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Publication numberUS2885008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date5 May 1959
Filing date7 Sep 1954
Priority date7 Sep 1954
Publication numberUS 2885008 A, US 2885008A, US-A-2885008, US2885008 A, US2885008A
InventorsHoffer Temple P
Original AssigneeHoffer Temple P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flow directing device
US 2885008 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 5 i959 T. P. HOF-'FER www FLOW DIRECTING DEVICE Filed Sept. 7, 1954 INVENTOR rem /e /2 #Offer ,59H @j #JMIW ATTORNEYS nited States Patent FLOW DIRECTING DEVICE Temple P. Hoier, Dallas, Tex. Application September 7, 1954, Serial No. 454,548

6 Claims. (Cl. 166-186) This invention relates to a new and useful device for directing and separating the flow of uids emanating from separate zones or areas whereby such uids may be Iisolated and separated from each other.

The device contemplates a removable flow separating device to be inserted in a housing therefor so that uid flowing from separate zones or areas into the device may be maintained separate and caused to ow through separate passages to separate points of deposit or storage.

The device illustrated and described herein is primarily intended for use in oil wells having separate zones of production therein, to keep separate and distinct the uids produced from the separate zones and to direct the flow of fluids from the separate zones of production through selected passages as such uids are produced from the well. However, it is to be understood that the inventionv comprehends a removable flow separator device which` may be removably inserted into a housing to separate and direct uids flowing through said device, and is not to be confined to the specific use and embodiment of the invention described herein.

In the petroleum industry, it is frequently desired to change the direction of flow and the points of ow discharge of uid passing through flow conducting devices. This is particularly true in producing oil and/or gas from wells having multiple zones of production.

In such wells, having multiple zones of production, it is desirable that the surface and subsurface equipment be arranged to produce the various zones simultaneously and in such a way as to prevent commingling ofthe fluids from the various zones, in order to comply with the requirements of state regulatory bodies in interest of conservation.

It has been the practice in the past, in completing such wells, to place a tubing-casing packer above the upper zone between the tubing and the casing to seal the annulus between the tubing and casing above such zone, and to place another tubing-casing packer betweer 1` the upper zone and the next lower zone of production in order to separate and isolate the separate zones.

Flow directing equipment is then placed in the tubing string so as to direct the ow of fluid from the lower rice - the How of uid from one of the zones of production in zone through the well tubing to the surface, and at the same time direct the flow of fluid from the upper zone into and through the annular space between the tubing and casing above the upper packer and to the surface.

In wells so completed it very ofter becomes desirable toreverse the paths of ow from the separate zones so as to divert the uid from the lower zone through the tubing-casing annulus above the upper packer and at the same time direct the uid produced from the upper zone of production through the Well tubing. This may come about as a result of the change in productive capacity of the separate zones, or for other reasons. Ordinarily, the stronger zone of production should be produced through the tubing-casing annulus because of the larger area through which the fluid must flow.

Furthermore-it` often becomesnecessary' to-block off order to treat the other zone with acids, to test the .Y

casing and packers for leaks, etc.

In order to carry out the operations outlined above with a minimum of time and expense, it has been the practice to lower into the tubing, by means of a steel measuring line, various flowdirecting tools which are landed in a landing nipple or head connected as a partv of the tubing string.

Equipment presently used to carry out these operations includes a complicated cross-over fitting which is usually made integral with the tubing string. This fitting includes. an intermediate ow passage between the inside and the outside of the tubing bore, which necessitates a largev diameter nipple or head incorporated as a part of the tubing string and run into the well with the tubing. Thisis undesirable because it reduces the annular space between the seating nipple and the casing and interferes with, or often prevents, the passing of tools about thev nipple in fishing or other operations often required 1n reversedin direction through said passages, causing sediment to be deposited therein which eventually stops up the iiow passages.

It is often the case that such restricted and circuitous.

flow passages have become stopped up during acidizing or sand fracturing operations, necessitating a shut-down in the midst of such operation.

Furthermore, in such old devices pressure equalizing devices are incorporated therein which must be actuated by direct application of force by a wire line extending from `the surface in order to disengage retaining means such as shear pins or spring retainers.

4In short, all such devices heretofore used for directing and diverting ow of uids in a well have incorporated a multiplicity of parts and elements, small area flow pas-y a sages and large diameter seating nipples, which restrict the flow of uids therethrough and thereabout, and which are complicated and diflicult to set, operate and retrieve.

A primary object of this invention is to provide a owdirecting device removably insertable in a housing to sep.

arate and direct the ow of iluids originating from separate zones or areas.

Another object of this invention is to provide a removable flow-directing device which may be removably inserted in a housing which is simple, has fewer parts, and provides maximum ow passages therethrough, and eliminates the use of cross-over fittings as a part of the housing in which it is inserted.

A further object of this invention is to provide a owdirecting device in which the outside diameter of the device is reduced to the end that a greater annular area is provided between the casing and the housing in which the device is inserted.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a removable dow-directing device for separating and directing the ow of separate fluids therethrough, which eliminates right angle bends and flow reversals in the ow passages therethrough.

A further object of this invention is to provide a owdirecting device having a simple and positive equalizing vmeans therein which does not require the use. gf surface operated wire line equipment to actuate same.

Still`another object of this invention is to provide a removable ilow-directing device insertable into a landing nipple in a well tubing through which device acidizing or sand fracturing operations may be carried out without the danger ofblocking the passages therethrough, by reason of the factsv that the ilow passages are large in area and there are no right angle bends and flow reversals in said passages.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a dow-directing device which may be removably inserted in alanding nipple incorporated as a part of the tubing which is simple andeasy to set, remove and operate.

Other and further objects of my invention will become apparent upon reading the detailed specification hereinaftervfollowing and byreferring to the drawing annexed hereto.

In the drawing, a suitable embodiment of my invention is shown wherein:

Fig. I is a partially schematic cross-sectional elevational View of a cased well bore extending through two zones of production and having a tubing string extending therethrough, which incorporates a housing with my retrievable flow-directing device removably inserted therein.

Fig. II is a partially sectonalized elevational view showing the retrievable dow-directing device removably inserted in the'housing forming a part of a tubing string in an oil well.

Fig. III is a cross-sectional view taken along the line III- III of Fig. 1I.

Fig. IV `is a cross-sectional view taken along the line IV--IV of Fig. II.

Fig. V is-a crosssectional view taken along the line In' the drawing, numeral references are employed to designate the various parts shown therein, and like numeralsdesignate like parts throughout the various ilgures of the drawing.

The numeral -indicates a well casing extending into a well bore 11 which has been drilled vertically into the earths strata 12, and extending through an upper zone of production 13 and a lower zone of production 14.

VA lower section of well tubing 15 extends into the cas-A ing 10 to a point adjacent the lower zone of production 14, said lower section of tubing 15 having a perforated tail pipe 16 connected to the lower end thereof by means of a coupling 17.

iAtubing-casing packer 18, of standard construction, is

positioned between the lower section of tubing 15 and the casing 10. Such packer 18 seals oil" and separates the zones of production 13 and 14 and prevents communicationtherebetween through the annular space between the casing 10'and the tubing section 15. Such packer 18 forms achamber 19 below the packer 18 which chamber isin communication with the lower zone of production 14` through the perforations 20 provided through the wall of the casing 10, which allows fluid to pass from the lower zone 14 through said perforations 20 into the chamber 19, and 'through the perforated tail pipe 16 into the bore of the section of tubing 15.

An upper tubing-casing packer 21, of standard construct1on, is disposed about the lower section of Vtubing 15,

above the upper zone of production 13, and such packerv '21'seals the annular space between the casing 10 vand tub- 1ng section 15 and prevents the tlow of iluid through the casing annulus from the upper zone 13 upwardly above the packer 21.'

An annular area 22 is formed between the section of tubing V15 and the casing 10, between the packers 18 and 21, and said annular area 22 is in communication with thezone of production 13 through the perforations 23 provided in the casing wall. Fluid is thus allowed to ilow from the zone of production 13 through the perforations 23- into the 4annular area 22, and such iluidris allowed to .-passthroughthe ilow passages 42-provided in the wall of the tubing section 15 and into the passage 43 inside said tubing section, from whence the iluid may flow upwardly through the ilow-directing device 46, and is directed thereby into the casing annulus 3.1, as will be described hereinafter.

The upper section of tubing 24 extends to the earths surface (not shown). The section of tubing 24 is connected to the coupling 26 by means of companion threads 28, and the seating nipple 25 is connected to the opposite end of coupling 26 by means of companion threads 27.

The tubing section 24 and the seating nipple 25 are so positioned in the coupling 26 as to provide an annular recess 29 between the ends of the seating nipple 25 and the tubing section 24. Such recess 29 receives the upper ends of the spring-.urged locking lugs 77 to removably engage the ilow-directing tool 46 in the housing therefor.

A plurality of lateral tlow ports on apertures 30 are provided through the wall of the seating nipple 25, said ilow ports being in communication with the casing annulus 31 above the packer 21.

A iluid by-pass collar 32 is attached to the lower end of the-seating nipple 25 by means of companion threads 33, and the lower end of the iluid by-pass collar 32 is attached to the lower section of tubing 15 by means of companion threads 34.

A tubularthrough-ilow receptacle 37 is concentrically mounted in the by-passcollar 32 by means of a spacer webV 38 which is welded, orotherwise securely attached, tothe outer wall of the receptacle 37 and to the inner wall ofthe by-pass collar 32.

A through-flow pipe 39 is attached to the lower A'end' of the receptacle 37 by means of Icompanion threads-40. A lpacker 41,l of conventional construction, is arranged betweenthe `through-ilow pipe 39 and the lower section of' tubing 15 in order to seal the annular space between said membersto prevent iluid from upper zone 13, which enters the ilow passages 42, yfrom commingling with the iluidproduced from the lower zone 14.

The` how-directing device is indicated generally at 46,j and is removably carried in a housing which is made up of theseating nipple 25 and the by-pass collar 32.

Included as a part of the ilow-directing device 46 is a baille sleeve 50 which has a lateral ilow passage 51 through the wall thereof, which is in communication with the flow ports 30 arranged through the wall of the seating nipple 25.

A packing retaining sleeve 52 is threadedly engaged to the'loweriend of -the baille sleeve 50 by means of companion threads 67. The packing retaining sleeve 52in Acludes an .upwardly extending enlargedv tubular portion 49 which slidably overlaps the baille sleeve 50, and is terminated at its outer end with an enlarged annular head 55;

A downwardly facing packing retaining shoulder 54 is provided about the baille sleeve 50 and suitable resilient packing material 53 is engaged and clamped between the enlarged upper end 55 of the retaining sleeve 52 and the shoulder 54.

The packing material 53 preferably consists of conventional chevron V-type packing rings, as is customarily used in such applications. The packing material 53 provides a seal against the ilow of iluid between the baille sleeve50 and the seating nipple 25.

Coinciding ilow ports 56 and 57 4are provided through the walls of the packing sleeve 52 and the baille sleeve 50, respectively.

A longitudinal baille 58 is provided in the baille sleeve 50. Said baille 58 is composed of a straight vertical portion 59 extending substantially along the central longitudinal 'axis of the baille sleeve 50, and an upper offset angular portion'60 anda lower oilset angular portion 6,1. The baille 58 is welded or otherwise securely` attached at its outer edges to the inner wall of baille sleeve 50. Batlle 58 constitutes la partition which divides the baille sleeve50 into twoseparate longitudinal ilow passages 62 and'63 therethrough.

The How-passage 62 communicates through the,y pipe 39 assesses and lower section of tubing 15 with the lower zone of production 14 and the flow of fluid Ifrom such zone is diverted by the angular portion 60 through the iiow passage 51 Iand iiow ports 30 into the casing annulus 31 through which it may iow to the surface.

The ow passage 63 communicates with the upper zone of production 13 through the chamber 22, passage' 43, by-pass sleeve 32, and the coinciding iow ports 56 and 57. The ow of fluid from said upper zone is directed by the baie 58 upwardly through the tubing string 24 and to the surface.

Thus, the baille S8 separates and isolates the uids produced from the separate zones of production 13 and 14, and causes the iiuids to flow through separate conduits to the surface.

It will be noted that the ow of uids from the separate zones of production is always upward in direction and there are no reversals or right-angular bends in the paths of ow of such uids; and that the passages provided for the liow of such fluids are of such area as to provide maximum passage for the flow of such iluids.

A tubular packing mandrel 68 is threadedly engaged to the lower end of the packing sleeve 52 by means of companion threads 69. A packing engaging shoulder 70 is provided on the lower end of the packing mandrel 68, and a conventional V-type packing element is clamped between the shoulder 70 and the lower end of the packing sleeve 52. The packing 71 seals against the inner wall of the receptacle 37, so as to prevent the flow of uid between the packing mandrel 68 and the inner wall of the receptacle 37, so that fluid passing upwardly through the pipe 39 is caused to iiow through the packing mandrel 68 and into the ow passage 62.

The hollow locking head 74 has flow ports 75 arranged through the opposite walls thereof, so that a portion of the uid passing upwardly through the locking head may pass outwardly through the ports 75 and wash away sediment and undesirable deposits which have a tendency to collect about the fishing neck 93, and thus allow the head 94 on fishing neck 93 to be easily engaged by a wire line retrieving tool. The tubular fishing neck 93 is made integral with locking head 74, and has a bore therethrough communicating with the hollow portion of said head.

Elongated vertical slots 76 are provided through the wall of the hollow head 74, on opposite sides thereof, in which slots the locking lugs 77 are mounted and in twhich they may pivotally move. The locking Ilugs 77 are pivotally connected to the wall of the locking head 74 by means of pins 78 connected through the wall of the head on opposite sides of the slots 76. The lower ends 79 of lthe locking lugs 77 extend into the bore of the locking head 74 when the locking lugs are in relaxed condition and the upper ends 80 thereof are detachably engaged with the recess 29 on the inner side of the coupling 26. The upper end 80 of the locking lugs 77 has a at portion which is engageable with the upper side of the recess 29.

At the upper end of each of the slots 76 is a down- Wardly extending skirt 81, and a spring 84 is engaged between the said skirt and the uppervend of each of the locking lugs 77. The spring 84 is arranged to urge the upper end 80 of the locking lug 77 outwardly, but the outward movement of the upper end of the locking lug 77 is limited by an overhanging lip 82 provided at the upper end of the slot 76, which engages an upwardly eX- tending finger 83, provided on the upper end of the locking lug 77.

A downwardly facing beveled shoulder 86 is provided on the outer side of the locking head 74, which shoulder is engageable with the upwardly :facing beveled shoulder 86, provided at the upper end of the seating nipple 2S. The engagement of the shoulders 85 and 86 limits the downward movement of the locking head 74, and the Slow-directing tool carried Nthe're'below, and 4when said shoulders are eiiga-gd, the operator knows that 'the iiow directing tool 46 is in proper position in the housing therefor, and that the locking lugs 77 are engaged in the recess 29, in position to prevent upward movement of the how-directing device.

For lowering the How-directing device and' setting it in the 'landing housing it may be attached to a lconventional wire line, socket-type, fishing tool, which usually consists of spring prongs which may be engaged with the enlarged head 94 on the fishing neck 93 and held in engagement by means of shear pins in a manner well known in the art. As the tool is lowered in the tubing, so suspended to a wire line, the upper ends oflocking lugs 77 may spring inwardly as the heads 80 thereof slide along the inner side of the tubing, and when the` lugs reach the recess 29, the heads 80 thereof may spring outwardly to enter the recess and lock the tool in place against upward movement, as shown in Fig. II of the drawing. The wire line socket may then be disengaged by jarring action to break the shear pins, allowing the spring prongs thereof to spring outwardly out of engagement with the head 94, thus leaving the How-directing device removably mounted in the housing therefor. Such setting operation is conventional and it is not thought necessary to illustrate same in the drawings. p

When it is desired to remove the How-directing tool 46 from the housing therefor, the lugs 77 may be disengaged from the recess 29 by passing a cylindrical member attached to a conventional wire line retrieving socket into the bore of the locking head 74 to suflicient extent to allow the cylindrical member to engage the lower ends 79 of the lugs 77 and push them outward against the springs 84 to disengage the upper ends 80 0f the ilugs 77 from the recess 29. At such time thespring prongs on the conventional wire line retrieving socket have, by jarring action, engaged the head 94 of the lishing neck 93 to allow the How-directing tool to be retrieved ffrom the housing by drawing upwardly on the wire line.

It will be understood that other disengageable locking devices may be employed with the How-directing tool disclosed herein, the one shown being merelyy illustrative.

The locking head and lug arrangement, shown herein,- is made the subject of my copending application, Serial No. 462,037, tiled on October 13, 1954, to `which reference is made. Y

In some instances it may be desirable to land the How-directing device 46 on the beveled upwardly facing shoulder 73, provided in the lower end of the receptacle 37, by engaging the beveled lower end 72 of the mandrel 68 therewith. In such event, the outer diameter of the locking head 74 could be made so that it would pass downwardly inside of the seating nipple 25 to permit the tool to move downwardly to suchran extent as to cause engagement between the packing mandrel 68 and the shoulder 73.

ing material 89 is arranged about the skirt 87 and clamped between the shoulder 90 and the upper end of the baiiie sleeve 50.

The packing material 89 prevents the ow of uid between the locking head 74 and the inner side of the seating nipple 25.

A frangible equalizing plug extends inwardlypof the inner side of the baierksleeve 50, above the' bale 58. 4The plug 95 has a bore 96 therein which com- In fact, the ilow-l directing tool may be landed and limited against down, ward movement by engaging it against a shoulder pro-y municates with the area on the outside of the baille Sleeve 50 and with the casing annulus 31 through the ports so.

The frangible plug 95 is threadedly engaged in an opening through the baffle sleeve 50 by means of companion threads 97.

, Before unlocking the how-directing device from its housing, preparatory to withdrawing it from the tubing, it is desirable to equalize the pressures across the tool, so that it may be easily removed, and 'so as to prevent it from being blown .up the tubing upon being unlocked. Flow-directing devices heretofore used have usually employed equalizing devices which must be operated by .a wire line from the surface, and often in the use of such means, the tool has become accidentally unlocked before equalization of pressures, and the tool is blown up the tubing and entangled with the wire line equipment. In many instances, it has been necessary to pull the tubing, or engage in costly fishing operations in order to retrieve the flow-directing tool.

In my llow-directing device the pressure is equalized across the tool by simply dropping a conventional sinker bar into the tubing from the surface which falls downwardly and strikes .the equalizing plug 9S and breaks it ofi, opening the inner end of bore 96, allowing the pressure to be equalized across the tool without the use of wire line equipment. After equalization of pressure the sinker bar may be engaged and removed by conventional wire line equipment before unlocking the flow-directing tool'from its housing.

The baille 58 catches and supports the sinker bar, permitting it to be easily engaged by a wire line retrieving socket.

The housing for the flow-directing device 46, consisting of the seating nipple 25 and the by-pass collar 32, are incorporated in the tubing string when the tubing is run into the casing, and at such time the through ilow pipe 39, of required length, is attached to extend below the receptacle 37. The packers 18, 21 and 41 are also set at the proper levels as the tubing string is run.

Initially, when the well is completed, a straightthrough ilow device (not shown) may be removably inserted in the housing by means of conventional wire line equipment. Such straight-through ilow `device would be a modification of the ilow-directing device 46, shown herein, wherein the ilow ports 51, 56 and 57 would be eliminated and the packing 53 and the baille 58 are eliminated, .thereby permitting iluid from the upper zone 13 to ilow upwardly about the straight-through ow device and through ports 30 into the casing annulus 31; and lluid from the lower zone 14 would be permitted to tlow through the pipe 39 and through the bore of the straight-through ilow device into the tubing section 24 thereabove.

Later, Should it become desirable to reverse the paths of ow of fluids from the zones 13 and 14, the straightthrough llow device could be removed from the housingv with conventional wire line equipment, and the ilowdirecting device 46, illustrated and described herein, can be inserted in the housing and removably locked in place therein, in the manner hereinabove described.

When the flow-directing `device 46 is in place in the housing, iluid from the upper Zone 13 will llow through passage 43, about receptacle 37, through ports 56, 57, through passage 63, through head 74 and through tubing 24 to .the surface; and iluid from lower zone 14 will .flow through tubing section 15, through pipe 39, through passage 62, through port 30 into the casing annulus and thence to the surface.

Thus, the paths of ilow of rfluids from the separate zones have been reversed with a minimum of manipulation, and with a minimum of restriction of ilow, by the useof my ilow-directingdevice.

Positive pressure equalizing means is providedto per- 1. A removable baille sleeve insertable in a housing` incorporated as apart of a tubing string in a well comprising, a tubular body; a longitudinal baille arranged in said body, said baille having a portion substantially coextensive with the longitudinal axis of the sleeve, and oiset portions at each end thereof turned in opposite directions and secured to the wall of the body; said baille dividing the sleeve into two longitudinal ilow passages therethrough; a ilow port through the wall of thesleeve communicating with one ilow passage; another ilow port;

arranged through the wall of the sleeve in spaced relation to .the iirst named ilow port, communicating with the other low passage; packing means carried about the sleeve.

Ibetween the ilow ports; a hole through the wall of the sleeve above the baille; a frangible equalizing plug at-` tached to the wall of the sleeve, closing said hole, and extending inwardly thereof above the baille, said equalizing plug having a hollow `bore closed at its inner end and communicating through the hole with the exterior of the sleeve, said hollow portion being arranged to cause communication between the interior and exterior of the sleeve when the equalizing plug is broken.

2. A housing for a ilow directing device, said housing being arranged to be incorporated as a part of a tubing string and comprising, a seating nipple arranged to receive and seat a ilow directing device therein and having flow ports arranged through the wall thereof; a bypass collar attached Ibelow the seating nipple; and a tubular receptacle attached inside the by-pass collar, said tubular receptacle being lessin diameter than the by-A pass collar to permit the tlow of fluid thereabout.

3. A housing for a ow directing device comprising,V

vthe by-pass collar to permit the flow of fluid thereabout;

and a coupling detachably joining the seating .nipple with a tubing string, said coupling forming an annular recess therein between the end of the tubing string and the seating nipple.

4. ilow directing device including, a baille sleeve; a long1tudinal partition arranged in the baille sleeve, the i ends of the partition being secured to opposite walls of the sleeve, dividing the baille sleeve into two ilow passages, each of which communicates with one of the end .openings of the sleeve; a port arranged through the wall of the baille sleeve communicating with one ilow passage; another port arranged through the wall of the'` baille sleeve in spaced longitudinal relation to the rst named port and communicating with the other ilow passage; packing means carried about the baille sleeve between the said ports; a packing mandrel attached to the lower end of the baille sleeve and having a bore therethrough communicating with one of said ilow passages; a locking head attached to the other end of the baille sleeve having a bore therethrough communicating with the other ilow passage; packing means arranged about the locking head; and packing means arranged about'the packing mandrel.

5. In a device for directing the ilow of iluid from separate zones of production in a well comprising, a housing for a ilow directing device, said housing being arranged to be incorporated as a part of a tubing string and including, a seating nipple arranged to receive and seat allow directing device therein and having jilow apertures arranged through the wall thereof, a by-pass collar attached below the seating nipple, and a tubular receptacle attached inside the by-pass collar, said tubular receptacle `being less in diameter than the by-pass collar to permit the flow of uid thereabout; a ow directing device arranged to be inserted in the housing and including, a bafe sleeve, a longitudinal partition arranged in the baile sleeve, the ends of the partition being secured to opposite walls of the sleeve, dividing the baille sleeve into two longitudinal flow passages each of which communicates with one of the end openings of the sleeve, a port arranged through the wall of the bale sleeve communieating with one flow passage, another port arranged through the wall of the baffie sleeve in spaced longitudinal relation to the first named port and communicating with the other ow passage, packing means `carried about the baille sleeve between the ports therein, said packing means being arranged to seal between the baille sleeve and the seating nipple below the apertures in the wall of the seating nipple, a packing mandrel carried on the lower end of the baffle sleeve and having a bore therethrough communicating with one of said ow passages, packing means arranged about the packing mandrel and arranged to seal between the packing mandrel and the tubular receptacle when inserted therein, a locking head carried at the other end of the bailie sleeve having a bore therethrough communicating with the other flow passage, and packing means arranged about the locking head and adapted to seal between the locking head and the seating nipple above the flow apertures in the wall of the seating nipple.

6. In a device for directing the ow of fluid from separate zones of production in a well comprising, a tubing string, a housing including a seating nipple arranged to receive and seat a flow directing device therein and having ow apertures arranged through the wall thereof, a coupling joining the seating nipple to the tubing string thereabove, an annular recess in the coupling between the seating nipple and the tubing string, a by-pass collar attached below the seating nipple, and a tubular receptacle attached inside the by-pass collar, said tubular receptacle rbeing less in diameter than the by-pass collar to permit the flow of iluid thereabout; a ow directing device arranged to be inserted in the housing and including, a bafe sleeve, a longitudinal partition arranged in the bafe sleeve, the ends of the partition being secured to opposite walls of the sleeve, dividing the baille sleeve into two longitudinal ow passages each of which communicates with one of the end openings of the sleeve, a port arranged through the wall of the baille sleeve communieating with one ow passage, a port arranged through the wall of the baffle sleeve in spaced longitudinal relation to the first named port and communicating with the other ow passage, packing means carried about the bathe sleeve between the ports therein, said packing means being arranged to seal between the bathe sleeve and the seating nipple below the apertures in the wall of the seating nipple, a packing mandrel carried on the lower end of the bale sleeve and having a bore therethrough communicating with one of said flow passages, packing means arranged about the packing mandrel and arranged to seal between the packing mandrel and the tubular receptacle when inserted therein, a locking head carried at the other end of the baie sleeve having a bore therethrough communicating with the other ow passage, and packing means arranged about the locking head and adapted to seal between the locking head and the seating nipple above the ow apertures in the wall of the seating nipple; and means carried by the locking head arranged to releasably engage in the coupling recess to hold the ow directing device in the housing.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,854,477 McKissick Apr. 19, 1932 2,153,812 Newton Apr. 11, 1939 2,194,616 Schoeneck Mar. 26, 1940 2,360,311 Ausburn et al Oct. 17, 1944 2,493,962 Gray Jan. 10, 1950 2,543,382 Schabarum Feb. 27, 1951 2,717,041 Brown Sept. 6, 1955 2,726,724 Wilhoit et al. Dec. 13, 1955

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US5813461 *12 Jul 199629 Sep 1998Theisen; Joseph P.Co-axial well construction technique for hazardous waste assessment and remediation
US6481503 *8 Jan 200119 Nov 2002Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-purpose injection and production well system
US7127856 *4 Jun 200431 Oct 2006Hans T. Hagen, IIIInsulated stud panel and method of making such
US71682163 Dec 200430 Jan 2007Hans T. Hagen, IIIInsulated stud panel and method of making such
US757483730 Mar 200618 Aug 2009Hans T. Hagen, Jr.Insulated stud panel and method of making such
US8495852 *1 Nov 201130 Jul 2013Johns ManvilleMethods and systems for insulating a building
US20130081346 *3 Oct 20114 Apr 2013Ames KulprathipanjaMethods and systems for sealing a wall
US20130104469 *1 Nov 20112 May 2013Ralph Michael FayMethods and systems for insulating a building
USRE4030819 Nov 200413 May 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-purpose injection and production well system
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/136, 166/89.2, 166/186, 166/191
International ClassificationE21B43/00, E21B43/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/14
European ClassificationE21B43/14