Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2451430 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date12 Oct 1948
Filing date23 Apr 1946
Priority date23 Apr 1946
Publication numberUS 2451430 A, US 2451430A, US-A-2451430, US2451430 A, US2451430A
InventorsBarone Salvatore A
Original AssigneeJefferson Standard Broadcastin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carrier frequency shift signaling
US 2451430 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 12, 1948. s. A. BARONE CARRIER FREQUENCY SHIFT SIGNALING Filed April 23, 1946 Space /5 M m i 5 3 mm 2 n MH 0 A 4, 7 j 4 D w Q mm W ZMW A Cm A0 a M BM R A mu 6 7 Fl MR A/Pfi 2 mm MCI r M p :DLR fl )CW ME m m 7 w Mw MT BM ON. r A m TONE KEYER Space Ma f/( /4 1N VEN TOR.

A TTOAIVEY Patented Oct. 12, 1948 UNITED i 2,451,4309; 1 CARRIER FREQUENCY I Salvatore A. Barone, Freeport; .N. -Y.,assignor, 'by

m esne assignments, to Jefierson...Standard.-; Company, a corpo ion of. North.

Broadcasting Carolina Application April 23, 1946, Serial-No. 664 468 7Claims. c1.2.; 'g

This invention relates to Wave signalling systems and more especially to systems of signalling by carrier frequency shift.

A principal object of the invention is to provide an improved method and organization of apparatus for producing frequency-shift carriers whose mean frequency is maintained at an accurately predetermined value.

Another principal object is to provide a carrier frequency-shift radio transmitter wherein a highly stable carrier frequency source such as a crystal-controlled master oscillator, is subjected to a plurality of successive frequency modulation stages in such a way that the mean frequency of the shifted output carrier frequencies is maintained equal to the frequency of said there is produced shifted carrier frequencies having. ahighly stabilized mean frequencyequal to that of said oscillator.

Another feature relates to a carrier frequencymeans to'modulate said main carrier by the frequency-shifted output of one local oscillator, and

means to frequency-shift the modulated main carrier by the frequency-shifted output of the other local oscillator. By means of suitable frequency selector circuits such as band-pass filters or the like, there are selected at the output of the system frequency-shifted carriers whose mean frequency remains equal to the frequency of [said crystal-controlled generator and is substantially independent of accidental changes in the said local oscillator circuits and associated equipment.

A further feature relates to an improved method ofshifting carrier oscillations derived from a crystal-controlled oscillator so that the output carrier has a fixed mean frequency equal to the crystal frequency, the said output mean frequency being shifted equally in opposite direcee .ri 'we e i to t r ta frequ n d corresponding. to telegraph mark and space nals or. the. like.

A.still further featurerelatesto thenovelior ganization, arrangement and relative .interconae nection of. par'tswhich cooperate to proyidegana improved. and flexible carrien frequencyi shifirg telegraph systemand thelike. 1.

Otherfeaturesand advantages not specifically enumerated will be apparent after a considera, tion of the'following detailed the appended claims.

In the drawing which shows one preferred embodiment of the invention, there isrepresented 5 by the numeral In any highlystabilized high frequency oscillator, suchas a temperature-controlled crystal oscillator, which generates the; desired master radio frequency F3 The. output frequency of the system. is indicated Has-,1. (FiZAf), where Af is preferably in the audio.- frequency range, e. g., 400 C. P. S. This output,

can then be considered as two separate carriers,

one having a frequency (F.2A,f) representing; for example a telegraph space signal; and a free, if quency (F+2Af) representing for example a'telegraph mark signal For the purpose of shifting the output frequency between the above-noted limits representing space and mark, there is provided any well-known keying device II, which produces at thepath I 2 a D. C. voltage of for example a positive polarity'and predetermined magnitude when keyed by a space signal and r a D. C. voltage of negative polarity but the same;

magnitude when keyed by a mark signal. ;It

will be understood of course, that the reverse may be true, that is, the space signal maybe repre polarity. and the mark, signal may be represented by the positive polar ity. In any event, and in accordance withlthe 1, present invention, the output of the keyer His 7 sented. by the negative divided into two paths l2, l3, and one pathis designed to produce opposite with respect to that in the cated schematically by the waves, [5.

The signal from path 12 is fed to any suitable,- reactance tube I6, so that the input voltages ape pear in the output of the tube as equivalent xreactance variations. The magnitude of these re.-, actance variations will, in the well-known way, be a function of the amplitude of thetone sig----; nal applied over path l2. ,For a detailed description of a typical reactance tube that may be used,

reference is hereby made to application Serial No. 434,498, filed March 13, 1942; which'issued April 9, 1946, as Patent No. 2,398,054. Likewise,

e. ignal i a h 1 which s ine act phase Sig descriptions and polarity of voltages,., other path as indiexample-only the higher beat' frequencynamel is select'ed for passage byfthe' bangl -pass filter 23;

opposition to the tone signal in path I2, is applied to a similar reactance tube l1.

Associated 'with the output of tube I6 is a local oscillator l8, which may be a free run- 'ning oscillator that need not be controlled to '5 the same degree of accuracy as oscillator Ill, and

which can have its output frequency varied in; accordance'with the reactance variations produced by tube I6. The local oscillator I8 may normally generate a frequency 1, which by way r of example may be thirty k. c, .The oscillatory .control circuit of oscillator ill will include the plate reactance of tube l-B sovthat as the latter is varied by the signals from path 12,:a corre-v sponding change AI is produced in the output frequency of oscillator l8. For a detailed description of one preferred manner of yarying the frequency of oscillator l8, reference may be had to said application Serial No. 434,498. Conse-' quently, there is produced an output frequency from oscillator l8 whichvis (fa-AT) represent.-w ing a telegraph mark signal, and ti jienfl' repre= senting a telegraph space signal; Itlwill beun: derstood of course; that when a mark signal is, beingkeyed at device ll, thejoscillatorxla' may-= generate the frequency (fee-inf), consequently when a space signal vis"being keyed at device H, v oscillator L8 generates'the frequency (f+AJ);..

Ina'similar manner, the reactance'tube il "l con-1 trols thefrequency of waxffree'running 'oscillator 19 which is similar to oscillator: l8, and nor mally generates a frequency 4. Likewise, theoutput of oscillator i9 is variedin frequency'between (f-fiif) and (f+AJ). 'Ho'wever; because ofthe phase opposition of the signals in paths !2 and .I l3,the frequency of oscillatorfil -is changed inth'e j opposite 'direction from-the changein frequencyof oscillator I8: for the same telegraph signal L which is" keyed at device 1H. Inother words-,-if fora space signal at device i L the oscillator l8 produces'a frequenr'zyUfl-Af) ,then simultaneously the oscillatorl9 producesai frequen'cy (fAf)-. Likewise; when oscillator l8 is producingafrequenc'y-lffinfl corresponding to a mark signal' at device ll ,oscillator l9 is producing "a fre-,

The output of oscillator l B-is connected-in balancedfdlvided'relation to any vvell-known bal anc'ed modulator -26, such'for example as'described in Radio Engineering," by Terrnan, "ls t ;edi-" tiong 'pa ge fi5l 'published by McGraw-Hill-Booi; Ce npany,lnc.;, ew Yorkylqijl."Modulator 2e isalso'fed' withthe frequency-l? from'thecry'stal oscillator l9. These two frequencies are mixed in] the 'd evice Zil inthdtvell-knbwh manner so as to produce in the outputthe sum'and difference fre 1' quencies; Inthis type of nod'ulator, the .frequencyF is suppressedinthe output? The double beatfrequenciesfrom the-modulator zeal-sap plied to a band-passfilter 2|,which passes fo i'T F+ f+Af indicatedin the drawing;

The shifted frequency frorn oscillat r {9 like: wise: fed in balanced divided relation to; another balanced modulator-2g, which is alsq fed with th Hf f) s sa item lte Be ause it j balanced modulatoraction of device 22'; the frequency F-l-(fiqf) is suppressedfin' the output. 1 However, "here are present at' this ou put two been, namelYlF-EfifiAj) (1pm 1 s "1 7 I mariner Esra. .7

One vof these lbea'ts ffor example the lower The r-let result is'that the frequeny' at the output ciated equipment.

nal such as a ,mark'vsi nal bynarrier1f menta m x ng w th sa d, frequen y F th a ma from the th of t 4- terminals of filter 23 is (F-l-ZAI) representing a space signal at device II; andlF-ZAI) representing a mark signal at device I I. It will be observed therefore, that the mean frequency F of these two output carrier frequencies always remain equal to, the said frequenc F of the master oscillator 'lfl'; and this mean frequencyremains stable notwithstanding undesired variations' in temperature, humidity and similar iconditions affecting oscillators l3 and i9 and their asso- "By the expression free running as employed inthe claims, is meant'an oscillator which can be '7 set to generate normally a particular frequency a but which frequency can be varied by means of a signal; as distinguished from a fixed frequency oscillator such as a crystal controlled oscillator.

While one particular embodiment has been de- I scribed, it will be understood that various changes and modifications may be made therein Without departing from the spirit and scope of the invei'i tioni i What is' claimed is: i 1. The method of signalling which comprises, generating a master-frequency F,'=genera ting pair of local-auxiliaryfrequencies-each of -fre quencyf, frequency-modulatingboth said l'o'ca frequencies by the same signal: but in opposite respects to produce respective side bands lfi rif) and (fir-A1), mixing the (JJz'A))' frequency 'from one local oscillator with said master" frequency F; and selecting one side band aloneemixing the i! said selected side band. -with the frequency-i (I'IM) from the other-local oscillator," amass- V lecting therefrom '-a side band "com'pone'n L (E:2Af) J, V .2. The method of transmitting a telegraph sig- V nal by carrier frequency shiftwhich? comprises, generating a master'frequencyF which 'repre 1T3 sents the mean between the lirn-its ofthe shifted' carrierfrequencies'to be transmitted, mixing wit saidmaster frequency 'a frequency "1 from a 10" free running carrier source whose frequerio shifted apredetermined amount and. direction i accordance with a telegraph signal such'asa mark signal, selecting one side band of the resulting. mixture, mixing with: said selected sideband l a carrier frequency from another idea]; ifreeii taneously shifted said predeterminedamount-uni. accordance with said signal .butiin the-opposites direction, and selecting fromthe.resulting mir ture a frequency inthe range. (FitZADWmR I T e-inethodiof transmitting ;.a tlcsrap merc shift which compr ses eneratin ree r nn ns-ca riers eac i-thelsame qua- 1 s mult n ousl hif lns he fi e n of both car ier b t in o no te frequency t o s b sa d si na ge erating amaste .-.t d' equ ncy from one of said f res r1 nine rriers a d sel ct ng on s de b u ng with sa s l c ed s de-band rrier; and se e tins efr m the'la' t: mixture the band represented by (Fi' a carrierrequency shifts sna n, a ource emaster frequenc r;

cal u ni e?qsi atorseac e ra in t e sam f eq ency f; graph signals' means responsive to a graph signal suchfasja mark signal f tan'eously shiftingifthe frequencies "of a oscillators substantially thesame amount-tut opposite frequency directions, means to mix the output of one oscillator with said master frequency F and to select one side band from the resultant mixture, means to mix said selected side band with the shifted frequency from the other local oscillator, and means to select from the last-mentioned mixture a frequency in the range (FiZAf), where Af represents the extent of frequency shift in said local oscillators.

5. In a carrier frequency shift signalling system, a source of master carrier frequency F, a telegraph tone keyer, a pair of shiftable frequency local oscillators each normally generating the same frequency f, means to apply keyed tone signals simultaneously to both said oscillators to shift their respective output frequencies substantially equal amounts but in opposite directions, a first balanced modulator which is fed with said master frequency F and with the shifted frequency from one local oscillator, means to select from the output of said first balanced modulator a sideband frequency F+(I:Af), another balanced modulator which is fed with a selected side band from the first balanced modulator and with the shifted frequency from the second local oscillator, and means to select from the output of said second balanced modulator a band represented by (FiZAf) where A represents the extent of frequency shift in said local oscillators.

6. In a carrier frequency shift signalling systerm, a source of master frequency F, a source of keyed telegraph signals, a pair of balanced modulators, a plurality of separate paths leading from said keyer respectively to said balanced modulators, each of said paths including in series a local shiftable frequency oscillator and a reactance tube, each oscillator generating normally the same frequency 1, means to vary the plate reactances of the .tubes in said paths to produce opposite frequency shifts in said local oscillators under control of said keyed signals, a selector system in the form of a band-pass filter for selecting from t pu 0 t e fir t bala ced medulator a sideband F-l-(fiAf) and a selector system in the form of a band-pass filter connected to the output of the second balanced modulator for selecting a frequency in the range (FiZAf) where M represents the extent of frequency shift in said local oscillators under control of said keyed signals.

7. In a carrier frequency shift signalling systerm, a source of master frequency F, a local shiftable frequency oscillator of normal frequency f,

. a first mixing network upon which the said master frequency F and said local oscillations are impressed said mixing network acting to suppress said frequency F, means to shift the frequency of said local oscillator over the range (fi-Af) under control of one telegraph signal, means to select from the output of said first network a frequency band F-i-(fi-Af), a second local shiftable frequency oscillator of normal frequency f, a second mixing network upon which the said frequencies F-i-(fiAf) are impressed together with the oscillations from said second oscillator, said second network acting to suppress the range of frequencies F+ (fztAf), and means to select from the output of said second network a frequency in the band (FiZAf).

SALVATORE A. BARONE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1831576 *16 Oct 193010 Nov 1931Petersen Christ OAnti-side slipping attachment
US2020409 *15 Aug 193312 Nov 1935American Telephone & TelegraphBand separation system
US2086918 *22 Aug 193513 Jul 1937Rca CorpMethod of frequency or phase modulation
US2099294 *8 Oct 193616 Nov 1937Telefunken GmbhCarrier wave modulation and suppression
US2151464 *23 Jul 193721 Mar 1939Wired Radio IncRestricted frequency transmission
US2169212 *16 Jan 193715 Aug 1939Armstrong Edwin HRadio transmitting system
US2228815 *27 Jan 194014 Jan 1941Gen ElectricFrequency conversion system
US2405765 *12 Feb 194213 Aug 1946Rca CorpRadio repeater
US2407212 *13 Jun 19443 Sep 1946Rca CorpRadio relaying
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2602159 *14 Jun 19461 Jul 1952Collins Radio CoFrequency modulation generator
US2623952 *1 Apr 195030 Dec 1952Magnetic Equipment IncModulating system
US2731600 *2 Apr 195117 Jan 1956Stachura Edward JCommunication system
US2833852 *10 Mar 19516 May 1958Philco CorpColor signal control system for color television receivers
US6049706 *21 Oct 199811 Apr 2000Parkervision, Inc.Integrated frequency translation and selectivity
US6061551 *21 Oct 19989 May 2000Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting electromagnetic signals
US6061555 *21 Oct 19989 May 2000Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for ensuring reception of a communications signal
US6091940 *21 Oct 199818 Jul 2000Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion
US626651818 Aug 199924 Jul 2001Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting electromagnetic signals by sampling and integrating over apertures
US635373523 Aug 19995 Mar 2002Parkervision, Inc.MDG method for output signal generation
US63703713 Mar 19999 Apr 2002Parkervision, Inc.Applications of universal frequency translation
US642153418 Aug 199916 Jul 2002Parkervision, Inc.Integrated frequency translation and selectivity
US654272216 Apr 19991 Apr 2003Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion with variety of transmitter configurations
US656030116 Apr 19996 May 2003Parkervision, Inc.Integrated frequency translation and selectivity with a variety of filter embodiments
US658090216 Apr 199917 Jun 2003Parkervision, Inc.Frequency translation using optimized switch structures
US664725018 Aug 199911 Nov 2003Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for ensuring reception of a communications signal
US668749316 Apr 19993 Feb 2004Parkervision, Inc.Method and circuit for down-converting a signal using a complementary FET structure for improved dynamic range
US669412810 May 200017 Feb 2004Parkervision, Inc.Frequency synthesizer using universal frequency translation technology
US67045493 Jan 20009 Mar 2004Parkvision, Inc.Multi-mode, multi-band communication system
US67045583 Jan 20009 Mar 2004Parkervision, Inc.Image-reject down-converter and embodiments thereof, such as the family radio service
US67983515 Apr 200028 Sep 2004Parkervision, Inc.Automated meter reader applications of universal frequency translation
US681348520 Apr 20012 Nov 2004Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting and up-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same
US683665030 Dec 200228 Dec 2004Parkervision, Inc.Methods and systems for down-converting electromagnetic signals, and applications thereof
US687383610 May 200029 Mar 2005Parkervision, Inc.Universal platform module and methods and apparatuses relating thereto enabled by universal frequency translation technology
US687981714 Mar 200012 Apr 2005Parkervision, Inc.DC offset, re-radiation, and I/Q solutions using universal frequency translation technology
US696373412 Dec 20028 Nov 2005Parkervision, Inc.Differential frequency down-conversion using techniques of universal frequency translation technology
US69758488 Nov 200213 Dec 2005Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for DC offset removal in a radio frequency communication channel
US70068053 Jan 200028 Feb 2006Parker Vision, Inc.Aliasing communication system with multi-mode and multi-band functionality and embodiments thereof, such as the family radio service
US701028616 May 20017 Mar 2006Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus, system, and method for down-converting and up-converting electromagnetic signals
US701055913 Nov 20017 Mar 2006Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for a parallel correlator and applications thereof
US70166634 Mar 200221 Mar 2006Parkervision, Inc.Applications of universal frequency translation
US702778610 May 200011 Apr 2006Parkervision, Inc.Carrier and clock recovery using universal frequency translation
US703937213 Apr 20002 May 2006Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion with modulation embodiments
US705050818 Jul 200223 May 2006Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion with a variety of transmitter configurations
US70542964 Aug 200030 May 2006Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) technology and applications including techniques of universal frequency translation
US70723904 Aug 20004 Jul 2006Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) using universal frequency translation technology including multi-phase embodiments
US70724277 Nov 20024 Jul 2006Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing DC offsets in a communication system
US70760117 Feb 200311 Jul 2006Parkervision, Inc.Integrated frequency translation and selectivity
US70821719 Jun 200025 Jul 2006Parkervision, Inc.Phase shifting applications of universal frequency translation
US70853359 Nov 20011 Aug 2006Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing DC offsets in a communication system
US710702812 Oct 200412 Sep 2006Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus, system, and method for up converting electromagnetic signals
US711043514 Mar 200019 Sep 2006Parkervision, Inc.Spread spectrum applications of universal frequency translation
US71104444 Aug 200019 Sep 2006Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) using universal frequency translation technology including multi-phase embodiments and circuit implementations
US719094112 Dec 200213 Mar 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing DC offsets in communication systems using universal frequency translation technology
US719424627 Dec 200420 Mar 2007Parkervision, Inc.Methods and systems for down-converting a signal using a complementary transistor structure
US721889912 Oct 200415 May 2007Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus, system, and method for up-converting electromagnetic signals
US72189075 Jul 200515 May 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and circuit for down-converting a signal
US722474913 Dec 200229 May 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing re-radiation using techniques of universal frequency translation technology
US723396918 Apr 200519 Jun 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for a parallel correlator and applications thereof
US72367544 Mar 200226 Jun 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion
US72458863 Feb 200517 Jul 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion with modulation embodiments
US727216410 Dec 200218 Sep 2007Parkervision, Inc.Reducing DC offsets using spectral spreading
US729283529 Jan 20016 Nov 2007Parkervision, Inc.Wireless and wired cable modem applications of universal frequency translation technology
US72958265 May 200013 Nov 2007Parkervision, Inc.Integrated frequency translation and selectivity with gain control functionality, and applications thereof
US730824210 Aug 200411 Dec 2007Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting and up-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same
US73216404 Jun 200322 Jan 2008Parkervision, Inc.Active polyphase inverter filter for quadrature signal generation
US732173510 May 200022 Jan 2008Parkervision, Inc.Optical down-converter using universal frequency translation technology
US737641016 Feb 200620 May 2008Parkervision, Inc.Methods and systems for down-converting a signal using a complementary transistor structure
US73795152 Mar 200127 May 2008Parkervision, Inc.Phased array antenna applications of universal frequency translation
US737988318 Jul 200227 May 2008Parkervision, Inc.Networking methods and systems
US738629225 Oct 200410 Jun 2008Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus, system, and method for down-converting and up-converting electromagnetic signals
US738910024 Mar 200317 Jun 2008Parkervision, Inc.Method and circuit for down-converting a signal
US743391018 Apr 20057 Oct 2008Parkervision, Inc.Method and apparatus for the parallel correlator and applications thereof
US745445324 Nov 200318 Nov 2008Parkervision, Inc.Methods, systems, and computer program products for parallel correlation and applications thereof
US746058418 Jul 20022 Dec 2008Parkervision, Inc.Networking methods and systems
US748368627 Oct 200427 Jan 2009Parkervision, Inc.Universal platform module and methods and apparatuses relating thereto enabled by universal frequency translation technology
US749634225 Oct 200424 Feb 2009Parkervision, Inc.Down-converting electromagnetic signals, including controlled discharge of capacitors
US751589614 Apr 20007 Apr 2009Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same, and aperture relationships
US752952218 Oct 20065 May 2009Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method for communicating an input signal in polar representation
US753947417 Feb 200526 May 2009Parkervision, Inc.DC offset, re-radiation, and I/Q solutions using universal frequency translation technology
US754609622 May 20079 Jun 2009Parkervision, Inc.Frequency up-conversion using a harmonic generation and extraction module
US755450815 Jan 200830 Jun 2009Parker Vision, Inc.Phased array antenna applications on universal frequency translation
US759942117 Apr 20066 Oct 2009Parkervision, Inc.Spread spectrum applications of universal frequency translation
US762037816 Jul 200717 Nov 2009Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion with modulation embodiments
US765314525 Jan 200526 Jan 2010Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) using universal frequency translation technology including multi-phase embodiments and circuit implementations
US765315817 Feb 200626 Jan 2010Parkervision, Inc.Gain control in a communication channel
US769323022 Feb 20066 Apr 2010Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method of differential IQ frequency up-conversion
US76935022 May 20086 Apr 2010Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting an electromagnetic signal, transforms for same, and aperture relationships
US769791621 Sep 200513 Apr 2010Parkervision, Inc.Applications of universal frequency translation
US772484528 Mar 200625 May 2010Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting and electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same
US777368820 Dec 200410 Aug 2010Parkervision, Inc.Method, system, and apparatus for balanced frequency up-conversion, including circuitry to directly couple the outputs of multiple transistors
US782240112 Oct 200426 Oct 2010Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method for down-converting electromagnetic signals by controlled charging and discharging of a capacitor
US782681720 Mar 20092 Nov 2010Parker Vision, Inc.Applications of universal frequency translation
US78651777 Jan 20094 Jan 2011Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same, and aperture relationships
US78947897 Apr 200922 Feb 2011Parkervision, Inc.Down-conversion of an electromagnetic signal with feedback control
US792963814 Jan 201019 Apr 2011Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) using universal frequency translation technology including multi-phase embodiments
US79360229 Jan 20083 May 2011Parkervision, Inc.Method and circuit for down-converting a signal
US793705931 Mar 20083 May 2011Parkervision, Inc.Converting an electromagnetic signal via sub-sampling
US799181524 Jan 20082 Aug 2011Parkervision, Inc.Methods, systems, and computer program products for parallel correlation and applications thereof
US80192915 May 200913 Sep 2011Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency down-conversion and frequency up-conversion
US80363045 Apr 201011 Oct 2011Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method of differential IQ frequency up-conversion
US807779724 Jun 201013 Dec 2011Parkervision, Inc.Method, system, and apparatus for balanced frequency up-conversion of a baseband signal
US816019631 Oct 200617 Apr 2012Parkervision, Inc.Networking methods and systems
US816053414 Sep 201017 Apr 2012Parkervision, Inc.Applications of universal frequency translation
US819010826 Apr 201129 May 2012Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for frequency up-conversion
US81901164 Mar 201129 May 2012Parker Vision, Inc.Methods and systems for down-converting a signal using a complementary transistor structure
US82238987 May 201017 Jul 2012Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same
US822428122 Dec 201017 Jul 2012Parkervision, Inc.Down-conversion of an electromagnetic signal with feedback control
US822902319 Apr 201124 Jul 2012Parkervision, Inc.Wireless local area network (WLAN) using universal frequency translation technology including multi-phase embodiments
US823385510 Nov 200931 Jul 2012Parkervision, Inc.Up-conversion based on gated information signal
US829540610 May 200023 Oct 2012Parkervision, Inc.Universal platform module for a plurality of communication protocols
US82958007 Sep 201023 Oct 2012Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method for down-converting electromagnetic signals by controlled charging and discharging of a capacitor
US834061822 Dec 201025 Dec 2012Parkervision, Inc.Method and system for down-converting an electromagnetic signal, and transforms for same, and aperture relationships
US84070619 May 200826 Mar 2013Parkervision, Inc.Networking methods and systems
US84469949 Dec 200921 May 2013Parkervision, Inc.Gain control in a communication channel
US859422813 Sep 201126 Nov 2013Parkervision, Inc.Apparatus and method of differential IQ frequency up-conversion
US20080035222 *11 Aug 200614 Feb 2008Fraser Craig JDisposable breakaway nozzle connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification375/307, 332/100
International ClassificationH03C3/14, H04L27/12, H04L27/10, H03C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationH03C3/14, H04L27/12
European ClassificationH03C3/14, H04L27/12