Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2488382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date15 Nov 1949
Filing date7 Jun 1946
Priority date7 Jun 1946
Publication numberUS 2488382 A, US 2488382A, US-A-2488382, US2488382 A, US2488382A
InventorsDavis Whitman W
Original AssigneeDavis Whitman W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic foot support
US 2488382 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1949 w, w, DAVIS 2,488,382

PNEUMATIC FOOT SUPPQRT Filed June 7, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet l ZZZ/3712274277 Z27. Jar/.215

M @Wk Nov. 15, 1949 w. w. DAVIS PNEUMATIC FOOT SUPPORT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 7, 1946 27192322755 21 .Ua W's Patented Nov. 15, 1949 TED S TATES l ra-TEN 2,488,382, I

PNEUMATIC F0011 "SUPPORT "WhitmanW. Davis, Burbank, 'Calif.

Application June 7, 1946,- Se1 ia"i -No. "6753'54 1 Claim.

This invention relates to cushioned foot supports and, although not thereto restricted, is adapted particularly to the insertable "and removable type of insert or pa'd, constructed 'of two or more plies of suitable material, such as rubber, canvas-reenfcr'ce'd or cord-'r'eenforced rubber, leather, "or otherwisaat least twin of the plies being adapted to define between them exteriorly isolated chambers or cells, adapted to sealedly contain "a nuidgsuch as slycerine' ornther liquid, or'aiga's or gaseous'inixtu're,fsuch as air.

The chambers uncellsareherein referred to as pneumatic or air chambers "o'r cells'b'ecauseair is one of thereconim'enlied'Tluidsftheword, air, when employed herein, referring to air, or alternatively to any other suitable fluid. Any one or some orall of said plies are not ne'cessari'ly coextensive "with the entire structure, which is divided into a'plura1=chamber=constituting part and into a solid, generally attenuated, part. The

term, -solid, when employed herein, refers to the part ofthesupportwherein no definite, "deliberately designedairehainber or cell obtains and thatconsists 'of one or a 'plurality'of "mutually adjoining layers of suitable, "preferably resilient, material. 'su'ch'a structure would be conceivably a 'layer'of sponge rubber sheathed on both sides with canvas=reenforced rubber or plain "sheet rubber or leather or a combination ofthe f'oregoing and/or 'othermaterial's.

'Obj'eCt'aLIId aidvallifa'gebfiny"ihliiitiiih "Collsists in'tlie provision ofscieiitific correction for abnormal funct'ioning'oi" the human "foot, whether acquired or congenital and whether it derives frominlis'c'le or ligament weakness or strain or the like, as Well as in the provision of alleviation for non-correc'tible cases of the foregoing and of alleviation for not-yet s'urgicall-y corrected structural abnormalities, suchas, for "example, calcaneal spurs on theheel.

An important object and advantage consists in the provision of Wide individual applicability, in a'truly'scientific clinical-spirit, of every enact a number o f' 'basic invention-embodying supports to "every kind "of foot disorder for which the supports "may be indicated, the number of different'basic supportsbeing'deterniinedsolely by the necessary different lengths and widths in the various combinations, excepting for some supports provided with extensions of the basic structure corresponding air wells :or chambers for the support of the first phalangeal-metatarsal jciirit. Another object and-advantage consists in the provision of "structural economy without "sacrifice in the consistent durable performance of the support.

Additional objects and advantages manifest themselves thruout this specification, supplemented :by the accompanying drawings, for which views of typical, but not of allrpossible, embodiments have-been selected as 'suitable subjeets, the

views being schematic ones showing only the.

contours, in plan viewpof the various air-'"chambers and solid parts of the supports; the general art is so01d and well established that, topersdns skilled in it, a largenumber of "different materials and assembling-methods, all more or less satisfactory, are known, and any one of said materials and assembling methods are applicable to embodiments of the instant invention.

Figures 1, -2, 3,4, 5-and-6show said typical :embod-iments, which'are respectively indicated by lm-l-l, l2, l3, M and 15.

It -is manifest-that, in commontoall embodiments, there are an-inner or long longitudinal.

arch supportingchamber' or cell 6 and two auxiliary air chambers or 'cells, -altl'iough the invention can be embodie'din supports having, in addition tothe long longitudinal arch chamber, also referred to as the standard-cell or chamber, a, single or several auxiliary chambers, also re-' ferredto ascornplementary chambers or cells, from all of which, it is manifest, the standard chamber is inevery instance isolated. Referring to Figure-1, this support is provided with the half-elliptical, functionally complete heel-supporting heel-chamber "and the anterior or transverse arch-supporting simple metatarsal chamber 18, both communicating with one an- -other thru the there interveningmedialexchange duct [9. Marg-inally,but not in area, chamber I1 is coextensive with the-heel; the'incompletene'ss is 'with respect to the indentation 28, constituting a -recess to accommodate a calcancal spin on the heel. The position of chamber l a'corresponds with the foot locus ininiediately' behind the sec: ond, third and fourth metatarsal heads, also :re-

ferred to as metatarsals, just as the positionpf the main or standard chamber l6 corresponds to the medial side of the inner or long longitudinal 3 arch. In both cases, the two chambers allow the respective muscles and ligaments to shorten and strengthen for eventual unaided support thereby of the respective bones. Standard chamber 16 is always isolated because the kind and degree of 5 support for the long arch are substantially constant for all positions of the foot, whether when standing or in locomotion. When walking, the first impact is received on the heel, which impact is cushioned by the mass of air in chamber ll, this mass being immediately thereupon transferred under pressure therefrom thru the medial exchange duct l9 into the metatarsal cell 3, constituting it into a transitory cushion for receipt thereon of the next impact, whereupon the cycle begins to be repeated as long as the walking continues. In the case of communicating chambers, the total mass of air admitted to them is such as to inflate the anterior said chamber to a height of about three-eights of an inch, with the posterior said chamber collapsed, to which rule of inflation there is an exception, to which reference will be had during the description of Figure 4. My experience teaches me that, in the majority of cases, the three-eighths of an inch for infiation height is the most comfortable and beneflcial.

Referring to Figure 2, the simple metatarsal chamber l8 of Figure 1 has here been replaced by the modified metatarsal chamber [8A, designed to support the transverse or metatarsal arch behind the fifth as well as behind the second, third and fourth metatarsal heads, and also to support the short or outer longitudinal arch by the extension i8B'of cell I8A, which extension extends to the inner'incomplete heel chamber 20, with which chamber I8A therefore communicates. This extension, because of its relative attenuated form, functions somewhat similarly to the exchange duct 19 in Figure 1. This disposition of cells accords-lateral balance to the footand prevents inrolling or pronation.

Referring to Figure 3, the modified metatarsal chamber [8A communicates, thru the extension I813, with the cuboid chamber 2|, which adjoins and directly communicates with the outer incomplete heel chamber 22. Also present is an isolated scophoid cell 23, supporting the scophoid bone. Chamber 21 supports the cuboid bone. The function of cell 22 corresponds partly to the function of the complete heel cell in Figure 1.

Referring to Figure 4, the metatarsal cell [8 communicates, thru the medial exchange duct I9, with the enlarged inner incomplete heel chamber. 24, functioning similarly to cell in Figure 1, the indentation or recess for the calcaneal spur beingindicated by 35. Additionally included are the anterior marginal cell 25, the outer incomplete heel chamber 26 and the there intervening'o'uter exchange duct-2T, thethr'ee 60 sections being isolated'from'theother air sec- I tions but coacting with them in alleviation of or treatment of metat'arsalgia or Mortons'Toe; and cushioning the metatarsal heads. Inorder to assure that there is always at least'amas's'i65 of air in cell 25 suffi'cientforthe support of the" metatarsal heads, I inflate sections'25, 26 and? 21 with more air in-proportion to' their total volume than in the case of other combinations of communicating cells, referredto in thefsixth 70 paragraph of this specification. 'Theanterior marginal cell 25 constitutes a pier for. thejmeta v tarsal heads. a

Referring to Figure 5, a composite metatarsal cell, consisting of the first metatarsal cell section 29, the metatarsal arch cell section 30 and the fifth metatarsal cell section 3|, communicates, thru the exchange duct 32, with the combined cuboid and fifth metatarsal base cell 33, approximating a short or outer longitudinal arch cell, which in turn communicates, thru exchange duct 34, with modified heel cell 36, its calcaneal spur recess being indicated by 31.

Referring to Figure 6, a metatarsal cell [8 communicates, thru duct 19, with modified heel cell [1, whose calcaneal heel spur recess is indicated by 28. The numeral 38-.indicatesa first-phalangeal-metatarsal-joint cell correcting for hypermobility, shortness of the first metatarsal or looseness in said joint. Cell 38 is preferably mounted on a pier constituted from a relatively thick extension of the ply or plies constituting the solid part of the support. During the transfer of air from cell I8 to cell ll, a small amount thereof finds itself trapped in cell 39, which supthereof finds itself trapped in cell 40, which cushions the cuboid bone.

No attempt has been made to describe all pos-f sible combinations of cells as it would needlessly burden this specification and the accompanying drawings. With the exception of the isolated standard cell supporting the inner longitudinal arch, every other cell may be made to communicate with or be isolated from every and any other cell, or cells, this relationship being determined by the particular abnormality for which treatment or alleviation is indicated.

I claim: I

In a pneumatic foot support, the combination of a base member having an inflatable pneumatic cushion in a forward position to underlie the ball of the foot; a. second inflatable pneumatic cushion in a rearward position adapted to underlie the heel of the foot, the member having a restricted passageway connecting said pneumatic cushions, a sufficient supply of pneumatic fluid in said connected cushions to completely inflate only one of said cushions so that shifting of the weight from the heel to the ball of the foot during walking causes flow of'said pneumatic fiuid' from one to the other of the inflatable cushions I through said passageway; and a third and fully inflated pneumatic chamber on the member in a central position to underlie the principal arch of the foot, said chamber being pneumatically isolated from the cushions and from said passageway.

' WHITMAN W. DAVIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: V

UNITED STATES PATENTS Persichino Oct. 24, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1145533 *6 Jul 1915 Arch-supporter.
US1193608 *26 Oct 19158 Aug 1916 Insole
US1304915 *31 Jul 191827 May 1919Burton A SpinneyPneumatic insole.
US1530603 *3 May 192424 Mar 1925Klotz AlfredPneumatic insertion for boots
US2177116 *26 Jul 193724 Oct 1939Michele PersichinoPneumatic foot supporter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2677906 *14 Aug 195211 May 1954Arnold ReedCushioned inner sole for shoes and meth od of making the same
US2884646 *12 Dec 19565 May 1959Alcosa EtsBladder structure
US3121430 *10 May 196018 Feb 1964O'reilly Edwin LInflatable insole with self-fitting arch support
US3990457 *14 Aug 19759 Nov 1976Curiel Products CorporationPodiatric insole
US4802289 *25 Mar 19877 Feb 1989Hans GuldagerInsole
US5113599 *27 Sep 199019 May 1992Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5353459 *1 Sep 199311 Oct 1994Nike, Inc.Method for inflating a bladder
US5425184 *29 Mar 199320 Jun 1995Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5625964 *7 Jun 19956 May 1997Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5794361 *19 Jun 199618 Aug 1998Sadler S.A.S. Di Marc Sadler & C.Footwear with a sole provided with a damper device
US5832630 *23 Jul 199310 Nov 1998Nike, Inc.Bladder and method of making the same
US5878510 *19 Jul 19969 Mar 1999Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US5987779 *17 Apr 199623 Nov 1999Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5996254 *4 Mar 19997 Dec 1999Goven; MichaelInflatable insole system
US6055746 *5 May 19972 May 2000Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US6092310 *8 Mar 199925 Jul 2000Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US6138382 *8 Mar 199931 Oct 2000Schoesler; Henning R.Fluid filled insole
US61786638 Mar 199930 Jan 2001Henning R. SchoeslerFluid filled insole with metatarsal pad
US62584215 Nov 199810 Jul 2001Nike, Inc.Bladder and method of making the same
US637451416 Mar 200023 Apr 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear having a bladder with support members
US638586416 Mar 200014 May 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear bladder with controlled flex tensile member
US640287916 Mar 200011 Jun 2002Nike, Inc.Method of making bladder with inverted edge seam
US645726216 Mar 20001 Oct 2002Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a motion control device
US646361228 Nov 200015 Oct 2002Nike, Inc.Bladder and method of making the same
US657149016 Mar 20003 Jun 2003Nike, Inc.Bladder with multi-stage regionalized cushioning
US658309613 Oct 199924 Jun 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyLaundry detergents comprising modified alkylbenzene sulfonates
US6722059 *25 Oct 200120 Apr 2004Acushnet CompanyDynamic and static cushioning footbed
US67859852 Jul 20027 Sep 2004Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US67960569 May 200228 Sep 2004Nike, Inc.Footwear sole component with a single sealed chamber
US69317644 Aug 200323 Aug 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole structure incorporating a cushioning component
US69711936 Mar 20026 Dec 2005Nike, Inc.Bladder with high pressure replenishment reservoir
US69883294 Mar 200524 Jan 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US700033516 Jul 200321 Feb 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber
US70476702 Jul 200323 May 2006Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US707327614 May 200411 Jul 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear sole component with a single sealed chamber
US708617928 Jan 20048 Aug 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US708618028 Jan 20048 Aug 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US710031028 Jan 20045 Sep 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US712879616 Jul 200331 Oct 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber
US713203224 Apr 20037 Nov 2006Nike, Inc.Bladder with multi-stage regionalized cushioning
US714113128 Jan 200428 Nov 2006Nike, Inc.Method of making article of footwear having a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US715262524 May 200426 Dec 2006Reebok International Ltd.Combination check valve and release valve
US715678723 Dec 20032 Jan 2007Nike, Inc.Inflatable structure and method of manufacture
US724344326 Aug 200517 Jul 2007Nike, Inc.Footwear sole component with a single sealed chamber
US724448329 May 200217 Jul 2007Nike, Inc.Bladder with inverted edge seam and method of making the bladder
US727844512 Jul 20049 Oct 2007Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US733756028 Oct 20054 Mar 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US734085129 Mar 200611 Mar 2008Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US738364823 Feb 200510 Jun 2008Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US740142012 May 200622 Jul 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US742679226 Aug 200523 Sep 2008Nike, Inc.Footwear sole component with an insert
US743433915 Nov 200514 Oct 2008Nike, Inc.Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber
US744815028 Feb 200511 Nov 2008Reebok International Ltd.Insert with variable cushioning and support and article of footwear containing same
US744852211 Nov 200311 Nov 2008Nike, Inc.Fluid-filled bladder for use with strap
US751306712 Jan 20067 Apr 2009Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US75334773 Oct 200519 May 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US755684628 Jan 20047 Jul 2009Nike, Inc.Fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US756246914 Oct 200521 Jul 2009Nike, Inc.Footwear with fluid-filled bladder and a reinforcing structure
US760033119 May 200813 Oct 2009Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US76220141 Jul 200524 Nov 2009Reebok International Ltd.Method for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US769443813 Dec 200613 Apr 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US770774422 Aug 20064 May 2010Nike, Inc.Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber
US770774529 Dec 20064 May 2010Nike, Inc.Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber
US77214654 Jan 200825 May 2010Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US773524111 Jan 200615 Jun 2010Reebok International, Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US777495517 Apr 200917 Aug 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US778419613 Dec 200631 Aug 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an inflatable ground engaging surface
US78102556 Feb 200712 Oct 2010Nike, Inc.Interlocking fluid-filled chambers for an article of footwear
US781025617 Apr 200912 Oct 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US79308397 Oct 200926 Apr 2011Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US793452120 Dec 20063 May 2011Reebok International, Ltd.Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US795016910 May 200731 May 2011Nike, Inc.Contoured fluid-filled chamber
US803762329 Jun 200618 Oct 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a fluid system
US81514899 Apr 201010 Apr 2012Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US82308747 Oct 200831 Jul 2012Reebok International LimitedConfigurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US82561417 Apr 20094 Sep 2012Reebok International LimitedArticle of footwear having an adjustable ride
US830223417 Apr 20096 Nov 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US830232829 Jun 20106 Nov 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US831264328 Sep 201020 Nov 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US841427511 Jan 20079 Apr 2013Reebok International LimitedPump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US854083823 Nov 200924 Sep 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US857278612 Oct 20105 Nov 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable bladders for use in footwear and other articles of manufacture
US865660813 Sep 201225 Feb 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US865797913 Apr 200725 Feb 2014Nike, Inc.Method of manufacturing a fluid-filled bladder with a reinforcing structure
US86776529 Mar 201225 Mar 2014Reebok International Ltd.Shoe having an inflatable bladder
US8720473 *4 Oct 201113 May 2014Robert Scott AlmeidaCell flow technology that provides continuously variable, and renewable, continuance of pressure resistance
US20110162233 *14 Mar 20117 Jul 2011Dah Lih Puh Co., LtdAir cushion with multistage shock-absorbing assembly and fabricating method
US20120298227 *4 Oct 201129 Nov 2012Robert Scott AlmeidaCell flow technology that provides continuously variable, and renewable, continuance of pressure resistance
DE930369C *27 Nov 195214 Jul 1955Herbert OstermanSchuheinlage
DE1195639B *26 Jul 196124 Jun 1965Dr Med Ernst KoppeSchuh- oder Einlegesohle
DE2801197A1 *12 Jan 197820 Jul 1978Marion F RudyAufblaseinlage fuer fussbekleidung
EP0060353A1 *26 Sep 198122 Sep 1982FLUMATIC s.r.l.Orthopedic device for use in the prevention and treatment of foot disorders
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/153
International ClassificationA43B13/20, A43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/20
European ClassificationA43B13/20