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Publication numberUS2810271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date22 Oct 1957
Filing date29 Sep 1955
Priority date29 Sep 1955
Publication numberUS 2810271 A, US 2810271A, US-A-2810271, US2810271 A, US2810271A
InventorsJohn M Murphy, Orson V Saunders, Verlos G Sharpe
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2810271 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O t- 2. 1957 o. v. SAUNDERS ETAL 2,81

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Sept. 29, 1955 INVENTORS V Saunders Sharpe Orson Var/0s 6 John M Murphy 08' W T Ire/r Attorney a mm m mxlqm m .i QT. .7 p m mm H p g u w mm ow Oct. 22, 1957 o. v. SAUNDERS EIAL 3 52 .REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed Sept. 29, 1955 f5Sh6bB-Sh98t 4 INVENTORS firs/on .igsmders er as arpe 5 1 By John M. Murphy Their A flarney Oct 22, 1957 o. v. SAUNDERS ETAL' 2,81 71 REFRIGERATING APPARATUS 5 shets-sne'ei 5 Filed Sept. 29, 1955 N Orson- L Saunders g Var/0s 6f Sharpe By John M. Murphy 2,810,271 Patented Oct. 22, 1957 United States Patent Qfiice 2,810,271 REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Orson V. Saunders, John M. Murphy, and Verlos G. Sharpe, Payton, Ohio, assignors to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Application September29, 1955, Serial No. 537,474 6 Claims. (Cl. 62117.45)

This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus and more particularly to a counter-top type of refrigerator for use in preserving both frozen and unfrozen foods.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved structural arrangement of the various parts forming a household refrigerator so as to make it possible to mount the refrigerator at a height substantially corresponding to the normal height of a kitchen work surface or counter.

More particularly, it is an object of this invention to provide an improved arrangement of the refrigerant liquefying apparatus so as to make it practical to introduce the condenser cooling air from the front of the refrigerator cabinet and to discharge the air through a top outlet.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a counter-top or wall type of household refrigerator of such a shape and size which harmonizes in construction and design with other kitchen cabinets.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an improved cabinet construction wherein the parts are all compactly arranged.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary perspective view, with parts broken away, showing the relationship of the refrigerator to other kitchen appliances;

Figure 2 is an end elevational view, with parts broken away, showing somewhat schematically the air flow through the condenser compartment of the refrigerator shown in Figure 1; l

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially on line 3--3 of Figure 2 showing the arrangement of the various compartments within the refrigerator cabinet;

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken subs-tantially on line 4-4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially on line 5-5 of Figure 3; and

Figure 6 is a pictorial view looking into the refrigerator with the doors in the open position.

Referring now to the drawing, wherein a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown, reference numeral 10 generally designates a refrigerator unit which is adapted to be supported on a base cabinet 12, the top of which is arranged substantially in alignment with the usual work surface 14 in a kitchen. The cabinet 12 is intended to represent a conventional counter height kitchen cabinet having doors 13 leading to a storage space beneath the refrigerator unit 10. The refrigerator 10 is relatively long in comparison with its height so as to make it more convenient for the housewife to reach into its food storage compartments. An overhead storage cabinet 16 having an access door 17 is placed directly above the unit it so as to provide extra storage space. It will condenser circulating fan 50.

purpose to be explained more fully hereinafter.

For purposes of illustration, a wall type oven 18 and surface heater units 19 have been shown mounted adacent the one end of the refrigerator unit 10 and no cabinets have been shown adjacent its other end, whereas the construction of the refrigerator is such that additional cabinet units can be placed in direct. contact with either end of the refrigerator unit without interfering with the efficient operation of the refrigerator.

The refrigerator unit 10 consists of an outer metallic shell 20 which is separated into a plurality of compartments. The largest compartment 22 is formed by means of an inner shell 24 surrounded by bag-type insulation 26 at its rear, sides, top, and bottom. A freezer compartment 30 is provided directly below a portion of the compartment 22 and includes a separate inner liner 32 which is surrounded by bag-type insulation 26 at its sides,

rear, and top. A defrost water collecting pan 34 is placed directly beneath the inner shell 32 so as to collect water which may drain from the outer surfaces of the. inner shell 32 when the freezer compartment is defrosted.

A block of porous polystyrene foam type insulation 36 is arranged in the pan 34 so as to provide insulation for the bottom surface of the liner 32 without interfering with drainage of condensate water. The bottom surface of the block 36 is provided with cut-away grooves 38 which facilitate drainage of the condensate water toward the outlet 40 adjacent the one corner of the drainpan 34.

The lower lefthand corner of the cabinet 20 forms a condenser compartment 42 which serves to house the usual motor-compressor unit 44, the condenser 54, a super heat removing coil 46, condensate drain pan 48, and the ment 42 communicates with an upwardly extending fluelike portion 52 which is substantially coextensive with the one end wall of the cabinet 10 and which serves to house the upwardly extending portion of the refrigerant condenser 54. The motor-compressor unit 44 and the condenser 54 serves the usual function of supplying liquid refrigerant to the freezer compartment evaporator or cooling coil 60 which is wrapped around the outer surface of the inner shell portion 32 and the refrigo-plate 62 located in the food storage compartment 22. The usual restrictor 64 is provided in theline which leads from the condenser 54 to the freezer compartment coil 60. The outlet from the coil 60 is connected to the refrigoplate 62 through a line 66 which serves to convey the unvaporized liquid refrigerant leaving the freezer compartment evaporator 60 into the refrigo-plate 62. The outlet of the evaporator section 62 is connected to the inlet of the compressor through the line 70.

The motor compressor unit is adapted to be cycled by means of a temperature responsive switch '72 having a temperature sensing bulb 74 arranged in contact with a portion of the refrigo-plate 62.

The thermostat 74 serves to close the motor control switch 72 whenever the temperature of the refrigo-plate 62 exceeds a temperature of 36 and serves to discontinue the operation of the motor compressor unit when the temperature of the refrigo-plate decreases to approximately 2 above zero. The thermostatically operated switch 72 thus controls the cycling of the compressor so as to refrost the refrigo-plate 62 during each OFF cycle. It is necessary to manually disconnect the refrigerator once every several months or whenever it is necessary to defrost the freezing compartment evaporator 32. For a more complete description of a refrigeration control The condenser compartsystem of the type used herein, reference is hereby made baffle 76 whichlies substantially parallel to the refrigoplate. The battle 76 is spaced from the top wall of the food storage compartment so as to allow the air to flow overthe top of the bafile and down over the refrigo-plate so as to be cooled thereby before circulating through the food storage compartment 22.

A condensate collecting trough 80'is provided beneath the refrigo-plate so as to prevent the defrost water from dripping down onto the food stored in the food storage compartment. The trough 80 is provided with an outlet 82 at its lowermost point, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4. This outlet is arranged adjacent the rear wallof the compartment 22 and serves to discharge the condensate water onto an embossed portion 84 provided on the rear wall of the compartment 22 so that the condensate water will drain down on the rear wall and then onto the bottom surface of the main food storage compartment from whence it flows into a drain 86 which leads to a trough 88 (see Figs. 3 and provided on the one wall of the condenser compartment for conveying the condensate water into the cup-like portion 90 arranged adjacent the outlet of the drain-pan 34 described hereinabove. The cup-like portion 90 includes a flexible drainboard or lip 104 which overlies the water or condensate collecting pan The pan 48 is removably supported adjacent the bottom of the condenser compartment. It is arranged so as to expose the water therein to the air circulating through the condenser compartment and thereby cause re-evaporation of the water. As best shown in Fig. 5, the condensate collecting pan 48 is removably mounted and is secured to a handle element 100 by means of a bracket 102 so that it is possible, to pull the condensate pan out of the machinery compartment for cleaning or for emptying. As previouslyexplained, the cup-like portion 90 is provided with a flexible drainboard or lip 104 which overlies the upper edge of the drain-pan 48. This lip is made flexible so as to make it possible to raise the pan 48 past the lip 104during removal of the pan from the bottom of the machinery compartment. l Guide pins 106 are secured to the sides of the pan 48 and operate within guide slots 108 formed in the side rails 110 so as to facilitate raising the pan above the fixed structural element 112 (see Fig. 5) during removal of the pan.

A pair of doors 122 and 123 are provided at the front of the cabinet for closing the food compartments 22 and 30. As best shown in Figs. 2, 5 and 6, the condenser cooling air is required to enter the condenser compartment throughthe clearance space 120 provided between the lower edge of the front door 122 and the table top 14. It will be noted that the door 122 is provided with an uninsulated portion 124 which provides the necessary clearance between the door and the condenser air intake grill 126. Door seal, means 127 is provided on each of the doors for sealing against the cabinet 20 at the front edges of the food compartments. The meeting edges of the doors are provided with sealing strips 129 which seal against one another when both doors are closed whereby the need for a center mullion has been eliminated.

The condenser fan 50 serves to pull the air inthrough the grill 126 and to discharge the air rearwardly and upwardly through the machinery and condenser compartment 42. An air outlet opening 130 is provided adjacent the upper front edge of the top wall of the flue 52, as

best shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. This outlet opening130 is provided in that portion of the top 'wall of the cabinet 20 whichiextends outwardly into the room farther than the upper cabinet section 16.

A oneaway rubber valve 140 ,(see Fig; 3) is provided at the outlet of the condensate drain 40 which permits water to leave the outlet of the drain but does not permit insects, hot air, or the like to enter the drain from the condenser compartment.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, as may come within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. In a counter-top type of refrigerator, an outer cabinet adapted to be supported on a counter-top in a kitchen or the like, means forming a first insulated food compartment within said cabinet, means forming a second insulated food compartment within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, an air inlet in the front wall of said cabinet, an air outlet in the topwall of said cabinet adjacent the front of said cabinet, means for circulating air in through said air inlet and into thermal exchange relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means and then out through said outlet, said cabinet including closure means for said food compartments, said closure means being substantially coextensive with the front of said cabinet and having a portion concealing said air inlet, said portion being spaced from the front of said cabinet adjacent said air inlet so as to admit air between said portion and said air inlet, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment and a second evaporator surrounding said second compartment, separate means for collecting defrost water from each of said 'evaporators, and a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water.

2. In a counter top type of refrigerator, an outer cabinet adapted to be supported on a counter-top in a kitchen or the like, means forming a first insulated food compartment within said cabinet, means forming a second insulated food compartment within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, an air inlet in the front Wall of said cabinet, an air outlet in the top wall of said cabinet adjacent the front of said cabinet, means for circulating air in through said air inlet and into thermal exchange relationship with said refrigerant liqueincluding closure means for said food compartments, said closure means being substantially coextensive with the front of said cabinet and having a portion'concealing said air inlet, said portion being spaced from the front of said cabinet adjacent said air inlet so as to admit air between said portion and said air inlet, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment and a second evaporatorsurrounding said second compartment, separate means for collecting defrost water from each of said evaporators, and a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water, said receptacle being adapted to rest on said counter-top in the path of said circulating air.

3. In a counter-top type of refrigerator, an outer cabinet adapted to be supported on'a counter-top in a kitchen or the like, means forming a first insulated food compartment Within said cabinet, means forming a second insulated food compartment within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, an air inlet in the front wall of said cabinet, an air outlet in the top wall of cabinet adjacent the front of said cabinet, means for circulating air in through said air inlet and into thermal exchange relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means and then out through said outlet, said cabinet including closure means for said food compartments, said closure means being substantially coextensive with the front of said cabinet and having a portion concealing said air inlet, said portion being spaced from the front of said cabinet adjacent said air inlet so as to admit air between said portion and said air inlet, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment anda second evaporator surrounding said second compartment, separate means for collecting defrost Water from each of said evaporators, a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water, said receptacle being adapted to rest on said counter-top in the path of said circulating air, and complementary guide means on said receptacle and said cabinet for lifting said receptacle in response to forward movement thereof.

4. In a counter-top type of refrigerator, an outer cabinet adapted to be supported on a counter-top in a kitchen or the like, means forming a first insulated food compartment within said cabinet, means forming a second insulated food compartment within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, an air inlet in the front wall of said cabinet, an air outlet in the top wall of said cabinet adjacent the front of said cabinet, means for circulating air in through said air inlet and into thermal exchange relationship with said refrigerant liquefying' means and then out through said outlet, said cabinet including closure means for said food compartments, said closure means being substantially coextensive with the front of said cabinet and having a portion concealing said air inlet, said portion being spaced from the front of said cabinet adjacent said air inlet so as to admit air between said portion and said air inlet, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment and a second evaporator surrounding said second compartment,

separate means for collecting defrost water from each of said evaporators, a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water, and flexible spout means for directing Water from said collecting means into said receptacle, said spout means overlying one edge of said receptacle whereby upon upward movement of said receptacle during removal thereof said spout means flexes out of the path of said receptacle.

5. In a refrigerator, an outer cabinet, means forming a' first insulated food compartment said cabinet,

means forming a second insulated food compartment within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, means for circulating air in thermal exchange relationship With said refrigerant liquefying means, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship With said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment and a second evaporator surrounding said second compartment, separate means for collecting defrost water from each of said evaporators, a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water, means for removably supporting said receptacle in the path of said circulating air, and complementary guide means on said receptacle and said cabinet for lifting said receptacle in response to forward movement thereof.

6. In a refrigerator, an outer cabinet, means forming a first insulated food compartment within said cabinet, mean forming a second insulated food compartment Within said cabinet, refrigerant liquefying means disposed within said cabinet, evaporator means connected in refrigerant flow relationship with said refrigerant liquefying means for refrigerating said insulated food compartments, said evaporator means comprising a first evaporator located in said first food compartment and a second evaporator surrounding said second compartment, separate means for collecting defrost Water from each of said evaporators, a common receptacle for storing all of said defrost water, and flexible spout means for directing water from said collecting means into said receptacle, said spout means overlying one edge of said receptacle whereby upon upward movement of said receptacle during removal thereof said spout means flexes out of the path of said receptacle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,837,265 Hampson et a1 Dec. 22, 1931 2,236,111 7 Philipp Mar. 25, 1941 2,280,554 Steenstrup Apr. 21, 1942 2,598,917 Ingram June 3, 1952 2,706,387 Swanson Apr. 19, 1955 2,708,350 Earle May 17, 1955 2,724,241 Jacobs Nov. 22, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1837265 *4 Aug 192622 Dec 1931Hoover CoRefrigerator construction
US2236111 *21 Oct 193825 Mar 1941Nash Kelvinator CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2280554 *27 Sep 194021 Apr 1942Gen ElectricRefrigerator cabinet
US2598917 *29 Dec 19493 Jun 1952Ingram Herbert MRefrigerator construction
US2706387 *2 Mar 195319 Apr 1955Tyler Refrigeration CorpCondensation control on the outside of refrigerated cabinets
US2708350 *4 Dec 195117 May 1955Guyon L C EarleAir circulation system for kitchen unit
US2724241 *13 Jun 195222 Nov 1955Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4714304 *29 Dec 198622 Dec 1987Whirlpool CorporationBuilt-in refrigerator cabinet
EP0190794A2 *30 Jan 198613 Aug 1986Bauknecht Hausgeräte GmbHBuilt-in refrigerator
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/289, 62/455, 62/443, 62/287, 62/259.1, 62/447, 62/258
International ClassificationF25D23/10, F25D11/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2323/00275, F25D2323/021, F25D23/10, F25D2323/00277, F25D2323/00264, F25D11/02
European ClassificationF25D11/02, F25D23/10