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Publication numberUS3566489 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date2 Mar 1971
Filing date29 Jul 1969
Priority date29 Jul 1969
Publication numberUS 3566489 A, US 3566489A, US-A-3566489, US3566489 A, US3566489A
InventorsRobert C Morley
Original AssigneeRobert C Morley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Replaceable spike for shoes
US 3566489 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v March 2, 1971 R. c. MORLEY REPLACEABLE SPIKE FOR SHOES I Filed July 29, 1969 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IFIG.

Filed July 29, 1969 R. c. MORLEY REPLACE ABLE SPIKE FOR SHOES 2 Sheets-Sheet I United States Patent O 3,566,489 REPLACEABLE SPIKE FOR SHOES Robert C. Morley, 55 Chicago Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43222 Continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 767,212,

Oct. 14, 1968. This application July 29, 1969, Ser.

Int. Cl. A43c 15/00 US. C]. 36-67 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An assembly is described for ready replacement of a shoe spike. The assembly comprises a one or two piece anchor extending through the outer sole and having a flange on the outer sole and a replaceable spike member locked into the retainer member by terminal split finger protuberances.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION This is a continuation-in-part of co-pending application Ser. No. 767,212 filed Oct. 14, 1968, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a replaceable spike for shoes. In particular, it relates to replaceable spikes for use on athletic shoes such as golf shoes and the like.

Although there have been a number of replaceable shoe spike constructions described in the past, such constructions generally have one or more disadvantages. Thus, Langer, US. 2,607,134 described a replaceable spike which is diflicult to remove without causing damage to the shoe. Further, its construction is subject to snapping with continued flexing of the sole of the shoe.

Threaded spike constructions have also been described, as for example, in US. Patents 2,895,235; 2,689,417; 2,582,053; 2,578,591; 1,435,872; 1,025,087; 325,194 and 19,205. The spikes of these patents similarly are diflicult to replace or have holders of insuflicient strength.

Other patents dealing with replaceable spikes have been found to be generally costly and complex.

One object of the present invention is to provide a replaceable spike construction which is sturdy, simple and inexpensive.

A further object of this invention is to provide such a construction wherein the spike is easily inserted or removed.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the description and claims which follow taken together with the appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OIF DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a partial section of a shoe showing a two-piece anchor spike construction in place.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of FIG. 1 showing in addition a tool used for removing a spike.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the spike.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the insert member.

FIG. 5 is a partial section of a shoe sole showing a onepiece anchore spike construction in place.

FIG. 6 is an exploded view of FIG. 5.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The invention comprises two cooperating components. One is either a two-piece anchor comprising a retainer member and a receiving chamber having a solid rim engageable with the inner surface of the outer sole and a depending interiorly threaded tubular portion extending through the sole or a one piece version bent over onto a washer.

The retainer member has a tubular portion with exterior threading engageable with the interior threading of the receiving chamber and a rim or flange engageable 3,566,489 Patented Mar. 2, 1971 with the outer surface of the outer sole. The retainer member is characterized as having in the extreme portion of its tubular section a recessed or chamfer portion so that the end of the retainer tubular section adjacent the inner sole has a larger interior diameter than the body of the tubular section.

The second component is a replaceable spike member. This member comprises an exterior spike portion, a median seating flange, and a locking portion terminating in split fingers having protuberances at their ends. The median flange is preferably chamfered to seat in a mating chamfer of the retainer member. The locking portion is pushed through the tubular portion until its split finger protuberances engage the inner chamfered area of the retainer member.

The receiving chamber is forced in from the interior of the shoe. The retainer member is threaded into the receiving chamber by a simple tool engageable with orifices provided in the rim of the retainer member. The replaceable spike member is locked into the retainer member by simple pressure. Removal of the spike member is accomplished by inserting a wedge-like tool between spike member flange and retainer member rim. It is preferable to use a tool which applies wedge action on opposite sides of the flange and rim joint. Such a tool comprises a narrow short wedge end having a slot so as to operate on both sides of the rim-flange joint.

In the one-piece anchor version, there is a tubular member having a flange on the outer surface of the outer sole and having a portion bent over onto a washer on the inner surface of the outer sole.

Although the replaceable spike member of this invention is easily inserted or withdrawn by the use of an appropriate tool, it remains firmly in place during even the most violent flexing of the shoe sole. Further, even if the receiving chamber should loosen and turn because of immersion in water or mud, the spike will nevertheless stay in place.

The components of this invention are relatively simple and inexpensive to fabricate. Further, the strength of the spike is at least equal and in many cases superior to the strength of commercially available spikes for athletic shoes and the like.

SPECIFIC EXAMPLES OF INVENTION Referring now to FIGS. 1-4 of the drawings, the receiving chamber 30 is inserted below the inner sole 32 so that its solid rim 30a engages the inner surface of the outer sole 31 and its depending tubular portion 30b with interior threading 30c extends through the outer sole 31 to its outer surface.

The retainer member 11 has an annular rim 11a adapted to abut the outer surface of the outer sole 31. Retainer member 11 has a tubular portion 15 which is open at the bottom and has an upper chamfer recess 17 and a lower chamfer 19. The retainer member 11 with its exterior threading 11b is adapted to be threaded into the tubular section 30b. Orifices 21 are provided so that an appropriate tool may be inserted to assist in threading the retainer member 11 tightly into place. When retainer member 11 is tightly in place, the rim 11a abuts the outer sole 31 and the tubular section 15 abuts the solid rim 30a.

The replaceable spike member 10 comprises an exterior spike portion 10a, a median seating flange 20 with a chamfer 22 and a locking portion 14 terminating in a pair of split fingers 12 having terminal protuberances 16 and 24. The replaceable spike member 10 is adapted to have its elongated locking portion 14 extend through the tubular section of the retaining member until the protuberances 16 and 24 are seated in the recess 17. The member 10 is so proportioned that the median flange 20 will seat with its chamfer 22 against chamfer 19 when the protuberances 3 are locked into the recess. The diameter of the base of the locking portion is such as to give a fairly close fit in the tubular portion of the retainer member.

Insertion of the replaceable spike member is done by simple direct pressure. Removal is accomplished by applying wedge pressure between the rim 11a of the re: tainer member and the flange of the replaceable spike member. A preferred tool is illustrated having a narrow wedge end split by a notch 41 so that both sides of the wedge 42 will fit around the base of the elongated locking member 14.

In the one-piece anchor construction illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, the anchor member 111 comprises an outer flange portion 111d, a tubular portion 111c having an inner recess 111b with an extension 111a bent over the Washer 130 onto the inner surface of an outer sole 131 below an inner sole 132. There are thus two cavities in the anchor 111, namely a narrow entering cavity 111 and a wider seating cavity 111e. Thus, when replaceable spike member is pushed into the cavities 111 and 111e, its split fingers 112 permit the protuberances 116 and 124 of the locking portion 114 to pass through cavity 111 and then lock into cavity 111e. The protuberance 120 seats tightly against the flange 111d.

I claim:

1. In combination:

(a) an anchor comprising a rim adapted to engage the inner surface of a shoe sole and a tubular portion adapted to extend through such sole and terminate in an annular rim abutting the outer surface of the shoe sole; said tubular portion being open at the bottom and having a recess in its upper inner portion; and

(b) a replaceable spike member comprising an exterior spike portion, a median seating flange adapted to abut said annular rim and an elongated locking portion adapted to extend through said tubular portion and having longitudinal split fingers with terminal protuberances adapted to be seated in said recess.

2. Claim 1 wherein said anchor comprises in cooperable combination:

(a) a receiving chamber having a tubular portion adapted to extend through such sole and having interior threading; and

(b) a retainer member comprising a tubular portion open at the bottom and having exterior threading adapted to engage the interior threading of said receiving chamber; the upper inner portion of said tubular portion having the recess.

3. Claim 1 wherein said annular rim and spike member flange have registerable chamfers.

4. Claim 1 wherein said annular rim has an orifice for engagement by a tool.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,506,801 5/1950 MacNeill 36-59 2,607,134 8/1952 Langer 3659 3,267,593 8/1966 Turner 36-59 OTHER REFERENCES American Shoemaking, Apr. 22, 1925, p. 21.

PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/00, A43C15/161, A43D100/14
European ClassificationA43D100/14, A43C15/16A, A43C15/00