the heel ribs 50 is greater than that of the rib members 51 because of the size of the heel'portion 13. The remainder of the rib members 51 have a height sufficient to support the frontal end 12 of the lower sole section 11.

Rib members 52 are adapted to receive the ends of the straps 18. The ends of the straps 18 are inserted through the elongated slots 17. As can be seen from FIG. 4 and FIG. 5, rib member 52 is specially adapted to receive the end of the strap 18 by the isolation of the rib member 52 from the remainder of the rib members 51. Slots are opened in the ends of the straps 18 to allow the ends of the straps 18 to be disposed upon and therefore held by the rib members 52. A conventional adhesive is then applied to the joined strap 18 to facilitate permanent attachment of the end of the strap 18. It would be obvious to one with skill in the art that the ends of the straps 18 could be joined to the bottom surface of the upper sole section 11 by other means such as stapling to prevent the strap 18 from being pulled back through the elongated slot 17.

Referring to FIG. 5, to facilitate alignment of the two sole sections when they are being connected, the outer edge of the upper sole section 14 is extended into a depending aligning member 54. The aligning member 54 depends from the bottom surface of the upper sole section 14 forming a recess into which the aligning member 33 on the lower sole section 11 will be engaged. In turn, aligning member 53 will cooperatively engage the outer extent of the top surface of sidewall 32. FIG. 6 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the alignment means. The outer periphery of the rib members 51 and 50 are adapted with a protruding edge 61 thereby forming a receiving area 62 for securing the upper sole section 11. The aligning member 33 on the lower sole section 11 is adapted for mutual engagement with the edge 61 and corresponding receiving area 62. The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6 will permit the upper and lower sole sections 14 and 11 to be securely engaged while they are being connected. This will preclude the need for clamping devices.

The securing of the straps 18 to the upper sole section 14 in the alternative embodiment of the present invention can be best seen in FIG. 6. FIG. 6 is a partial sectional view of the upper sole section 14 with a typical strap 18 being secured in place. The elongated slots 17 are disposed in the insole covering 15 and the body of the upper sole section 14, the length of the elongated slot 17 being substantially aligned with the specially adapted ribbed members 53. Since the straps 18 are to securely hold the present invention shoe structure 10 to a human foot, the material will have a sufficient amount of strength. To compensate for the structural rigidity, the adapted rib member 53 is provided with the inclined surface 55. The angle 61 created by the rib surface 55 relative to the bottom surface of the upper sole section 14 gives the present invention shoe structure 10 a low profile by allowing the straps 18 to be mounted at the proper attitude in relation to the insole surface. The angle will be approximately 45.

The coupling of the upper and lower sole sections 14 and 11 is implemented by utilizing an adhesive which is consistent with the type of thermoplastic being used. The embodiment of the present invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-5 has alignment ridges 33 and 54 to inhibit any shifting of the sole sections 14 and 11 while they are being fastened together. If the embodiment shown in FIG. 6 is utilized, the alignment and coupling of the sole sections 14 and 11 is further simplified.

The resulting shoe structure is one which will fulfill the stated objectives. The use of the injection-moldable thermoplastic provides an economical material which can be easily adapted to fit a variety of applications. The ribbed configuration of the upper and lower sole sections 14 and 11, in combination with the method for securing the insole covering 15 and the straps 18 results in a product which solves those problems which have heretofore been unresolved by the prior art.

Iclaim:

1. A shoe comprising:

a; an upper and lower sole portion made of plastic, said upper portion having a top and bottom surface and at least two openings from said top to said bottom surface thereof, and having ribs depending downwardly from the b. a strap having a first and second end, each of said ends disposed through openings in said upper sole portion, said ends adapted to be received by the bottom surface of said upper sole portion;

. means for coupling said first and second ends of said strap to the bottom surface of said upper sole portion;

. an insole covering secured to said top surface of said upper sole portion; and

means for joining said upper and lower sole portions.

. A shoe comprising:

a first sole portion of plastic substantially adapted to the shape of the human foot having a heel and an upwardly projecting sidewall extending from the peripheral edge of said portion;

b. a second sole portion of plastic having a top and bottom surface, a plurality of elongated slots disposed in said second sole portion from said top to said bottom surface and supporting ribs depending downwardly from said bottom surface, said bottom surface adapted for engaging said sidewall of said first sole portion;

. an insole covering secured to said top surface of said second sole portion, said insole covering having elongated slots disposed therein substantially adjacent those disposed through said second sole portion;

d. a strap having end portions, each being inserted through one of said elongated slots said end portions being adapted to be secured to the bottom surface of said second sole portion;

. means for coupling said end portions of said strap to said bottom surface of said second sole portion; and means for joining said first sole portion to said second sole portion.

. A shoe comprising:

. a first sole section of plastic comprising a substantially coplanar front portion and a raised heel portion, said heel portion being substantially hollow, a sidewall extending upwardly from the peripheral edge of said first sole section;

b. a second sole section of plastic having a top, bottom and side surfaces, said side surfaces defining substantially the same shape as said first sole section, said second sole section having elongated slots disposed through said section from said top to said bottom surface, rib members extending downward from said bottom surface, a portion thereof being adapted to receive a strap;

c. an insole covering secured to said top surface of said second sole section, said insole covering having elongated slots substantially adjacent those disposed through said second sole section;

d. a strap having end portions, each being inserted through one of said elongated slots;

e. means for coupling said ends of said strap to said portion of rib members; and

f. means for joining said first and second sole section.

4. A shoe as in claim 3 wherein said means for coupling said strap ends to said portion of rib member comprises:

a. an obstruction member coupled to the end of said strap, said obstruction member being dimensionally wider than said elongated slots; and,

b. means for securing said obstruction member to said rib member.

. A shoe comprising:

a. a first sole section of plastic comprising a substantially coplanarfront portion and a raised heel portion, said portion being substantially hollow, a sidewall extending upwardly from the peripheral edge of said first sole section;

b. a second sole section of plastic having a top, bottom, and side surfaces, said side surfaces defining substantially the same shape as said first sole section, said second sole section having elongated slots disposed through said section from said top to sald bottom surface, rib members extending downward from said bottom surface, a portion thereof being adapted to receive a strap end;

c. an insole covering comprising fabric backed with flexible plastic secured to said top surface of said second sole section, said insole covering having elongated slots substantially adjacent those disposed through said second sole section;

d. a strap having end portions, each being inserted through one of said elongated slots, said end portions having openings disposed therein, said end portions being disposed upon and coupled to a rib member adapted for securing said strap; and, v

e. means for joining said first and second sole sections.

6. A shoe as in claims 3 or 4 wherein said sidewall of said first sole section and said bottom surface of said second sole section have mutually engaging means to enable alignment of said sole sections.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2214791 *4 Apr 193817 Sep 1940 Manufacture op shoes
US2308873 *16 Aug 194119 Jan 1943Sebastiano GalloShoe construction
US2588061 *27 Dec 19494 Mar 1952Svit NpShoe having an upper formed of strap members each secured by a flat fastener member
US2760279 *5 Jul 195528 Aug 1956Nu Dell Plastics CorpSandal
US2773317 *13 Jul 195411 Dec 1956Boesen Helle JensArticles of footwear
US3323233 *6 Jul 19646 Jun 1967William M SchollArticle of footwear and method of making the same
US3407517 *27 Jul 196729 Oct 1968Harold B. GessnerSling back sandal
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4333247 *6 Dec 19788 Jun 1982Tak Plast CompanyFootwear article and process
US4369537 *12 May 198025 Jan 1983Midgley Noel HMethod of forming a footwear component
US5060400 *31 Oct 199029 Oct 1991Amasia International, Ltd.Open toe/open heel shoe having replaceable inner sole
US5247741 *6 Mar 199228 Sep 1993Suave Shoe CorporationFootwear having a molded sole
US7272897 *28 Mar 200325 Sep 2007Zu Sheng YuSandal having a variety of lacing styles
US7367142 *9 May 20056 May 2008Exo Italia S.R.L.Open shoe, such as a slipper, sandal and the like
US20040064976 *3 Oct 20028 Apr 2004Barteet Dominique M.Inerchangeable shoe ensemble
US20050257399 *28 Mar 200324 Nov 2005Yu Zu SSandal having a variety of lacing styles
US20050262726 *9 May 20051 Dec 2005Exo Italia S.R.L.Open shoe, such as a slipper, sandal and the like
WO1998014082A1 *29 Sep 19979 Apr 1998Perfect Impression Footwear CompanyCustom-fitting footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 12/142.00S
International ClassificationA43B3/10, A43B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/103, A43B9/00
European ClassificationA43B3/10B1A, A43B9/00