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Publication numberUS2237678 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date8 Apr 1941
Filing date4 Jan 1939
Priority date4 Jan 1939
Publication numberUS 2237678 A, US 2237678A, US-A-2237678, US2237678 A, US2237678A
InventorsLohr Raymond J, Straw Robert C
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Repeating cork-shooting toy
US 2237678 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 8, R J LQHR ETAL REPEATING CORK-SHOOTING TOY ATTORNEY Apr. 8, 1941 REPEATING CORK-SHOOTING TOY Raymond J. Lohr and Robert C. Straw, Erie, Pa., assignors to Louis Marx & Company, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application January l, 1939, Serial No. 249,182

18 Claims.

This invention relates to toys. and more particularly to a repeating pellet shooting toy. Dreierably simulating a gun, and preferably shooting corks.

The primary object of our invention is to generally improve toys of this character.

"itcy pop guns are very old. More recently, such nunshave been improved for repeated operation by keeping the cork captive within the muzzle oi the gun and using the cork repeatedly for successive noise-producing operations. ever, with such a gun the cork is not discharged from the gun, and there is no simulation oi actual flight of a projectile. The toy merely produces a noise.

in accordance with features and objects of the present invention, we provide a toy having a cork magazine which is preliminarily loaded with a series of corks. These may be fired successively from the gun. The toy is realistic because it not only produces a noise, but also expells a simulated projectile. However, there is no danger or injury because the projectile, when made of cork, as is preferably the case, is extremely light in weight and resilient.

The cork is preferably expelled by means of air compressed in a cylinder in front of a springactuated piston. The cork is not carried directly in the end of the cylinder, but instead is carried in one of a series of chambers in the cork magaaine, said chamber being disposed in communication with the cylinder and acting as a continua- Howtion thereof. It would be difllcult or impossible to maintain a tight fit between the magazine and cylinder, for the magazine is movable past the end of the cylinder. A snug engagement would make it diilicult to feed the magazine. One object of the present invention is to overcome the foregoing diiflculty and with this object in view, the magazine is made readily movable-in fact, it is even spaced somewhat from the end of the cylinder. Auxiliary sealing mechanism is provided for pulling the magazine tightly against the end of the cylinder when the gun is being fired. The operation of the sealing means is only intermittent, and the magazine is released for sought to be defined in the claims. The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing a toy embodying features or the present invention, and simulating a sub-machine gun;

Fig. 2 is a section taken in elevation through the clerk shooting magazine of the gun shown in Fi Fig. 3 is a similar view but showing the relation of the parts at the end of the firing stroke;

Fig. 4 is a transverse section taken in the plane of the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a perspective view showing the application of the invention to a gun. simulating an automatic pistol;

Fig. 6 is a section taken in elevation through the cork shooting mechanism of the gun shown in Fig. 5;

Fig. i is a similar view showing the relation of the parts at the end of the firing stroke;

Fig. 8 is a horizontal view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 6, and explanatory of the feed mechanism for the cork magazine;

Fig. 9 is a section taken in elevation through another toy simulating an automatic pistol, but provided with a different type oi. operating mechanism;

Fig. 1015 a horizontal section taken in the plane of the line it-iB oi Fig. 9;

Fig. i1 is anend elevation of the gun shown in Figs. 9 and iii;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 9, but showing the relation of the parts at the-end of the firing stroke oi the gun;

Fig. 13 is a section taken in the plane of the line i3l3 of Fig. 9, and is explanatory of the feed mechanism for the cork magazine;

Fig. 14 is a side elevation of a toy simulating a revolver, the cork magazine being located at the simulated cylinder or cartridge magazine of the revolver;

Fig. 15 shows the gun of Fig. it with one side oi the body removed to expose the internal mechanism;

Fig. 16 is explanatory of a detail, and is taken on the line it of Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 is a perspective view of the muzzle portion of a simulated sub-machine gun utilizing a flexible cork magazine;

Fig. 18 is explanatory of the construction of the magazine;

Fig. 19 is a perspective view illustrating a straight cork magazine;

Fig. 20 is a section showing the construction of the same; and

- Fig. 21 is a schematic diagram explanatory oi. the method of using the same.

Referring to the drawings, and more particuiarly to Fig. 1, the toy there shown simulates a sub-machine gun, and comprises a simulated barrel l2, a stock l4, a forward grip l6, arearward grip l3 which acts also as a trigger, or firing lever, and a cork magazine 20. The magazine 46 is provided with a series of individual cork chambers 22. These are preliminarily loaded with pellets acting as projectiles. The pellets are preferably ordinary corks of the frustroconical type used for corking bottles. Such a cork is shown being discharged from the muzzle of the gun, at 24. It will be observed that the forward portion 26 of the barrel is very much larger in diameter than the cork 24, and the movement of the cork is in no way impeded by the barrel. In fact, its flight is a free flight directly from the cork chamber of magazine 28, and the forward portion 26 of the barrel is added merely to improve the appearance of the toy and to more closely simulate a gun. The cork is expelled by mechanism carried in a frame 28, the upper part of which is housed in barrel l2, and the lower part of which is housed in a body portion 36 beneath the gun barrel.

The internal mechanism carried by frame 28 and including the trigger l8 and cork magazine 26, may be bodily removed from the gun. This mechanism is shown in Figs. 2, 3, and 4, and is next described.

The cork is expelled by compressed air. The air is compressed in a metal cylinder 32 the forward end of which is curled inwardly at 34 and receives a rubber gasket 36. A piston 38 is reciprocable in cylinder 32. It is mounted at the forward end of a piston rod 40 formed out of a flat strip of metal. Piston rod 40' is surrounded by a powerful compression spring 42 the forward end of which bears against piston 38, and the rear end of which bears against a suitable reaction plate 44 secured between the side plates 46 of the frame.

Operating lever or trigger I8 is pivotally mounted at 48. The trigger is a flattened tubular member the forward and rear sides 56 of which are cut away at the upper portion. It carries a pawl 62 pivotally mounted thereon at 54. The pawl is normally urged upwardly by a spring 66. The forward end or hook 58 of the pawl engages in a slot 68 cut through piston rod 48. It will be evident that as trigger I8 is drawn rearwardly from the position shown in Fig. 2 to that shown in Fig. 3, the piston rod 40 will be pulled rearwardly by pawl 52 from the position of Fig. 2 to the broken line position 40' of Fig. 3. At this time, however, the upper camming portion 62 of the pawl rides against the lower edge of plate 64, and the latter forces the pawl downwardly, thereby disengaging the hook 58 from the piston rod. The spring 42 is thus released and abruptly forces the piston 38 to forward position.

The cork magazine is in the present case a rotatable or wheel-like magazine, and it may be conveniently made by die-casting methods. It comprises a hub 66 (Fig. 3) at the center of a generally circular plate 68 carrying a series of peripherally disposed cork chambers 18. These may be cylindrical as shown, and are suitably dimensioned to tightly receive the corks, insertion of the corks preferably being arrested by the tapered shape thereof before the inner ends reach the back of the cork chamber. A hole 12 iscut through the magazine at the rear of each chamber for communication between the air compressing cylinder 32 and the cork chamber. The magazine is rotatably mounted on a shaft '14 carried in transverse walls 16 and 18 of the frame. It will be evident from inspection of Fig. 3 that the shaft 14 is so located as to bring the top-most cork chamber directly in alignment with the cylinder 32. In fact, the cork chamber forms a continuation of the air cylinder, and the arrangement is much the same as though the topmost cork had been inserted directly in the end of the air cylinder.

One important difference, of course, is the possibility of leakage of air between the cylinder and the cork chamber. This is particularly true in view of the provision of a substantial clearance between the cork magazine and gasket 36, as is clearly shown in Fig. 2. This diificulty is overcome in the present case by the provision of special sealing means for clamping the cork chamber against gasket 36 at the time that the cork is discharged. The sealing mechanism comprises a rod or strip overlying the frame 28 and connected at its rear end to the trigger l8. Specifically, strip 88 is provided with sidewardly projecting ears 82 which are received in holes cut through the side walls of trigger l8. The forward end of strip 60 carries 9. depending stud 84. The periphery of the cork magazine carries a ledge or rim 86. This may be a continuous rim, or, if desired, and in order to conserve metal, it may be discontinuous, as is best shown in Fig. 4. It will be evident on comparison of Figs. 2 and 3 that as the trigger or operating lever i8 is pulled rearwardly, the strip 80 is drawn rearwardly, thus causing the stud 34 to bear against the ledge or rim 86 of the cork magazine, thereby pulling the magazine and particularly the local cork chamber tightly against the rubber gasket 36. This condition is, of course, maintained during the discharge of the gun, for the piston is released, as shown in Fig. 3, while the trigger is still held in rearward position.

Between successive operations of the trigger N3, the cork magazine is rotated or advanced to bring another cork into position for discharge. In the present case, this is done by feed mechanism comprising a pawl 88 pivoted at 90 and having an arm 92 connected to the forward end of a link 94. The rear end of link 94 is pivotally connected to trigger l8 at 96. The pivot 98 is preferably in the form of an eyelet which is slidably received in a slot 98. A spring wire I06 has a part passing through eyelet 90, and another part bearing against the frame wall 18, this spring being coiled at NH and functioning to normally urge the pawl to the forward position shown in solid lines in Fig. 3.

The rear surface of the center portion 68 of the cork magazine is provided with a ring of cup-like recesses or indentations I02. These correspond to the cork chambers, and in the present case, there are twelve cork chambers and I2 recesses I02. In its rest position, the trigger it! is forward and the pawl 88 is in the position shown in Fig. 2. When the trigger is drawn rearwardly, the pawl is turned from the position shown in Fig. 2 to that shown in Fig. 3. During this movement, the pawl moves from a lower one of the recesses I82 to the next higher recess. The necessary rearward movement of the pawl to pass from one recess to the next is accommodated by the slot 98. In other words, during its movement from the position of Fig. 2 to the solid line position of Fig. 3,

the owl intermediately assumes the broken line position of Fig. 3. It will be evident that as trigger II moves forwardly from the position of Fig. 3 to the rest position of Fig. 2, the pawl 88 will advance the cork magazine one step. thus bringing a new cork into firing position.

In order to insure accurate registration of the cork with the air cylinder, the gun may be provided with pilot means or spring detent means. Specifically, we provide a horizontally reciprocable rod IM, said rod being normally urged iorward by a light compression spring I08. The forward end of rod I04 is rounded, and is so located as to be received in the topmost one of the cup-like recesses I02. Inasmuch as the recesses are in radial alignment with the cork chambers, it will be evident from inspection of pig. 4 that the cork magazine is brought to rest in proper registration for the next discharge. When the cork magazine is being stepped from one position to the next, the detent rod I04 is readily moved rearwardiy by the camming action between the sloping surfaces of recesses Iul and the rounded end of rod I04.

Attention is now directed to Fig. 5. This allows a toy simulating an automatic pistol. The toy body comprises a barrel portion IIO, a handle or grip II2, a trigger or operating lever II4, a corlr magazine H8, and an enlarged or overslzerl muzzle II8 disposed in front of cork magurine H8. The magazine is in this case kept comparatively small in diameter, it being arraured to receive six corks.

The operating mechanism of this-gun is shown in l lgs. 6, 7 and 8. It comprises a cylinder I carrying a rubber gasket I22 at its forward end. it piston I24 is mounted at the forward end of piston rod I28 (made of a flat strip of metal much as previously described), and is normally urrecl lorward by compression spring I28 the rear end of which bears against an appropriate stop I30 extending between the side walls. The trigger II4 is pivotally mounted at III. The trigger is made of a piece of heavy gauge sheet metal bent to lJ-shape, as is best shown in Fig. 5. A red I32 extends between the side walls of the trigger, and is preferably provided with a untl- -iriction roller I34. This rides against the upper part I88 of an arm I88 the lower end of which is pivoted at I40.

the upper end oi arm I38 carries a pawl I42. said pawl being plvotally mounted at I44 and being normally urged upwardly by means of a pull spring I46. The forward end of pawl I42 is termed into a hook I48, said hook being resolvable in a slot I58 cut through piston rod I26, as is best shown in Fig. 6. When trigger H4 is drawn rearwardly it moves arm I38 rearwardly, as shown in Fig. 7, and this in turn causes the pawl I32 to pull the piston rod rearwardly to the broken line position I26. Near the end of the trigger movement, a camming surface Ital on pawl I42 rides against the lower edge of a cross plate and piston rod guide I54, thereby iorcing the pawl downwardly and disengaging the hook I48 from the piston rod, thus releasing the piston for abrupt forward movement, all as is indicated in Fig. 7. The trigger is restored by spring lib.

The sealing means for the present gun is much like that previously described. It comorlses a strip or link I58, the rear end of which is pivotally connected to trigger H4 at I 88. The forward portion of link I56 passes through and is guided by frame wail I80. The end of link I08 carries a depending stud I82 which cooperates with a peripheral rim or ledge I84 on the cork magazine or drum Hi. It will be evident that normally, the magazine is free of gasket I22 and of stud I82, as is shown in Fig. 6,

but that when the trigger H4 is pulled rearwar'dly, the stud I82 is drawn rearwardiy, and clamps the cork magazine, and particularly the top cork chamber tightly against the gasket I22, as isclearly shown in Fig. 7.

The feed mechanism for the cork magazine is quite diil'erent from that previously described. The magazine is fixedly secured to the outer end of a shaft I88 which is rotatably mounted in end plate I and a bearing plate I88. The rear end of shaft I88 is provided with a spiral screw. This is most cheaply done, for toy purposes, by simply twisting a strip of metal, as shown at I10, the forward end of twisted strip I10 being secured to the rear end of shaft I66, as is best shown in Fig. 8. A pair of matingly toothed members I12 and I14, forming in effect a unidirectional clutch, are reciprocable on spiral strip I10. The member I12 may be termed a fixed member, it having a pair of outwardly projecting pins or trunnions I18 which are received in links I18. Thus the member I12 is non-rotatable, and it is provided with a hole I80 large enough to clear the spiral strip I10. The other clutch member I14 is provided with a rectangular slit which receives the spiral strip I10. The member I14 is reciprocable along strip I10, but is non-rotatable thereon. The member I14 is normally urged into engagement with member I12 by means of a small compression spring I82 disposed between member I14 and a wall I84 which connects and may be formed integrally with the links I18. The links I18 are pivotally connected to trigger I I4 at the point I88.

011 reflection, it will be evident that, as trigger H4 is drawn from the position of Fig. 6 to that of Fig. '7, the clutch elements are slid rearwardly on spiral strip lIIl, during which movement the clutch member I14 is rotated counterclockwise, as viewed from the muzzle oi the gun. The clutch teeth are so sloped as to readily permit thismovementfi When the trigger is released, the clutch assembly is moved forwardly from the position of Fig. 7 to that shown in Fig. 6. At this time the clutch member I14 cannot rotate, it being held against rotation by the clutch member I12. The forward movement of member I14 along spiral strip I10 therefore causes the spiral strip to turn and this is accompanied by rotation of shaft I86 and the cork magazine lit. The pitch of the spiral and the stroke of the clutch therealong are, of course, so relatively proportioned as to produce the desired rotation. which, in the present case, amounts to A; of a revolution.

The gun is preferably provided with pilot or detent mechanism for proper registration of the cork magazine, and to discourage accidental movement thereof. This detent mechanism as here illustrated is substantially like that previously described, it comprising a detent rod I88 having a rounded forward end and normally urged forwardly by means of a compression spring I90. The detent rod cooperates with a ring of six cone shaped or cup-like recesses indented in the back of the cork magazine, much as was previously described, except that in the present case the recesses may be comparatively shallow and are used solely for pilot or registration purposes, and not for feed purposes.

A' modified form of operating mechanism for a toy pistol simulating an automatic gun, is shown in Figs. 9 through 13 of the drawings. Referring to those figures, the air is compressed in a cylinder I92 which is turned inwardly or flanged at its forward end and provided with a rubber gasket I94. A piston I96 is mounted at the forward end of the piston rod I98. This piston rod is a strip of metal, but in the present case is disposed vertically, or edgewise, instead of horizontally. Thegnsual compression drive spring 200 surrounds piston rod I98 and bears at its forward end against the piston and at its rear end against a transverse frame wall 202. The trigger 204 is pivotally mounted on a pin 206. The trigger carries a cam element 208, said element being pivotally mounted between the side walls of the trigger on a pin 2 I0. The cam is normally moved to the position shownin Fig. 9 by means of a spring wire 2I2. The position of the cam is determined or limited by lugs 2I4 struck inwardly from the sides of the trigger. The cam element 208 is a U-shaped element providing spaced cams connected by a bottom wall 2I6. These cams are adapted to ride on opposite sides of the piston rod I96, as is best shown in Fig. 10. As the trigger is pulled rearwardly, the cams 208 bear against studs 2I8 projecting on opposite sides of the piston rod. The piston rod is thus forced to move rearwardly by the action of cams 208 on studs 2I8. When the trigger has been pulled nearly to its rearward position, the piston has been retracted and the main spring 200 compressed. The cams 208 are bent outwardly to form escape passages 220. At the end of the trigger stroke the escape passages reach the studs 2I8, whereupon the piston rod shoots abruptly forward, the studs 2l8 passing through the escape passage, as is indicated in Fig. 12. When the trigger is restored to initial position (the spring 2 I2 acting also as a restoring spring), the cam element 208 passes around or behind the studs 2I8, the necessary movement of the cam element being accommodated by pivot 2I0 and spring 2I2. When the trigger reaches its full forward position, the spring 2I2 turns the cam element to the position shown in Fig. 9, thus preparing the same for another operation of the piston.

The feed or stepping mechanism for the cork magazine 222 is much like that last described. The cork magazine is fixedly mounted on the forward end of the shaft 224. The rear end of shaft 224 carries a twisted or spiralled strip 226. A one-way clutch mechanism is slidable on strip 226. The non-rotatable clutch element 228 is provided with sidewardly projecting ears or trunnions 230 (Fig. 13) which are carried in downwardly extending plates 232 (the nearer one is cut away in Fig. 9), said plates being connected to or formed integrally with links 234. These links are connected or joined at their rear ends by a rod 236, which rod passes through a slot 238 in piston rod I98. A similar slot 239 is cut through the piston rod to clear the trigger pivot 206. The links 234 are normally urged forwardly by the upwardly turned ends 240 of a wire spring 242.

With the parts in the normal position shown in Fig. 9, the rod 236 is at the forward end of slot 238. When the trigger is drawn rearwardly, the piston rod I98 is drawn rearwardly, and this in turn pulls the links 234 rearwardly. The links are held in rearward position during discharge of the gun by means of stops 244 formed at the forward part of the cam element. The stops 244 are so located that when the trigger is in rearward position, the stops are ahead of the rod 228, and remain so while the piston rod is released to move forwardly. all as is shown in Fig. 12.

The rotatable part 248 of the unidirectional feed clutch functions exactly like that previously described in connection with Fig. 8. but for toy purposes the part 248 may be stamped out of heavy gauge sheet metal. The result is a sixvaned member best shown in Fig. 13, and provided with a rectangular slot at the center which slidably receives the spiral strip 228. A light compression spring 248 urges the parts of the clutch-together. It will be understood that as the trigger is moved rearwardly, the clutch is .moved rearwardly, and, the rotatable part 248 228. During forward movement of the trigger.

the non-rotatable part 228 prevents rotation of the part 246, and the latter turns the spiral member 226 and thereby'turns the cork magazine through a desired arc, which in this case is A; of a revolution.

The detent or locking means for the cork magazine is much like that previously described, it comprising a detent rod 280, the rounded forward end of which is normally urged forwardly by means of spring 252 into engagement with one of a series of six indentations or recesses 254 on the back of the cork magazine,

The sealing mechanism comprises a channelshaped member 258 the forward part of which is located above the muzzle portion of the gun, and the rearward part of which is located within the gun body, it passing thereinto at an opening 258 best shown in Fig. 10. The forward portion of member 258 is guided by a simulated sight 260. It is formed into a hook at 262, said hook being adapted for cooperation with the peripheral rim or ledge 264 of the magazine, as is best shown in Figs. 9 and 11. The 'rear end of member 256 is provided with dotentarms 266 which are spaced apart enough to clear the cams 208. When the links 234 and their cross-rod 236 are moved rearwardly from the position shown in Fig. 9 to the position shown in Fig. 12, the cross-rod 236 bears against the depending arms 266 and forces the sealing member 266 rearwardly, thus causing the hook 262 to clamp the cork magazine tightly against the gasket I94.

Still another form of toy embodying features of the present invention is shown in Figs. 14, 15 and 16. This toy simulates a revolver. It comprises a gun body made of oppositely dished pieces of sheet metal so shaped as to simulate a barrel 210, a cartridge cylinder 212, and a handle or grip 214. The gun is operated by means of an operating lever or trigger 216. A cork magazine 218 is rotatably mounted directly ahead and simultatedly forming a part of the cartridge cylinder 212. The essential change in the present toy is that the operating mechanism has been compacted to very small dimension, thereby bringing the cork magazine 218 rearwardly to its natural position in a revolver. The barrel 210 is, of course, made large enough in diameter to freely clear the corks. Although the operating lever 216 differs in appearance from the trigger of a conventional revolver, this lever is held within and hidden by the hand of a child playing with the toy, and therefore does not detract from the realistic appearance of the toy.

The air compressing mechanism comprises a cylinder 280 having a rubber sealing gasket 282 at its forward end, much as previously described. A piston is movable in cylinder 280 and is connected to the forward end of a piston rod 284. The piston rod is surrounded by a compression spring 286 the forward end of which bears against the piston, and the rear end of which bears against a cross-plate 288, the ends of which are formed into tongues received in the opposite side walls of the gun body.

The gun is provided with a simulated hammer itd. This is pivoted at 292. It is provided with a. hook 294 which is hooked into a slot extending transversely of piston rod 284. Rearward movement of the hammer causes rearward movement of the piston rod. The hammer is moved rearwardly by means of a dog 296 carried by a trigget his. Trigger 216 is a piece of heavy gauge sheet metal bent to U-shape at its lower portion, and providing spaced parallel walls 300 at its upper portion. The trigger is pivoted on a pin lid ertending across the gun body. The dog 296 is pivotally mounted between the side walls 300 by means of lugs or cars 3112 (Fig. 16) extending sidewardly from the forward end of plate 296. l late tan is also provided with sidewardly projecting ears304 at its rear end, these cars being somewhat vertically movable in slots 306 (Fig. liii cut through side walls 300 of the trigger. The dog is normally moved downward by a wire spring add.

its the trigger 276 is pulled 'rearwardly, the rear edge of dog 296 bears against the edge 3"! of hammer 290, as is best shown in Figs. 15 and it. The hammer is thus moved rearwardly about pivot me and the spring 286 is compressed. Near the end of the trigger movement, a forwardly projecting finger did on hammer 290 rises and bears against the dog 296, moving the same upwardly past the surface dill. The hammer is then released for abrupt forward movement with the piston. When the trigger is released, it is moved forwardly by means of a pull spring 3. The dog rides over the surface MB of hammer 290 and finally, when the trigger has moved all the way forward to the rest position shown in Fig. 15, the spring tdd moves the dog downwardly to its position in front of the hammer surface till, thus preparing the parts for another operation.

The sealing means will be understood from the drawings, particularly in view of the. description oi the other guns. It comprises a member M3 having a heck are for engaging the periphery of the magazine did. The member did is provided with sidewardly spaced arms 322, said arms being pivotally connected to trigger 27h at the point hit. As the trigger is moved rearwardly, the hook lid is moved rearwardly, and clamps the cork magazine into tight engagement with the gasket tilt at the forward end of the air compressing cylinder,

The feed or stepping mechanism for the cork magazine probably requires no detailed description, it being much like that described in connection with the simulated sub-machine gun of it through d. It employs a pawl rather than a spiral or screw element with a unidirectionai clutch. Specifically, there is a pawl 326 which is pivoted at 323, and is provided with a depending arm 330 connected at 332 to the forward end of a link 334 which is itself connected to trigger 216 by means of a pin 3%. The connection preferably includes a slot 338 for lost motion. The mounting of the pawl on pin 328 also preferably includes a slot 340 to afford retraction of the pawl during its passage from one recess to the next, it being understood that the back of the cork magazine is provided with a rim; of six recesses corresponding to the six cork chambers of the magazine. The pawl is normally moved to the position shown in Fig. by mean! of a. restoring and feed spring 342.

As the trigger is pulled rearwardly, the pin 336 moves in slot 338. Toward the end of the .azine to be fieitible.

trigger movement when the lost motion has been used up, the link 334 is moved toward the left,

as shown in Fig. 15, thereby moving the pawl downwardly. The pawl rides out of the recess 346, this being facilitated by slot 340, and moves downwardly to the next lower recess. As the trigger moves forwardly, the restoring spring 342 moves the pawl inwardly and upwardly, thereby feeding the cork magazine ahead to bring another cork into position in front of the air compression cylinder.

The cork magazine is properly located by means of a detent 348 which functions Just as was previously described, and in cooperation with the lowermost one of the recesses.

The forms of the invention so far described have employed rotatable cork magazines. It is possible, however. to also use a cork magazine of the flexible or link type. Thus, referring to Figs. 17 and it, the cork magazine is made up of a series of links tilt, each shaped to form a cork receiving chamber 352. These chambers are loaded with corks 354, and the link magazine is passed through appropriate windows 35! in the side walls of the gun body 353 which in the present case, simulates a sub-machine gun. Only the forward end of the gun is shown. It will be understood that appropriate guides 358 forming a part of the gun mechanism insure a properly guided horizontal travel of the. links as they pass in front of the air cylinder. It will also be understood that sealing means almost exactly like that previously described may be used to draw the uppermost link against the rubber gasket at the forward end of the air cylinder at the time of firing of thegun. The feed mechanism may be much like that previously described, but modified to operate at the uppermost link of the magazine (instead of at the side or bottom of a rotatable magazine). in a sense, the chain-like cork magazine may be considered to be a large cork wheel only the upper peripheral portion of which is passing through the gun mechanism.

Moreover, it is not essential for the cork magit simple straight, rigid strip may be used. Thus, referring to Fig. 19,. the cork magazine comprises a strip 360 carrying a series of cork chambers 3%. These may be secured to the strip ttil by hanging or riveting the same in place as is shown at 364 in Fig. so. The strip may be provided with a series of holes std-said holes functioning for cooperation with a suitable feed pawl which steps the strip ahead from one cork chamber to the next. The strip may, of course, be drawn into tight sealing en gagement with the forward end of the air cylinder by sealing means exactly like that previously described.

This idea will be clear from inspection of Fig. 21. The air cylinder 368 is like that previously described. The strip 360 is guided by the stationary guide 310 and a movable guide M2, the latter being formed at the end of a sealing member 314 similar to those previously described. The feed pawl 316 feeds strip 360, the pawl being actuated by mechanism much like that already described.

It is believed that the construction and operation, as well as the many advantages of our improved cork shooting toy, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. The

toy is provided with a cork magazine having a series of cork receiving chambers. The magazine is preliminarily loaded with corks by simply pressing the same into the cork chambers. When the magazine is a rotatable'magazine, it is readily rotated to facilitate the insertion of corks provided, of course, that it is turned in its direction of free movement. To operate the gun, it is then-merely necessary to pull the operating lever or trigger. All of the mechanism is preferably though not necessarily operated by a single lever. In such case, the lever, during its rearward movement, compresses the piston spring and seals the cork magazine tightly against the air cylinder. Near the end of the trigger stroke, the piston is released for abrupt forward movement, but the magazine is held sealed against the air cylinder. The cork is forcibly ejected with a percussive noise, much as in the case of an ordinary pop gun. As the trigger is released, the sealing engagement between the magazine and the air cylinder is released, and the feed mechanism steps the cork magazine ahead to bring another cork in front of the air cylinder.

In the claims, we have, for brevity and convenience, used the term .cork, but this is to be understood as including rubber or other equivalent suitable material, as well as cork. Moreover, the projectile need not be frustroconical in shape. It may, for example, be spherical, and of somewhat oversize diameter so as to fit snugly in the magazine chambers. We intend the claims to include such a variation in shape.

It will be understood that the mechanisms may be housed in various types of toy bodies to simulate other weapons than those illustrated. It will also be understood that mechanisms of known type may be used in which the piston spring is compressed and the gun cocked by separate mechanism independent of the trigger, and a separate trigger may then be used for the sole purpose of releasing the piston and firing the gun. It will therefore be apparent that while we have shown and described our invention in preferred forms, many changes and modifications may be made in the structures disclosed, without departing from the spirit of the invention defined in the following claims.

We claim":

1. A toy comprising a cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder, a cork magazine movably mounted in communication with said cylinder and having a series of individual cork-receiving,

chambers, a gasket at the magazine end communicating with the cylinder, intermittently operable means for pulling the magazine against the gasket to form a sealed connection therebetween, and means for actuating said piston in the cylinder in order to eject the cork from the chamber then held in communication with the cylinder.

2. A toy comprising a cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder, a cork magazine movably mounted at one end of said cylinder and having a series of individual cork-receiving chambers, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, intermittently operable means for pulling the magazine against the gasket to form a sealed connection therebetween, intermittently operable means for stepping the magazine ahead to the next cork chamber when the sealing means is released, and

means for actuating said piston in the cylinder in order to eject the cork then held in front of the cylinder by the magazine.

3. A toy weapon comprising a cylinder, 9. piston movable in said cylinder, a cork magazine rotatably mounted at one end of said cylinder and having a series of individual cork-receiving chambers, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, intermittently operable means for pulling the magazine against the gasket to form a sealed connection therebetween, intermittently operable means for rotating the magazine ahead to the next cork chamber when the sealing means is released, and means for actuating said piston in the cylinder in order to eject the cork then held in front of the cylinder by the magazine.

4. A repeating cork shooter comprising an air compressing cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder, 9. piston rod, a spring, means for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring. a movable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that the cork chambers are moved successively into alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, sealing means for pulling the magazine against the gasket, and additional means for stepping the magazine to the next cork to be discharged.

5. A repeating cork shooter comprising an air compressing cylinder, a piston movable in said cyllnder,'a piston rod, a spring, means for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted thatone of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, sealing means for pulling the magazine against the gasket, and additional means for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged.

6. A repeating cork shooter comprising an air compressing cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, 2. spring, a lever for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, sealing means actuated by said lever for pulling the magazine against the gasket during operation of the lever, and additional means actuated during movement of the lever for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged.

7. A repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring, and a movable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder.

8. A repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means actuated by said trigger for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, and a movable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that the cork chambers may be moved successively into alignment with the air cylinder.

9. A repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means actuated by said trigger for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, and a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front 01 the air cylinder.

iii. a repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means actuated by said trigger for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod ior abrupt forward movement of the piston, a movable magazine for carrying a plurality oi corks, said magazine being so mounted that one of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder, a gasket at the end at the cylinder, and sealing means actuated by said trigger for pulling the magazine against the gasket during firing of the gun.

ll. it repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means actuated by said trigger for retracting the piston rod and piston and compress ing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod ior abrupt torward movement oi the piston, a movable magazine ior carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one all the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front oi? the air cylinder, and additional means actuated during the restoring movement of the trigger for stepping the magaaine to the next cork to be discharged by the gun.

it. it repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one of the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in I iront oi the air cylinder, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, sealing means for pulling the magazine against the gasket during firing of the gun, and additional means for rotating the magazine to the neat cork to be discharged by the gun.

it. it repeating cork gun comprising a gun body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in said gun body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, means actuated by said trigger -ior retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks, said magazine being so mounted that one oi the cork chambers is in alignment with and disposed in front of the air cylinder, a gasket at the end of the cylinder, sealing means actuated by said trigger for pulling the magazine against the gasket during firing of the gun, and additional means actuated during the restoring movement of the trigger for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged by the gun.

14. A repeating cork shooter comprising air compressing means, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks successively into communication with the air compressing means, and additional means for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged, said means including a spiral strip connected to the magazine, a non-rotatable ratchet wheel slidable-along said strip and connected to an operating lever for movement thereby, and a mating ratchet wheel slidable along saidstrip but rotatable therewith, the ratchet teeth being so iaced that they disengage during pulling of the lever in one direction but engage during opposite movement of the lever in order to rotate the magazine.

15; A repeating cork shooter comprising an air compressing cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring, a lever for retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality of corks successively in alignment with the air cylinder, and additional means actuated during restoring movement of the lever for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged, said means including a spiral strip connected to the magazine, a non-rotatable ratchet wheel slidable along said strip and connected to the lever for movement thereby, and a mating ratchet wheel slidable along said strip but rotatable therewith, the ratchet teeth being so iaced that they disengage during pulling of the lever but engage during return of the lever, in order to rotate the magazine.

16. A repeating cork gun comprising a body having a simulated barrel, a grip, a trigger, an air compressing cylinder in the body, a piston movable in said cylinder, a piston rod, a spring,'means actuated by said trigger tor retracting the piston rod and piston and compressing the spring and thereafter releasing the piston rod for abrupt forward movement of the piston, a rotatable magazine for carrying a plurality oi corks successively in aligent with the air cylinder, a gasket at the end oi the cylinder, sealing means actuated by the trigger tor pulling the magazine against the gasket during firing of the gun, and additional means actuated during restoring movement oi the trigger for rotating the magazine to the next cork to be discharged, said means including a spiral strip connected to the magazine, a non-rotatable ratchet wheel slidable along said strip and connected to the trigger for movement thereby, and a mating ratchet wheel slidable along said strip but rotatable therewith, the ratchet teeth being so laced that they disengage during pulling oi the trigger but engage during return of the trigger, in order to rotate the magazine.

17. A toy comprising air compressing means, a cork magazine movabiy mounted for communication therewith and having a series of individual cork-receiving chambers, each oi? said chambers being adapted to receive an ordinary tapered cork with the large end of the cork projecting out of the forward face oi the chamber, means whereby the chambers loaded with corks may be brought successively into communication with the aircompressing means without interference by the projecting ends of the corks, and means bearing against a part of the magazine rearwardly of the forward face of the magazine and so constructed and arranged as to hold the rear end oi. a loaded chamber tightly against the forward end of the air-compressing means.

18. A toy gun comprising a simulated gun barrel, air-compressing means, a cork magazine movably mounted behind said barrel for communication with said air-compressing means and having a series of individual cork-receiving chambers, each of said chambers being adapted to receive an ordinary tapered cork with the large end of the cork projecting out of the forward end of the chamber, the front of the magazine being spaced from the rear end of the barrel to provide a clearance for the projecting ends of the corks, means whereby the chambers loaded with corks may be brought successively into. communication with the air-compressing means, and means to hold the rear end of a chamber tightly against the forward end 01' the air-compressing means without obstructing the path of movement 10 of the cork out of the forward end of the chamber.

RAYMOND J. LOHR. ROBERT c. STRAW.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification124/66, 124/51.1, 124/44.7, 124/48
International ClassificationF41B11/14, F41A9/28, F41B11/00, F41B11/02, F41A9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A9/28, F41B11/54, F41B11/642
European ClassificationF41B11/54, F41B11/642, F41A9/28