Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2452502 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date26 Oct 1948
Filing date25 Apr 1945
Priority date25 Apr 1945
Publication numberUS 2452502 A, US 2452502A, US-A-2452502, US2452502 A, US2452502A
InventorsTarbox John P
Original AssigneeTarbox John P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe construction
US 2452502 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. TARBOX SHOE CONSTRUCTION Filed April 23, 1945 aux/00221111711175 .3 -32 INVENTOR Patented Oct. 26, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHOE CONSTRUCTION John P. Tarbox, Philadelphia, Pa. Application April 23, 1945, Serial No. 589,722

9 Claims. (Cl. 2.6-2.5)

The shoe construction of my invention is that type in which the shoe is opened and closed for fastening about the foot of the wearer by a hinge movement between the heel and the vamp portions. This type of shoe has hitherto been proposed in the art several times but has failed in practical adoption because the construction was impractical.

According to my invention I have completely revised the general construction of the shoe with a view to attaining these practicabilities to a high degree. In so doing I utilize molded plastic material to a considerable extent. In the vamp portion I form as one molded unit the inner sole and the toe, a part of the outer sole, and a part of the hinge joint. In the heel portion I form it entirely of molded plastic material. These changes in materials and construction enable me to improve the nature of the joint in general between the Vamp portion and the heel portion of the shoe as hinged thereto, including improvements in the heel joint itself and the securing means utilized in connection with the heel joint. They also enable me to apply readily removable and replaceable heel and sole portions.

All of these things and the various andsundry details of construction are delineated in the following drawings and described in the annexed specification.

Of the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the shoe;

Figure 2 is a cross-section on line 2-2 in a vertical plane of the hinge Joint between the heel and toe portions;

Figure 3 is a transverse section of the sole just behind the toe portion;

Figure 4 is a similar transverse section along the line 44 near the rear edge of the molded toe;

Figure 5 is a section of the toe portion of the removable sole on line 5--5 of Figure 1 in the direction. of the arrows, showing a form. of the front attaching clip;

Figure 6 is a view of the bottom of the sole showing in plan form the rear attaching clip of the removable sole; and

Figure 7 is a longitudinal section of the toe portion of the shoe showing a modified form of front attaching clip.

The vamp portion is designated generally III, the heel portion generally II. The general division between the vamp and the heel portions is transversely of the shoe in the general vicinity of the front wall I6 of the heel per se I8 of the shoe. The two portions are hinged together on shoe toe, both inside and outside.

may be moved downwardly with respect to the vamp portion I0 approximately as shown in dotted lines in Figure 1.

The vamp portion III is built about a sole I9.

This sole I9 is of molded plastic material. It comprises a heavy, relatively rigid afterpart 20, a relatively thin and flexible intermediate part 2i (in the region of the ball of the foot), and a relatively thicker and less flexible toe part 22. Molded integrally with the toe part 22 of the sole is the whole toe proper of the shoe 23, which is shaped precisely as required for the finished It is preferably of heavy cross-section at the front and at the sides and top the section is gradually reduced to thinly tapered margins 24. Just beneath and in front of the point of the toe the toe portion 22 is extended at 25 to receive the renewable sole, as will presently be described. Integrally formed with the heavy and relatively rigid rear end 2|] of the sole is a central hinge ear 26 of a width sufficiently less than the gross width of the sole in this region to accommodate hinge ears formed on the heel portion I I.

The vamp proper of the shoe comprises walls I2 and may be constructed of any suitable flexi-- ble material as leather, cloth, rubber and the like. Its general construction and form insofar as it covers the region of the shoe between the toe proper 23 and the line of division between the vamp and heel portions I0 and II is of the same contour and extent as usually employed in shoes. Too, it is provided in its center with the usual divided top 21 tied together adjustably by strings 28. Its means of securement to the toe proper and sole, however, are quite difierent from those usually employed. The sole I9 has its under margins rabbeted at 29 and the flexible walls I2 of the vamp are brought down over the outer edges of the sole 2! and cemented in the rabbet 29 beneath the sole, cement being applied to the lateral edges as well if desired, thus afiording a strong bond which is stressed in shear. At the front the vamp is overlapped outwardly upon the tapered rear margin 24 of the toe 23 and cemented there, with its front edge abutting a raised bead 30 which in effect forms a rabbet in connection with the tapered front margin 24 of the toe. The rear edge 3i of the vamp wall I2 form outermost contour of the shoe.

extends diagonally downwardly and rearwardly to the rear end 32 of the sole portion 20, which projects behind the hinge axis I4. This edge may be finished in any desired manner (not shown) as, for example, by longitudinal seams and the like. So constructed and extended the vamp walls in this rear region of the vamp portion constitute an effective downwardly and rearwardly stressed tie to the sole against which the tension of the strings 28 are exerted to keep the vamp portion smoothly pulled over the instep.

Secured removably beneath the toe portion 22 and the adjoining flexible portion 2I of the sole is the removable and replaceable outer sole 33. This sole is of varying cross-section longitudinally, thickest in its central portion under the ball of the foot and the thin portion of sole I9, where it is subjected to greatest wear, and of decreasing thickness toward its opposite ends beneath the thicker sole portions 20 and 22. It is flexible and preferably elastic to a considerable degree. At its front end there is riveted to it a metallic clip 34 of curvilinear plan form (see Fig, and channel cross-section which fits over the correspondingly curvilinear front end projection or terminus 25 of the sole in such a manner as to hold the front end of sole 33 tightly up against the under face of sole portion 22. Its rear end has similarly riveted to it a metallic hook 35 of a width approaching but not equal to the width of sole 9 at this point. This clip meets with a complemental clip 36 of similar form and somewhat greater width riveted to sole I9. Clips 35 and 36, as shown in Figure 6, interlock when in engagement, 36 being provided with small nibs 31 at each end over which 35 may slide, and between which it sockets. The outer sole 33 is considerably wider than the inner sole throughout the regions to which it is applied, its rounded projecting edges 38 providing the plan Each of these projecting edges 38 is provided adjoining the vamp wall I2 with an upwardly projecting and close-fitting rib 39, the two ribs 39 being adapted closely to embrace the lower outer corners of vamp I2 and sole I9 between them when the sole is stretched in place. The relative dimensions of the parts and the relative rigidities, fiexibilities and elasticities of the component parts and portions are such that when clip 34 is entered over the projecting front end 25 of inner sole I9, the outer sole may be pulled rearwardly and at the same time clip 35 entered laterally over nib 31 at one end of clip 36. The sole 33 may then be pushed laterally under the vamp portion, clip 35 entering clip 36 fully and becoming seated between the nibs 31, and ribs 39 slipping one on either side of vamp walls I2 and sole II! to snugly socket themselves into place. So attached sole 33 is retained under its own stress combined with such stress as is imposed upon coacting portions of the sole I9.

The heel portion II, as has been remarked, is molded entirely of plastic material. Upon the forepart I6 of the heel per se I3 are formed hinge ears 40 spaced apart and of dimensions to receive snugly between them the coacting hinge ear 26 integrally formed on the sole portion 20, to underlie the laterally overhanging parts of sole part 26 beneath the vamp wall receiving rabbets 29, and to form frontal extensions of the outer side walls of the heel per se I3.

The upper walls I5 of the heel portion I I extend integrally upwards from the top portion of the heel per se I3. These walls I5 are themselves of varying cross-section and flexibility. At the front they are purposely of thin cross-section and relatively very flexible, being formed transversely of a contour and dimension which enables them to flex outwardly under moderate pressure to fit the sides of the foot as contoured by the walls I2 of the vamp. In this region walls I5 are extended forwardly toward the toe of the shoe a considerable distance in advance of the front of the heel per se and the hinge axis I4 in order that when the heel portion is moved to its 90 dotted-line position the front margins H (see the dotted-line position) will overlap outwardly the rear margins 3I of the vamp walls I2, whereby the interiorexterior relations of the respective walls I2, I5 are not changed when the shoe is opened to receive the foot. However, the walls I5 thicken up in section at their bottom regions and toward the rear or heel wall 42, becoming relatively thicker and stiffer, even rigid, at and toward the extreme rear. Vertically, however, in the rear section, the walls I5 are progressively thinned and at the top margins 43 are again relatively thin and flexible whereby to accommodate themselves more agreeably and comfortably to the horizontal contours of the foot. At the top margin 43 the edges may be suitably rounded and beaded for further comfort.

The heel per se I3 is hollowed out on its under side to the rear of axis I4. In its forepart it is hollowed out complementally to abuttingly receive the rearwardly projecting end 32 of the sole portion 20 against the fore-edge of its floor portion 44 in a vertical plane, whereby to accurately define the foot-enclosing position of the heel portion I I with respect to the vamp portion III, and to accurately maintain the floor 44 of the heel in alignment with the floor 45 of the sole.

To the rear of the abutting edges of 32 and 44 the hollow in heel per se I3 decreases in depth rearwardly (see Figure 2) Near the rear the decreased depth provides a shelf 41. Secured by screws 43 to this shelf is the temporary retaining spring II. The fore-end of this spring is ofiset upwardly and engages in a notch 49 in the central hinge ear I9 of the sole portion 20. The angle of the engagement is such that under force applied downwardly to the heel portion I I as respects the vamp portion I0, whether on or ofi the foot of the wearer, the spring end may be forced from the retaining notch 49 to release the heel portion II to be swung downwardly. Yet the retaining force of the end of the spring in the notch 43 is such that the heel portion I I is retained in its normal position about the foot against the application of moderate or ordinary forces of dislodgement, even if desired under the most severe dislodging forces usually encountered in wear. Supplementing this spring retainer I1, however, and of a nature to exert much stronger holding force, are permanent retaining means I8 previously referred to as located at the top edge of the shoe. These are in the form of flexible leather or fabric strips 50 sewed to the top of the vamp near the rear edge BI and following the top margins 43 of the heel walls I5, where they are provided with pushbutton fasteners 5|, the one element of which is carried by the strips 50 and the other element of which is mounted in walls I5. The dimensions are such that these strips 50 are pulled tight when the fore-end of the floor 44 of the heel portion II vertically abuts the rear end 45 of the sole l3 and when the buttons 5| are fastened. On the other hand, merely by grasping in ones fingers the rearwardly projecting rear ends of the strips 50 on either side of the shoe the buttons may be instantly released and the heel por- The outer lower edges 52 of the molded main body of the heel l3 are grooved all the way around, on each the front wall Hi, the side walls, and the rear walls. Snapped over thebottom I and into these grooves is the complementally formed upper edge flange 53 of a flexible and elastic, removable and replaceable heel pad 54 Interiorly of both the heel portion H and the vamp portion Hi there isor may be provided in the corners between the vamp and heel walls I2 and I 5 and the sole I9 and floor 44 any suitable lining, filling and shaping material such as indicated at 55 in each of Figures 2, 3 and 4. These materials are, of course, divided in the vertical plane 56 of the abutting parts 45, 44 and appropriately treated at this point of division to insure accurate meeting without deterioration of their abutting portions during use. i

The advantages of my new shoe construction are many. Outstanding among them are the following:

The shoe may be much more cheaply constructed than leather and fabric shoes as ordinarily made, jointly for the reasons that molding of plastic material and cementing of such pliable material as is used in conjunction therewith eliminates sewing and special forming during sewing, and the required quantity of expensive pliable material like leather and special fabrics is a minimum.

Utilization of plastic material improves durability of the shoe by improving the wearing qualities of both the rear heel Walls 42 and the toe 23, effectively providing'against scuffing of the same.

The facility with which provision may be made for removable and replaceable soles and heels is also an outgrowth of the use of plastic materials.

There should be mentioned in this connection. incidentally, too, not only the wide range of choice of colors and color tones which molded plastic provides, but also the preservation of finish and polish during use.

outstandingly, however, the molded plastic construction serves the purposes of effecting hinging together of the vamp and heel portions l0 and II for most efiicient, quick action for putting on and taking off of shoes. The hinge oint becomes entirely concealed, neat and effective, a thoroughly efficient mechanical device.- Without conflicting with the full application and use of pliable material in the vamp, it insures closefitting, stable jointing of the two portions. The joint never changes from its accurate shoe size. It afi'ords the wearer the same feeling of substan tiality and security he has in a one-piece shoe. Finally, the joint of my invention lends itself to the application of both temporary and permanent retaining means of a'substantial but quick-acting type.

Especially in the instance of a radical departure from conventional constructions such as is this shoe construction, the invention is susceptible of numerous modifications without departing in any wise from its generic spirit. The fact that such a radical departure is itself so very new mayv in one or several instances be the source of descriptive and claim terminology which fall short of fully expressing the generic spirit. Applicants invention should none the less be pro tected to him by the appended claims in the fullness of this generic spirit.

What I claim is:

r s 1. A shoe comprising vamp and heel portions hinged together below the inner and upper surface of the sole for relative pivotal movement to I occupy closed position about the foot and open position for removal from the foot, together with a catch means provided between the portions, said catch means including a spring tensioned member adapted to hold the heel in closed and open positions, said spring tensioned member being displaceable from either open or closed position by a movement of the heel portion.

2. A shoe comprising heel and vamp portions transversely divided but hinged together for movement of the heel portion downwardly to admit the foot to the vamp and then upwardly to close the shoe about the foot, having a heel per se provided with a hollow interior, and a leaf retaining spring in the hollow having a latch end engaged by the hinge to hold the shoe closed.

3. A low quartered shoe having heel and vamp portions connected together for angular movement of the heel portion with respect to the vamp portion to admit and to enclose the foot and each portion incorporating side walls, means through which the vamp is adjusted to the size of the instep portion of the foot independently of the heel portion; and means fastening together the upper portion of the vamp side wall and the upper portion of the heel side wall and stressing the perimentral portion of the foot opening to secure the shoe upon the foot.

4. A low quartered shoe having heel and vamp portions connected together for angular movement of the heel portion with respect to the vamp portion to admit and to enclose the foot and each portion incorporating side walls, means through which the vamp is adjusted to the size of the instep portion of the foot independently of the heel portion, and means fastening together the upper portion of the vamp side wall and the upper portion of the heel side wall to secure the shoe upon the foot, the rear side portions of the vamp wall extending diagonally downwardly and rearwardly from substantially the top edge of the vamp portion to substantially the bottom thereof, and the side walls of the heel portion outwardly overlapping said downward and rearward extensions.

5. A shoe having transversely divided heel and vamp portions transversely hinged together for angular movement of the heel portion with respect to the vamp portion to admit and to enclose the foot, retaining means non-adjustable to size to retain the two portions in closed position about the foot, and means independent of both said retaining means and said heel portion to adjust the vamp to the size of the foot, the rear portion of the vamp wall being extended diagonally downwardly and rearwardly and connected with the sole portion of the vamp behind the hinge axis.

6. A shoe comprising vamp and heel portions hinged together transversely to permit the heel portion to be moved bodily downwardly to open the vamp rearwardly for the entry and removal of the foot, at least one of the two said portions being molded as a unit of plastic material and embodying an element of the hinge also molded of plastic material as a part of the unit.

7. A shoe comprising vamp and heel portions hinged together transversely to permit the heel portion to be moved bodily downwardy to open the vamp rearwardly for the entry and removal of the foot, at least oneof the two said portions being molded as a unit of plastic material and 7 l embodying an element of the hinge having molded connection therewith.

8. A shoe comprising vamp and heel portion connected together transversely to permit the heel portion to be moved bodily downward to open the back rearwardly for entry and removal of the foot from the shoe, the vamp and the heel portions having side walls overlapping when the shoe is closed onto the foot, the heel and its side walls being comprised of molded plastic material and said heel side walls being of varying cross section and thinnest in their front portions so as to enable those portions to flex outwardly under moderate pressure to fit the sides or the foot.

9. A shoe comprising vamp and heel portions hinged together below the inner and upper sur face of the sole for relative angular movement to occupy closed position about the foot and open position for removal from the foot, together with a catch means provided between the portions, said catch means including a spring tensioned member engageable to hold the heel in closed position through exertion of the spring tension yet disengageable to permit it to be moved to open position 8 despite spring tension, said spring tensioned member being engageable and disengageable solely through said relative angular movement of vamp and heel portions, and said catch means being so disposed as to be inaccessible when the shoe is closed.

JOHN P. TARBOX.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 474,574 Brozon May 10, 1882 623,803 Morrow Apr. 25, 1899 1,081,678 Langerok Dec. 16, 1913 2,165,281 Llppert July 11, 1939 2,178,025 Richter Oct. 31, 1939 2,349,374 Pym May 23, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 451,157 Germany Oct. 17, 1927

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US474574 *9 Jan 189210 May 1892 bruzon
US623803 *25 Apr 189825 Apr 1899 Heel-rubber
US1081678 *6 Jul 191116 Dec 1913 Shoe.
US2165281 *13 May 193711 Jul 1939Richard D WernetDetachable and replaceable heel
US2178025 *8 Feb 193931 Oct 1939Eduard RichterComposite shoe
US2349374 *19 Feb 194223 May 1944United Shoe Machinery CorpManufacture of shoes and shoe parts
DE451157C *12 Jun 192617 Oct 1927Hermann SchloereckeFortbewegungshinderndes Mittel fuer Gefangene
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2994972 *14 Jun 19608 Aug 1961Goodrich Co B FArticle of footwear
US3146535 *13 Jun 19631 Sep 1964David ClaymanOvershoe
US4959914 *1 Nov 19882 Oct 1990Skischuhfabrik Dynafit Gesellschaft MbhSki-boot
US5184410 *13 Jun 19919 Feb 1993Hamilton Paul RPivoting shoe construction
US5282327 *16 Feb 19931 Feb 1994Ogle Estel EPivotal heel for footwear
US5342070 *4 Feb 199330 Aug 1994Rollerblade, Inc.In-line skate with molded joe box
US6594921 *5 Jul 200122 Jul 2003David ChangShoe with a pivotal counter portion
US7607242 *21 Nov 200527 Oct 2009John Fotis KarandonisFootwear
US7793438 *26 Jan 200714 Sep 2010Reebok International Ltd.Rear entry footwear
US795067610 Sep 200431 May 2011Easton Sports, Inc.Article of footwear comprising a unitary support structure and method of manufacture
US82454181 Mar 200821 Aug 2012Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US82454213 Apr 200921 Aug 2012Nike, Inc.Closure systems for articles of footwear
US863579118 Jul 201228 Jan 2014Nike, Inc.Closure systems for articles of footwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/87, 36/138
International ClassificationA43B3/00, A43B3/24, A43B11/00, A43B21/42, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B11/00, A43B3/24, A43B21/42
European ClassificationA43B3/24, A43B21/42, A43B11/00