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Publication numberUS3262134 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date26 Jul 1966
Filing date2 Nov 1964
Priority date2 Nov 1964
Publication numberUS 3262134 A, US 3262134A, US-A-3262134, US3262134 A, US3262134A
InventorsBramble Jr Oliver C
Original AssigneeBramble Jr Oliver C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mat
US 3262134 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1956 o. c. BRAMBLE, JR 3,262,134

MAT

Filed Nov. 2, 1964 Fi e/ZZZ? United States Patent Filed Nov. 2, 1964, Ser. No. 408,042 15 Claims. (Cl. 344) This invention relates to a mat and more particularly to an improved construction for a mat which is suitable for use either on a gymnasium floor or in the field in conjunction with sports wherein the participants fall from a substantial height onto a mat, such as, in high jumping.

Gym mats are customarily made of a canvas cover stuffed with cotton or other such similar material and tufted in order to retain the shape of the mat. The conventional mats are not Well suited for use in a gymnasium in conjunction with certain sports, such as, high jump. In the high jump, participants jump, roll over a bar, and fall to the mat in a relatively awkward position. There is a history of many injuries especially broken arms and damaged elbows of high jumpers who land on a conventional gym mat. In order to provide an improved gym mat construction, the applicant has found that by using an open cell foam rubber cushion inside a cover which cushion has a thickness of six inches or greater, the number of injuries is reduced to a point where the number of injuries is nil. The subject mat has been used in grammar school and high school athletic programs where most injuries occur with high jumpers because of their limited experience in high jumping. In the course of testing this mat, there were no injuries which resulted in fractured bones, The lack of fractured bones in the particular programs in which the mat was tested indicates that the instant mat is greatly superior to the mats which were previously used. It was anticipated that the number of injuries may be reduced; however, it was totally unexpected to find that in the course of the entire testing period, which lasted several months, there were no resulting fractures of bones since the participants all had little or no experience in high jumping. It is therefore a principal object of the present invention to provide an improved gym mat construction which mat may be used on a gymnasium floor and inexperienced high jumpers may land on the mat without appreciable damage to the high jumper.

It is another object of the herein disclosed invention to provide an improved gym mat construction wherein the gym mat may be utilized on a gymnasium floor and it may be easily and conveniently stored and handled by simply and easily dissembling the gym mat.

It is a further object of the instant invention to provide an improved gym mat construction which may be safely used on a gymnasium floor, and it may be also used in the field Where the participants Wear shoes having spikes thereon without damaging the gym mat.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide an improved gym mat construction which gym mat may be easily and economically manufactured, but the mat has a high degree of durability.

Other objects and uses of the herein disclosed invention will become readily apparent to thost skilled in the art upon a perusal of the following specification in light of the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a gym mat embodying the herein disclosed invention;

FIGURE 2 is a partial cross sectional view taken on line 2-2 of FIGURE 1 showing the inner construction of the gym mat shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an end view of a gym mat embodying the herein disclosed invention with a landing surface secured to a cover of the gym mat; and

3,252,l3d Patented July as, was

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of a cushion for use in the subject mat.

Referring now to the drawing, a mat indicated by numeral 10, which mat is an embodiment of the present invention, generally consisting of a pair of identical cushions 12 each covered by a shield 14 and encased in a cover 16.

Each of the cushions 12 has a rectangular outer periphery in which the length is twice the width, so that when the cushions are laid side by side with the long edges in abutment, the cushions define a mat which is, substantially square. Each of the cushions in this instance has a thickness of six inches to provide sufiicient thickness of the cushion to prevent the mat from bottoming out. Each cushion is made of an open cell foam copolymer, specifically the copolymer in this instance is polyureathene having a density of 1.6 pounds per cubic foot. Although the density of 1.6 pounds per cubic foot is the preferred density, the density of the copolymer may range between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot. The polyureathene foam is compressible to 25 percent of its original thickness upon loading under the American Society of Testing Materials, test number D 1564- 63T. It should be noted that in addition to a polyureathene, a polyester foam may be used as well as any other suitable resilient foam rubber which meets the requirements of compressibility set forth herein.

As was mentioned above, each of the cushions 12 is covered with a shield 14 to protect the cushion during handling. The shield in this instance is of 10 ounce woven nylon fabric; however, the nylon fabrics between 10 and 16 ounces may be used. In addition to nylon, 21 number eight or heavier duck material may also be used. Each of the shields 14 has a plurality of grommets 18 positioned thereon along the long edges or sides 20 of the cushion. These grommets provide openings which act as vents for the cushion; so that when the cushion is compressed, air may be expelled from the shield, and of course, when a compressive force is released from the cushion, air may be drawn back into the shield, so that the resilience of the cushion is dependent entirely upon the cushion material since the air is not trapped within the shield.

The cover 16 is made of a material identical to the material of the shields. The cover has a square outer periphery and a thickness which is sufficiently great to receive the cushions. On one side of the cover, there is an opening of a sufficient size to receive the two cushions. An elongated zipper 22 is mounted in the cover at the opening to provide a convenient means for closing the opening to retain the cushions within the cover.

In FIGURES 1 and 2, the mat I0 is shown with four elongated latex strips 24 bonded to the bottom of the cover with a suitable bonding agent such as an epoxy resin. It is readily apparent that the latex strips could be sewn onto the cover instead of being cemented to the cover. These latex strips provide a friction means for the mat which is engageable with a gymnasium floor to prevent the mat from readily sliding on a gymnasium fioor.

Looking now to FIGURE 3, a mat 40 is shown therein which mat is adapted for use in the field Where athletes wear track shoes with spikes. The mat 40 is identical in construction to mat 10, but the latex strips are not attached to the bottom of the cover. Instead, a landing surface 42 is bonded to the upper surface of the cover. The landing surface is a layer of matted fibers bonded to each other in a thickness of one quarter of an inch. In this instance, the fibers are made of a copolymer, specifically, polypropylene. The layer of matted fibers provides a surface upon which the spikes of a track shoe may be received without penetrating the landing surface to damage the cover or the cushions. The fiber layer, in this instance, has a density of 9.66 pounds per cubic foot. It is evident that a layer having a greater density and a greater thickness may be used; however, the specific layer described herein has been found to be effective.

Although the instant description has described two mats, one of which has the friction means mounted on the bottom and the other with a landing surface secured to the top, it is evident that a single mat may be made in which the friction means and the landing surface are secured to the cover, so that the mat may be used either on a gymnasium floor or in the field.

It is apparent that when the mat is used, the cushions 12 are placed in the cover 16, and the mat is then placed on a gymnasium floor adjacent to a high jump bar. When the high jumper comes over the bar, he then lands onto the mat 10. Inasmuch as the cushions are confined Within the cover, they do not spread apart. Should the high jumper land at the position where the cushions abut, he is still protected. The utilization of two cushions in the mat allows the mat to be handled conveniently by removing one of the cushions from the cover for handling and storing the mat. The cushions are covered with the shield 14 in order to protect the cushions during handling. Thus, the shield is actually handled, and there is no opportunity for the cushions themselves to be gouged or otherwise damaged.

The improved feature in handling the mat discussed in relation to mat 10 is also applicable to mat 40, inasmuch as the construction is substantially the same with the exception of the difference in the cover construction. It should also be noted that a particular pair of cushions may be converted for use in either a gymnasium or in a field simply by changing the cover. The cushions from one mat may be removed and placed in another cover to make the change simply and conveniently. Inasmuch as the cushions are always used in a cover, the hardest wear is on the cover, so that the expense of replacing a mat is eliminated. It is only necessary to replace the cover rather than the cover and the cushion.

It also should be noted that inasmuch as each of the cushions is a uniform piece of uniform material, the entire surface of the mat has a uniform cushioning effect. In a construction wherein the material of the cushion may change position during usage, it is common for the material to be pushed to the outer edges of the mat thereby the center tends to become flattened out, and decrease substantially the cushioning effect of the mat. The present construction eliminates this change of cushioning effect during the life of the mat.

It is obvious that those skilled in the art may find other and varied uses for the gym mat disclosed herein. They may also make various modifications and improvements without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Although a specific embodiment has been shown and described in detail herein, it is to be expressly understood that the herein disclosed invention is limited only by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions positioned adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, each cushion having a thickness of six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents on the sides thereof to allow air to escape when the cushions are compressed, and a container for holding the cushions together in the horizontal plane.

2. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions positioned adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, each cushion having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents on opposite sides thereof to allow air to escape when the cushion is compressed, a cover having a receiving aperture contained therein for receiving the cushion to hold the cushions together, and friction means mounted on the bottom of the cover to hold the cover and the cushions relative to a supporting surface.

'3. A gym mat comprising a cushion of an open cell resilient foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, said cushion having a thickness of at least six inches, and a cover surrounding said cushion.

4. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and being positioned adjacent to the other cushion in a substantially horizontal plane, each cushion having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material, and a container encasing the cushions and holding the cushions together in a substantially horizontal plane.

5. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of the cushions being identical in size to the other cushion and having a rectangular outer periphery, each of said cushions having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell polyureathene foam having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, and a container for holding the cushions together in a substantially horizontal plane.

6. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery, each of said cushions being adjacent to each other, each of said cushions having a thickness of at least six inches, each of said cushions being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, and a container for holding the cushions together in the horizontal plane.

7. A gy-m mat comprising a pair of rectangular cushions positioned adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, each of said cushions having a thickness of at least siX inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering the entire outer surface of each of said cushions, each of said shields having a plurality of vents to allow the air to escape when the respective cushion is compressed, a cover encasing the cushions for holding the cushions together in the horizontal plane, and a plurality of elongated latex strips secured to the bottom of the cover to provide a means for holding the cover relative to a supporting surface.

8. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions positioned adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, each of said cushions having a thickness of at least six inches, each of said cushions being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering individually each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents on a side to allow air to escape when the cushion is compressed, a container encasing said cushions and holding the cushions together in a substantially horizontal plane, and a layer of fiber bonded together having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the cover to provide a landing surface for said cover; said layer of fibers having a density of approximately 9.66 pounds per cubic foot.

9. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of the cushions having a generally rectangular outline and being positioned adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, each cushion having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering individually each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents on opposite sides thereof to allow air to escape when the re- 5 spective cushion is compressed, a cover encasing the cushions for holding the cushions in the horizonal plane, and a layer of fibers bonded together and having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the cover to provide a landing surface for the cover.

10. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open oell resilient foam rubber material, a container receiving the cushion to hold the cushions together with opposite edges adjacent to each other and holding the cushions in a substantially horizontal plane, friction means mounted on the bottom of the container to prevent the container from sliding relative to a supporting surface, and a layer of fibers bonded together having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch and secured to the upper surface of the container to provide a landing surface therefor.

11. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and being positioned adjacent to the other cushion in a substantially horizontal plane, each of said cushions having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering individually each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents to allow air to escape when the cushion is compressed, a cover encasing the cushions to hold the cushions together in the horizontal plane, a friction means mounted on the bottom surface of the cover to hold the cover relative to a supporting surface, and a layer of fibers bonded together having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the cover to provide a landing surface.

12. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and having a thickness of six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a fabric shield covering each of said cushions, a fabric container receiving the cushions to hold the cushions together adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, a plurality of elongated latex strips fixed to the bottom of the container to prevent slipping of the container relative to a supporting surface, and a layer of fibers bonded together having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the container to provide a landing surface therefor.

13. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell resilient foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering each of said cushions having a plurality of vents on each of a pair of opposed edges to allow air to escape when the cushion is compressed, a container receiving the cushions and holding the cushions adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, a plurality of elongated latex strips secured to the bottom of the container to prevent sliding of the container relative to a supporting surface, and a layer of fibers bonded together and having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the container to provide a landing surface therefor.

14. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions, each of said cushions having a rectangular outer periphery and having a thickness of six inches, each cushion being an open cell polyureathene foam having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a fabric shield cover ing each of said cushions, each of the shields having a plurality of vents in opposite sides defining the edges of the respective cushions, a fabric container receiving the cushions for holding the cushions adjacent to each other with opposite edges in substantial abutment and said cushions being in a substantially horizontal plane, a layer of fibers bonded together and having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the container to provide a landing surface therefor, and a plurality of elongated latex strips secured to the bottom of the container to provide a means for preventing sliding of the container relative to a supporting surface.

15. A gym mat comprising a pair of cushions having a rectangular outer periphery, each of said cushions being positioned adjacent to the other cushion in a substantially horizontal plane, each cushion having a thickness of at least six inches, each cushion being an open cell foam rubber material having a density between 1.5 and 1.85 pounds per cubic foot, a shield covering the entire outer surface of each of said cushions, each of said shields having vents on each of a pair of opposed sides to allow air to escape when the cushion is compressed, a container receiving the cushions holding the cushions adjacent to each other in a substantially horizontal plane, a plurality of latex strips on the bottom of the container for holding the container relative to a supporting surface, and a layer of fibers bonded together and having a thickness of at least one quarter of an inch secured to the upper surface of the container to provide a landing surface, said layer of fibers having a density of approximately 9.66 pounds per cubic foot.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,151,894 8/1915 Meineoke 571 2,298,218 10/1942 Mads-on 5361 2,651,788 9/1 953 Forwood 5352 2,853,399 9/1958 Shoults 5-361 2,962,183 11/1960 Rill et a1. 220-9 3,027,573 4/1962 Bell 5355 3,027,967 4/1962 Silver 5-355 3,070,402 12/1962 Stanton 5345 3,082,768 3/1963 Johns 5355 3,118,153 1/1964 Hood 5361 3,204,259 9/1965 Gordon 5-355 FOREIGN PATENTS 656,809 5/1929 France.

395,923 7/ 1933 Great Britain.

134,698 2/1952 Sweden.

FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner. C. A. N UNBERG, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3369808 *2 Sep 196520 Feb 1968Jerry W. SconceJumper's landing pit
US3892401 *6 Aug 19701 Jul 1975Amf IncJumping pit
US4168061 *11 Nov 197718 Sep 1979Gordon Donald WAthlete's long jump pit
US4245838 *28 Mar 197920 Jan 1981Nissen CorporationPole vaulting landing pit
US4887811 *13 Jan 198919 Dec 1989Tresh Thomas MBaseball slide practice device
US5099530 *25 Oct 199031 Mar 1992Scott Carolyn ACover for exercise pad
US5562573 *15 Jun 19958 Oct 1996Harinishi; AtsushiLanding mat for gymnasts
US5865710 *1 Aug 19962 Feb 1999Wilson-Hyde; CynthiaStep aerobic platform
US675181617 Apr 200322 Jun 2004Barbara WechslerExercise mat ensemble and method of use
US6951035 *26 Nov 20024 Oct 2005Kinchen Darlene LProtective cushion
US778543726 Jan 200731 Aug 2010L&P Property Management CompanyAnti-microbial carpet underlay and method of making
US7819778 *12 Feb 200726 Oct 2010Everlast Climbing Industries, Inc.Safety mat securement assembly
US787534331 Oct 200725 Jan 2011L & P Property Management Companycoating a pad and forming a laminated film; contains foam particles bonded together by a binder including zinc pyrithione; linear low density polyethylene homo- or copolymer
US20120124740 *22 Nov 201124 May 2012Kerstin CastleMat
DE202008006453U1 *16 Jan 200813 Nov 2008Kybun AgFitness- und Therapiematte zum Stehen und Gehen
WO2002029180A1 *26 Sep 200111 Apr 2002Peter Anthony BellImpact-absorbing unit
WO2005110295A1 *18 May 200524 Nov 2005Guy HamaekersPad for back or neck correction and method of using same
WO2005113919A1 *16 May 20051 Dec 2005Peter BellAn impact-absorbing unit
WO2008087594A1 *16 Jan 200824 Jul 2008Kybun AgFitness and therapy mat for standing and walking
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/420, 482/23
International ClassificationA63B6/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B6/00
European ClassificationA63B6/00