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Publication numberUS2676813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date27 Apr 1954
Filing date10 Aug 1949
Priority date13 Jun 1949
Also published asDE867558C, US2746565
Publication numberUS 2676813 A, US 2676813A, US-A-2676813, US2676813 A, US2676813A
InventorsBeyl Jean Joseph Alfred
Original AssigneeBeyl Jean Joseph Alfred
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety ski fastening
US 2676813 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, 1954 J. J. A. BEYL.

SAFETY SKI FASTENING 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Aug. 10, 1949 40 A w S 2.137

m m m April 27, 1954 J. J. A. BEYL 2,576,813

SAFETY SKI FASTENING Filed Aug. lO, 1949 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEHTOR:

9 j- TEAH TOSEPH ALFRED Patented Apr. 27, 1954 .,Generallm lia kie by means ,ef a st;I shge'mqrepyenl firmly rup.i;byan .oblique 191 to. theki .aswellgas the ml'positon., @nume oithefastenmdesig ed :te Y L denedwilLnQw" bede. bedf,0'r,.the..1,2.14p exemplication muy im; thpw oflimjation, reference being had to appended 41A n n ,t of ,the springsi.,

yhe a the device is restored autoangular springs I9 are the more effective as the iiat portions I'I are longer.

Preferably, the plate I2 is flush with the ski.

The tubes or sleeves in which the springs I9 are housed are preferably made of Duralumin in order to exclude icing risks and to make the whole device lighter in weight. In fact, all such metal kinds or grades that are consistent with a satisfactory operation of the device may be used.

The turntable I may be made of spring steel, in which case an additional safety is aorded in the case of a simple torsionless forward fall since as a result of a small deflection of the table and a4 consequent slight lifting of the eyed lug 4 the strain on the skiers joints is lessened.

Instead of the springs I9, one or several pairs of leaf springs may be used whichare xed at their ends and normally pressed against the at portions II as shown in Fig. 3, their positions in the deflected position of the turntable being as shown in broken lines.

Still a further possibility is to pivot the turntable I to the disc 6 by means of awholly cylindrical stud and to anchor either end of the turntable to the top of the ski through a tension spring 25 as shown in Fig. 4. In that case anydeflection of the turntable I from its` normal position will increase the stress on the. spring 2B and consequently their effectiveness in returning said turntable. The said springs 26 may be housed in sleeves arranged either on top of the ski or housed in recesses in the top side of the latter.

In the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 a turntable I equal in width to the ski 2 and slightly longer than the skiers shoe carries a stirrup 3 into which the user slips the cap of his shoe and an eyed lug 4 through which the `foot-retaining strap is threaded. The Iiurntable I with the stirrup 3 carried thereby is secured to a disc 6 provided with a central stud formed withan oblong section 'I and a cylindrical section 8. A steel plate 30 resting directly" on the ski surrounds a circular rabbet 3l on the pivot 6`IB and prevents it from getting out of its housing in the ski.

Boxed in a recess 33 milled in the ski is a onepiece cartridge 32 cast of a light alloy and bored throughout with one single hole in which a pair of hollow pistons 34, 35 are received which are located at either side of the pivot 6-1,-9.

Arranged withineach'of said hollow pistons are a plurality of nested coaxial reversedly coiled springs 36, whereby a maximum force is obtained within a piston of minimum diameter. The said springs are rested at their one end on the bottom of the related hollow pistons 34 or 35 and are stressed at their other ends by means of grub screws 31, 38 received in the internally screwthreaded ends of the cartridge 32. Said screwsv 31, 33 are formed at their free ends with a plain stud 39, received each in the related hollow pistons 34, 35 in such a mannerthat same isv correctly centered. Consequently,l the said pistons 34, 35 are pressed by the springs 35 into engagement with the fiat sides of the oblong section 1 of the stud and tend to keep said sides at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the 4 ski. Since the pistons are reliably guided within the ski their action upon the sides of the pivot stud will remain the same for each particular value of the deiiection of the turntable I. Just the same as in the embodiment according to Figs. 1 and 2 the skiers boot is secured to the ski by resilient means which allow for a certain angular displacement of the boot about an axis at right angles to the top side of the ski consequent to a torsional stress and by which the shoe is restored to normal position as soon as the force that urges it away from said position decreases. By virtue of this arrangement the torque exerted upon the oblong section 'I of the pivot stud by the elastic means remains substantially constant. Effectively, while the springs are stressed more and more` as the deflection of the turntable I increases, the said stresses are exerted upon the oblong section 1 through shorter and shorter lever arms. In this manner, the resistance to be overcome remains substantially constant, whether at the beginning or towards the end or in the course of the angular displacement.

The cylindrical section of the pivot stud is mounted in a hole 4I bored through the cartridge 32.

It will be appreciated that the invention can be carried into effect in a great many ways and that the embodiments described hereinbefore should be considered only as nonlimitary examples.

What I claim as new is:

1 In combination with a ski, an elongated foot-supporting turntable swingable about an axis at right angles to the top side of said ski, means to secure ,rigidly the skiers boot to said turntable, al downwardly projecting cam rigid with the lower side of said turntable and coaxial with said axis a rigid member in contact with the cam, and resilient means permanently urging said rigid member against said cam so as to bring the turntable rigid therewith towards a position coaxial with the ski, when said turntable has been turned away from said coaxial position.

2. In combination with a ski, an elongated foot-supporting turntable swingable about an axis at right Aangles to the top side of said ski, means to attach the skiers boot to said turntable, a downwardly projecting cam rigid with the lower side of said turntable and coaxial with said axis and provided lwith atleast one nat `vertical face at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the ski, at least one rigid member with a substantially plane vertical end face in contact with said cam when said turntable is in a position coaxial with said ski means for guiding said member for parallel motion in the longitudinal direction of the ski and, resilient means housed in said ski and urging permanently the rigid member against saidI cam so as to bring the turntable towards `a po',s` ition coaxial with vthe ski, when said turntable has f"been turned away .from said coaxial position.

3. In combination with a ski, an elongated footsupporting turntable swingable about an axis at right angles to the top side of said ski, means to attach the skiers boot to said turntable, a downwardly projecting cam rigid with the lower side of said turntable and coaxial with said axis and provided with two flat Vertical faces on diametrically opposite sides of said cam, a pair of rigid members on opposite sides oi said cam and each provided with a substantially plane vertical end face adapted to bear with a corresponding atface of said cam, means for guiding said members for parallel motion in the 1ongitudinal direction of the ski and resilient means housed in and urging permanently said rigid members upon said cam so as to bring the turntable towards a position coaxial with the ski, when the same has been turned away from said coaxial position.

4. 1n combination with a ski, an elongated foot-supporting turntable swingable about an axis at right angles to the top side of said ski, means to attach the skiers boot to said turntable, an open-ended tubular member embedded in said ski and extending in the longitudinal direction of the ski on both sides of said axis of rotation, at each end of said tubular member a screw engaged in said tubular member, a cam rigid with said turntable and projecting downwardly from the lower side of said turntable into said tubular member and coaxially with said axis of rotation and provided with two at vertical faces on di- 6 ametrically opposite sides of said cam, on each side of said cam a piston guided in said tubular member and provided with a at end face adapted to bear on a corresponding flat face of said cam, and for each piston at least one spring bearing on one side on said piston and on the other side on the corresponding screw.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 1' Name Date 2,276,896 Walker Mar. 17, 1942 2,381,793 Wallace Aug. 7, 1945 2,383,064 Lanz Aug. 21, 1945 2,534,038 Lanz Dec. 12, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 846,997 France Sept. 28, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2276896 *2 Apr 194017 Mar 1942Walker BrooksSki binding
US2381793 *14 May 19427 Aug 1945David A WallaceSki harness
US2383064 *30 Jul 194221 Aug 1945Lanz Adrian BerchtoldSki binding
US2534038 *12 Jun 194512 Dec 1950Lanz Adrian BerchtoldSafety ski binding
FR846997A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2867447 *15 Aug 19556 Jan 1959Gaffron D MuellerSafety ski binding
US2899210 *7 May 195611 Aug 1959 Marker
US3027173 *12 Dec 195827 Mar 1962Beyl Jean-Joseph AlfredSafety ski binder
US3446511 *7 Apr 196727 May 1969Hannes MarkerSole support for safety ski bindings
US3515402 *11 Mar 19682 Jun 1970Marker HannesSafety ski binding
US3544123 *29 Mar 19681 Dec 1970Sports TechnologyAnti-friction device for ski boots and skis
US3583719 *18 Mar 19698 Jun 1971Hannes MarkerSafety ski binding
US3899190 *7 Feb 197212 Aug 1975Gertsch AgSki boot having internal binding components
US3971567 *11 Jun 197427 Jul 1976Vereinigte Baubeschlagfabriken Gretsch And Co. GmbhSafety ski binding
US3998475 *4 Dec 197421 Dec 1976Erich EckartSafety ski binding
US4027896 *4 Mar 19767 Jun 1977Garcia CorporationSki binding
US4182524 *14 Aug 19788 Jan 1980Look S.A.Safety ski binding
US4314714 *6 Aug 19799 Feb 1982Ulrich GertschSafety ski binding
US4676522 *12 Jul 198330 Jun 1987Salomon S.A.Safety binding for a ski boot
US4678201 *27 Jul 19847 Jul 1987Gregory WilliamsSki binding
US4792156 *24 Jun 198720 Dec 1988Salomon, S.A.Safety binding for cross-country skiing
US4928988 *24 Feb 198729 May 1990Salomon S.A.Safety binding for a ski
US6817619 *19 Feb 200216 Nov 2004Joshua Charles HarrisonSafety device for snowboards
US6966563 *26 Feb 200422 Nov 2005Harrison Joshua CSafety device for snowboards
US731859817 Feb 200415 Jan 2008Kneebinding Inc.Alpine ski binding heel unit
US788708411 Dec 200715 Feb 2011Kneebinding, Inc.Alpine ski binding heel unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/636, 280/618
International ClassificationB61K3/02, A63C9/081, A63C9/085, A63C9/086
Cooperative ClassificationB61K3/02, A63C9/086, A63C9/081
European ClassificationA63C9/081, A63C9/086, B61K3/02