Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2547423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date3 Apr 1951
Filing date10 Feb 1945
Priority date10 Feb 1945
Publication numberUS 2547423 A, US 2547423A, US-A-2547423, US2547423 A, US2547423A
InventorsCopping Bruce G, Wegman Evert S
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing apparatus for carbonated beverages
US 2547423 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3, 1951 E. s. WEGMAN ET AL 2,547,423

DISPENSING APPARATUS FOR CARBONATED BEVERAGES Filed Feb. 10, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 L2 WITNESSES: INVENTORS BRUCE G.COPPING, EVERT $.WEGMAN.

ATTORNEY April 3, 1951 E. s. WEGMAN EIAL 2,547,423

DISPENSING APPARATUS FOR CARBONATED BEVERAGES Filed Feb. 10, 1945 2 ShBGiS-Sht 2 240 zsa :00

hhnnnh uuuuuu WITNESSES: M 5 INVENTORS BRUCE G.C0PP1NG. 6 :H 34 s EVERT $.WEGMAN.

. A i BY ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 3, 1951 BEVERAGES DISPENSING APPARATUS FOR CARBONATED Evert S. Wegman, East Longmeadow, Mass., and Bruce G. Copping, Atlanta, Ga., assignors to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application February 10, 1945, Serial No. 577,203

7 Claims. (01. 225-21) This invention relates to beverage dispensing apparatus, and particularly to apparatus of the type wherein measured quantities of syrup and carbonated water are discharged into and mixed in a common container. In certain aspects the invention is particularly applicable to that type of dispensing apparatus in which a carbonator is supplied as part of the apparatus for mixing carbon dioxide from a suitable container under pressure with water to be dispensed.

In the copending application of Bruce G. Copping, Serial No. 480,108, filed March 22, 1943, now Patent No. 2,495,201, January 24, 1950, for Automatic Valve for Dispensing and Proportioning Syrup and Carbonated Water, there is disclosed a dispensing apparatus in which the pressure of the carbonated water being dispensed is used to operate a syrup pump through the intermediary of a hydraulic metering device, so that syrup and water are dispensed in constant proportion to produce a uniform beverage at all times. The present invention is directed to the operation of a similar system of metered syrup pumping, but using as the energy source for the syrup pump the pressure, properly controlled, of the carbon dioxide supply for the carbonator. This; has the advantage over the prior system in that the considerable waste of cold, carbonated water is elimi nated. Such waste is particularly apparent when the dispensing apparatus is designed to selectively dispense one of several syrups, as the prior system discloses operation of all the pumps when the carbonated water valve is opened even though only one syrup is actually dispensed.

The present invention provides for the selective operation of any one syrup pump in a Inultiple flavor system by the use of the available carbon dioxide although the invention is equall applicable to a single flavor system. i

The invention further provides for the ready removal of the syrup pump 'and its associated parts from the syrup tank when cleaning, repair or adjustment are necessary.

These and other objects are effected by our invention as will be apparent from the following description and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part-of this application, in which:

Fig. i is a'schematic representation of a beverage dispensing system embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 isiia vertical section through the carbohated waterdispensing no'zzle;

Fig. 3 is a representative wiring. diagramfor a multiple syrup dispensing system embodying the invention;

Fig. 4 is a vertical elevation largely in section showing details of the syrup pump construction and the manner of its removal from the syrup tank; and I j Fig. 5 is a vertical section through a solenoid valve for controlling the flow of carbon dioxide to manually, or from a source under pressure through a conduit H and a float-controlled valve 12. The water is cooled by a refrigerating coil [3 immersed therein and connected by conduits I4,- l5, to a refrigerant condensing unit IS. The refrigerating system is merely illustrative of the many ways of cooling the water and in itself forms no part of the invention. A carbonator I1 is preferably immersed in the water in tank Ill. The carbonator is supplied with water under pres sure from tank I fi-through a pump l8 and conduit I9. Cold carbonated water is discharged from the carbonator I! through a valve-controlled nozzle 26 when the solenoid 2| is energized to unseat the valve by means of pivoted lever 22. Syrup tanks 23, of which two are shown, are also substantially immersed in the water in tank Iii. Each of these tanks is-provided with a syrup pump 24 and a syrup flow-controlling valve 25'. Syrup discharged from each tank passes through a small conduit 26 which terminates near'th'e water nozzle 20 so that both syrup and water are discharged simultaneously into the container or cup 21. The syrup pumping mechanism is shown in detail in Fig. 4. A body 30, which may be a cast ing, contains the syrup valve 25 and supports the syrup pump 26. This body is detachably sup ported, as by a pin and cammed slot connection 3|, in a fitting 32 secured as by brazing or welding to the bottom wall 33 of the syrup tank 23. [A flared coupling 34 detachably secures the-syrup tube 25 to the depending portion of body 30 which projects through the fitting 32. A two-way valve 35 for controlling the flow of syrup from the tank to the pump and from the pump to the syrup tube 26 is provided with an elongated stem 36. This stem or operating 'rod extends from the valve proper at the bottom of the syrup tank to a solenoid 3'! supported in a recess formed in the detachable cover 38 of the syrup tank. I The syrup pump 24, which is offset in the body from the valve"25,is providedwi'th acon'duit flange 43 provided around the edge of the main opening 44 in the top of the tank and which flange is provided with a compressible .sealing gasket 45. The cover 38 is provided with a suitably shaped fiange 45 which, when engaged by thumbscrews 4! securely hol'ds thecoverin sealing engagement with the top o'f the tank.

When it is desired to remove :thers'yruppump 1 and valve assembly from its tank, the -thumbscrews are removed, conduits 2.6 181101 39 areseparated at the couplings 34 and 39a, respectively, and the whole assembly.including cover "38is1'otated sufficiently to release the pin and slot connection 31 whereupon the assembl is removed vertically from the tank through opening 44. *It should be here noted that a'compressible resillent gasket '48 is provided betweenthe-fixedfitting 32 andthe' lower en'd of the detachable valve member 25 below the connection 31 to :prevent syrup leakage r at' thispoirit. gasket 'is cornpresSed by the'Weig'ht of the assembly and'by'the camming action of the connection 31 when the assembly is in'itsno'rm'al operating posi.ion shown inFigJl.

The syrup dispensing assembly The syruppumpiand valve mechanism 'per se form no "part 'o'fithe presentinvention and will only 'be .sufficiently'described to explain their operation by the .use:of carbon.dioxide. The pump 24 comprises a pair of threaded Castings 5i], .5! which form .a pair of -.chambers :52, 53 separated by arigid'dividingxwa'lkfl. .-A rubber sac-or cell 55 having its upper end closed isloc'atedin-the chamber 52 and a .similar cell 56 isdisposed in chamber 53. The :open --ends of these cells are clamped by suitable flanges between opposite sides of the dividing -wall 54 and the castings 50, 5|, thus sealingrthe insides of the'cells from communication withtheoutside.

The-two cells are in con.rolled communication with each'other, :however, through an-adjustable tapered plug 51 mountedin-a boss 58 formed in partition wall'54, and which boss is provided-with a tapered orifice 59 into which plug 51 extends. A central orifice B and'transverse orifices fil in the plug afford-communication be :ween the interior of cell :SEthrough-orifiees B056! and 59,

and the interior of cell 56. The cells 55 and-5.6 are completely =filled with water or other substantially noncompressible liquid.

The cell :56 bears against 'a slidabl'e stem e2 which is clamped through plates-G3 and bolt 6 1 to "the closed end -of .-a .flexible cup-shaped diaphragm 65 which serves as the syrup pump proper. .The diaphragm 6 5 is :normally distended .bylaspringwGG. The 'openend of the'diaphragm is clamped-tightly between the body 30 and a pro- .tective casing 61 surrounding the pump diaphragm. .Flow of syrup .to and from the .pump is con trolled by the *valve assembly .25. The valve ,iproper 35, operated by the-stem 36,-has an upper flexible face .68 and :a lower flexible face .69. The .upper :face cooperates with a -seat "l0 and .the lower face with-aseat *H A'port I2provides communication through valve body 25, and :passage 13 to the interior of pump diaphragm '65. 7 The port 12 also is open constantly to'the syrup tank 23.

When the parts are in the position shown in Fig. 4, the solenoid 31 is deenergized, and communication between the interior of the syrup pump and 'the syrup tube 26 is :closed because valve'facefifl is engaging seat'll underthe infiuence of the weight of the parts and the in- :fluence of spring 14. However, when solenoid 31 is energize-dinresponse to predetermined condi- '-tions suchas 'the insertion of a coin in suitable mechanism, valve 35 moves upwardly to engage seat 10, and, carbonjdioxide under pressure being applied to the interior of chamber 52 and the exterior-"of cell .55 from conduit 39 in a manner to behereafter described, that cell is compressed, :forcing liquid through orifices 60, GI and 59 to the interior of cell 56. Thereupon the latter cell expands=and through stem 52 forces syrup from the interior of pump diaphragm through passage 1-3 and past valve seat H to orifice 15 and syrup tubei'25. When.the solenoid 31 is d'eener gized'and the flow- 0f carbon dioxide'is'simultaneously shutoff, the parts return to the position of Fig. 4 and a fresh supply'of syrup is drawn into'the pump through port J2 and passage 73. A checkvalve 15 may bezprovided in the dividing wall- 54 to insure quick'return'of the liquid from 061156 toce1l55.

The carbon dioxide system =Carbon dioxide is supplied to the'system from a suitable container through a pressure reducing valve -8l which may be either manual or automatic. The systemherein'described has beensuccessfully operated with a controlled-pressure of approximately sixty pounds per square inch. After leaving the .valve 81 the gas enters a -conduit.82 .from which a branch conduit-83 leads to the carbonator H. Otherbranches 40 lead from conduit-82 to the conduits 39 which, in turn, lead to the syrup pumps 24. These branch-conduits 40 are normally closed by solenoid controlled valves 84-and are open to gas flow only when these valves are energized.

Only'one such valve is energized when-a drink is to be dispensed, and the control circuit is so arranged that the solenoid-operated gas control valve 84 and the-syrup valve solenoid 31 of a single syrup tank are simultaneously energized to permit the flow of syrup only from that selected tank. These solenoids are energized simultaneously with solenoid 2! of the carbonated water control valve 88 in nozzle 20 and the circuit is so arranged thatthe carbonated water valve and onesyruppump and valve operate and are open .for a. predetermined time to produce a mixed drink of a given volume, whereupon all the solenoids are deenergized. When this occurs, it becomes necessary to relieve the pressure on cell 55 .to permit thepump to draw in a fresh charge of syrup. This may be done by interposing conduits 85 in each branch conduit 40 between the solenoid valve 84 and the conduit 39 of each pumping system and connecting them to-a conduit 86 which communicates with the carbonated water discharge nozzle through a coupling 8'! below the carbonated water valve 88 (Fig. 2). These conduits 85 are provided with check valves 85a to permit fluid flow only in the directions of the arrows (Fig. 1).

The nozzle 20 is constructed on the principle of the nozzle described in the aforesaid application of Bruce G. C0pping,'that is, it is so designed that-the rate offiowxof carbonated water through it to the cup is hydraulically proportioned to the rate of flow of water from cell 55 to cell 56' through the controlled passage 59, and consequently to the rate of flow of syrup from its pump 65 to the cup, thus ensuring a constant proportioning of the syrup and water component of the beverage regardless of variations in the temperature of the beverage components or the applied CO2 pressure.

As here shown, the nozzle comprises a valve 88 normally closing a port 99 leading from the carbonator IT to a chamber 94 prov'ded in the nozzle 20. The valve 88 is provided with a stem 92 attached at its lower end by an open web to a sliding collar 9|. by a spring 93 and is unsea ed when soenoid 2| is energized and rocks lever 22. The forked outer end of lever 22 engages collar 9| to depres's'the collar and unseat the valve. 'When the valve is thus unseated, carbonated water under pressure flow from the carbcnator i I past screen 89, throughport 99 to chamber 94 and then through restricted capillary passages 95 to the cup. -A check v-alve96 is provided in conduit 86 to prevent the flow of carbonated water'into the carbon dioxide conduits, but to permit the flow of carbon dioxide gas to the fitting 8?, chamber 94 and out through capillary passages 95 to the atmosphere when the flow of carbonated water has ceased;

To assist in the quick release of carbon dioxide and restore the syrup system promptly to its normal position ready for the succeeding dis pensing operation, an elongated gas venting port 92a may be provided in valve stem 92, as shown in dottedlines in Fig. 2. The upper end of this port passes laterally through the valve stem and communicates withchamber 94 through ports 94a when the valve 88 is seated, thus venting conduit 85 to the atmosphere. On the other hand, when the valve stem is depressed for the dispensing of a beverage, the upper end of the port is sealed by the valve body in which stem 92 slides, so that carbonated water can flow to the cup only through the capillary passages 95.

The capillary passages 95 are here shown as a plurality of nested cones of calculated length and spacing so that the rate of flow of water between them is accurately controlled and, as before stated, the rate of flow is hydraulicaly proportioned to the rate of fiow of water from cell 55 to cell 56 through orifice or passage 59 so that syrup and water are dispensed to the cup in constant proportions.

The valve is normally seated When thevalve '88 is opened and carbonated 7 water under pressure is flowing through the nozzle, its pressure is substantially equal to, that of the carbon dioxide in the syrup pumping'sysmm as the carbonator and the pumping system derive their pressure from the same source, and consequently there will be no material flow of fluid either way through conduit 86 and branches 85. However, when the system is deenergized, the water valve 38 and the solenoid valve a l 'close and the pressure in chamber 94 of nozzle 20 drops toatmospheric, whereupon the pressure of carbon-dioxide trapped between valve 84 and cell is instantly relieved through branch conduit 85, conduit 85, past check valve 96 and into chamber 94 to the atmosphere. This pufi of gas tends to sweep out any residual water which may be clinging to the capillarypassages 95 and thus eliminates after-dripf Instead of the pressure relieving system just described, the residual pressure may also be relieved by making the solenoid gas controlling valve 84in the form of a two-way valve as shown in Fig. 5. Here the assembly is shown with the solenoid 9'! deenergized and the core 98, which carries valves 99, I96 at opposite ends, in its lowermost position with the valve I09 seated and closing communication between the conduit 82 and the conduit 40. When the solenoid is energized the core 98 moves upwardly against spring ml to seat valve 99, closing port IE2, which opens tothe atmosphere, and unseating valve I09 to permit the flow of gas from conduit 82 to conduit 40. Then, when the solenoid is deenergized, valve IllIl reseats and valve 99 is unseated so that residual carbon dioxide is discharged from conduit 40' past the loosely fittingcore 98 and valve 99 to the atmosphere. An electrical control circuit for the described systemis shown in Fig. 3. As the system is pri-' marily intended for operation as an automatic coin controlled apparatus, the circuit will be so described, although it is apparent that its" operation could as well be initiated manually; The

circuit and system are also described as selectively.

- they can be arranged to dispense one of any number of syrups by the proper provision of. tanks, pumps'and valvesf As shown, the insertion of a coin in a selected slot closes either of momentary contact switches I05, thereby establishing a circuit from line conductor L1 through conductor I06, solenoid I01, conductors I62, I09 and III], normally closed timer switch III and conductor II 2 to line conductor L2. Momentary'con'tact switch" Iil5: is of the type which establishes a circuit in response'to a slight pressure and instantly opens when the pressure is removed. When solenoid Iill isinitially energized, a holding circuitfis established from L1 through conductor I95, contacts H3; solenoid Iil'l'and conductors I98, I99, I.I0, switch i I I and conductor I I2 to L2. The energization of relay I61 also sets up, but does not close, a circuit to the selected carbon dioxide flow control valve 84 and the corresponding syrup valve solenoid 3'I. This circuit runs from L1 through conductor :96, contacts IM, conductor II5, through the valve solenoids 84 and 37 in parallel, con-. ductors H1, H8 and I3I, to the contacts-l|9 of timer relay solenoid I2 I, which is not as yet closed, and then through conductor 12% to L2. I

After the coin passes switch I95, which is disposed in the usual chute,'it passes through a slug rejector (not shown) and then, in the case of an automatic dispensing machine, causes the dropping of a cup beneath the dispensing nozzle of the apparatus by the actuation of a second momentary contact switch (not shown). The ap paratus is now ready for the dispensing of the beverage, and the coin'co'ntinues its passage down the chute, finally I tripping momentary contact switch I 22. The closing of this switch starts the timer motor M rotating and also energizes timer relay solenoid i2I, a circuit being estab-' lished from L1 through conductors I96, I23, switch I22, conductor I25, motor M, conductors I25, i253 and Ill closed switch" iIIand conductor H2 to L2. Current also flows from conductor I24 through timer relay solenoid I2 I, and conductors I39, I26, H0, switch iii and conductor H2 to L2.

conductor I29, solenoid I.2I, oonduotors"I3Il, I26,- IIIl, switch I II and conductor M2 to L2. Current also flows in parallel from conductor :29 through conductor I24, motor M, conductors I :and I26 to conductor I I9 and thence through switch I II and conductor I I2 to L2.

The 'energization of relay I2I also closes contacts I I9 completing the circuit through the syrup valve solenoid '37 and gasvalve solenoid 84, opening 'the respective valves and causing the flow of syrup to the cup. Simultaneously with the establishment of the aforesaid circuit a circuit is established for the carbonated water valve solenoid 2| from L1 through conductor I16. solenoid 2 I, conductor .I3I, contacts I I9 and conductor I20 to L2. It should be noted that the carbonated water valve 88 is opened every time the machine is operated but that only one set of syrup and gas valves is operated by the insertion of a 'coin .in a selected slot, and it should befurther noted that all the main circuits are controlled by the timer switch III. As before stated, this switch is normally closed. Its opening is controlled by a finger I mounted on and rotating with the shaft of motor M. The .finger I35 is normally held against an adjustable stop I36 by a light spring I31. When the motor is energized, its shaft, which is driven through suitable reduction gearing, rotates the finger I35 against the pull of spring I3? until the finger engages and opens switch III. Thereupon all circuits including that of motor M are opened and the 'finger is drawn back against stop I 36 by spring I37 so that switch III recloses and the apparatus is restored for the next dispensing operation. The position of stop I 36 may be varied to control the length of the dispensing cycle.

It is apparent from the foregoing description that the invention provides a compact beverage dispensing apparatus in which the syrup dispensing portions are readily accessible for servicing pensed by controlled pressure derived from acontainer of carbon dioxide, the combination of a container for carbonated water adapted to be constantly subjected togcarbon dioxide pressure, a syrup container adapted to be maintained at atmospheric pressure, pump means for discharging syrup from the container to the nozzle, means for admitting carbon dioxide under pressure at selected intervals to said pump means, means for controlling the flow of carbonated water from its container to the nozzle, timer means for operating said flow-controlling means in timed relation to the means for admitting carbon dioxide pressure to the pump, and means for instantly relieving carbon dioxide pressure on said pump means when sufiicient syrup has been dispensed, said means including a conduit opening into said nozzle and having an operating connection between said pump means and the means for ad- Knitting carbon dioxide .to said pump.

' 2. 'In apparatus for dispensing a mixed, car- 8 I bonated beverage through a dispensing nozzle, and in which the beverage components are dispensed by controlled pressure derived from a container of carbon dioxide, the combination of a container for carbonated water adapted to be constantly subjected to carbon dioxide pressure, a syrup containeradapted to be maintained at atmospheric pressure, pump means for discharg-. ing syrup from the container to the nozzle, electrically-operated valve means for admitting car bon dioxide under pressure at selected'intervals to said pump means, electrically-operated means :for controlling the'flow of carbonated water from its container to the nozzle, timer means for operat-.. ing said flow-controlling means in timed relation to said electrically-operated valve means, and

means including said electrically-operated valve means for instantly .relieving the carbon dioxide pressure on said pump means at the end ofa dispensing cycle.

3. .In apparatus for dispensing a mixed, carbonated beverage through a dispensing :nozzle, and in which the beverage components are dispensed by controlled pressure derived from a con} tainer of carbon dioxide, the combination of a container for carbonated water adapted to be constantly subjected to carbon dioxide pressure, a syrup container adapted to be maintained at atmospheric pressure, pump means for discharg ing syrup from the container .to the nozzle, electrically-operated valve means for admitting carbon dioxide under pressure at selected intervals to said pump means, electrically-operated means for controlling the flow of carbonated water from its container to the nozzle, timer means for op-' erating said flow-controlling means in timed relation to said electrically-operated valve means; and means for instantly relieving the carbon dioxide pressure on said pump means at the end of a dispensing cycle, said pressure .relieving means including a conduit opening into saidnozzle and operatively connected betweensaidpump means and the electrically-controlled valve means.

4. In apparatus .for dispensing a mixed, car bonated beverage through a dispensing nozzle, and in which the motive power for the beverage components to be dispensed is derived from car bon dioxide pressure, the combination of a relatively deep syrup tank, a syrup pump disposed in the lower part of said tank, a separable connection between the syrup pump and the lower tank wall, said connection including a gasket member deformable under the weight of the pump to seal the tank against leakage around said separable connection, a conduit for supplying..fluid pressure to said pump, and a separable connection i" or said-conduit adjacent the top wall of the syrup tank, all of said separable 'connec tions constituting means whereby said pump may be removed from said tank through the top wall thereof.

5. In apparatus for dispensing a mixed, carbonated beverage, the combination of a dispensing nozzle, a conduit adapted to contain carbon dioxide gas under pressure, a carbonator for containing carbonated water and communicating with said conduit, a container for syrup, gas motivated pumping means for discharging "syrup from its container to the nozzle, means for conveying gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure from said conduit to the pumping means at selected intervals for motivating said pumping means to discharge syrup to the nozzle, and means operated in timed relation to the motivation of said pumping means for efiecting communication between said carbonator and the nozzle to discharge carbonated water from the former to the latter.

6. In apparatus for dispensing a mixed, carbonated beverage, the combination of a dispensing nozzle, a conduit adapted to contain carbon dioxide gas under pressure, a carbonator for containing carbonated water and gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure, said carbonator communicating with said conduit at all times, a container for syrup subjected interiorly to the pressure of the ambient atmosphere, gas motivated pumping means for discharging syrup from the container to the nozzle, electrically operated means for delivering gaseous carbon dioxide from said conduit to said pumping means at selected intervals for motivating the pumping means, electrically operated means for controlling the flow of carbonated water from the carbonator directly to said nozzle, and timing means for controlling energization of both of said electrically operated means in timed relation.

7. In apparatus for dispensing a mixed carbonated beverage, the combination of a dispensing nozzle, a conduit adapted to contain carbon dioxide gas under pressure, a carbonator for containing carbonated water and communicating with said conduit, a container for syrup, gas motivated pumping means for discharging syrup from its container to the nozzle, means for conveying gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure from said conduit to the pumping means for motivating the latter, means for controlling the flow of carbonated water from its container directly to the nozzle, timing means actuated at intervals for operating said flow controlling means and said carbon dioxide conveying means for a predetermined period of time and means rendered efiective at the conclusion of said period of time for relieving the carbon dioxide pressure acting on said pumping means.

EVERT S. WEGMAN. BRUCE G. COPPING.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,743,236 Redmond Jan. 14, 1930 1,746,597 Lind Feb. 11, 1930 2,140,679 McKeever Dec. 20, 1938 2,188,646 Bunch Jan. 30, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1743236 *18 Aug 192214 Jan 1930Redmond Albert GMeans for supplying fuel to charge-forming devices
US1746597 *11 Oct 192611 Feb 1930Edward J LindSoda-water-dispensing machine
US2140679 *19 Apr 193820 Dec 1938Smith Separator CorpChemical flow controller
US2188646 *29 Sep 193730 Jan 1940Ray BunchPump assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2657628 *9 Jan 19473 Nov 1953Wurlitzer CoBeverage dispensing apparatus
US2823833 *7 Jan 195518 Feb 1958Dole Valve CoConcentrate dispenser
US3823846 *26 Aug 197116 Jul 1974T ProbstMeans for automatically dispensing preselected volumes of a beverage
US4076145 *9 Aug 197628 Feb 1978The Cornelius CompanyMethod and apparatus for dispensing a beverage
US4687120 *27 Sep 198518 Aug 1987The Cornelius CompanyPowerable by compressed gas
US4955507 *18 Sep 198911 Sep 1990The Coca-Cola CompanyOrange juice dispensing system
US4962866 *4 Nov 198816 Oct 1990The Coca-Cola CompanyNon-attended, self-service cup vender
US4967936 *4 Jan 19906 Nov 1990Milton Roy Co.Beverage dispenser
US5082143 *6 Jun 199021 Jan 1992Schramm Jr William LAutomatic control system for accurately dispensing mixed drinks
US5172831 *23 Dec 199122 Dec 1992Ebtech, Inc.Valve actuator for a soft drink dispenser station
US5203474 *16 Jun 199020 Apr 1993Alco Standard CorporationBeverage dispensing nozzle
US5323832 *15 Dec 199228 Jun 1994Ebtech, Inc.Valve actuator for a soft drink dispenser station
WO1993013007A1 *20 Nov 19928 Jul 1993Ebtech IncValve actuator for a soft drink dispenser station
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/129.2, 222/133
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0021, B67D1/0036
European ClassificationB67D1/00F4B6B2, B67D1/00F4