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Publication numberUS3307844 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date7 Mar 1967
Filing date21 May 1964
Priority date21 May 1964
Publication numberUS 3307844 A, US 3307844A, US-A-3307844, US3307844 A, US3307844A
InventorsHarold L Stults
Original AssigneeHarold L Stults
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interfolding facial tissues
US 3307844 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. L. STULTS INTERFOLDING FACIAL TISSUES March 7, 1967 Filed May 21, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. HAROLD L STULTS March 7, 1967 H. STULTS INTERFOLDING FACIAL TISSUES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 21, 1964 INVENTOR. HAROLD L. STULTS ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,307,844 INTERFOLDING FACIAL TISSUES Harold L. Stults, 37 Hillside Ave, Short Hills, NJ. 07078 Filed May 21, 1964, Ser. No. 369,066 Claims. (Cl. 270-40) This invention relates to the production of disposable paper tissues of the type commonly used as disposable paper handkerchiefs, but frequently referred to as facial tissues or cleansing tissues. The present invention is directed toward producing packages of such tissues which are interfolded each with the next so that when the top one is drawn from the stack it carries with it the leading edge of the next tissue beneath it in the stack.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved method and mechanism for interfolding tissues in the above manner. A further object is to provide for interfolding such tissues in such a way as to permit great leeway in the packaging and use. A further object is to provide a stack of tissues which may be packaged in a box or carton in such a way that one or several of the tissues may be removed without disturbing the general condition of those remove-d or of those remaining in the stack.

It is desirable to package tissues of the above type in such a way as to permit removal and use for many different purposes and under many different circumstances. Packages of more or less standard size have been adopted in the trade, such packages being in the form of a rectangular paperboard box or carton containing a stack of folded tissues. Generally, the tissues are two-ply and are inter-folded in such a way that the length of each folded tissue is its original dimension in that direction, and its width is approximately one-half its original dimension in the other direction. The tissue may be folded along the center so that there are two folds, or it may be folded twice, with a central portion of approximately one-half the width of the issue and two side or edged folds each of which is substantially one-fourth the width of the tissue. In some packages, the tissues are interconnected one with another by releasable connections so that the trailing end of one tissue pulls the leading end of the next tissue from the box but then tears away. The present invention relates to issues which are not interconnected, but are interfolded so that the trailing edge of each issue drags the next tissue up, as explained above.

In recent years there have been great strides in improving the rate of operation and the efficiency of converting equipment for folding and packaging tissue products and the like. It is an object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatus for the interfolding of tissues to produce packages of the above character with high speed packaging equipment. These and other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out below.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an isometric view of a package of facial tissues produced in accordance with thepresent invention; 1

FIGURE 2 is a schematic representation of the mode of interfolding facial tissues in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 3 is a somewhat schematic representation of a portion of the equipment for producing a rope of interfolding tissues in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a schematic representation of the interfolding operation; and,

FIGURES 5 and 6 are schematic representations of arrangements for mounting the tissue rolls and bringing the tissue webs together in interfolded condition.

Referring to FIGURE 1 in the drawings, a package 2 3,307,844 Patented Mar. 7, 1967 of the disposable tissues has a paperboard carton 4 with an opening 6 in its top wall, thus exposing the top tissue of a stack of 8 of interfolded tissues. As will be explained more fully below, the top tissue in the stack may be grasped and withdrawn through opening 6, and as it passes through the opening it drags with it the top fold of the next tissue beneath it in the stack. Thus, the tissues are dispensed, one at a time because of the interfolded relationship beween them. Furthermore, any number of the tissues may be withdrawn by reaching through the opening and grasping a portion ofthe stock.

The interfolded relationship between the tissues in stack 8 is best understood by referring to FIGURE 4 wherein a portion of stack 8 is represented somewhat schematically. The portion of stack 8 shown in FIG- URE 4 is formed by odd numbered tissues 11, 13, 15, and 17 and even numbered tissues 12, 14, and 16. Each of the odd numbered tissues has its right-hand edge folded downwardly and inwardly to form afold 20, and its left-hand edge is folded upwardly and inwardly to form a fold 22, leaving a center portion portion 24. Each of the folds 20 and 22 is substantially one-half the width of the center portion 24. Each of the even numbered tissues has its left-hand edge folded downwardly and inwardly to form a fold 26, and its right-hand edge is folded upwardly and inwardly to form a fold 28, thus leaving a center portion which is substantially twice the width of the two-edge folds, the same as with the odd numbered tissues.

In the production of stack 8 the tissues are formed from webs having the width of the finished tissues. The webs are passed through folding mechanisms which produce the folds and assemble the folded webs into a continuous tissue rope. At the end of the tissue rope, the number of tissues corresponds to that in the complete stack 8 of FIGURE 1, although stack 8 may be assembled from two or more smaller stacks. The tissue rope is then cut into predetermined lengths corresponding to the length of stack 8.

In forming the tissue rope to form stack 8 of FIGURE 4, the center lines of all of the tissues are in alignment and the bottom folds 20 and 26 are of the same width as the top folds 22 and 28. However, the widths of these top and bottom folds may be exactly one-half the width of the center folds 24 and 30, or they maybe substantially less in relative width. As indicated above, when the top tissue 17 is engaged at its top fold 22 and is drawn upwardly, its trailing edge fold carries with it the top told 28 of the next adjacent tiessue 16. Likewise, when the top fold 28 of tissue 16 is drawn upwardly the tissue car ries with it the top fold 26 of the next adjacent tissue 15; and, the tissues are drawn upwardly in series, one at a time. Also, two or more tissues may be grasped and removed together without disturbing the folded condition.

The interfolding of the tissues of stack 8 is obtained (see the top of FIGURE 4) by first folding the left-hand edge of the web of tissue 12 downwardly to form the bottom fold .26, and that web is then placed upon the web of tissue 11. The left-hand edge of the web of tissue 1:1 is then folded over the left-hand edge of the web of tissue 12 to form fold 22; and, the right-hand edge of the web of tissue 13 is folded downwardly, and that web is placed on the web of tissue 12. The right-hand edge of the web of tissue 12 is then folded over the right-hand edge of the web of tissue 13 to form the top fold 28. The steps are continued as tissues 14, 15 and 16 and 17 are added to the stack with the web of each odd numbered tissue being folded the same as the webs of tissues 11 and 13 and with the webs of the even numbered tissues being folded thesarne as the web of tissue 12.

Illustratively, the actual folding and stacking of the webs of the tissues is performed in the manner represented in FIGURE .2, wherein the webs of paper are brought together serially and with the center lines in alignment, thus to form a tissue rope 40 which is cut into predeter- ."nined lengths to form the individual stacks 8. In FIG- URE 2 each web is represented as moving downwardly and around a pressure roll 42, which compresses the top of the tissue rope and it also causes the web to change direction from vertical to horizontal movement. At the trailing side of each roll there is a folding plate or pan which performs the folding of the top fold of the next previous web. Hence, starting from the right-hand portion of FIGURE 2 the bottom web 44 is shown with its right-hand edge being folded upwardly over the downwardly folded edge of the next web 46. The next web 48 is then placed upon web 46 and the top fold of. web 44, after which the left-hand edge of web 46 is folded Jver web 48; and, the operation is repeated for the additional webs.

FIGURES and 6 represent schematically two arrangernents for forming the bottom folds 20 and 26. Referring to FIGURE 5, rolls 5t) and 52 are mounted in alignment upon horizontal axes, and the webs 54 and 56 move horizontally to the right. Web 56 has its edge folded upwardly to form what is to be the bottom fold 26 upon the left-hand edge of one of the even numbered tissues of FIGURE 4. The web then passes around a roll 58 and moves downwardly to the roll 42 which is positioned at the top of the tissue rope. Similarly, web 54 has its right-hand edge folded upwardly to form the fold 20 which is to be the bottom fold upon the right-hand edge of one of the odd numbered tissues of FIGURE 4. In FIGURE 6, a pair of rolls 60 and 62 are mounted upon horizontal axes, and the webs 64 and 66 are drawn downwardly therefrom. The edge folding on each web to form the bottom folds 2t) and 26 is performed as the webs 64 and 66 move downwardly toward the respective rolls 42.

Referring now to FIGURE 3, a folding plate '73 is represented somewhat schematically, and is shown folding the left-hand edge of the web upwardly. The web is drawn around the folding plate and the fold is held against the top of the plate by a spring-pressed member 72. Hence, as the web is drawn from right to left in FIGURE 3, the left-hand edge is folded in a continuous manner. As represented in FIGURE 2 each of the rollers 42 presses downwardly upon the top of the rope so as to hold the webs in tight interfolded relationship and the webs are creased along the respective folds. The rope is carried on a belt conveyor and is pulled from the end. Preferably, the rope is built up into the number'oftissues desired for a stack 8 for a package 2,, as that of FIG- URE 1. The rope is then cut and the stacks are packaged automatically into the cartons 4. The stack of FIG- URE 4 may be packed in carton 4 either in the position shown, or it may be inverted. When it is in the position shown, the fold 22 is on top so that the fold 28 of the next tissue 16 is drawn up by the double folded trailing edge of tissue 17. Hence, the tissue is grasped by an edge fold and the trailing edge is relatively firm so that it picks up the edge 28. However, when the stack is inverted, fold 20 is grasped and the trailing edge of the tissue. is formed by fold 22 which extends around the.

double thickness at fold 26 of the next tissue 12. With this arrangement, the leading edge is of double thickness and has greater rigidity than the single thickness of fold 2 2. Hence, the stack 8 is adaptable to various types of dispensers, such as carton 4. In carton 4 the opening 6 1s illustrated as substantially circular so that the tissue encounters resistance as it is drawn outwardly. In that way the trailing end or edge of the tissue tends to cling ;o the interfolded trailing tissue but the interfold is re- .eased when the leading edge of the trailing tissue emerges irom opening 6.

As indicated above, the interfolded relationship is represented schematically in the drawings with the folds 2t) and 22 being shown less than one-quarter the width of the tissue. It has also been pointed out that folds 20 and 22 will normally be substantially one-quarter the width of the tissue but that this folding arrangement permits great leeway in the relative widths of these side folds. Also, the method and apparatus of the present invention permit high-speed operation and a relatively short distance between each web and the next at the point where they join the rope. The invention contemplates that all of the webs in the rope are in exact alignment although some misalignment can be tolerated without impairment of the operation or of the quality of the product.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the apparatus of the above invention and as the art herein described might be varied in various parts, all without departing from the scope of the invention, it is to be understood that all matter hereinabove set forth, or shown in the accompanying drawings, is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of forming stacks of interfolded disposable paper tissues of the type identified as facial tissues comprising, the steps of, unwinding a plurality of Webs of the paper tissue having the width desired as one dimension of the tissues, said webs corresponding in number to the number of tissues desired in the stacks and the webs being identified below in a numerical series starting with the web from which the end tissue in the stack is formed, folding the first web toward one of its faces away from its other face to form a first side fold portion which is substantially one-quarter of the width of the web and which is positioned against the adjacent portion of said one face, folding said second web toward one of its faces and away from the other of its faces to form a first side fold portion which is substantially one-quarter of the width of the web and which is positioned against said one face of the second web, moving said webs longitudinally thereof along paths which bring them together with their center lines being substantially together and with said first side fold portions being opposite each other with respect to said center lines, and with said first side fold portion and said one face of the second web being positioned against said other face of the first web, whereby the unfolded side edge portion of each web extends away from the center lines of the webs beyond the folded edge of the other web, folding the third web in the above-described manner of folding said first web to produce a first side fold portion of the third web corresponding to said first side fold portion of the first web and positioned similarly with respect to the same side edge and face of the third web, moving the third web longitudinally thereof along a path which brings it against the second web with its center line in alignment with the center lines of the first and second webs and with said first side fold portion of the third web being in alignment with said first side edge portion of the first web and positioned against said other side of the second web, folding said unfolded side portion of the second web around said first side fold portion of the third web and against the re- .spective other side of the third web, continuing the folding and assemblying of successive webs in the numerical series with each even-numbered web being interfolded with the next adjacent odd-numbered webs in the manner identical with the second web and with the odd-numbered webs being interfolded with the next adjacent even numbered webs in the manner identical with the first and third webs, thereby to produce a continuous rope of interfolded webs, and cutting the rope into successive lengths. to produce the desired stacks.

2. A method as described in claim 1 wherein each web is passed beneath a roll as it is moved into contact with the next lower numbered web.

3. A method as described in claim 2 wherein the first web is positioned upon a moving conveyor which carries the rope at the rate of movement of the web and each ad ditional web is added to the rope along the path of the conveyor.

4. A method as described in claim 2 wherein the first fold on each web is produced while the web is passed in a horizontal direction and the web is folded upwardly.

5. A method as described in claim 3 wherein the first in a vertical direction downwardly.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Blosser et a1. 270-89 X Reynolds 27 0-41 X Teall 270-40 Moore 270-40 Presnell et a1. 27040 EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner.

fold on each web is produced while the web is passed 10 JEROME SCHNALL, Examine"- N. M. ELLISON, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1992179 *1 Nov 193226 Feb 1935Veldown Company IncNapkin folding machine
US2512874 *6 Jul 194427 Jun 1950Reynolds Julian LCoated electrical condenser
US2642279 *21 Feb 195016 Jun 1953Douglas CrutchleyWeb interfolding apparatus and method
US3122361 *10 Aug 196225 Feb 1964Kimberly Clark CoMethod and apparatus for folding sheet material
US3199861 *10 Apr 196110 Aug 1965Scott Paper CoApparatus for folding web material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4146569 *13 Jul 197727 Mar 1979Giuseppe GiammarcoProcess for removing gaseous impurities from a gaseous mixture containing the same
US5642835 *15 Dec 19951 Jul 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanySheet products for use in a pop-up dispenser and method for forming
US5868276 *14 May 19979 Feb 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Folded sheet material web and assembly and method and apparatus therefore
US5891008 *15 Dec 19956 Apr 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanySheet products for use in a pop-up dispenser and method for forming from stretched ribbons
US5992682 *11 Sep 199830 Nov 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Method for forming a sheet material web and assembly
US623832825 Oct 199929 May 2001Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Folding device
US6565500 *8 Aug 200020 May 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for batch production of stacks of folded sheets
US6599228 *3 Dec 200229 Jul 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyDevice for batch production of folded sheets
US674002128 Dec 200125 May 2004Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc.Device and method for longitudinally folding a stack of webs
US674908312 May 200315 Jun 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Stack of fan folded material and combinations thereof
US690574831 May 200114 Jun 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Stack of fan folded material and combinations thereof
US700836427 Sep 20027 Mar 2006C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Sheet folding apparatus and method
US7081080 *30 May 200225 Jul 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Stack of fan folded material and combinations thereof
US77584862 Feb 200620 Jul 2010C.G. Bretting Manufacturing CompanySheet folding apparatus and method
EP1670705A2 *6 Oct 200421 Jun 2006Specialty Systems Advanced Machinery, Inc.Folded roll product and method and apparatus for making and using the same
WO2003057609A1 *25 Jun 200217 Jul 2003Kimberly Clark CoDevice and method for longitudinally folding a stack of webs
WO2007073244A1 *19 Dec 200528 Jun 2007Kling RobertDispenser for and method of manufacturing a bundle of interfolded towels and bundle of towels manufactured by the method
Classifications
U.S. Classification270/40
International ClassificationB65H45/22, B65H45/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65H45/24, B65H2701/1924, A47K2010/428
European ClassificationB65H45/24
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
24 Mar 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: GEORGIA-PACIFIC CORPORATION, ATLANTA, GA. 30348,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HUDSON PULP & PAPER CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003842/0699
Effective date: 19810112