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Publication numberUS3091042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date28 May 1963
Filing date4 Apr 1960
Priority date4 Apr 1960
Publication numberUS 3091042 A, US 3091042A, US-A-3091042, US3091042 A, US3091042A
InventorsFrancis M Gilkerson
Original AssigneeFrancis M Gilkerson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Form fitting shoe structure
US 3091042 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 28, 1963 F. M. GlLKERsoN 3,091,042

FORM FITTING SHOE STRUCTURE Filed April 4. 1960 Z @gli ze /NV'E NTOIQ: FRANC/5 M. G/LKE R50/4,

19T-ro RNEYS gLMZ Patented May 28, 1963' 3,991,042 FORM FETTING SHQE STRUCTURE Francis M. GiLzerson, Box 405, Chesteriield, Mo. Filed Apr. 4, 1960, Ser, No. 19,764 4 Qlaims. (Cl. .3G-2.5)

The present invention relates generally to the shoe art, and more particularly to a novel shoe structure incorporating a novel insole structure produced under known production methods.

-It has long been desirable to provide a stock shoe by present production methods for the general trade, which is effectively form iitting as to the insole, yet has the external appearance of the accepted shoe of today. It has been desirable to provide a shoe including an insole having a substantial support for the longitudinal arch and formed generally to keep the entire foot in a balanced position to prevent the foot from slipping sideways or longitudinally in the shoe. It is also desirable that the provision thereof not interfere with present day conventional mass production methods, styling, or fitting of shoes. There has long existed the need for a shoe which properly positions the normal foot of a wearer, which can be purchased at the usual retail outlets, and which has the external appearance and style, as desired, of current shoes. Special orthopedic shoes can be purchased and various inserts are available, but a `shoe providing proper positioning of the foot and maximum comfort for the run-of-the-mill purchaser is not available as a stock item in the retail stores today.

Therefore, an object of the present invention is to provide a novel shoe construction which fuliills the long felt need as set forth in the foregoing paragraph.

In brief, the present novel shoe construction includes a premolded insole formed, for example, of a suitable cork and rubber compound, or the like, which is contoured to provide a substantial support and natural fit for the longitudinal arch and to keep the entire foot in a balanced position, yet the interior over-all measurements of the finished shoe product are substantially the same as that of a comparable shoe using a conventional insole. The outside measurements, appearance, and styling of the shoe are not changed. In making the shoe with the insole thus contoured, a mod-ined last is provided. A conventional last is feathered or reduced around the circumference or border of the sole, and the central area thereof is filled so that a convex, transverse cross section is achieved. Lasts of such predetermined modified bottom form'may be provided by the last maker. Insoles are cast in molds made from the modified lasts, said insoles, in' general, being concave in the forepart and heel areas and arched intermediate thereof to support the longitudinal arch of the foot.

Another object is to provide a novel shoe structure in a stock shoe which includes an insole that will prevent the foot from slipping laterally or longitudinally in the Wear thereof, and which has 'a cross section `area. substantially equd to that of a comparable conventional insole.

Another object is to provide a novel cast insole for a stock shoe which is form fitting for the bottom of a normal foot, which will not lump under the toes of the wearer, thereby `decreasing wear on the outer sole, and which substantially `eliminates running over to the inside or to the outside of the foot.

Another object is to provide a novel shoe structure, which properly positions the foot of a wearer in a stock shoe, yet offers no interference to the usual methods of making or styling shoes in the mass production methods of today.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages are apparent from the following description taken with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE l is a side elevational view of a conventional last;

FIGURE Z is a view similar to FIGURE 1, showing the conventional last after modiiication in accordance with the present novel method of making a for-m iitting precast insole;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged bottom plan View of the last of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal, vertical, cross-sectional view taken on the line 4--4 of FIGURE 3, the upper part of the last being broken away for conservation of space;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse, vertical, cross-sectional view taken on substantially the line 5 5 of FIGURE 3, the upper portion of the last being broken away for conservation of space;

FIGURE 6 is a ybottom plan view of a novel insole structure incorporating the teachings of the present invention;

FIGURE 7 is a top plan View thereof;

FIGURE 8 is a longitudinal, vertical, cross-sectional View taken on substantially the lined-8 of FIGURE 7;

FIGURES 9, l0, and l1 are transverse, ventical, crosssectional views taken on substantially the lines 9 9, 1li-lll, and 11--11 of FIGURE 7; and

FIGURE l2 is an enlarged, transverse, vertical, crosssectional view through the forepart or vamp of a shoe incorporating the present novel cast insole.

Referring to the drawing more particularly by reference numerals, 18 indicates a conventional shoe last, while 2d indicates generally a modiiied shoe last made in accordance with the principles of the present invention. VComparing the modiiied shoe last 201 with the conventional shoe last 1S, the former is beveled or feathered at Z2 around the entire perimeter of the bottom or sole, as is clear from FIGURES 2-5. In a size 7 last for mens shoe, for example, the bevel 22 is substantially 5%32 in `depth yat the outer edge andV feathers inwardly for a distance of substantially s/z". In the longitudinal arch area, the bevel depth is substantidly twice as great, o-r /l, and the inward featherng is correspondingly The island area defined by the inner circumference of the bevel 22 is deeper or thicker than the cornparable area of the shoe last 1S, being substantially 1/16" thicker in the center area, feathering outwardly into the bevel 22 to form a smooth continuous last bottom, as is clearly illustrated in the drawing. Last makers provide these modiiied lasts 2S to specifications.

A mold is lmade from each modified shoe last Ztl by any desired method in which cast insoles 26 are made.

A cast insole 26 for a size 7 mens shoe is generally of the configuration shown in FIGURES l6-,1'1 Vof the Y drawing. lt will be observed that the novel molded insole 26 includes a raised longitudinal arch portion 27S, a depressed heel cavity 30, and a generally concave portion 32 for Vthe forepart of the foot. The rmarginal edge or periphery 33 of the cast insole 26 slopes inwardly, so that the bottom 3S of the cast insole 26 has substantially the `same peripheral measurement or bottom outline as a standard fiat leather insole. Hence, there is no distortion outwardly of the shoe upper.

In FIGURE `12, the novel cast insole l25 is illustrated as part of a shoe 34. The shoe 34 includes the cast insole 26 disposed within a vamp 36 and vamp lining 3S and above an outsole 40 which is glued to the inturned edges of the vamp 36 (upper) in the usual fashion of shoemaking. A small amount of filler material 4Z may be disposed at each side of the present insole 26.

It is manifest that any process of shoemaking may be employed in applying the sole 40, such as the Goodyear welt, stitchdown, McKay, and the like. A unique feature of the present invention is the fact that its use requires no change in any of the modern ymethods of shoemaking. The castinsole 26 is merely substituted Afor a conventional insole and modified lasts replace conventional lasts 18.

In FIGURE l2, it is clear that the overall closed path made by following the vamp lining 38 and the upper surface of the cast insole 26 on a transverse vertical section is substantially the same as a similar continuous path formed by following the vamp lining 38 and the upper surface of a regular flat insole 44 indicated by dotted or broken lines. The novel cast insole 26 extends above the stock flat insole 44 at the sides thereof and below it intermediate the sides. In other words, the normally unoccupied space at the juncture of the insole and upper in a normal shoe is utilized by the present novel cast insole 26 in properly positioning a foot. This fact and the further factor of forming the cast insole 26 centrally of a thickness less than that of the conventional insole 44 avoids an overtight or snug iit, and the requirement of an over-all deeper shoe, which the public .always has resisted purchasing` This is another significant feature of the present novel shoe structure.

It is manifest that the raised longitudinal portion 28 of the cast insole 26 eifects a substantial support for the longitudinal arch of the foot. Additionally, the heel cup andthe concave foreportion of the cast insole 26 provides comfortable reception for the affected portions of the foot in a manner to prevent slipping `or sliding of the foot backwardly and forwardly or -sideways in the shoe 34.

There is no lumping of the insole under the toes, and rolling sideways of the foot to overturn or overrun the shoe either to the inside or to the outside is prevented.

It is to be understood that speciiic dimensions of bevel and feathering will vary with the shoe size, or type. The

Vmarginal edge lof the cast insole 26 may be varied to satisfy different methods of manufacture, as an integral portion may be provided for stitching.

Basically, the cast insole 26 is formed with the upper surface contoured for the foot and to the particular last, and the bottom Vsurface substantially flat and of a periphery substantially equal to the periphery of the bottom of a conventional leather insole.

It is manifest that there has been provided a novel shoe structure. The objects and advantages sought therefor are achieved thereby.

It is to be understood that the foregoing description and the accompanying drawings have been given by way of illustration and example. It is also to be understood that changes in form -of the several parts, substitution of equivalent elements, and rearrangement of parts, which will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art, are contemplated as within ythe scope of the present invention, which is limited only by the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

l1. A shoe comprising an upper, an outsole, and a full insole, said upper, Voutsole and insolev being permanently secured together, said insole being contoured on :its upper surface to substantially conform to a normal foot of appropriate size, and on its lower surface to complement the upper surface of the outsole, margins of the upper surface of the insole being substantially greater than the margins of the lower surface of the insole, the upper surface of the insole extending beyond the lower surface of the insole at a maximum in the region of the shank under the center of the longitudinal arch of the -foot and tapering to minimums at the `toe and Aheel ends of the insole, marginal'portions of the insole being thicker than a comparable ordinary insole and the central portions being thinner, whereby the total volumey ofthe insole is substantially equal to that of a comparable ordinary insole and the total volume of the shoe is substantially equal to that of la comparable ordinary shoe. p

2. A shoe comprising an upper, an outsole, and a full insole, said upper, outsole and insole being permanently secured together, said insole being contoured on its upper surface to substantially conform to a normal foot of appropriate size, and on its lower surface to complement the upper surface of the outsole, margins of the upper surface of the insole being substantially greater than the margins of the lower surface of the insole, the upper surface of the insole extending beyond the lower surface of the insole at a maximum in the region of the shank under the center of the longitudinal arch of the foot and tapering to minimums at the toe and heel ends of the insole, marginal portions of the insole being thicker than a comparable ordinary insole and the central portions being thinner,

whereby the tot-al volume of the insole is substantially equal to that of a compara-ble ordinary insole.

3. A shoe comprising an upper, an insole and an outsole, said upper, outsole and insole being permanently secured together, said insole being contoured on its upper surface to substantially conform to the foot of an average wearer,

the periphery of said upper surface being greater than the periphery of said bottom surface, said insole having a volume substantially equal to that of 1an equivalent ordinary insole of substantially uniform thickness.

4. A shoe comprising an upper, an insole and an outsole, said upper, outsole and insole being permanently secured together, -said insole being contoured on its upper surface vto substantially conform to the footof an yaverage wearer,

' the periphery of said upper surface being greater than the periphery of said bottom surf-ace, said insole having a volume substantially equal to that of an equivalent ordinary insole of substantially uniform thickness, the cubic capacity of said shoe adapted to receive a foot being substantially that of a shoe with an ordinary insole of substantially uniform thickness.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,255,892 Krippendorf Feb. 12, 1918 `1,479,899 De Ridder Jan. 8, 1924 1,518,840 De Ridder Dec. 9, 1924 '1,959,876 Rich May 22, 1934 `2,427,986 Whitman Sept. 23, 1947 2,838,776 Tax June 17, 1958 2,924,849 Buchman Feb. 16, 1960 3,068,872 Brody' Dec. 18, 1962 FOREIGN PATENTS V1,171,054 France Sept. 29, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1255892 *8 Jun 191612 Feb 1918United Shoe Machinery AbProcess of making shoes.
US1479899 *20 Jan 19238 Jan 1924Ridder Oliver E DeMethod of making shoes
US1518840 *20 Feb 19229 Dec 1924Ridder Oliver E DeMethod of making shoes and an innersole used in such method
US1959876 *26 Sep 193222 May 1934Rich George GerryMethod of making sanitary innersoles
US2427986 *27 Feb 194623 Sep 1947Goodrich Co B FCorrective insole
US2838776 *3 Dec 195417 Jun 1958Tax Herman RMethod of making an orthopedic shoe
US2924849 *16 Aug 195616 Feb 1960Buchman HenryTray for making a corrective footmolded appliance
US3068872 *11 Aug 195918 Dec 1962Elliot Brody AlecFoot supporting device
FR1171054A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3416245 *27 Jul 196717 Dec 1968Frank Noone Shoe Co IncContoured insole
US3601908 *15 May 196931 Aug 1971Francis M GilkersonMolded insole
US3766669 *4 Jan 197123 Oct 1973Usm CorpProfiled cellular article
US3875689 *8 May 19748 Apr 1975Juan Frau S ASole for a shoe
US4003146 *13 Feb 197518 Jan 1977Ernst MeierMethod of manufacture of a shoe
US4454662 *10 Feb 198219 Jun 1984Stubblefield Jerry DAthletic shoe sole
US5203096 *3 Dec 199020 Apr 1993Rosen Henri EInsole assemblies for shoe girth adjustment
US5714098 *20 Dec 19953 Feb 1998Nike, Inc.Footwear fitting method
US5879725 *9 Sep 19979 Mar 1999Nike, Inc.Footwear fitting system
US746147026 Oct 20059 Dec 2008The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system and method with interchangeable cartridges
US768133326 Oct 200523 Mar 2010The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system with interchangeable cartridges
US77620087 Sep 200627 Jul 2010The Timberland CompanyExtreme service footwear
US20060107552 *26 Oct 200525 May 2006The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system with interchangeable cartridges
US20060107553 *26 Oct 200525 May 2006The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system and method with interchangeable cartridges
US20100180474 *7 Sep 200622 Jul 2010The Timberland CompanyExtreme service footwear
WO1983002715A1 *10 Feb 198318 Aug 1983Stubblefield, Jerry, D.Athletic shoe sole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/93, 36/91, 36/154, 36/43
International ClassificationA43B13/38
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/38, A43B7/141
European ClassificationA43B7/14A10, A43B13/38