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Publication numberUS20170221104 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 15/489,361
Publication date3 Aug 2017
Filing date17 Apr 2017
Priority date21 Oct 2010
Also published asUS8620750, US9665888, US20120101858, US20120101901, US20140122239
Publication number15489361, 489361, US 2017/0221104 A1, US 2017/221104 A1, US 20170221104 A1, US 20170221104A1, US 2017221104 A1, US 2017221104A1, US-A1-20170221104, US-A1-2017221104, US2017/0221104A1, US2017/221104A1, US20170221104 A1, US20170221104A1, US2017221104 A1, US2017221104A1
InventorsThomas DePasquale, John Love, Michael Lore, Michael Fredericks, Andrew Csontos
Original AssigneeConcur Technologies, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and system for targeting messages to travelers
US 20170221104 A1
Abstract
A computer-implemented method of targeting electronic messages to travelers, comprising performing processing associated with: utilizing geographic information comprising itinerary information, to determine where the travelers are currently and/or are projected to be during a given time period; creating a list of travelers which categorizes the geographic information and/or traveler information about the travelers on the list; electronically notifying a merchant with information related to the list and the current geographic information and/or current traveler information of the travelers on the list; receiving an electronic request from the merchant to transmit an electronic targeted message to some or all of the travelers on the list; and transmitting the electronic targeted message to some or all of the travelers on the list.
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Claims(4)
1. A computer-implemented method of targeting electronic messages, comprising:
performing processing associated with utilizing information, utilizing at least one processor in communication with at least one database, comprising geographic location information and already-reserved itinerary location information from a travel reservation system, to determine where at least two travelers with different itinerary information are currently and are projected to be during at least one given time period; and
performing processing associated with electronically notifying at least one merchant with information related to the at least one list and the current geographic information, and already-reserved traveler itinerary location information of the travelers on the at least one list.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising performing processing associated with analyzing expense reporting information to identify the past travel purchase information.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein multiple electronic targeted messages are transmitted in a prioritized manner.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein receiving the merchant preference information comprises receiving an update to previously received merchant preference information and performing processing associated with updating the merchant preference information.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a Continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/060,960 filed Oct. 23, 2013, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/277,923 filed Oct. 20, 2011(now U.S. Pat. No. 8,620,750 issued Dec. 31, 2013) which claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application Nos. 61/405,480, filed Oct. 21, 2010, and 61/405,488, filed Oct. 21, 2010, the entireties of which are incorporated by reference herein.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • [0002]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a system for targeting messages to travelers, according to one embodiment.
  • [0003]
    FIG. 2 is a system diagram illustrating booking and/or expense management application of FIG. 1, according to one embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0004]
    FIG. 3 sets forth a method for targeting messages to travelers, according to one embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a system 100 for targeting messages to travelers, according to one embodiment. Using an environment such as the one illustrated in FIG. 1, messages targeted to a particular user can be sent. In one embodiment, travelers can be sent targeted messages (e.g., from a host) while they utilize applications and/or devices (e.g., personal digital assistant, phone, smart phone, etc.) when they travel. These devices and/or applications can also include features that provide weather information, flight information (e.g., status, schedule, gate, and baggage information), travel reservation and/or itinerary information (e.g., for air, rail, hotel, car, limousine, taxi, dining, or airport parking), or global positioning system (GPS) information (e.g., to help target messages), or any combination thereof. Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that many other features can be included. In addition, some devices and/or applications can integrate with other devices and/or applications so that information can be exchanged to improve the travel experience.
  • [0006]
    One example of system 100 is set forth in FIG. 1. However, it should be noted that system 100 could include: a traditional web-based application inside a computer browser, a client-server application which runs on a local personal computer, a mobile web application which is optimized for a smart phone or PDA, a system that involves sending email, text or other short messages to a device (e.g., phone computer), or a mobile application that runs as a program on a smart phone, PDA, IPADŽ, or other mobile computing device; or any combination thereof.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 1 illustrates some primary components of system 100, according to an embodiment of the present invention. System 100 can comprise: a distributed computer network 105; a client computer 106; a client user interface (UI) module 107; or a booking and/or expense management application 110 in communication with a host server computer 120; or any combination thereof. It should be noted that many configurations are possible. For example, the booking and/or expense management application 110 can be accessed from the work stations 106, which can communicate with the host server computer 120. In addition, the booking and/or expense management application 110 can be wholly or partially located on the client work station 106. Additionally, the booking and/or expense management application 110 can be wholly or partially located on the host server computer 120. Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that other configurations are also possible. It should be noted that any of the modules, applications, systems, etc. of FIG. 1 or 2 can be optional, or can be fully or partially combined with other modules/applications, systems, etc.
  • [0008]
    Referring back to FIG. 1, the distributed computer network 105 can be a network (e.g., Internet, Intranet) that facilitates communication between one or more client computers 106, such as, but not limited to: personal computers (PCs), minicomputers, microcomputers, main frame computers, telephone devices, or other wired or wireless devices, such as hand-held devices, or any combination thereof. FIG. 1 also illustrates a booking and/or expense management application 110, which is housed, for example, on a host server computer 120, which can include, but is not limited to: a minicomputer, a microcomputer, a PC, a mainframe computer, or any device with a processor and repository (e.g., database) or coupling to a repository, or any combination thereof.
  • [0009]
    The client computer 106 can accept input from users, and allow users to view output from the travel and/or expense management application 110. The client UI module 107 can include software on the client computer 106 that can let a user view, for example, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) documents and access files and software related to those documents. The present invention can utilize, for example, HTML-based systems, Java-based systems, XML-based systems, or systems where a custom-built application communicates over the network, or any combination thereof. Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that many other types of systems can be utilized.
  • [0010]
    The booking and/or expense management application 110 can work on or with a client UI module 107 to display information to the user so that services and/or products can be booked and/or expensed. Some details of the booking and/or expense management application 110 are set out in FIG. 2. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can work with many other types of tools (e.g., global distribution system, service provider website (e.g., airline website, car rental website), or internal database, or any combination thereof) to determine which offers are available that correspond with the primary service and/or product the user is interested in buying. For example, the booking and/or expense management application 110 can retrieve messages from an API (Application Programming Interface) (e.g., SERVE, SAVORED, GROUPON, THE DEALMAP) and then send those messages to users. In other embodiments, messages may be retrieved from a database (e.g., internal to system 100, external to system 100) and sent to users. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can also send targeted messages that include a link to launch an API and/or website (e.g., hotel finder, fuel finder, taxi finder, restaurant finder, deals website). For example, if it is known that a user has rented a rental car, and is flying out of Dallas, Tex. in the next few hours, a targeted message including a link to a fuel finder application may be sent to the user.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2 is a system diagram illustrating booking and/or expense management application 110 of FIG. 1, according to one embodiment of the present invention. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can comprise a server UI module 201, a policy enforcement module 205, a reporting module 206, or a targeted messages module 298, or any combination thereof. These modules may be in contact with a database 208. While these various modules are explained with respect to the booking and/or expense management application 110, those of ordinary skill in the art will see that not all modules described are necessary. In addition, additional modules or combination modules are possible. Additionally, it should be noted that pieces of modules can be utilized with or without other modules.
  • [0012]
    In one embodiment, the booking and/or expense management application 110 can include a server module 201, which can communicate with a client module 107 (e.g., on a client work station 106) through the network 105. The server module 201 can transmit data to the client module 107 (e.g., corporate policy data, data accumulated from various travel and expense data sources). Additional details on submitting expense reports, downloading travel data, or other credit card data can be found in the patent applications which are incorporated by reference.
  • [0013]
    Those experienced in the art will recognize that many other modules can be used to build the booking and/or expense management application 110. Data found and utilized by the booking and/or expense management application 110 can be stored in database 208. In one embodiment, the database 208 can comprise a travel reservation (e.g., itinerary, reservation) database 212, an expense database 211, a merchant information database 213, a policies database 214, a message tracking database 215, or any combination thereof
  • [0014]
    The travel reservation database 212 can comprise data received by using some combination of multiple sources (e.g., an on-line booking tool, a travel agent, contact with a travel vendor, a provider reservation and/or sale system, a provider ancillary option system). The travel request data from these sources can be assembled and stored in the travel reservation database 212.
  • [0015]
    The expense database 211 can comprise expense data received from multiple sources as well. The payer (e.g., the user, the traveler, the traveler's assistant), can pay the travel agency or travel vendor with, for example, a credit card. The record of this transaction can go to the credit card vendor, which can transmit funds to the travel vendor for the amount purchased. The expense database 211 could be used in the following example: after travel occurs, and a user goes to submit an expense report, information about offers can be retrieved from, for example, the expense database 211 because all information on offers can be saved to this or another database.
  • [0016]
    The policy database 214 can comprise data relating to various entities policies. Information from the policy database 214 can be used by the policy enforcement module 205 to review targeted messages (e.g., offers) to make sure they comply with entity policies. Information from the policy database 214 can also be used by the message ordering module 295 to prioritize offers based on whether they comply with the entities' policies.
  • [0017]
    The message tracking database 215 can comprise data relating to how the traveler (or someone associated with the traveler, such as an assistant, colleague, family member, etc.) interacted with the message.
  • [0018]
    Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that the various databases can be combined or broken up further in some embodiments of the invention.
  • [0019]
    The booking and/or expense management application 110 can receive travel data from a travel system, expense transaction data from a credit card vendor, and purchasing data from a travel vendor. For a given expense, data may be present from any number of sources, including the possibility that no data is present. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can receive data from the multiple sources at different times and different rates. A source could transmit data continuously or near-continuously (e.g., once per hour), daily, weekly, or even monthly or at longer intervals. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can store all the data received from all the sources when the information is received. The booking and/or expense management application 110 can identify the traveler corresponding to a given travel request and/or expense data and/or using an affinity program number (e.g., frequent flier number). Expense data can come encoded with a credit card number that has been assigned to a specific person. For example, for central billed cards, other traveler-identifying information can be included. In an alternate embodiment, if a user uses an on-line self-booking tool to make a travel request, an identification of the user making the request (or user on whose behalf the request is made) can be stored at the time of request, and the record locator from the PNR can also be stored. Travel data identified by this specific record locator can be mapped to a specific traveler. Information about a traveler can be embedded into the remarks section of the PNR by the travel agency, or the passenger's name can be read from the PNR. Similar methods can be used to identify the traveler on data transmitted directly from a travel vendor. Additionally other uniquely identifying information, such as frequent traveler numbers, can be used.
  • [0020]
    The booking and/or expense management application 110 can also include a policy enforcement module 205. The policy enforcement module 205 can review, for example, various offers to make sure they comply with entity policy before displaying any offers to a user. The policy enforcement module 205 can also be used with the message ordering module 295 to show or send offers in a particular order.
  • [0021]
    The route mapping module 290 can use information from the various databases, as well as information from the GPS module 297, to map a traveler's route for a particular time period.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 3 sets forth a method for targeting messages to travelers, according to one embodiment. In some embodiments, hosts creating and/or managing devices and/or applications can charge a fee for the use of the device and/or application that enables sending targeted messages, or can charge others (e.g., merchants including venders, providers, and/or suppliers) for the ability to target messages to the travelers, or both. In some cases, targeted messages can generate revenue for the host managing the targeted messages based on: whether or not the traveler “clicks” on or views the targeted message to get more information (e.g., pay per click, pay per view); or if a purchase or reservation of some form is completed; or any combination thereof. Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that other methods can be used to generate revenue for an entity.
  • [0023]
    In some embodiments, merchants can choose whether or not, and to whom, they would like to send targeted messages on a given day or at a given hour based on information the merchant has at a certain point in time. In some embodiments, a merchant can send information on whether and to whom he would like to receive targeted messages from any type of device (e.g., computer, mobile device). For example, the host can notify a restaurant manager that there are a certain number of travelers in the area that meet certain criteria (e.g., criteria set by the restaurant and/or criteria the host thinks indicates that certain travelers might be interested in a particular restaurant). The restaurant manager can then wander around and check the kitchen, the reception area, and/or the floor and determine he can handle more business that evening, and then send a message or respond to an inquiry from the host from his cell phone to a host indicating that he would like to send a coupon to a certain set of travelers (e.g., any traveler within a 20 mile radius that is under 30). As another example, a restaurant manager may decide that he would like anyone the host knows that will likely be within a 20 mile radius under 30 to be automatically sent a coupon.
  • [0024]
    In some embodiments, entities can control the devices and/or applications that a traveler utilizes. For example, an entity (company, government, non-profit or other entity) and/or the travel agency may prefer a mobile application that connects with the travel agency and/or travel systems selected by the entity. Travel managers at entities have a vested interest in knowing where all their travelers are at any given time. Were a major event such as war, volcano, earthquake, or bridge collapse to occur, the travel manager has an obligation to try to determine if any travelers are impacted, determine whether each traveler is safe, and potentially re-route the traveler based on the changing circumstances on the ground. Travel managers can rely on reporting systems provided by travel agencies and/or travel systems to determine the location of each traveler. If travelers do not purchase their travel through the entity's travel agency and/or travel system (e.g., utilizing a telephone, on on-line or mobile phone-enabled application that ties into the travel agency's systems), then the travel agency and/or travel system may not be able to provide this reporting. The consequent loss of accuracy in this reporting may negatively impact the travel agency and/or travel system's business.
  • [0025]
    Referring to FIG. 3, in 305, a database 208, including traveler information (e.g., travel itineraries (e.g., past, present, future, or any combination thereof) in a travel reservation database 212 and/or expense reporting information (e.g., past, present, future, or any combination thereof) in an expense database 211), can be maintained. In this manner, information about the different types of travelers (e.g., who the travelers are, where the travelers are going, demographic information) and what they tend to purchase when they travel can be learned.
  • [0026]
    In 310, the targeting messages module 298 can search for itinerary information in a travel reservation database 212 and map out travel routes for travelers in designated areas (e.g., where merchants that are and/or might be interested in sending targeted messages have establishments). For example, the traveler's travel route can be compared to addresses of merchants who have indicated they are or may be interested in sending targeted matches to the travelers. The itinerary information and/or GPS information can be reviewed to know what travelers are traveling at a certain point in time, where they are going, and where they are currently. The targeting messages module 298 can then map out the travelers travel routes for a particular time. For example, the targeting messages module 298 can be programmed to automatically search database 211 and 212 at a certain time every day to determine if any travelers are leaving within the next 48 hours (or any other amount of time), and give those itineraries to an itinerary route mapping module 290, which can then map out the travelers travel map for 48 hours (or any other amount of time). For example, the targeting messages module 298 could determine that it knows of 300 people who should be or are traveling to the Washington DC metropolitan area on a particular date. Based on the hotel reservations or pre-paid hotel rooms, the targeting messages module 298 can determine 125 of the 300 travelers are staying in or near Tyson's Corner in McLean, Virginia.
  • [0027]
    In 315, the travel routes and optionally traveler information can be compared with message information to determine if there are any matches and then targeted messages can be sent accordingly. For example, the travel routes and traveler information can be broken down to fit in categories. The categories can then be searched to determine if there is a match. It should be noted that there are many other ways of determining matches. It should also be noted that traveler information can include expense information, itinerary information, or preference information, or any combination thereof. Preference information may include preference information entered by a particular user or for a particular user. Preference information may also include preferences guessed for a particular user by using information derived from similar users (e.g., using machine learning techniques implemented in systems run by HADOOP, GOOGLE, AMAZON, NETFLIX).
  • [0028]
    For example, in some embodiments, merchants who have signed up for notifications can be sent information about how many travelers there are near or that will be near their establishment that are likely to be interested in the merchant's product and/or service. Information on who may be interested can be derived from spending information, such as, but not limited to: past spending (e.g., names of establishments where the traveler previously bought products and/or services, types of establishments where the traveler previously bought products or services (e.g., based on SIC codes, MCC codes, NAICS codes, other codes); type of expense traveler chose when entering expense in expense report; number of guests traveler entertains when traveling; the amount the traveler normally spends on products and/or services; the traveler's entity's allowances for products and/or services; or any combination thereof). Information about the merchants that have signed up for the notifications can be stored in merchant information database 213. The information in the merchant information database 213 can include, but is not limited to: who the merchants are; where they are located; what they sell; what special offers they have (e.g., coupons, etc.); what type of demographics they are interested in; type of merchant establishment (e.g., based on SIC codes, MCC codes, NAICS codes, other codes); typical prices the merchant charges; or hours of operation for the merchant; or any combination thereof
  • [0029]
    The notification to the merchant could be, but is not limited to: an e-mail; an alert in a web or desktop application (e.g., on a computer and/or mobile device (e.g., phone)); a voice mail for a mobile phone; an SMS text for a mobile phone; or an alert inside an application running on a mobile phone; or any combination thereof. Those of ordinary skill in the art will see that any type of device a merchant could use with the capability to send and/or receive messages can be utilized.
  • [0030]
    In some embodiments, the merchant can choose which travelers to target based on demographic information (e.g., age, profession, salary, etc.), name information, information about the traveler's itinerary (e.g., it is known the traveler is staying at a particular hotel where a convention is taking place, so the merchant could send targeted messages to travelers also staying at the hotel indicating they can meet up with colleagues with the convention at a certain restaurant and get a discount). The merchant can also tailor an offer in a manner that adapts to the daily and/or hourly circumstances. In one embodiment, a device can receive targeted messages, and information regarding when to display or not display the targeted messages (e.g., at a certain time or within a certain time range, when the user is at or is not at a certain location or within a location range (e.g., latitude and longitude), etc.). In this way, for example, in some circumstances, targeted messages may be cached for a future event, and may be shown on the device even when the device is not connected to the network using, for example, previously known travel, expense and/or GPS data.
  • [0031]
    In other embodiments, targeted messages can be automatically matched and sent when a traveler (or a traveler's device) requests itinerary information. In this way, the merchants do not need to be further involved for the targeted messages to be sent.
  • [0032]
    For example, based on the spending information of the 125 travelers in the Tyson's Corner example, the targeting messages module 298 can determine that 45 of the 125 travelers that will be at Tyson's Corner would be receptive to an offer for fine dining. In some embodiments, a notification (e.g., a SMS text) can then be sent to merchant contacts (e.g., managers of Capitol Grille, the Palm, etc.) who have signed up with the host, indicating that there are 45 travelers who will likely be near their establishment that day. Information can also be communicated indicating that 28 of the travelers are already in the Tyson's corner area (e.g., and may be available for lunch and/or dinner) with the remaining 17 travelers arriving later but still before the dinner hour. A manager can check the reservation book and see that, for example, the restaurant is full for dinner but has plenty of space for lunch. Thus, the manager can choose to send a targeted message to the 28 travelers offering a free appetizer with purchase of a meal during the hours of 11 AM and 2 PM. As another example, the manager can determine at about 3 PM that he has many reservations for 7:30 PM and later, but fewer before 7:30 PM. The manager can thus send a targeted message advertising a discount for early bird meals where the traveler is seated before 6 PM, and have the targeted message sent and/or shown from 3 PM until 5:40 PM. In this way, the merchant can fill otherwise empty seats without having to offer a discount or promotion for the later hours when the house is already filled.
  • [0033]
    It should be noted that, in some embodiments, the merchants can pre-authorize a certain level of targeted messages to be sent so that the merchant does not need to give authorization. Thus, the merchant has the ability to pre-authorize previously saved offers. The merchant can also put a start time and stop time, or other criteria indicating when any targeted message should be delivered, if applicable.
  • [0034]
    In some embodiments, the physical location of the traveler (obtained, i.e., via GPS embedded in a mobile phone) can be combined with itinerary information to tailor an offer. For example, if a traveler is traveling from Washington DC to Seattle, WA on a flight which connects through Chicago. If the traveler's GPS information indicates that they are still in Washington DC but not at the airport, taxi, limo, and/or pre-paid parking can be offered. If the traveler is at the airport in Washington or Chicago, discounts to a coffee shop and/or restaurant in the airport can be offered if there is more than 20 minutes before the traveler's flight. (Note that, in some embodiments, information on whether flights are delayed or cancelled can also be taken into account.) If in any location, the traveler does not have a hotel reservation, he could be reminded about the entity's preferred hotels. If the traveler is in Seattle, dinner near the traveler's current location or near the traveler's hotel can be advertised and/or a coupon can be sent.
  • [0035]
    In 320, the targeted messages module 298 can use policy information in a policy database 214 to determine if a targeted message conflicts with an entity's policies. Targeted messages for certain travelers can then be deleted if those messages do not comply with the traveler's entity's policy. In some embodiments, the policies can help select which targeted message(s) will be presented, and in what order. For example, an entity may have a corporate negotiated contract with a MARRIOTT property in a given city where a preferential rate is offered in exchange for driving a certain amount of volume to that hotel property. If a traveler arriving in that city sees a targeted message for a HYATT property, offering a discount or preferential amenity that makes the HYATT attractive to the traveler, the traveler may choose to stay at the HYATT, which denies the entity the ability to use this stay towards their volume commitment at the MARRIOTT. Thus, the entity may choose to have only Marriott offers displayed. In addition, an entity may have a policy that dinner should cost no more than $25 per night, so a message recommending the local Morton's steak house would not be shown (or would be shown after cheaper dinner options).
  • [0036]
    In 325, the targeting messages module 298 can send, in, for example, a prioritized manner, the targeted messages that the merchants have indicated they would like to send. In this way, the traveler will view or otherwise receive the targeted messages in a certain order. The prioritization can be based on vendor criteria and/or how well a message targets a given traveler. This can help optimize the benefit to the traveler, so the traveler will not complain about the offers, and may view them as a benefit. This can also optimize the revenue to the host because the more effective the offer (e.g., as far as the offer being used and generating revenue and profit for the vendor), the more the vendors will pay). Thus, the ordering can be done, for example, based on: how much a vendor has paid or may pay for the targeted message; whether a vendor has paid or may pay in order for his targeted message to be shown before other targeted messages; traveler preferences; travel patterns determined from the traveler's past behavior; categorization of the traveler as compared to other similar travelers; or the traveler's entity's policies; or any combination thereof. It should be noted that there are many other reasons the ordering of the targeted messages can be prioritized or changed.
  • [0037]
    The targeted message can be presented in many ways, including, but not limited to: an e-mail, an alert in a web or desktop application (e.g., on a computer and/or a mobile device (e.g., phone) when viewing the traveler's itinerary); a voice mail for a mobile phone; an SMS text for a mobile phone; or an alert inside an application running on a mobile phone (e.g., when viewing the traveler's itinerary); or any combination thereof
  • [0038]
    In 330, the targeting messages module 298 can send information about the targeted messages that are actually sent can be stored in a message tracking database 215. For example, information can be compiled, including, but not limited to: how many travelers were sent the targeted message, how many travelers actually viewed the targeted message (e.g., opened and/or accessed a text or email), whether the traveler interacted with the targeted message, when a user interacted with the targeted message (e.g., time information), or whether the traveler used a coupon or other offer communicated in the targeted message, or any combination thereof. It should be noted that there are many other types of information about the targeted messages that can be stored.
  • [0039]
    In 340, the targeted messages module 298 can retrieve information from the expense database 211 and search the message tracking database 215 to determine whether a targeted message was utilized by a traveler. For example, some targeted messages may not require any interaction. The targeted message may simply recommend a given establishment and give directions, with no further information. Thus, the host may need to know which travelers actually took the merchant up on the offer. The host can rely on the merchant to provide this information. In addition, the targeted messages module 298 can also search information in the expense database 211 to determine which travelers expensed a product and\or service from a particular merchant. The targeted messages database 215 can then be searched to determine if any of those travelers had received or interacted with a targeted message from that particular merchant. This can be done, for example, in an audit by a person and/or an automated audit, to help ensure that a merchant is paying for what he should (e.g., a restaurant may not pay unless a reservation is made or if the traveler shows up and purchases something). The stored information can also be used to help optimize targeting in the future for this traveler as well as other travelers (e.g., with similar demographic information).
  • [0040]
    Thus, for example, if the offer is transmitted to the 45 travelers and 20 click on the offer (which is a $10 coupon) and 10 use the offer, the merchant could be charged for the 45 that were sent the offer; for the 20 that clicked on the offer; or for the 10 that used the offer; or any combination thereof In some embodiments, merchants can only be charged when a traveler actually buys their product and/or service. In this way, if no-one takes the manager up on the offer, the manager may not have to pay. The merchant can report this information to the host or the host could audit and/or search the expense database 211 to see, for example, who ate at the Morton's in Tyson's Corner on a particular day.
  • [0041]
    While various embodiments have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example, and not limitation. It will be apparent to persons skilled in the relevant art(s) that various changes in form and detail can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope. In fact, after reading the above description, it will be apparent to one skilled in the relevant art(s) how to implement alternative embodiments. Thus, the present embodiments should not be limited by any of the above-described embodiments.
  • [0042]
    In addition, it should be understood that any figures which highlight the functionality and advantages, are presented for example purposes only. The disclosed methodology and system are each sufficiently flexible and configurable, such that it may be utilized in ways other than that shown. For example, the steps listed in any flowchart may be re-ordered or only optionally used (even when not explicitly indicated) in some embodiments. Thus, those skilled in the art will realize that the ordering of the steps of the figures can be altered in other embodiments and that various steps can be removed in some embodiments.
  • [0043]
    It should be noted that Applicant has, for consistency reasons, used the phrase “comprising” throughout the claims instead of, or in addition to, “including, but not limited to”. However, it should be noted that “comprising” should be interpreted as meaning “including, but not limited to”.
  • [0044]
    In addition, it should be noted that, if not already set forth explicitly, the term “a” should be interpreted as “at least one” and “the”, “said”, etc. should be interpreted as “the at least one”, “said at least one”, etc.
  • [0045]
    It should be noted that the purpose of any Abstract of the Disclosure, Summary, or Background section is to enable the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally, and especially the scientists, engineers and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The Abstract of the Disclosure, Summary, or Background section are not intended to limit the scope of the invention in any way.
  • [0046]
    Finally, it is the applicant's intent that only claims that include the express language “means for” or “step for” be interpreted under 35 U.S.C. 112, paragraph 6. Claims that do not expressly include the phrase “means for” or “step for” are not to be interpreted under 35 U.S.C. 112, paragraph 6.
Classifications
International ClassificationG06Q30/02, H04W4/20, H04W4/02, H04W4/06
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q30/0261, H04W4/206, G06Q30/0205, H04W4/06, G06Q30/0271, G06Q10/02, H04W4/025
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
17 Apr 2017ASAssignment
Owner name: CONCUR TECHNOLOGIES, INC., WASHINGTON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DEPASQUALE, THOMAS;LOVE, JOHN;LORE, MICHAEL;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20111215 TO 20111219;REEL/FRAME:042031/0360