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Publication numberUS2925719 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date23 Feb 1960
Filing date21 Aug 1958
Priority date21 Aug 1958
Publication numberUS 2925719 A, US 2925719A, US-A-2925719, US2925719 A, US2925719A
InventorsLinn Clifford A, Robbins Albert A
Original AssigneeKwik Kold Of America Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating package
US 2925719 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1960 A. A. ROBBINS ETAL 2,925,719

REFRIGERATING PACKAGE Filed Aug. 21, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 1960 A. A. ROBBINS ET AL 2,925,719

REFRIGERATING PACKAGE Filed Aug. 21, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 23, 1960 A. A. RQBBINS HAL 2,925,719

REFRIGERATING PACKAGE Filed Aug. 21, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 VENTOR. kemrflngaswvs United States Patent G REFRIGERATING PACKAGE Albert A. Robbins, West Covina, Calif., and Clifford A. Linn, Las Vegas, Nev., assignors to Kwik-Kold of America, Inc., Las Vegas, Nev., a corporation of Nevada Application August 21, 1958, Serial No. 756,398

4 Claims. (Cl. 62-4) ulated so as to rupture the water-containing envelope.

The dry chemical then mixes with the water so as to produce an endothermic chemical reaction that reduces the temperature of the resulting solution. A refrigerating package of this nature is covered by my co-pending patent application Serial No. 582,748, filed May 4, 1956, now Patent No. 2,907,173, issued October 6, 1959.

While such refrigerating packages have proved to be generally satisfactory, some difliculty has been experienced in readily rupturing the inner envelope when the package is to be activated. Although the inner envelope has a lower bursting resistance than the outer envelope, the bursting resistance of the inner envelope must be sufficiently high that it will not undergo inadvertent rupture during handling and transportation of the refrigerating package.

It is a major object of the present invention to provide an improved refrigerating package of the aforedescribed nature wherein the inner envelope may be readily ruptured when the bag is to be activated, yet this inner envelope has sufficient bursting strength that it will not be inadvertently ruptured during normal handling and transportation of the package.

A more particular object of the invention is to provide a refrigerating package having a sealed outer envelope wherein is disposed a sealed, water-containing inner envelope and a quantity of dry freezing chemical, with the interior of the outer envelope being partially evacuated of air so as to permit the inner envelope to be readily ruptured by the application of an inwardlydirected force upon the outer envelope.

A further object of the invention is to provide a refrigerating package of the aforedescribed nature wherein a quantity of coloring dye is added to the refrigerating chemical when the outer envelope is filled. In this regard, the commercially available refrigerating chemical is generally a dirty brown color. Accordingly, when the refrigerating package is activated, the resulting solution is likewise a dirty brown color. By the intro duction of a coloring dye to the refrigerating chemical, the solution obtained when the package is activated will have a pleasing appearance.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for forming a refrigerating package of the aforedescribed nature.

Yet another object of the present invention is to pro- "ice vide novel apparatus for forming a refrigerating package of the aforedescribed nature.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the appended drawings wherein:

Figure l is a perspective view of a preferred form of refrigerating package embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the outer envelope of said refrigerating package before such envelope is filled;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the inner envelope of said refrigerating package before saidenvelope, is filled; I

Figure 4 is a side elevational view showing a preferred form of apparatus embodying the present invention, said apparatus being utilized to form said refrigerating package; i

Figure 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken on line 55 of Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5, but showing the parts thereof disposed in a second position;

Figure 7 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken on line 7-7 of Figure 4;

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, but showing the parts thereof disposed in a second position;

Figure 9 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 99 of Figure 1;

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 9 but showing how said refrigerating package is activated;

Figure 11 is a perspective view showing said refrigerating package as it undergoes activation;

Figure 12 is a perspective'view showing the manner in which air may be manually manipulated from the outer envelope of saidrefrigerating package;

Figure. 13 is a side elevational view taken partly in vertical section showing how the outer envelope of Figure 12 may be sealed; 1 Y

Figure 14 is a top plan view of a second form of apparatus embodying the present invention, said apparatus being employed to form said refrigerating package;

Figure 15 is an enlarged perspective view showing an airdevacuating member of the apparatus of Figure 14; an

Figure 16 is a perspective view showing a modification of the apparatus of Figures 14 and 15.

Referring to the drawings, the preferred form of refrigerating package P embodying the present invention includes an outer envelope 20 formed of a suitable, flexible, fluid-tight sheet plastic material, an inner envelope 22 formed of the same material, a quantity of dry refrigerating chemical 24, such as ammonium nitrate, and a quantity of water or other hydrous chemical 26 disposed within the inner envelope 22. The refrigerating package P normally appears as shown in Figures 1 and 9. When this package is to be activated, an inward squeezing force is manually applied thereto as indicated in Figure 10 so as to eifect the rupture of the inner bag 22. Upon such rupturing of the inner bag 22, the water 26 originally contained therein will mix with the dry chemical 24 so as to result in a solution having a much lower temperature than the original temperature of the package P.

Referring now particularly to Figures 1 through 8, there is shown a preferred form of apparatus for forming the aforedescribed refrigerating package P. Preferably, the inner and outer envelopes 20 and 22 will be formed from an extruded tube of transparent sheet plastic material. While polyethylene has proved satisfactory, other synthetic plastics may be employed, as, for ex- 3 ample, vinyl or acetate. It is important to note that the bursting strength of the inner envelope should be less than that of the outer envelope. This may. be readily accomplished by forming the inner envelope of a thinner sheet of plastic material thanthat from whichthebuter envelope is formed. Alternately, theinner envelope may be formed with one or more weakened areas. As shown in Figures 2 and 3, the extruded tube material is first cut to the proper length for forming the inner and outer envelopes. Next, the lower ends of these lengths are sealed as by a conventional'heat sealer. Next, the opentopped inner and outer envelopes 20 and 22 are trans ferred to the apparatus shown in Figures 4 through 8.

Referring to Figure 4, this apparatus includes a first conveyer belt member34and a second conveyer belt member 36 disposed adjacentthe'exit end of the first couveyer belt 34, withthe'conveyer'belt member 34 receiving the open-topped, inner. envelopes 22 and transferring them to'the entrance sidefo'f the second conveyer belt member 36. Each open-topped inner "envelope 22 is filled with water by means of a suitablemetering device 37 positioned adjacent the entrance side of the first conveyer belt member 34. The conveyer belt than transfers the Water-filled inner envelope 22 to a suitable sealer device, generally designated 38, which serves to seal the upper end of the water-filled inner envelope '22. The conveyer belt member 34 then dumps the water-filled and sealed inner envelope 22 into an open-topped outer envelope 20 disposed at the entrance side of the second conveyer belt member 36. The second conveyer belt member 36 then transfers the inner and outer envelopes to a second station where the outer envelope is filled with the desired quantity of refrigerating chemical 24 from a suitable, conventional chemical metering hopper 40. Additionally, a small quantity of a water-soluble coloring dye 42 is introduced to the interior of the outer envelope by means ofa suitable conventional, liquid metering device 44. Next, the conveyer belt member 36 transfers the package to a suitable air evacuator and sealer member, generally designated 46. This latter member 46 partially evacuates the outer envelope 20 of the air originally contained the'rein, and then heat seals its upper end. Thereafter, the completed refrigerating package P is moved off the conveyer belt member 36 into a suitable receptacle 48.

Referring now to Figures 7 and 8, thereare shown details of the sealerdevice 38 utilized to seal the upper end of the water-filled inner envelope 22. This device 38 includes a pair of crank arms 50 and 52 which are supported at their midportions by a pair of horizontal pivotpins 54 and 56, respectively. These pivot pins are mounted upon a suitable framework (not shown). The upper ends of the arms 50 and 52 are provided with complementaiy electric heating and pressing bars 58 and 60, respectively. These bars 58 and 60 are supported on suitable mounting blocks 62 and 64, respectively. Preferably, a pair of resilient closure blocks 66 and 68 will be mounted below the mounting blocks 62 and 64, respectively.

I With continued reference to these Figures 7 and 8, the upper ends of the arms 50 and 52 will initially be spacedapart as a water-filled inner bag 22 is moved therebetween. Next, the arms 50 and 52 are pivoted inwardly towards one another by a suitable mechanism (not shown) to the position indicated in Figure 8. At this time, the resilient blocks 66 and 68 will effectively close the upper portion of the inner envelope 22 while concurrently heat and pressure is applied to the upper edge ofth e bag by the bars 58 and 60. This'heat will cause the plastic to fuse along the upper edges of the sides of the envelope 22. In this manner, the upper end of theinner envelope 22 will be effectively sealed, the resilient blocks 66 'and'68 preventing any water from splashing intothe sealed area. The arms 50 and 52 will then be caused to move apart to their original position of Figure 7 in order that the conveyer belt member 34 may dump the water-filled and sealed inner envelope 22 onto the entrance side of the second conveyer belt member 36.

Referring now to Figures 5 and 6, there are shown the details of the air evacuator and sealer member 46. This member includes a pair of crank arms 70 and 72. The midportion of these crank arms are supported by horizontal pivot pins 74 and 76, respectively. These pivot pins are in turn mounted upon a suitable framework (not shown). The upper portion of each of the arms 70 and 72 are rigidly afiixed to pads 78 and 80. The latter are formed of an easily deformed, resilient material, such as foam rubber, secured to a bracket element 82 and 84, respectively, with the latter being aflixed to the upper portion of the arms 70 and 72, as by rivets 86. The up per ends of the brackets 82and 84am in turn aflixed to a' pair of back-up blocks 88 and 90, respectively. These back-up blocks 88 and 90mm apair of complementary electric heating and pressing bars 92 and 94, respectively.

In the operation of the air evacuating and sealer member 46, the arms 70 and 72 are initially spaced apart in their dotted outline position of Figure 5 while an outer envelope 20 is moved therebetween. Next, these arms 70 and 72 are pivoted inwardly towards one another as shown in dotted outline in Figure 5 by a'suitable mechanism (not shown). This inward movement continues until the arms 70 and 72 and their associated parts reach the position shown in Figure '6. Referring particularly to Figure 5, it will be observed that the lower portions of the sponge rubber pads 78 and are of greater width than the upper portions thereof. Accordingly,.the lower portions of the pads 78 and 80 will engage the intermediate portion of the outer bag 20, and as the arms continue to move inwardly, the point of contact of these pads with the outer surfaces of the envelope will progressively move upwardly. In this manner the pads 78 and 80 will effectively evacuate the major portion of the air originally contained withinthe upper portion of the outer envelope 20. This step is indicated by the directional arrows in Figure 5. When the arms 70 and 72 have reached their innermost position of Figure 6, the heat sealing bars 92 and 94 will be activated so as to seal the upper end of the outer bag 20. The arms 70 and 72 will then be retracted to their original position and the air evacuator and sealer member 46 will be in readiness to receive the next outer envelope to be sealed.

Referring now to Figure l2, it should be particularly noted that instead of employing the afore-described air evacuator and sealer member-46 to partially evacuate the upper portion of the unsealed outerenvelope 20 of air, it ispossiblc to effect such evacuation manually in the manner indicated in this figure. 'Thus, as shown in this figure, the oppositesides of the upper portion of the outer envelope may be manuallysqueezed together so as to partially evacuate such upper portion. With the sides of the so-evacuated upper portion of the outer envelope held together, the envelope is then transferred to the sealing apparatus, generally designated 40, shown in Figure 13. Referring to the latter figure, the apparatus includes a horizontal platform 92 which extends rearwardly from the upper end of a vertical indexing wall 94'. A lower wall 96 extends forwardly from the lower end of the indexing wall 94'. A conventional electric heat sealer 98 is pivotally mounted at the rear of the platform 92 This heat sealer 98 includes a heating bar 100.

In the use of the apparatus 90', the outer envelope to be sealed 'is'clisposed against the indexing wall 94' in an upright position with its lower end resting upon the lower wall 96. The pressed-together upper portion of the outer enevelope is then manipulated from its dotted outline position of Figure 13 downwardly until the pressedtogether sides rest upon the upper surface of the platform 92', The heat sealer 98 is then pivot ed downwardly from its dotted outline position in this figure to its solid outline position therein. In-this latter position, the sealing bar 100 will engage the upper edge of the outer envelope 20 so as to fuse the sides of the envelope together. The refrigerating package P will then be ready for use.

Referring now to Figures 14 and 15, there is shown a second form of apparatus embodying the present invention, which apparatus may be employed to form the aforedescribed refrigerating package P. This second form of apparatus includes a horizontally extending conveyor belt 100' arranged to move from the left-hand side of the drawing to the right-hand side thereof respective to Figure 14. The conveyor belt 100 receives the refrigerating package P at such time as the latter has been filled with the water-containing inner envelope 22, the refrigerating chemical 24 and the coloring dye. The upper portion of the outer envelope 20 is then partially evacuated and sealed by the apparatus of Figures 14 and 15 so as to produce a finished package.

With continued reference to Figure 14, the open-topped outer envelopes are deposited on the left-hand portion of the conveyor belt 100' and are moved through a suitable guide member 102 which maintains the outer envelope in an upright position. As the outer envelope confinues to move to the right relative to Figure 14, it will pass between a pair of horizontally extending bands 104 and 106. The bands 104 and 106 are supported by a plurality of pairs of pulleys 108, 110, 112, and 114, with the latterv being supported by a suitable framework (not shown). The bands 104 and 106 abut one another along the center line of the conveyor belt 100 in order that their abutting portions will grasp theupper'portion of the outer envelopes 20 as these envelopes are moved along by the conveyor belt 100. The speeds of the conveyor belt 100 and the bands 104 and 106 should be accordingly properly coordinated.

It should be noted that the vertically extending shafts 116 which support the front pair of rollers 108 are also keyed to a pair of air-evacuating rollers 118 and 120. These air evacuating rollers 118 and 120 are preferably formed of a readily deformed, resilient material such as sponge rubber. The width of the rollers 118 and 120 generally corresponds to the vertical distance between the portion of the outer envelope 20 just above the part that is filled with the refrigerating chemical 24 and the upper edge of the outer envelope. As will be clear by reference to Figure 14, the facing sides of the rollers 118 and 120 are squeezed into a flattened configuration inasmuch as the radius of these rollers exceeds the distance separating the front pair of shafts 116. With this arrangement, and referring particularly to Figure 15, as an outer envelope 20 is moved between the rollers 118 and 120 the latter will serve to progressively partially evacuate the upper portion of the outer envelope.

After the rollers 118 and 120 have partially evacuated the upper portion of an outer envelope, the upper edge thereof will be squeezed between the abutting surfaces of the bands 104 and 106 as the envelope is movedtowards the right in Figure 14. The upper end of the outer envelope is then urged between a pair of electric heat sealing bars 124 and 126. The electric heating bars 124 and 126 may be of conventional construction and serve to fuse the upper edges of the sides of the outer envelope together in a manner similar to that described hereinbefore with regard to the apparatus of Figures 4 through 8 and Figure 13. Preferably, a pair of cooling bars 128 and 130 will be mounted adjacent the heater bars 124 and 126. These cooler bars 128 and 130 may conveniently be formed with passages 132 which are in contact with a cooling fluid such as air. After the upper end of the outer envelope has passed through the cooling bars 128 and 130 the refrigerating package P will be ready for use.

Referring now to Figure 16, there is shown a modification of the apparatus of Figures 14;and 15. in this modification, the aforedescribed air evacuating sponge rubber rollers 118 and are replaced by a pair of'auxiliary bands and 142. The latter aredisposed ahead of the bands 104' and 106' and are of a width corresponding to the width of the sponge rubber rollers 118 and 120. As will be apparent by reference to Figure 16, the bands 140 and 142 will serve to squeeze the upper portions of the outer envelopes so as to force air therefrom through the open top thereof. The remainder of the apparatus may be considered equivalent to the arrangement of Figure 14.

Referring now to Figures 10 and 11, in order to activate the aforedescribed refrigerating package P, it may be grasped between the fingers and thumb of a user and an inwardly-directed force exerted against the external surfaces of the sides of the outer envelope 20. This inwardlydirected force will be directly applied upon the waterfilled inner bag 22 inasmuch as the internal surfaces of the outer envelope abut the external surfaces of the inner envelope 22. As noted hereinabove, the bursting strength of the inner envelope 22 is less than the bursting strength of the outer envelope 20. Hence, the inner envelop will be ruptured and its water will come into contact with the refrigerating chemical 24. It should be particularly noted that the partial evacuation of the outer envelope 2-0 greatly reduces the amount of squeezing force required to rupture the inner envelope 22. Accordingly, it is possible for the inner envelope to have a higher bursting strength than would be the case if such partial evacuation were not effected. In this manner, the likelihood that the inner envelope would be inadvertently ruptured duringhandling or transportation is considerably lessened. Additionally, since less manual pressure is required in order to rupture the inner envelope than where such partial evacuation does not take place, the convenience of using the refrigerating package P is considerably enhanced. This is especially true where the refrigerating package P must be activated at higher altitudes. When the water released from the inner envelope 22 contacts the aforementioned coloring dye the resulting solution will assume a pleasing appearance. In practice, the use of a blue dye has proven to be very satisfactory.

It should be understood that various modifications and changes may be made with regard to the foregoing description without departing from the spirit of the inven tion or the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. A refrigerating package, comprising: a sealed outer envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight sheet material; a refrigerating chemical disposed within said outer envelope; and a sealed water-containing inner envelope disposed within said outer envelope, said inner envelope being of smaller dimensions and having a lower bursting strength than said outer envelope, and the interior of said outer envelope being at least partially evacuated of the air originally contained therein, the water within said inner envelope being normally isolated from said refrigerating chemical with the exterior surfaces of the walls of said inner envelope being directly engageable by the interior surfaces of the walls of said outer envelope whereby an inwardly-directed force applied against said outer envelope will impose a direct mechanical force upon said inner envelope so as to rupture the latter without breaking said outer envelope to thereby effect mixing of the water with said refrigerating chemical.

2. A refrigerating package, comprising: a sealed outer envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight, light-transmitting sheet material; a refrigerating chemical disposed within said outer envelope; a water-soluble coloring dye disposed in said outer envelope; and a sealed water-containing inner envelope disposed within said outer envelope, said inner envelope being of smaller dimension and having a lower bursting strength than said outer envelope, and the interior of said outer envelope being at least partially evacuated of the air originally contained therein, the water within 7 said inner envelope being normally isolated from said refrigerating chemical and said coloring dye with the exterior surfaces of the walls of said inner envelope being directly engageable by the interior surfaces of the walls of said outer envelope whereby an inwardly-directed force applied against said outer envelope will impose a direct mechanical force upon said inner envelope so as .to

rupture the latter without breaking said outer envelope to thereby eifeet mixing of the water with said refrigerating chemical and said coloring dye.

3. A refrigerating package, comprising: a sealed outer envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight, transparent sheet plastic material; a refrigerating chemical disposed within said outer envelope; and a sealed water-containing inner envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight, transparent sheet plastic material disposed in said outer envelope, said inner envelope being of smaller dimensions and having a lower bursting strength than said outer envelope, and the interior of said outer envelope being at least partially evacuated of the air originally contained therein, the water within said inner envelope being normally isolated from said refrigerating chemical, with the exterior surfaces of the walls of said inner envelope being directly engageable by the interior surfaces of the walls of said outer envelope whereby an inwardly-directed force applied against said outer envelope will impose a direct mechanical force upon said inner envelope so as to rupture the latter without breaking said outer envelope to thereby eflect mixing of the water with said refrigerating chemical.

4. A refrigerating package, comprising: a sealed outer envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight, transparent sheet plastic material; a refrigerating chemical disposed within said outer envelope; a water-soluble coloring dye disposed in said outer envelope; and a sealed water-containing inner envelope formed of flexible, fluid-tight, transparent sheet plastic material disposed in said outer envelope, said inner envelope being of smaller dimensions and having a lower bursting strength than said outer envelope, and the interior of said outer envelope being at least partially evacuated of the air originally contained therein,-the water within said inner envelope being normally isolated from said refrigerating chemical, with the exterior surfaces of the walls of said inner envelope being directly engageable by the interior surfaces of the walls of said outer envelope whereby an inwardly-directed force applied against said outer envelope will impose a direct mechanical force upon said inner envelope so as to rupture the latter without breaking said outer envelope to thereby efiect mixing of the water with said refrigerating chemical and said coloring dye.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,581,470

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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/4, 53/239, 206/219, 62/530, 53/434, 53/428, 53/449
International ClassificationF24J1/00, B65D81/32, F25D5/02, F25D5/00, B65B29/00, B65B29/10, C09K5/00, C09K5/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D5/02, B65B29/10, C09K5/066, F24J1/00, B65D81/3272
European ClassificationF25D5/02, B65B29/10, F24J1/00, C09K5/06D, B65D81/32H2