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Publication numberUS2680919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date15 Jun 1954
Filing date3 Dec 1951
Priority date3 Dec 1951
Publication numberUS 2680919 A, US 2680919A, US-A-2680919, US2680919 A, US2680919A
InventorsFlorida L Riggs
Original AssigneeFlorida L Riggs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insole-type appliance
US 2680919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. L. RIGGS INSOLE-TYPE APPLIANCE June 15, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 5, 1951 Fig. 3

Fig. I

. Zhwentor Florida L Riggs attorney June 15, 1954 F. L. RIGGS 2,680,919

INSOLE-TYPE APPLIANCE Filed Dec. 3, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 III,

7 Fig. I0

Snventor F/or/a'a L. Riggs attorney Patented June 15, 1954 UNITED STATE OFFICE 2 Claims. 1

This invention relates to insole-type appliances of the character described in Letters Patent of the United States No. 2,546,408 issued to me on March 27, 1951, and is a development from and an improvement over the subject matter of said patent, a principal object of the present invention being the provision of an appliance adapted for continuous as well as occasional use in a conformation stimulative of normally correct foot attitude and operation conducive to full and unimpeded blood circulation to and through the foot.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved insole-type appliance employable in either built-in or removable association with a shoe as a preventive, as well as a corrective and therapeutic, agent.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved insole-type appliance conformed to support the human foot in a proper orientation of the natural foot arches.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, my invention consists in the construction, arrangement, and combination of elements as hereinafter set forth, pointed out in my claims, and illustrated by the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a plan view of a typical embodiment of the invention as positioned for use in underlying relation with a dorsal diagram of the bones comprised in a human left foot. Figure 2 is a plan view of the embodiment of the improvement r presented in Figure 1. Figure 3 is a side elevation of the improvement represented in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 4 is a section longitudinally of the improvement as illustrated taken substantially on the indicated line 4-4 of Figure 2. Figure 5 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line 55 of Figure 2. Figure 6 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line 6-6 of Figure 2. Figure 7 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line 'l! of Figure 2. Figure 8 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line 88 01' Figure 2. Figure 9 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line 9-4! of Figure 2. Figure 10 is a cross section taken substantially on the indicated line Hl-lll of Figure 2.

As represented by the skeletal diagram of Fig I ure 1, the human foot includes a load-bearing, articulated arrangement comprised from the phalanges [5, the metatarsal bones l6, them"- ternal, middle, and external cuneiform bones indicated respectively at I1, I 8 and I 9, the scaphoid and circulatory system functioning,

bone 20, the cuboid bone 2|, the astragalus bone 22, and the os calcis 23, in the general arrangement and interassociation shown. The great toe of the foot is constituted from and served by two phalanx elements While the remaining toes of the foot are in each instance constituted from and served by three phalanx elements [5, and the metatarsal bones l6 are designated in numerical succession in a rising order from the inner'and to the outer margin of the foot, the bone it in the series serving the great toe being hence the first metatarsal bone. The various bones of the foot are engaged and interarticulated to constitute a longitudinal arch extending from heel to toe With its maximum uprise on the line connecting the heel and great toe, a transverse arch through the cuneiform and cuboid bones, an anterior metatarsal arch at approximately the junction of the metatarsal bones IS with the phalanges l5, and a point of load imposition at approximately the junction of the scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and 0s calcis bones determined by the relation of the load-transmitting tibia with the astragalus. In natural, proper articulation, the bones of the foot receive the load from the tibia and normally support and balance such load through the agency of the foot arches with full accommodation of nerves and elements of the circulatory system and the pressures and displacements incident to ambulation. Manifestly, any distortion in the normal interrelation and articulation of the foot bones is reflected by abnormal and improperly compensated load incidence, by impairment of nerve and by consequent development of stresses, strains, growths, and displacements, with their attendant aches and pains, inimical to normal health and well being. Modern footwear, improper habits of posture and ambulation, and weaknesses inherent in the muscles and ligaments of the foot all contribute to aggravation of initial abnormalities and preclude natural correction thereof, hence the instant invention is directed to the provision of an appliance employable to urge and maintain the foot bones in natural articulation and proper interrelation conducive to' natural correction and rehabilitation of any developed deficiency and preventive of distortions and displacements productive of functional impairments.

The natural operative conformation of the human foot is such as to substantially align the foot longitudinal arch in and with the direction of normal 'ambulation so that the great toe, and

the heavy first metatarsal bone serving the same, sustain a major portion of the load, and any material variation in the disposition of such arch line alters the angle and point of load imposition relative to the foot arches in an undesirable manner, and the instant invention is hence designed to support, strengthen and maintain the foot arches in their proper functional disposition and relation and to urge return of any deviated foot attitude to normal, all to encourage proper accommodation of circulatory and nerve system functioning without limitation or impairment thereof.

In any of its practical embodiments, the improvement takes the form of a generally flat, relatively thin, preferably flexible unit fabricated from appropriate material in a size and outline adapte for removable and replaceable insertion, or for permanent, built-in inclusion, as an insole within and in directly the inner face of a conventional shoe sole, said units hence being supplied in complementary pairs whereof the elements are adapted for use in shoes of right and left foot characteristics. In its general form and construction, the improved insole unit is analogous to devices commonly and presently available, and differs from conventional such devices primarily in the form, construction, and arrangement of support elements associated with the insole for the preventive and corrective purposes set forth.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the numeral 24 designates an insole unit sized and contoured for reception within a conventional left shoe, said unit being comprised from relatively thin, flexible material, such as leather or the equivalent, in a single or multiple ply arrangement, as may be desired. A very common foot condition requiring prevention or correction being a tendency to toe outward. or to tilt the foot laterally in an outward direction, an elevating strip or area 25 of resiliently-yieldable material, such as sponge rubber or the equivalent, is associated in marginal registration with and fixed along the outer margin of the unit it in a variation of width laterally and inwardly of said unit and in a particularity of upper surface contour hereinafter set forth appropriate to elevate the outer side of the foot above the plane of the unit 2 and to consequently ti t the foot transverse arches inwardly; such tilting of the foot transverse arches tending to induce a straight line attitude of the foot and to maintain the arches in proper supporting relation with the load and in proper functional accommodation with related elements of the nerve and circulatory system.

At the forward end of the unit 24 the strip or area 25 is extended in marginal registration with said unit from the outer and toward the inner of the unit side margins as a moderatelycrowned tongue 2% which merges into the unit 2% plane ahead of the great toe position and which terminates in advance of the great toe anterior phalanx l5, t us to provide a low, yieldable abutment against which the great toe may resist forces tending to slide it forwardly on the unit while avoiding any elevation of the great toe relative to the unit plane. Rearwardly from its tongue portion 28, the strip or area 25 is gradually increased in thickness and in width to a maximum elevation above the unit as plane, and to a maximum width transversely of said unit, definitive of a smoothly-contoured, flattened ridge or boss 27 disposed to engage beneath the overlying relation against crown and outer side of the anterior metatarsal arch closely adjacent the anterior ends, or heads, of the second, third, fourth and fifth metatarsal bones. The ridge or boss 2'! has a depth, or thickness perpendicular to the unit 25, more than twice the maximum thickness of the tongue 26, is slightly inclined to the longitudinal median line of the assembly to advance its inner end forwardly of the assembly relative to its outer end, and is contoured to a crown, or maximum depth line, paralleling the unit as plane and extending from beneath the position of the fifth metatarsal bone inwardly of the unit to engagement beneath the second metatarsal bone position. The crest of the ridge or boss 2i terminates in an inner end which engages but slightly, if at all, beneath the first metatarsal bone position, and from said crest inner end the strip or .area 25 is tapered or inclined laterally of the unit 2% to merge into and with the inner margin of said unit, thus determining a maximum width for said strip or area extending fully across and transversely covering the unit 26*. at the zone of the ridge or boss 27. Between the tongue 26 and zone of the ridge or boss 2i the inner margin of the strip or area 25 is slightly concaved in plan to approach the longitudinal median line of the unit 24, thus to fully clear the area of said unit wherewith the great toeis adapted to engage, and said strip or area is tapered in a decreasing thickness to feather into the unit plane along its said inner margin portion. Rearwardly of the assembly from the ridge or boss .2! the strip or area 25 extends in marginal coincidence with the outer margin of the unit 2% and in a gradually decreasing width and thickness determinative of a strip or area depth about half that of the ridge or boss 21 at the transverse zone marking the junction of t e scaphoid, cuboid and astragalus bones and a strip or area width at said zone on the order of one-third the unit 2d width there manifest. From the transverse zone of the assembly just above mentioned the strip or area 25 is continued in maintained marginal coincidence with the unit 2a in a uniform thickness approximately half that of the ridge or boss 2? to and across the rearward, or heel, end of said unit and thence forwardly along the unit inner margin to termination beneath the position of the scaphoid bone, thus developing a U-shaped strip or area portion 2 8 of uniform thickness surrounding and marginally underlying the position of the os calcis, the widths of the strip or area components constituting said U-shaped portion preferably being graduated from like minimums at the ends of the parallel members and to a relatively wider exposure at the heel end of the assembly.

Completing the assembly, a cylindrical stud 29 is formed on or abuts the free end of the U-shaped strip or area portion 28 to upstand perpendicularly and fixedly from the unit 2% adjacent the inner margin thereof and substantially centrally of and beneath the position of the scaphoid bone in a depth, or axial length, approximating the maximum thickness of the ridge or boss 21, and a similar cylindrical stud 3i) fixedly and perpendicularly upstands from the unit i l between the arms of the U-shaped portion 28 in spaced parallelism with the stud 29 and in position to engage beneath the junctionof the scaphoid, cuboid and astragalus bones in a depth, or axial length, corresponding with that of the stud 29. While the studs 29 and 30 are fixed to the unit 24 when the assembly is in use, it may be desirable that said studs be initially susceptible of individual adjustment relative to the unit to assure registration of the studs in proper relation with the bones of the foot as above set forth. Manifestly, initial adjustability of the studs 29 and 30 may be accommodated in various ways, and since the studs are fixed relative to the unit during use of the assembly they are so illustrated in the drawings.

Constituted as, shown and described, the assembly is available for use as a removable and replaceable insert in and with conventional shoes or for fixed incorporation in and with shoes particularly designed and constructed for its reception, the improvement operating with like eflect in either condition of use to encourage and maintain normally correct attitudes and relationships of the foot arches and articulated elements for consequent proper functioning of the nerve and circulatory systems to prevent, and to correct, weaknesses and abnormalities otherwise susceptible of development. When the assembly is in use, the ridge or boss 2! supplements and supports the anterior metatarsal arch in an elevation of the arch outer portion effective to maintain the longitudinal arch of the foot in its proper vertical plane and in position for correct load support and transmission, the U-shaped portion 28 of the strip 01' area 25 stcadies and supports the heel of the foot in the proper longitudinal arch attitude and alignment, the stud 29 acts as a cushioned support for the scaphoid bone and limits laterally inward oscillation thereof to assist in maintaining a correct disposition of the longitudinal arch, and the stud 30 provides a fulcrum of yieldable altitude whereon the foot arches may rock, both longitudinally and laterally of the foot, under the varying loads thereupon imposed. Thus use of the improvement operates to maintain and to oppose deviation from normally correct foot attitudes, to relieve abnormal frictions, stresses, and pressures adversely affecting the foot, and to encourage normal and correct functioning of the systems and muscles serving the foot; the points and areas of interengagement between the appliance and foot being chosen in such anatomical correlation with the foot structure as to supplement and assist, rather than to replace, normal anatomical and physiological reactions.

Since changes, variations, and modifications in the form, construction, and arrangement of the elements shown and described may be had without departing from the spirit of my invention, I wish to be understood as being limited solely by the scope of the appended claims, rather than by any details of the illustrative showing and foregoing description.

I claim as my invention- 1. In an insole-type appliance, the combination with a thin, flexible unit contoured for 00- operating accommodation and retention within a shoe in overlying relation with the shoe sole inner face and having a cushioning strip of resilient material upstanding from, along, and in marginal coincidence with the outer side and heel outline of said unit, an integral, lateral extension of said strip transversely of the unit, and

a resilient stud upstanding from the unit above the surface plane of the adjacent strip portions in position for registration beneath the joint common to the foot scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and 0s calcis bones, of a continuation of said strip as a tongue marginally along and across the toe outline of the unit, a crowned elevation terminating said tongue in advance of and as an abutment for the great toe, a second resilient stud spacedly paralleling said first stud as an elevated termination of the heel outline portion of said strip in position to register substantially centrally with and beneath the scaphoid bone, and an elevation of said strip lateral extension above the adjacent strip portions as a ridge of uniform thickness extending at a slight forward inclination transversely of the unit from the strip at the outer side thereof and beyond the longitudinal center line of the unit in position to engage with and beneath the crown and outer portion of the anterior metatarsal arch.

2. In an insole-type appliance consisting of a thin, flexible unit contoured for cooperating accommodation and retention within a shoe in overlying relation with the shoe sole inner face and having a cushioning strip of resilient material upstanding from, along, and in marginal coincidence with the outer side and heel outline of said unit, an integral, lateral extension of said strip transversely of the unit, and a resilient stud upstanding from the unit above the surface plane of the adjacent strip portions in position for registration beneath the joint common to the foot scaphoid, cuboid, astragalus and os calcis bones, the improvements comprising a tongue continuing said strip marginally along and across the toe outline of said unit, a crowned elevation terminating said tongue in advance of and as an abutment for the great toe, a second resilient stud spacedly paralleling said first stud as an elevated termination of the heel outline portion of said strip in position to register substantially centrally with and beneath the scaphoid bone, an elevation of said strip lateral extension above the adjacent strip portions as a fiat-topped ridge of uniform thickness extending at a slight forward inclination transversely of the unit from the strip at the outer side thereof and beyond the longitudinal center line of the unit in position to engage with and beneath the crown and outer portion of the anterior metatarsal arch, and an inner free end on said strip lateral extension feathered into mergence with the unit inwardly from the adjacent unit inner margin.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,986,646 Shade Jan. 1, 1935 2,106,508 Shaw Jan. 25, 1938 2,154,997 Schipper Apr. 18, 1939 2,411,901 Silver Dec. 3, 1946 2,426,735 Hiss Sept. 2, 1947 2,434,258 Burns Jan. 13, 1948 2,447,231 Bruckner Aug. 17, 1948 2,546,408 Riggs Mar. 27, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1986646 *17 Feb 19331 Jan 1935Schade AlfredFoot support
US2106508 *18 Aug 193325 Jan 1938Robert W ShawInsole
US2154997 *13 Jul 193618 Apr 1939Schipper John FrancisArch support
US2411901 *12 Jan 19453 Dec 1946Benjamin J SilverMetatarso-phalangeal ball cushion
US2426735 *3 Dec 19452 Sep 1947John M HissStabilizing insert for shoes
US2434258 *16 Apr 194613 Jan 1948William C BurnsBody weight distributing shoe pad construction
US2447231 *11 Sep 194617 Aug 1948Bruckner Edward KOrthopedic insole
US2546408 *7 Mar 195027 Mar 1951Florida L RiggsInsole-type appliance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2826833 *30 Apr 195618 Mar 1958HarrisArch support
US2857689 *19 Oct 195628 Oct 1958Leila May Van OstromCorrective foot support
US4170233 *16 Mar 19789 Oct 1979Bunsick Gordon EDevice for correcting the posture of a human foot
US4305212 *8 Sep 197815 Dec 1981Coomer Sven OOrthotically dynamic footwear
US4413430 *30 Oct 19818 Nov 1983Brown Dennis NSkate boot insert
US4517981 *8 Jun 198321 May 1985Santopietro Frank JFor supporting a human foot
US4677766 *28 Jul 19827 Jul 1987Scholl, Inc.Shoe inlay
US4686993 *26 Jul 198518 Aug 1987Paragon Podiatry LaboratoriesLow profile functional orthotic
US5915820 *20 Aug 199629 Jun 1999Adidas A GShoe having an internal chassis
US6105283 *12 Sep 199722 Aug 2000Park; In-SikShoe insole for correction, control, and underfoot comfort
US6119373 *9 Jul 199819 Sep 2000Adidas International B.V.Shoe having an external chassis
US64388737 Aug 200027 Aug 2002Adidas International B.V.Shoe having an external chassis
US66587664 May 20009 Dec 2003Adidas A.G.Shoe having an internal chassis
US7181868 *26 Jun 200227 Feb 2007Nike, IncorporatedArticle of footwear having a sole with a flex control member
US744135013 May 200528 Oct 2008Nike, Inc.Article of cleated footwear having medial and lateral sides with differing properties
US20100269371 *15 Apr 201028 Oct 2010Geoffrey Alan GrayOrthotic shoe insert for high-heeled shoes
EP1025770A2 *4 Feb 20009 Aug 2000adidas International B.V.Shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/155, 36/80
International ClassificationA43B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/144, A43B7/22, A43B7/1435, A43B7/1425, A43B7/1445
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20H, A43B7/22