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Publication numberUS2365920 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date26 Dec 1944
Filing date24 Jan 1941
Priority date24 Jan 1941
Publication numberUS 2365920 A, US 2365920A, US-A-2365920, US2365920 A, US2365920A
InventorsVaughn Albert E
Original AssigneeVaughn Albert E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for producing powder puffs
US 2365920 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1944. A. E. VAUGHN METHOD FOR PRODUCING POWDER PUFFS Filed Jan. 24, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Dec. 26, 1944. A. E. VAUGHN METHOD FOR PRODUCING POWDER PUFFS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 24, 1941 [III 0 M H J A m w: L M; EEmMfi w A /RF@ 5 5 C E AM% y m m 'IIIIIIIIIIA 7 J/AI //IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIII/IIII Patented Dec. 26, 1944 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD FOR PRODUCING POWDER PUFFS Albert E. Vaughn, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application January 24, 1941, Serial No. 315,821

15 Claims.

My invention relates to flexible envelopes containing finely divided powder, more particularly to such envelopes designed for progressively dispensing or applying a powder-like material. The invention is applicable in various arts to dispensing various finely divided materials but is being initially embodied in a dispensing powder puff. For the purpose of this disclosure, the invention will be described as so embodied, it being apparent that such a disclosure will be adequate guidance for those skilled in the art who may need to apply the invention to other devices for other purposes.

The general object of the invention is to produce a powder-containing puff with a porous dispensing wall, a powder puff that is eflicient, simple in construction, and inexpensive to manufacture.

One disadvantage of prior art powder puffs of this character is a tendency to becom soiled in a relatively short period of service and before any substantial quantity of the container powder is dispensed. An important object of my invention is to provide a self-cleaning dispensing medium in such a powder puff, and a feature of my invention is the discovery that a velure r velvet-like fabric with a silken or silk-like pile may serve as a dispensing medium that is selfcleaning.

After face powder dispensed from a supply container is applied to the skin of the user, some suitable means is desirable to spread or blend the applied powder. A further object of my invention resides in the method of making a facepowder dispenser having a non-dispensing portion to serve as a spreading or blending means. In this regard the preferred form of my invention is characterized by the concept of a dispensing envelope with a pliant marginal spreaderflap into which the porous dispensing fabric is continued to provide a desirable spreader surface.

Further objects of my invention reside in the method of fabricating the dispensing envelope containing the face powder. Included in these objects are: to provide a method suitable for mass production and low unit cost; to provide in the course of the manufacturing procedure a method of forming multiple spaced pockets in a continuous flexible sheet; to provide a method of packing measured masses of powder into the various pockets with substantial pressure; to provide a method of. preventing pockets deepening in the course of the packing operation; to provide a method of bonding a second sheet to said sheet around the pockets to form interconnected dispensing envelopes; to make suitably reinforced envelopes out of two .sheets of flexible material by applying an intermediate adhesive coat; and to utilize such an adhesive coat for at least two of the various functions of reinforcing the dispensing envelope, sealing the fabric of the envelope outside the dispensing zone of the envelope, bonding the two fabric sheets of the envelope together, and stiffening and thickening the marginal spreader-flap.

Finally, it is my object to provide efiicient means and apparatus for carrying out the above method, including means to form the multiple pockets, to hold the formed pockets to desired dimensions, to pack the pockets while the pockets are so held, and to bond the sheets together around the filled pockets.

The above and other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent in the detailed description to follow, taken with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings, which are to be considered as illustrative only:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view partly in section of the preferred form of my dispensing powder puff Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a cutting punch used in manufacturing the powder puff;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of an apparatus that may be used in manufacturing the powder puff in quantity;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the apparatus of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary section on an enlarged scale taken as indicated by the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a view in plan of a fragment of the base portion of the apparatus taken as indicated by the line 6-6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 3 showing the apparatus in open disposition at the beginning of the fabricating procedure;

Fig. 8 is a similar sectional view of the apparatus in closed disposition with a pocket-forming device cooperating therewith;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragment of Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 is a sectional view of the apparatus indicating how masses of powder are deposited in pockets of a flexible sheet;

Fig, 11 is an enlarged fragment of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a sectional view of the apparatus showing a powder-tamping means in cooperation therewith;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary section of Fig. 12 on an enlarged scale;

Fig. 14 is a sectional view of the apparatus after the tamping device of Fig. 12 has been removed and a slide plate has been shifted to equalize the quantities of powder in the various pockets;

Fig. is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale showing the slide plate of the apparatus in the course of movement;

Fig. 16.is a side elevation of a portion of the apparatus, partly in section, showing an auxiliary device for applying a covering sheet to the filled pockets; and

Fig. 17 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 16 showing the covering sheet pressed into place over the filled pockets.

The form of my powder puff being made available in commerce is distinguished from prior art devices by the use of silken velure to provide a self-cleaning dispensing wall for the face powder. By velure I mean a fabric resembling velvet in having a pile on one face and the term silken will be understood to refer not only to natural silk but also to various substitutes for silk.

Ordinary cotton fabric, if used for a powder puff, absorbs oils from cosmetics and from the user's skin, stubbornly retains the absorbed material, clings tenaciously to minute particles of discolored powder, and becomes soiled progressively and permanently. Silken fibers, on the other hand, have less affinity for face oils and other oils than has face powder and do not tenaciously retain soiled powder particles. If a mass of powder is progressively dispensed through or over silken pile, the flowing powder serves as a cleansing agent for the silken pile effective even against lipstick smears, and such fabric maintains an invitingly clean appearance to the end of an extensive service period.

Fig. 1 shows a mass of powder 20 retained between a front dispensing wall, generally designated 2|. and a back wall, generally designated 22. Preferably the back wall 22 is not adapted for dispensing powder. For the front dispensing wall 2| I prefer at present to use a sheet 23 of silken velure. the warp and weft of which is silk and the pile 25 of which is rayon. The back wall 22 may be of any suitable material, but preferably is substantially less flexible than the front dispensing wall 2| so that the front wall rather than the back wall bulges outward to encompass the powder mass 20, as shown in Fig. 1. In practice I produce a back wall 22 of the desired character by using a sheet 26 of cotton velure, disposing the sheet with the pile on the outer face and placing on the inner face a coating 21 for the dual purpose of sealing the inner face of the sheet and of providing the desired thickness in the back wall 22.

The powder puff of Fig. 1 has a marginal portion or flap 28 to serve as the previously mentioned means to be manipulated by the user for spreadingand blending applied powder. In the preferred form of my invention the marginal flap 28 is continuous around the envelope'and consists of three united layers, a marginal portion of the sheet 23 of silken velure, a coextensive marginal portion of the sheet 26 of cottonvelure, and the intervening coating 21. In the present form of my invention, the intermediate coating 21 is a rubber cement and not only serves to seal and reinforce the back wall 22 of the envelope but also serves to bond the two sheets 23 and 25 together and to contribute thickness to the marginal flap 28. An important characteristic of the rubber cement is that it is permanently pliantand permits a degree of flexibility in the marginal flap.

In service the powder put! is pressed and rubbed lightly against the skin to dispense and app y powder from the mass 20, the powder working outward through the mesh of the silken velure. The fact that the back wall 22 is non-porous prevents any substantial quantity of the powder from being dispensed onto the user's hand or being otherwise wasted. After the initial operation of applying the powder, the marginal flap 23 of the powder pull is employed as a wiping means to spread and blend the powder. In practice such a spreading operation is easily performed without further release of powder from the mass 20 to any undesirable degree. The rate of dispensation of the powder through the'silken velure is ample but, nevertheless, markedly economical, and such a powder puff packed with only a moderate quantity of powder has an extended life of service.

The fact that powder may be released by simply pressing the puff against the skin and rubbing lightly is an important feature of the invention. The usual dispensing powder puff must be patted against the skin to release powder, and suchac-,

tion causes powder particles to fly in random directions. For example, patting the pufl on the face will cause powder to be deposited on eye glasses.

Some prior art dispensing powder puffs have sewn edges. In practice it is difficult, if not impossible, to sew up an envelope containing any substantial quantity of powder and, furthermore, even fine stitching permits powder to escape at the edges of the finished envelope.

An apparatus that may be employed in my preferred method of fabricating the dispensing powder puff is best shown in Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 7.

A supporting member, generally designated 30,

over which is to be spread a sheet 3| of the previously mentioned silken velure, may comprise a base plate 32 having a number of recesses 33 corresponding to the number of powder-containing envelopes to be cut from the sheet 3|. Each of the recesses 33 may be formed by a metal cylinder 35 set to a substantial depth into the base plate 32. In the particular construction shown in the drawings the base plate 32 is cut away to a substantial depth around each metal cylinder 35 to permit the cylinder to be surrounded by a resilient collar 36 of substantial axial dimension, the collar being of sponge rubber or like material.

Cooperating with the support member 30 is a plate 31 having a number .of circular apertures 38 corresponding to the recesses 33. Preferably each, of the circular apertures 38 is beveled to provide a. flaring circumferential surface 40 and preferably each of the apertures is formed with a lip 4| having an outer conical wall 42. The apertured plate 31 may be the bottom plate of a powder-supply .box 43 having side walls 45 and end walls 46 and 41. Since it is contemplated that the box will be intermittently raised out of and lowered into proper register with the supporting member 30, the box may be held to a fixed path of movement, for example, by hinges 48 pivotally connecting the box to the base plate 32. The box may also be provided with a suitable handle 50 and may be counterbalanced by means including a cable 5| attached to an eye 52 on the box.

Mounted in the powder-supply box 43 for movement between the end wall 46 and a stop pin the box. The slide plate 58 has a number of apertures 3| disposed to register with the circular apertures 33 of the plate 31 when the slide assembly is against the end wall 48 of the supply box 43.

Initially the sheet 3| of silken velure is spread face down loosely over the plurality of recesses 33 of the supporting member 30, as indicated in Fi 7, after which the supply box 43 may be lowered onto the sheet 3|. In the next step a plurality of pockets 62 (Figs. 9 and 11) are formed in the sheet 3| by depressing the sheet into the various recesses 33 of the supporting member 30. For this operation I prefer to employ a depressing means, generally designated 63 in Fig. 8, comprising a plate 65, a handle '66 for manipulating the plate, and a plurality of fingers 61 extending downwardly from the plate and dimensioned and distributed to enter the apertures SI of the slide plate 56. To form all of the pockets in a sheet 3| simultaneously, the operator applies the depressing means 63 in the manner indicated by Figs. 8 and 9, the various fingers 61 being extended through, the bottom of the supply box 43 to depress the sheet 3| to the desired depth into each of the recesses 33. While the pockets 62 are being formed in the sheet 3|, the sheet should, of course, have freedom for movement over the supporting member 30 and at such time the operator may lift the supply box 43 slightly upward to prevent binding the sheet.

After the depressing means 63 is withdrawn the operator employs a plate 63 (Fig. 10) as a tool to shift the quantity of powder 6|! onto the slide plate 56 and cause the powder to fall through the slide plate and the bottom plate 31 of the box into the pockets 62. In practice the pocket-filling procedure consists of first shifting the powder into the slide assembly to fill the pockets and then, as indicated in Fig. 10, employing the plate 68 as a scraper to return the unused powder to normal position at the hinged end of the supply box 43. At this juncture each pocket and the corresponding plate apertures 38 and BI are filled with a mass I of loose powder as shown in Fig. 11.

The next step in the operation consists of packing each of the powder masses 10 into more compact space, and for this purpose I may employ a tamping means, generally designated H in Fig. 12. Such a tampin-g means may comprise a plate 12 having a handle 13 and a plurality of downwardly extending fingers 15, the fingers being dimensioned for sliding fit through the apertures of the slide plate 56. When the tamping means H is applied in the manner indicated in Fig. 12, each powder mass is pressed downward to a level 16 slightly above the bottom plate 31 of the supply box 43, as indicated in Fig. 13. It is apparent that the depressing means 63 could be adapted to serve the additional function of a tamping means, but I prefer to employ separate devices with the fingers of such length in each case that the required effect is produced when the plate of the devic is pressed down against the upper surface of the slide plate 56.

It is contemplated that the tamping operation will be performed with substantial pressure and such pressure must be resisted by the material of the sheet 6| without the sheet creeping to deepen the various pockets 62. Some provision, then, is necessary to hold the sheet against creepage during the. tamping operation. A feature of my invention in this regard is that the function of holding the sheet during the tamping individual loaded powder puffs.

operation may be performed by the apertured plate 31 in cooperation with the supp rt member 30. For this purpose each of the circular lips 4| is dimensioned and disposed to cause the material of the sheet 3| to be gripped along the rim or edge of each recess 33 when the operator pushes down on the handle to press the supply box 43 downward against the supporting member 30. When the operator presses the supply box 43 downward during the tamping operation, the material of the sheet 3| is efiectively gripped between the inner circular edge of the corresponding metal cylinder 35 and the conical wall 42 of the corresponding lip 4|, as clearly shown in Figs. 11 and 13. The circular lip 4| and the rim of the metal cylinder 35 cooperate not only to hold the material of the sheet 3| against slippage but also cooperate to form a continuous seal that prevents powder from being displaced laterally out of the pocket by the pressure exerted in the tamping operation.

After the powder mass ID in each of the pockets 62 is compressed into compactness by the tamping operation, the operator shifts the slide assembly to the limit position shown in Fig. 14, and as a result an excess quantity of each of the compact powder masses 10 is sheared away by the slide plate 56. Fig. 15 indicates the shearing action.

At this point the operator swings the supply box 43 upward to expose the sheet 3| with the compact powder masses l0 exposed thereon. It

may be noted here that one purpose of forming the apertures 38 in the plate 31 to flared configuration is to discourage any tendency for the powder masses to cling to the plate when it is swung upward to expose the loaded sheet 3|.

The fabrication procedure may be completed by providing a coated sheet of the previously mentioned cotton velure, spreading the coated sheet over the powder-laden sheet 3|, bonding the two sheets together around each of the powder masses and then cutting through the bonded sheets around the powder masses to release the While these final steps may be carried out in any suitable manner, the preferred practice of my invention is characterized by the use of temporary panels formed by attaching sheets of cotton velure to temporary reinforcing sheets such as sheets of cardboard.

Figs. 16 and 17 show one of the temporary panels 80, which consists of a sheet 8| of cardboard, a sheet 82 of cotton velure or other suitable fabric marginally attached to the cardboard by staples 83, the pile of the cotton velure being towards the cardboard, and finally a coating 85 of sealing material on the exposed side of the cotton velure. The cotton velure may be attached to a cardboard prior to the coating operation so that the cardboard may serve as convenient means for handling the cotton velure during the coating operation. The sealing coat 85 may be permanently pliable and the panel may be pressed down on the loaded sheet 3| before the adhesive sets, but, as heretofore indicated, in the preferred practice of my invention the sealing coat 85 is largely rubber and is so tween the two sheets of fabric.

the powder-laden sheets 8| the panels are heated to the tacky point of the coating 85. Fig. 16 shows such a panel in a tacky state being applied to a powder-laden sheet of silken velure 3| and Fig. 1'7 shows the panel under substantial pressure.

Means for pressing the panel downward to cause the two fabric sheets 3| and 82 to bond together may be constructed as indicated in Fig. 16.- The previously mentioned base plate 32 that comprises a part of the supporting member 30 carries a bracket 86 in which a pressure lever 81 is mounted by a pivot pin 88. It is contemplated that the powder-supply box 43 will be hinged to one end of the base plate 82 and the pressure lever 81 will be pivoted at a side edge of the base plate so that either the supply box or the pressure lever may be in operating disposition while the other is swung upward out of the way. Thus, Fig. 16 shows the powder box tilted upward and the pressure lever 81 lowered into operating disposition. A pressure plate 90 is pivotally connected to the pressure lever 81 by a suitable pin 9| extending through a bracket 92 on the upper surface of the plate, such an arrangement permitting the plate to be urged downward with even pressure on a panel 80.

As indicated in Fig. 1'7 one function of each of the metal cylinders 35 is to provide a circle of relativelyhigh pressure to insure that a sealing bond around each powder mass 10 is achieved be- Such an arrangement not only insures positive confinement of the powder in the puff, but also produces in the finished puff a circular depression shown at 93 in Fig. 1 that has some ornamental value. During the bonding operation lesser pressure is exerted through the two fabric sheets by the resilient collars 3B but sufficient to cause the two fabric sheets to at least adhere together effectively. I employ highly resilient collars 36 because I wish to make the two fabric sheets adhere to each other but to avoid crushing the pile of either sheet. One feature of such an arrangement is that the resilient collars 36 cause the under sheet 3| to lie fiat and smooth around each of the confined powder masses Hi. It is exceedingly difficult to bond the two sheets together without creating undesirable wrinkles that appear in the marginal portions 28 of the finished-powder pufis.

The result of the described pressure operation to bond the fabric sheets together is a panel comprising a sheet of interconnected envelopes marginally attached to a sheet of cardboard. The

final operation consists of cutting the panel as required to release the individual envelopes. In practice I cut the individual envelopes out of the final panel by a stamping operation, each stamping producing an individual powder pull? and a disc cut from the cardboard to be discarded. Fig. 2 shows a conventional cutting stamp 95 that may be used, the device having a circular cutting edge 96.

The particular practice of the invention given in detail herein for the purpose of illustration and to teach the principles involved will suggest to those skilled in the art various changes and modiflcations under the broad inventive concept, and I reserve the right to all such departures from the specific disclosure that are covered by my appended claims. I

I claim as my invention:

1. A method including the use of a support with plurality of envelopes containing masses of powdered material, one of said sheets being porous to permit egress of said powdered material therethrough, said method comprising the steps of: spreading one of said sheets on said support and pressing the sheet into said recesses to form a :plurality of pockets; pressing said sheet against said support annularly of 'said pockets to resist deepening of said pockets and at the same time pressing masses of said powdered material into said pockets"; releasing the pressure on each of said masses of powdered material; placing a covering sheet over said supported sheet and said masses of. the powdered material while said pressure is released; bonding said sheets together around said pockets; and cutting the bonded sheets around said pockets to release the pockets as individual envelopes.

2. A method including the use of a support with plural recesses for fabricating from two sheets a plurality of envelopes containing masses of powdered material, at least one of said sheets being porous, said method comprising the steps of: coating one of said sheets with an adhesive. material: spreading oneof said sheets on said support and pressing the sheet into said recesses to preform a plurality of pockets; depositing separate masses of said powdered material in said preformed pockets; spreading the other sheet over said supported sheet and said masses of the powdered material; exerting pressure downward on said upper sheet toward said support t cause said adhesive material to tightly bond said two sheets together continuously around said pockets in a narrow area adjacent said pockets and to relatively loosely bond said sheets together throughout the balance of their engaging areas; and cutting through the bonded portions of said sheets to release said pockets as individual envelopes provided with fiat extending margins of substantial width.

3. A method of fabricating from two porous sheets an envelope containing a mass of powdered material, said method including the use of plural recesses for fabricating from two sheets a a support with a recess and comprising the steps of: coating one of said sheets with an adhesive material to close the pores of the sheet and to provide means for bonding the two sheets together; placing one of said sheets on said support and depressing a portion of the sheet into said recess to preform a pocket; depositing a mass of powdered material in said preformed pocket; placing the other sheet over said pocket with said adhesive coating between the sheets; and pressing the upper sheet toward said support to cause said adhesive coating to bond the two sheets together around said pocket. 0

4. A method of fabricating from two porous sheets an envelopecontaining a mass of powdered material, said material including the use of a support with a recess and comprising the steps of coating one of said sheets with a thermal-responsive adhesive to close the pores of the sheet against transmission of the powdered material therethrough; placing one of said sheets on said support and depressing a portion of the sheet into said recess to preform a pocket; depositing a mass of the powdered material in said preformed pocket; placing the other sheet over said pocket with said adhesive coating between the sheets; and applying heat and pressure to cause said adhesive coating to bond said two sheets together around the margin of said pocket.

5. A method of fabricating from tw sheets a dispensing envelope containing powdered material, including the steps of attaching one of said bonding said two sheets together around each of said masses thereby forming a panel of spaced pockets including and reinforced by said temporary stiffening sheet; and cutting through said panel including said stiffening sheet around each of said pockets to release the pockets as individual envelopes and simultaneously to discard corresponding portions of said temporary stiffening sheet.

6. A method of fabricating from two porous sheets a plurality of dispensing envelopes containing powdered material, said method including the steps of: attaching one of said sheets to a temporary stiffening sheet; coating the face of said attached porous sheet with adhesive to seal the pores thereof;depositing spaced masses of the powdered material on one of said porous sheets; overlaying the spaced masses and the underlying sheet with the other of said porous sheets; bonding the two porous sheets together around each of said masses thereby forming a plurality of closed pockets of the powdered material in a panel including and reinforced by said temporary stiffening sheet; and cutting through said panel including said temporary stiffening sheet around each of said pockets to release the pockets as individual envelopes and simultaneously to discard corresponding portions of said temporary stiffening sheet.

7. A method of fabricating from two porous sheets a plurality of dispensing envelopes containing powdered material, said method including the steps of attaching one of said sheets to a temporary stiffening sheet; coating the face of said attached porous sheet with adhesive to seal the pores thereof; depositing spaced masses of the powdered material on one of said porous sheets; overlaying said spaced masses and the underlying porous sheet with the other of said porous sheets; pressing said two sheets together around each of said masses to bond the sheets together thereby forming closed pockets of the powdered material; and cutting through said temporary stiffening sheet and the bonded portions of said porous sheets around each of said pockets to release individual envelopes containing powdered material and simultaneously to discard corresponding portions of said temporary stiffening sheet, the cut around each of said pockets being spaced from said pockets to provide spreadermargins for the envelopes. 8. A method of fabricating from two pliant sheets, one of which is porous a plurality of envelopes containing masses of powdered material, comprising the steps of preforming a plurality of spaced pockets in one of said sheets; placing the masses of powdered material in said preformed pockets; placing the two sheets together with a layer of adhesive material therebetween to bond the sheets together around the outer margin of each of said pockets; and cutting the bonded sheets around said pockets to release the pockets as individual envelopes and to provide each of the envelopes with an annular flange therearound.

9. A method of fabricating from two pliant sheets, one of which is porous a plurality of envelopes containing masses of powdered material, comprising the steps of preforming a plurality of spaced pockets in one of said sheets;

placing the masses of powdered material in said preformed pockets while holding the material of said sheet around said pockets to prevent deepening of the pockets; placing the'two sheets together with a layer of adhesive material therebetween to bond the sheets together around the outer margin of each of said pockets; and cutting the bonded sheets around said pockets to release the pockets as individual envelopes and to provide each of the envelopes with an annular flange therearound.

10. A method of making a powder dispensing envelope from a facing sheet of powder-pervious material and a backing sheet, including the steps of: pressing a portion of said facing sheet into a recess so as to stretch said portion into the form of a pocket but leaving a peripheral fiat facing margin therearound; depositing a quantity of powder in said pocket sufficient to fill the same and to provide an excess thereof; compressing said powder and said excess into said pocket to a level substantially even with the plane of said facing margin; bringing said backing sheet into flat contact with said facing sheet so as to cover said pocket and forming a backing margin registering with said facing margin; bonding said sheets together at said margins; and cutting said bonded sheets around said pocket so as to provide a finished margin therearound, said backing sheet remaining substantially flat.

11. A method of making a powder dispensing envelope from a facing sheet of powder-pervious material and a backing sheet, including the steps of: forming a pocket in said facing sheet, with a peripheral flat facing margin therearound; depositing a quantity of powder in said pocket sufficient to fill the same and to provide an excess thereof; compressing said powder and said excess into said pocket to a level-substantially even with the plane of said facing margin; bringing said backing sheet into fiat contact with said facing sheet so as to cover said pocket and forming a backing margin registering with said facing margin; and bonding said sheets together at said margins.

12. A method of making a plurality of powder dispensing envelopes from a facing sheet of powder-pervious material and a backing sheet, including the steps of: forming a plurality of spaced pockets in said facing sheet; depositing a quantity of powder in each of said pockets sufficient to fill the same and to provide an excess thereof in each pocket; compressing said powder and said excess in each of said pockets to a level substantially even with the plane of said facing sheet; placing said backing sheet in flat contact with said facing sheet so as to cover all of said pockets; bonding'said sheets together around each of said pockets; and cutting the sheets around said pockets to release said pockets as individual envelopes.

13. A method of fabricating from two fabric sheets a dispensing envelope containing powdered material, including the steps of attaching one of said fabric sheets to a temporary stiffening sheet; depositing a measured mass of the pewdered material on one of said fabric sheets; overlying said mass of powder and the underlying fabric sheet with the other of said fabric sheets; bonding said fabric sheets together around said mass of powder to form a panel including and reinforced by said temporary stiffening sheet; cutting through said fabric sheets around said mass of powder to form an individual envelope;

and removing said temp rary stiflening sheet from said individual envelope.

14. A method of fabricating from a porous facing sheet and a backing sheet a dispensing envelope containing powdered material, including the steps oi: pretorming a pocket in the facing sheet to provide a peripheral flat margin around said pocket; forcing the powdered material under pressure into said pocket to substantially fill the same, while keeping said margin substantially free of powdered material; superimposing the backing sheet over said pocket and said margin; and tightly bonding said backing sheet to said margin in a narrow area around said pocket and relatively loosely bonding the outer area of said backing sheet to the outer area or said margin to form an individual envelope containing said powdered material. I

15. In a method .0! fabricating from a porous ing said pocket so as to securely bond said backing sheet to said facing sheet in said area to seal said powdered material in said pocket; and applying a lighter pressure to the remaining area of said backing sheet to bond the balance of said margin to said backing sheet without injuring the major portion of said pile on said margin.

ALBERT E. VAUGHN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2685395 *31 Jan 19513 Aug 1954Le Roy Food Products IncMultiple filling grid
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US2731777 *5 Jul 195324 Jan 1956 wollersheim
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US2949711 *2 Jul 195623 Aug 1960Vogt Clarence WMethod and apparatus for filling containers
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US5941055 *18 Dec 199724 Aug 1999Coates; FrankApparatus for making an instant beverage container with product therein
US6922975 *19 Jul 20002 Aug 2005Kanebo Cosmetics, Inc.Cosmetic material sheet and method for manufacture of the sheet and apparatus for use in the manufacture
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Classifications
U.S. Classification53/436, 53/453, 53/373.3, 53/375.6
International ClassificationA45D33/34, B65B11/50, A45D33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B11/50, A45D33/34
European ClassificationA45D33/34, B65B11/50