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Publication numberUS2472116 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date7 Jun 1949
Filing date18 Oct 1945
Priority date18 Oct 1945
Publication numberUS 2472116 A, US 2472116A, US-A-2472116, US2472116 A, US2472116A
InventorsMaynes Hyla F
Original AssigneeEmma C Maynes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe holder
US 2472116 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.H F. MAYNES SYRINGE HOLDER June 7, 1949.

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed OCT.. 18, 1945 s uw T 0 MA H IM dw F. A L Y Hwa, MN 0. 0N

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INVENTOR.

. 4 Shee'ts-Sheet 2 W c A A l L V. ,HwM

H. F. MAYNES SYRINGE HOLDER Q Om June 7, 1949.

Filed oct. 18, 1945 H. F. MAYNES June 7, 1949.

SYRINGE HOLDER 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed OCt. 18, 1945 .5 RN W, mm .w E WM. la FJ A. L .Y H qllvl, E S @E H. F. MAYNES June 7, 1949.

SYRINGE HOLDER 4 sheets-shee 4 Filed Oct. 18, 1945 om. rm.. Ov. mm. 0o. om. PS Q INVENTOR BY HYLA F. MAYNES @w@@.m,.@.

orngs Patented `une 7, 1949 OFFICE SYRINGE HOLDER Hyla F. Maynes, Miami, Fla., assigner of one-half to EmmaC. Maynes, Miami, Fla.

Application-October 18, 1945, Serial No. 623,085

(Cl. 12S-218) This invention relates to surgical syringesand particularly to means for .facilitatinglthefusezof such syringes.

The device of the present invention is intended for use with syringes in variouskinds of .hypodermic injections or for-the withdrawal of blood or other physiological specimens;l Various devices ofr the prior art aim at facilitating the use of hypodermic and othersurgical syringes but none of them fullls the objects .of ythe present invention.

According to the present invention lsyringe holders are provided which :are'iullyautomatic inoperation once a device is placed yin position for use and is' released for operation. Further, means are provided whereby theapositioningof the device relative to the portion of thepatients body to be acted upon may be readily'established and positively maintained, despite any natural unsteadiness or disturbing reflexes on. the. part of the patient or the operator.

Further, Athe syringe holders of the present infvention are characterized by the `fact. that syringes may be associated therewith byy direct relating lateral movement ofl syringe and holder whereby the likelihood of damage to the syringe needle is virtually eliminated.- In the prior.- art holders are usually so arranged Vthat a syringe must be threaded into the holder'axiall'y in a manner which makes it diiicult to preventa'ccidental contact of the needle with portions ofthe holder during assemblyof the syringeand holder.

In addition, the device of the. present invention-is characterized by thefa'ct that the `movement of the syringe to insert the needle is effected by an actuator which engages andipresses-.the syringe plunger to slide the syringe cylinderbo'dily along 'a stationary trough, so that the liquid in the syringe cylinder may act as a dash-pot during the sliding movement of the Ysyringe along the trough. This sliding movement is arrested, after insertion of the needle, by a stop vfor the syringe cylinder, whereupon continued pressure oi the actuator against the plunger acts' to inject the dose through theneedle- The above-mention'ed relative lateral movement of syringe and holder, to associate or assemble them, is 'enabled by reason of the stationary trough edgesbeing spaced apart sufficiently to receive the syringe between them, so that the syringe-can be easily inserted or dropped into the trough.

Devices constructed according to thewpresent invention further provide means whereby they may readily and repetitiously be set to .properly receive and accommodate Sa 'syringefset Afora Ipra.

determined dosage or capacity, or, in other form, tot automatically operate the syringe. according to a predetermined dose setting of the holder. The automatic operation of the device of. the present invention assures relative uniformity in the rate of injection or extraction not attainable in the manual control and operation upon which the art presently relies.

In one of the several forms of the invention illustrated and described herein to exemplify the principles oi' the invention the entire operation of preparing the syringe, taking Vup a dose, inserting the needle, administering the dose and with?- drawing the needle from the patient isaccom.- plished by manipulation oi the holder.

Other objects and advantages of the devices constructed and used in accordance with i the underlying principles of the present invention will appear to those skilled in the arts involved from a consideration of the following specication and the accompanying drawing, wherein several specic practical embodiments of the inventionare set forth by way of example. Thescope, of the present invention, however, is not limited to the exemplary forms illustrated, or in any other way excepting as defined in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of one form ofthe holderl of the present invention with a syringe associated therewith and ready for use;

Fig. 2 is another elevational view taken rat right angles to Fig. 1 and with a portion vof the holder broken away for added clearness;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal cross sectional -vieW viewed similarly to Fig. 1;

Fig 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but at a later stage of operation;

Fig. 5 is another view similar to Fig. 3 but at the iinal stage of operation;

Fig. '.6 is a transverse cross sectional view on the line e--S of Fig. 1;

Fig. '7 is a transverse cross sectional view on the lined-el of Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 is a transverse cross sectional- View on the line 3 8 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is a transverse cross sectional `viewtaken on the same plane as Fig. 8 but looking in the opposite direction and showing -a syringein the .processor assembly in the holder;

Fig. 10 is a View similar to Fig.. 9 but with :the syringe in iinal position of assembly in the holder;

-Figull is a detailed elevational .view ofizthe syringe operating plunger of` the device of Figs. 1 through 10;

Fig. 12 is a longitudinal cross-sectional-view of another form of the holder of the present invention;

Fig. 13 is a transverse cross-sectional view on the line I3-I3 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is an elevational view of still another form of the device of the present invention;

Fig. 15 is a transverse cross sectional view on the line I5-I5 of Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 is a transverse cross sectional View on the line IS-IS of Fig. 14;

Fig. 17 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of the device of the Figs. 14 through 16 viewed at right angles to Fig. 14;

Fig. 18 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of a further embodiment of the principles of the present invention;

Fig. 19 is a fragmentary elevational view of the medial portion of the embodiment of Fig. 18 viewed at right angles to Fig. 18; and

Fig. 20 is a transverse cross sectional view on the line 28-20 of Fig. 18.

Throughout the several gures of the drawings like characters of reference denote like parts and referring rst to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1 through 11, the numeral Ii) designates generally the main body portion or holder of the device comprising a barrel portion II, a shank I2 extending longitudinally from one side thereof, and a generally cylindrical end portion I3. As appears from Figs. 2 through 5, the conventional syringe, which the several holders set forth by way of example are designed to accommodate, is designated I4 generally and comprises a cylinder portion I6, a plunger I7 having a head I8, and a needle I9. In one form of surgical syringe in common use, the plunger end of the cylinder portion I6 has an enlarged annular flange or collar 26 which is flattened at opposite sides as at 2|.

Conventional syringes of the kind referred to herein by way of example have annular beads at the needle end of the syringe cylinder as indicated at 22 in Figs. 2 through 5. To simplify the assembly of a syringe in the holder of Figs. 1

through 11 opposed flats 23 are formed on the lj."

bead 22, as by grinding conventional syringes. Obviously, syringes intended for use or for possible use in a holder of the form being described may be provided with the flats 23 in their initial manufacture. The flats 23 are in registry with the flats 2l of collar 20 at the other end of the syringe cylinder.

The walls of the barrel portion II and the cylindrical end portions I3 have longitudinal lateral openings 24 and 25, respectively, which, with the connecting shank portion I2, form a continuous lateral opening which freely receives the syringe, regardless of the degree to which the plunger I'I may be withdrawn. In other words, the shank I2, the end portion I3, and the barrel portion II, because of the longitudinal lateral openings 2l! and 25, form a stationary trough for engaging and supporting the syringe cylinder and providing a guide for longitudinal movement of the cylinder along the trough, the space between the trough edges being sufficiently wide to receive the syringe. When the holder is constructed for use with a syringe having a flattened head portion and a flattened bead, as described above, the opening 24 is made wide enough to receive the flange or collar 20 across ats 2l, as is shown clearly in Fig. 9, and the opening 25 is made just wide enough to receive bead 22 across the flats 23. Each set of diametrically opposed ats 2l and 23 provides the syringe cylinder with a generally rectangular cross-section, the smaller dimension of which is less than the width of the space between the opposed edges of the corresponding part of the trough, while the larger dimension is greater than this width. The syringe is assembled in the position shown in Fig. 9 and is then rotated a quarter turn to the position of Fig. 10. In such rotated position collar 26 and bead 22 prevent dislodgment of the syringe from the holder.

As shown in Fig. 3 the end of cylindrical end portion I3 is reduced and threaded to receive a cap 28 having an apertured end wall 29. The end wall 29 comprises an anvil or foot which is placed against the skin of a patient with the parts in the position illustrated in Fig. 3. It will be noted that cap 28 has a lateral opening 30 which forms a continuation of lateral opening 25 and permits the syringe to be inserted in the holder by direct lateral movement. The relative longitudinal position of cap 28 may be adjusted by reason of its threaded connection with end portion I3. Further, the lateral openings 25 and 36 make possible quick assembly of cap 28 on end portion I3 without threading the cap on from the end. One edge of portion I3 adjacent opening 25 is introduced into opening 30 by direct lateral movement in any desired relative longitudinal position and the parts are then rotated relative to each other a partial rotation until the openings 25 and 3Q are in alignment and the threads in engagement.

The mechanism for releasing and automatically operating the device with the holder firmly supi. ported in body contacting position will now be described. An operating element or actuator of tubular form has an end wall 36 and is disposed for relative axial movement in barrel II, that is, along the trough I I, I2, I3. End wall 36 of operating element 35 receives a screw 31 having a head portion 38 of resilient cushioning material for abutting engagement with head I8 of syringe plunger I'I.

In the present embodiment a cap 39 threads into the outer end of barrel I I and a compression coil spring 0 is conned between end wall 36 of operating element 35 and the inner face of cap 39. Spring 40 normally urges operating element 35 to the left as viewed in Figs. 1 through 4 but means are provided for retaining the operating member in Various withdrawn positions against the resilient urge of spring 40. The exterior of operating element 35 is provided with a series of circularly extending ratchet teeth 44 as appears best from the detail view, Fig. 11, and a detaining pawl 45 is pivoted to the barrel II by means of torsion spring hinge 46 which normally urges the pawl in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Figs. 3 through 5. An extension 56 of pawl 45 comprises a manually engageable release lever and includes a pad or projection 5I which may extend through a lateral opening in the wall of barrel II for frictional braking engagement with the surface of operating element 35, as shown in Fig. 4.

Referring to Fig. 3, a manually adjustable rod 56 may be employed as a stop to readily position operating member 35 to set the holder for receiving a syringe containing a predetermined dose. Rod 56 is supported in cap 39 which has an inward tubular extension 51, and rod 56 threads into the extension as at 58, so that the threaded portion constitutes an adjustment member connected to stop 56 by which it may be axially adjusted relative to barrel II. In Fig. 3 rod 56 is shownadustedto provide for a dose of`10 units, `operating element 35 has been manually pushed totheurightuntil screw 3l abuts .the inner fenldfof :rod-56, Jthus automatically determining fitheinitial :position of operating element 35 With 'the :operating element so positioned the syrlIrgeJ'B-may merely be inserted in the manner previously described and plunger head i8 will ibe'incontact with or very close to padded head .'lloflscrew 37. This guards against the operat- Iing#elementstriking against the syringe plunger ywith impact which might injure the syringe. It iwlllbeinotedfrom Figs. l and 2, particularly the latter,that 'barrel ll of the holder has opposed fears 59 formed inwardly to serve as a stop which lmitswmovement of the operating member 35 to theleft as'shown in Figs. l and 2. The end of operating'member 35will meet ears 59 when the parts reach the position shown in Fig. 5.

With the lparts in the position of Fig. 3, the /operatorof-the device, whether it be the patient or'another person, places the cap 28 against the patients `skin-at any desired angle and, holding 'thefbarrelrrmly in iixed position, presses release IeVer'iIl-which removes pawl l5 from the ratchet "teeth .of operating element 35 and the force of spring 4;!) moves syringe l5 bodily until its collar T20 abuts U-shaped washer t@ which may be of -resilient material7 the rear face of the' washer thusserving as a stop for the syringe cylinder to 'limit its forward sliding movement in the stationarytrough. The washer t is shaped at its 'inner `portion for sliding frictional engagement Wlththe periphery of the syringe cylinder (Fig. 2), so that this inner portion of the washer consttutesarestraining member serving as a yield- .ablebrakeon cylinder it of the syringe, holding `it against unintended lengthwise movement. The nitia'l movement of operating element 35 brings thepar'ts tothe position of Fig. 4 where the needle is .properly inserted in the patient. The needle v'inserting movement is relatively rapid and in the Lembodimentnow being described depends upon ltheQdashpOt action of the syringe, since entry of '.iihepluhgerll into the syringe cannot be rapidly .effected 'because of the restricted orice of needle 1'9.

.After the parts reach the position of Fig. 4, operating element 35 continues to bear against head II8 ofplunger il and the contents of the ssyringeare expelled .through the orii-lce of needle L9 v.until the syringe is empty. The action of springfllll may result in a too rapid expulsion of ,.-theiontents of the syringe, but this rate is .and-.simply controlled by pressure of the operator-fs nger on release lever 5!! which en- .sagesprojection 5| against the barrel Il with sanyidesiredfdegree of pressure, thus providing a .-.manually .controlled brake for slowing the aczxtiontof .the operating element 35 to any desired degree. In this alternative, the rate of expulsion imayrbe-eslowed and controlled by direct applicattion'ffthethumb or fngerof the user to the :operato-r through opening 24, the thumb or finger eengagingagainst operator 35 at about the point {designated-A in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 5 shows the fpositionznf. partswhen the syringe plunger has efully entered syringe l5, and the device may when be removed to withdraw the needle from lfthe ,-patient.

Slt will tbe noted that shank l2 is slightly finarrovverthanthe diameter of the cylinder poration of the'syringge. This facilitates ready manual aimspinei of z the :f syrinse without interference on 5 fthe @part lof shank `12, yboth .in assembling and removing the syringe with respect ito the holder.

#Since .the `syringes illustrated in conjunction with the .various embodiments `herein shown and described may be the same, the Areference numerals assigned to the syringe and its `component parts yin thedescription of the foregoing embodiment will be retained in the description of the several other embodiments shown in Figs. 12 through 20.

Referring now to the embodiment of the present invention illustrated in Figs. 12 -and 113, the device there shown, like the previously ydescribed embodiment, has a barrel portion f'IU, Yan end portion lll and a, connecting shank portion 72. A cap or guard element 13 is'associated with 4the end portion 'H as in the `rst described embodiment.

The syringe hi is associated with the devicea's in the previous Aembodiment excepting that the flattened collar '25 is disposed in an kannular -enlargement 'il formed at the end of a sleeve `I8 which is disposed within barrel portion 10. `An end cap-8d for "barrel portion 'lil has an inwardly projecting sleeve 'Si which gives sliding bearing support to the opposite 'end of sleeve 18. A cylindrical member i3d-corresponding generally to operating member 35 of Figs. l through 11 is `disposed for axial sliding movement in sleeve 18 and is otherwise 'the same as operating member 35. A compression coil spring acts 'between end cap 8i! and the remote end of wall portion 80 of operating member 84. A limit screw 93 performs the same function as rod 5.6 ofthe previous embodiment.

Fig. l2 shows the device in an intermediate position where the needle of the syringe has been projected but the contents kof the syringe have not been fully expelled. In setting the device for operation, .sleeve 18 is first moved to the right as viewed in Fig. v12. A pawl 95 has a leaf spring support ,5B secured to sleeve 18 and leaf spring support 96 and pawl 95 are shown disposed in a slot 91 formed in barrel portion l0. Movement of sleeve'l tothe right as viewed in Fig. l2 cams spring support 96 downwardly as viewed in Fig. 12 and .causes pawl .S5 .tozpass through an opening 99 formed in sleeve 18 andinto engagement with ratchet teeth Hill ofoperating member 84. The springsupport 95 is biased to urge pawl 95 into engagement with teeth |00. During all ybut this `rst part yof the movement of sleeve 78 to the right, operating member 84 moves with it.

A lockingpawl lil-2 and an operating lever portion HlSthereof are the same in construction and operation as pawl 45 and release lever 59 of the previous embodiment. Whensleeve '1.8 reaches Yits limit of movementtonthe right yas viewed in Fig. 12, pawl m2 engages a notch m5 formedin sleeve i8 and. retains sleeve `'I8 releasably in-withdrawn position. .Further `setting of theholder involves manual movement of operatingrmember 84 further to the right as viewedin Fig. .12.,accoi-ding to .the .dose tobe administered. lSleeve 10 is provided .with markings as in Fig. 1,:the showing of the markings being omitted yin the `gures illustrating the present embodiment. As .operating member 84 moves to the right relative to ysleeve 18, pawl cams idly along ratchet .teeth 'i100 and operating member 84 is retained therebytin lany adjusted right-.hand position-desired, as for instance when screw it? of operate ting 4imem'ber .1.811 engages vthe end vof `adji'istizzig The holder is then ready to receive the syringe and placement of the latter in the holder with the head of the syringe plunger in engagement with or close to the padded end of screw |01 of operating member 84 is accomplished just as in the case of the previous embodiment, and the needle of the syringe will automatically be disposed in withdrawn position as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 of the previous embodiment. Releasing of the device for operation is accomplished by release lever |03 in the same manner as previously set forth, and projection thereof may be employed as a manual brake as previously described.

When sleeve 18 is released in this manner, spring 86 moves the sleeve and operating member 84 to the left as a unit through the cooperation of pawl 95 until the needle of the syringe is inserted in the patient, at which point the slanted nose portion of pawl 95 engages the left end of slot 31, which is likewise slanted, and pawl 95 is automatically cammed from engagement with ratchet teeth |60, against the resistance of spring support 36. This releases operating member 84 for movement relative to sleeve 18 and, under the impetus of spring 86, the operating member proceeds to the left until the plunger has expelled the entire contents of the syringe.

The embodiment illustrated in Figs. 14 through 17 will now be described. This form of the device is similar to the one shown in Figs. 1 through 11 in its manner of operation and differs mainly in the manner in which a syringe is retained in the holder and in the construction and arrangement of the body engaging guard element. Like the first-described embodiment, the present one has a barrel H5 with an end cap ||6 and an offset shank i1 projecting therefrom at the other end. Shank H1 carries an angular-ly formed guard or foot element H8 which has a longitudinal slot (not shown), for engagement by a screw and nut assembly |20, whereby the foot H8 may he adjustably located lengthwise with respect to shank l I1.

As appears from Fig. 16, the barrel portion l5, adjacent the plane on which Fig. 16 is taken, has a lateral opening |26 of the full width of the interior of the barrel. The syringe I4 need accordingly not be rotated in assembling the syringe. A spring element |25 fixed to shank ||1 has a pair of longitudinally spaced U-shaped spring clip portions |26 and |21 which are so formed that they support the body of syringe lli rmly but with a light enough pressure to permit endwise movement of the syringe for inserting the needle into the patient in a manner otherwise identical with that described in connection with the first embodiment.

In Figs. 17, the cylindrical operator is desighated |33, and an abutment screw |3| carried by the end wall of the operating member has a rearwardly extending shank |33 which is accessible for adjusting the axial position of screw |3| when the cylindrical operator |30 is at a, right-hand position, as in Fig. 17. Cap ||6 of barrel |5 supports an inwardly extending tube |35 as by means of the bent-over flange portion |36 at the end of tube |35. The only remaining distinction between the embodiment of Figs. 14 through 17 and the first-described embodiment is found in the arrangement of calibrations along barrel l5. A longitudinal opening |38 is formed in barrel ||5 with suitable scales provided along its edges so that the forward end of cylindrical operator |30, designated |39 in Fig. 14, indicates the capacity setting of the holder. The calibration arrangement of Fig. 14 may be employed with equal advantage in the first-described embodiment.

In the embodiment of Figs. 18 through 20 the device is arranged in such manner that it may be used for taking up doses in a syringe, as well as in the injection thereof into patients. Further, a syringe may, by the use of this form of holder, be employed in the extraction of blood specimens and the like from patients. The embodiment now to be described has the further advantage of being capable of withdrawing the needle from the patient Without changing the initial position of the holder, the entire injecting operation being thus concluded with the holder in firm position against the patients skin. For convenience of manipulation the embodiment about to be described is in the form of a pistol with a manually operable trigger for operating the syringe.

Referring to the administration of insulin by way of example, the following steps comprise the full administration procedure, so far as manipulation of the syringe is concerned. The plunger is first withdrawn to the desired dose to introduce an equivalent volume of air into the syringe. The needle of the syringe is then inserted through a rubber stopper which forms the cap of the insulin vial. The air in the syringe is then injected into the vial, the vial is inverted and the desired dose is drawn into the syringe by again withdrawing the plunger. The needle is then withdrawn from the vial `and the syringe is ready for injecting the insulin by first inserting the needle into the patient, then operating the plunger to inject the dose, and finally withdrawing the needle from the patient.

Referring to Figs. 18 through 20, the form of a device there sho-wn comprises a barrel portion |40, a shank |fl| projecting from an end thereof, and a cylindrical end portion |42. The shank |4| and end portion |42 and the mode of introducing the syringe into the device may be the same as in the rst described embodiment. However, collar 20 of syringe cylinder I6 is assembled in a transversely extending channel formation |45 by the quarter rotation of the syringe previously described. Channel formation |45, which serves as a part for gripping the syringe cylinder is integral with a longitudinally slotted channel shaped bar |41.

A rack member |50 of dove-tail formation, as shown in Fig. 20, is supported for longitudinal movement in a complementary groove |5| formed in barrel portion |40. At its end, rack |50 is provided with hook formations |52 and |53 which receive and grip the head |8 of the syringe plunger I1 when the syringe is assembled in the device. Rack |50 cooperates with the walls of barrel portion |46 to provide a longitudinal enclosure |55 within which bar |41 may slide longitudinally under certain conditions and in a manner which will presently appear.

Barrel portion |40 has a butt portion |60 whereby the device may be held in the manner of a pistol and a trigger element |6| founs part of a rack |62 which is guided for longitudinal sliding movement. The opposite end of rack |62 has secured thereto or formed therewith a spring pin |64 which projects into an opening in the end wall of barrel |40 and thus serves as a guide for rack |62. Rack |62 is further guided by a roller |66 supported for free rotation in the butt portion |60 and by meshing engagement with a pinion |68 which is rotatably mounted by means of a pin |10 supported at its opposite ends in bearing aerienne portionstly'lileandllz formedsinbarrel portionf'l-Au. Rimani-|68 is XedI-too'r formed with agear |14 lwhich". meshes' zwithzrack 5|).

.neomnpre'ssion"coi-l1springV |15 surrounds spring pin |64 between the end of rack |62 and the ad# jarentend wallrfofubarrel'portion Mlla'nd it will hefseenfromrthe forego-ing that. -when no manual pressure is i fbeing 'exerted -on trigger |61 `spring f-T-Swilll urge rack' |62 to the left as vviewed'in Eig'l--IB-faidlthus `Inove'racklSll to the right to an extreme withdrawn position. v-)This extreme positionrwillr-be variablydetermined in a manner which'will presently appear.

'73Sbtted\bar|41'has a-bifurcated end portion $80* w1-iich\'pivotally 'supports afrock arm v'|8| Whichfh-as latches'f |82 'and |83 at its opposite ends.-V A springelement-|8||=securedl at its opposite ends in bifurcation |80 acts against a pair oprctuberances projecting-from the hub portion ofroc'k arm |81 'toprovide -a snap over mechanism forroc'k armj |8| whereby it is spring urged to its"spring illustrated positiony in Fig. 18 and is also='spring urgecli-,o an opposite more clockwise positioniwhen m-anualpressure is exerted on latch portion|83,for reasons which will presently appear. Hook portion |53 of rack-lill has lan upwardlyprojecting lug |88 for engagement by latcharrn |83 lwhen the rock arm il is inits opposite-position from that illustrated in' Fig. 18. 1 i' Itwillbe notedthat 'the upper portion of barrel portion-HIJ isi-'slotted as at"| 9@ to receive bifurcationrv |80and also to receive the head portion |92 oi a'screw-'"|93 whose shank projects through Vthe 'slot in "bari N11l for 'engagement with a nut |94 dlsposedin'the'channel which comprises bar' |41; The lower' end of screw' |93 projects downwardly into a'groov'e"'| 96formed in"the.'adjacent surface of"'bar"|^5. The screw |93 and the groove |96 form a lost-motion'connection between `the bar |41fandthe` rackor'actuator |5|l,the element |93 volwhic'h is adjustablelongitudinally of the trough ND,"'|'4-I, l42tovary'the extent of the lost motion. Screw |93' supports a marking plate |91 `as shown inlFig. 20 and a 'downward extension |98 of plate |`9`|`prevents rotation of plate |91 when screw |93 isro't'ated. "The'opposite Vends of 'plate l'! may be pointed'as indicated in Fig. 19 to cooperate with apair of scales |98 and' |99 provided on the outer'surface of barrel portion |40 for measuring insulin dosesof 'eithe'r`20 or`40 unit strength, or

any other material.

"The manner in which` the device of Figs. 18 through 20 is-employed and itssequence of operat'ions `will ,now be described. Assuming that it is desired tn administer amaximum dose, screw i193 isloosened, placed in .the position illustratedin Rigs'.flkanot-19..` and :tightened to fix screw |93 and marker |191 relative tochannelbar lill'.v When it is in the position illustrated in Fig. i8 latch 82 prevents any relative,'axiall movement between the'syringe cylinderandv the holder proper. 4:In Figs 18 .triggeror operating memberfllil Ais shown in- 'amaxirnum compressed position. The next step to release trigger ll which 'withdraws the plunger v I1: of. the. syringe 4through 'thev Ioperation otlrack ifby: the spring or operating mem-ber lli-.runtilfthe-lbottom'end of screwtlSS engages the opposite end of groovefl'ilt of rack |59. This movement takes into the syringe a quantity of air .,..Afterfthev syringe plunger; isthus Withdrawn the needle |9 is inserted into an insulin vialand trigger I-l is manually @compressed until the plunger vof thesyringe is .fully inserted, discharging fthefairi- `from-the syringe into the vial. "The vialis theniinvertedfand trigger` |61 is released, which CausesY the syringe plunger to again be withdrawn-by rack-|59 :andthe dose takenup is againy accurately-determined by cooperationwbetween `scr/ew |93 andthe :left-handy end' lof groove |96.

After. thev needle is removed frointhe vial'rock arm--|`8|i` is- -manuallywos'cillated in a clockwise direction Pto ^re1ease latchy f I 82 fand the snapover action offspring |84 disposes-latchfiSB in lposition for lop-eration Vin a-:manner 'which 'will presently appear. Y V4Release ofl latchrfl 13E-permits spring |15 to extend its operation'bywcontinuedinovement orackfliiZ;4 pinionwily-gear l|11! land'rack |59. This continued operation moves channel bar" |41 to the rightlas' viewed Ainfig." 18. through'engagement of theleft endl vof 'groove'v |99 'against screw |93.; and vthe Aentire syringe ismovedaxfially to the fright' as viewed in-'lig` 18 until ithe righteh'and end of 'channel-bar lll-1 abutsfagainst a bearing roller 200 journaled inf-:barrel portion |40 for normally engagingfagainst the '-back Vof rack4` |50.

This-"degree of rwithclrav'ving movement ofthe entire Isyringe issuilicientv to Idispose 'the' needle behind theY extreme rendfof cylindrical end'portion |42 in'A Asubstantially ther position 'illustratedy in Figs. rZand 3 of thel :tiret-described"embodiment The outer 'end of endfporti'on |42 isthen pla-ced against the l`patient 'and' the" trigger-r 6| is manually compressed..-YDu'e-tothe dash 'pot action of the syringe the' vlatter.I will first f move fbodily to project 'the needle intov `the ipatientuntil "the left end' of channel"'bai-"|41` reaches `the left 'end wall of barrel portionel 40.

Gontinued'pressure upon trigger |61' moves the plunger.' into' the L'syringeun-til the rcontents of the latter'arel-fully expelled. `-At this juncture latch |831, which is 'theninan' pppositeposition to that illustra-nedl in Fig.fl8; automatically' cams'over and' latches ibehind'lug" |88 Vof rack"|`59. 'Release ofA pressure from triggerfrI-B'I then permits spring |15--tcractranoly ywithdraw rack^|50 to the' rig'htas viewed' inf Fig. 18 and, #since fc'h'annel `ba`r M1 and rack ll'lltare-now lockedtogether by latch"|83, the syringefwith itslplungerfis withdrawn as a unit and' the needle is thus 'withdrawnfrom the patient -to entirely 'complete 'the 4administration of the dose.

What is 'claimed is:

1. Syringe `means-includinga holder comprising abody member/and av syringeV having vthe'usual needlefat' one end and a depressible expulsion plungerprojecting from the'other end, opposite ends-of saidfsyringe having opposed flattened portions, said bodyinember having an end'portion thereofA lengageable 'with a^patients1skin and an opposite zend "portion" including. syringe plunger operatingy means, 'aconnecting portion 'offset from the` axisofthe -fsupportedsyringe 'whereby lthe syringe lood-y isy exposedto vview and manipulation, said end portions including lateral'fopeningshaving' ff reduced llentrance .f portions to receive the syringe ":across L'ats Ya'ndf"permit 'partial rotation thereof .forzreleasablyretaining the syringe body in association with the holder, and mea-ns 'limiting 'lengthwise m'ovenfient of thesyringe" relative to"thelrolderfbet'weenfan initial position where the Vnek'e'dle is flach-ind the` skin engaging' means and a 'terminal "pdsitionf where' the needle is beyond '7n the engaging' means at'di'stance 'sufficient to provide for proper entry of the needle into the patients body.

2. Syringe means including a holder comprising a body member and a syringe having the usual needle at one end and a depressible expulsion plunger projecting from the other end, opposite ends of said syringe having opposed ilattened portions. said body member having an end portion thereof engageable with a patients skin and an opposite end portion including syringe plunger operating means, a connecting portion offset from the axis of the supported syringe whereby the syringe body is exposed to view and manipulation, said end portions including lateral openings having reduced entrance portions to receive the syringe across flats and permit partial rotation thereof for releasably retaining the syringe body in association with the holder.

3. A syringe for use with a cylindrical holder having reduced lateral entrance openings for receiving the syringe body, said syringe having a needle at one end and a manipulating plunger at its other end. said syringe having annular enlargements at its opposite ends with diametrically opposed aligned flats for introducing the syringe through the holder entrance openings and partially rotating the holder and syringe relative to each other to prevent inadvertent disassembly.

4. A syringe holder comprising a body member for supportingr a syringe having the usual needle at one end and a denressible expulsion plunger proiectinq from the other end` said body member havingr an end portion thereof for receiving the needle end of the syringe and an opposite end portion including syringe plunger operating means. said rst end portion having a can screw threaded thereon for relative axial adjustment and engageable with a patients skin to comprise a guard for the syringe needle. and means limiting lengthwise movement of the syringe relative to the holder between an initial position where the needle is behind the skin engaging cap and a terminal position where the needle is beyond the skin engaging cap a distance suicient to provide for proper entry of the needle into the patients body, said rst end portion and said cap having lateral openings whereby they may be directly assembled in adjusted longitudinal position by direct lateral and partial rotational movement,

5. A device for operating a hypodermic syringe having a cylinder, a plunger projecting from the rear end thereof, and a needle at the front end of the cylinder; the device comprising a holder having an elongated stationary trough for engaging and supporting the syringe cylinder and forming a guide for longitudinal movement of the cylinder along the trough, the space between the trough edges being suiciently wide to receive the syringe, an actuator in the trough movable therealong in engagement with the syringe plunger, thereby sliding the cylinder forward alone.r the trough to project the needle, and a stop on the holder for limiting said forward sliding of the cylinder by the actuator, to cause the plunger to be moved in the cylinder by continued movement of the actuator.

6. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a spring mounted in the holder to the rear of the trough and acting upon the actuator to operate it.

'7. A device according to claim 5, in combination with the syringe, the syringe cylinder being rotatable in the trough and having diametrically opposed flats providing the cylinder with a generally rectangular cross-section, the smaller dimension of the rectangular cross-section being less than the width of the space between the trough edges, and the larger dimension of the rectangular cross-section being greater than said width.

8. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a restraining member in the trough made of resilient material shaped for sliding frictional engagement with the periphery of the syringe cylinder to hold it against accidental longitudinal movement in the trough.

9. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a second stop in the holder located to the rear of the actuator and engageable thereby to limit movement of the actuator away from the trough, and an adjustment member connected to the second stop for adjusting it longitudinally of the trough.

10. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a member movably mounted on the holder and having a catch engageable with the actuator to retain it in a retracted position, the catch being movable by the member to release the actuator, said member also having a brake engageable with the actuator by movement of the member to release the catch.

11. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough and having a part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a, part for gripping the syringe plunger, a latch for releasably securing the bar to the holder to prevent said longitudinal movement of the bar, the latch being movable to a released position for releasing the bar from the holder, an operating member connected Ito the actuator for moving it rearward in the holder, .the bar having a part engageable by the actuator to limit said rearward movement, the actuator having an element eng-ageable with the bar to project it forward upon forward movement of the actuator, and a second operating member connected to the actuator for pressing it forward.

12. A device according to claim 11, in which the latch is mounted on the bar, the actuator having a part engageable by the latch in its released position to couple the bar to the actuator.

13. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a pistol grip projecting laterally from the holder in fixed relation to the trough, a trigger disposed forwardly of the grip and movable relative thereto, and an operative connection between the trigger and the actuator.

14. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough and having a part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a part for gripping the syringe plunger, and a lost-motion connection between the bar and the actuator for moving the Ibar rearward with the actuator.

15. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough and having a part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a part for gripping the syringe plunger, and a lost-motion connection between the bar and the actuator for moving the bar rearward with the actuator and including an element adjustable longitudinally of the trough relative to the bar to vary the extent ofthe lost motion. y

16. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough and having a part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a part for gripping the syringe plunger, a lost-motion connection 13 between the bar and the :actuator for moving the bar rearward with the actuator, and a stop for limiting rearward movement of the bar relative to the trough.

17. A device according to claim 5, comprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough :and having a part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a part for gripping the syringe plunger, a lost-motion connection between the bar and the actuator for moving the bar rearward with the actuator, and a releasable latch operable selectively to couple the bar to the holder or to the actuator.

18. A device according to claim 5, ycomprising also a bar movable longitudinally of the trough and having a `part for gripping the syringe cylinder, the actuator having a part for gripping the syringe plunger, a lost-motion yconnection between the bar and the actuator for moving the bar rearward with the actuator, a latch on 2O the bar for securing the bar to the holder and movable to a position for releasing the bar, and a cam `on the actuator for operating the latch in said releasing position to couple the bar to the actuator.

HYLA F. MAYNES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,718,596 Smith June 25, 1929 2,295,849 Kayden Sept. 15, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 505,931 France May 1'7, 1920 539,092 France Mar. 28, 1922

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/136, 604/224
International ClassificationA61M5/20, A61M5/315
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/20, A61M2005/3152
European ClassificationA61M5/20