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Publication numberUS1991468 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date19 Feb 1935
Filing date27 Oct 1934
Priority date27 Oct 1934
Publication numberUS 1991468 A, US 1991468A, US-A-1991468, US1991468 A, US1991468A
InventorsSchoolfield Lucille D
Original AssigneeSchoolfield Lucille D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 1991468 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1935.

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE SCENE l rom a Caferpnllnr Down 'The The Glues Table Rnbbi'r Hole L. D. SCHOOLFIELD GAME 13 f 6"\THE GLASS TABLE '7 SCENE 2 ".7 ,f 2 W b i 2 /f/f 2 M 3:; A* o,

3*-` rn l H *,/2

`l \l "5 8 'H i1 f 6 4 Advme rqm a Caierpilar @CV/C6 owgisazzm g e 4f *ALISECCSMnE-RLANDJ 9 FIG 2. 1.7 2Q i? ALlCE lN VVONDERLAND Bq Lewis Carra" scene 1 Down the Rabblf Hale ,iq/,Aww 2 The Glass Tmc SCENE Adl/Ice lyram a, CMQ-Fullmscene 4 A Mad Tgwarrq E Couesz Wgegnos sa. J

Feb. 19,l 1935. L. D, scHooLFlELD 1,991,468

GAME

Filed Oct. 27, 1954 y2 SheS-Sheet 2 e" F163 f `PEUR RABBIT 1N en THE TALE 0F PETER RABBlT THE TALE 0Fv ne ablespoonfu af bed- Pei'er Rabbfs Home Mr. M: Grcgors Gar-den Mrs Rabb# and *he Chdren -Scenes {iram- *THE TALE 0F PETER RABBIT l 9 I Bg Benn Poner 6 FIG. 4- is CINDEELLA'S COACH Feier Rabbls Home Mr, Mc Greqorb Garden Mrs Rabb' and we Ch'ndren Feier Robb'n m Bed N THE STORY oF .CINDERELLA A+ H19 Ba ll The Prince Cmderellu -acenes ,rom *THE STORY oq cmDERx-:LLA i Scene i CindereHa l Scene 2 Cimlereloav Coach Scene 3 A+ *he BQ Scene 4 The Prince Scene /l l fkTHE STORY o w www MMM# gam-599% W ia'tenled Feb. 19,1935

UNITED fsTATEs GAME n Lucillen. schoblfla, Washington, D. c. Application Octoberk 27, 1934, Serialk No. 750,357V

" solaims. (c1. 27s- 152) My invention relates to games, and more par-r ticularly to games played with cards.

The main object of my invention is to provide a game played with cards which will afford entertainment and amusement to the players and,

at the same time, will be of considerable educational value inV that it familiarizes the players with scenes and dialogues from literature and the sources from which they aretaken. A further object is to make therscenes out-l standing and realistic, and the dialogue of the A still further object is to provide a gamees- Y pecially in a series for young children, which will .not only familiarize them with literature, but through depicting familiar rscenes with their titles, and the dialogue of well'known characters,

provides practice in recognition ofk words and phrases, which aids in building upv a reading vocabulary. Y 1 y My invention comprises agame of cards or the like in which a plurality of legends, stories,r

3 poems, books, Vand other forms vof literature` are legend, book, and the like, are depicted oncards, the cards drawn from a single work or storyconstituting a set or book in playing the game. Asrmany sets or books as desired may be used, and as many `cards for each set as` the scenes from the selected story or the like will permit.V ,The scenes may include human beings, animals, birds, insects or the like,ror depict inanimate objects, such as a table, a coach, a house, or, in fact, anyy part of the animal, vegetable, or mineral kingdoms, depending upon the source from; which they are drawn.

My invention will be better understood from tion in conjunction with theaccompanying selected, and sceneswdrawn from a single story,

from which the scenesand dialogue are taken.

consideration of the following detailed descrip cards, cards Without `dialogue are termed scene-cards. Y f

Figure 2 shows what I term la source-card i. e., a card bearing the title of the story, legend,

etc., from' which scenes are derived. This card `5` with the scene-cards and scene-dialogue catrdsV bearing the same symbols constitute a se y YFigures 3 and 4 are Views showing scenecards and scene-dialogue cards of additional 10 sets with their source-card taken from other branches of literature. Y

Upon referring'to the drawings, Figurel, 1 designates a card having thereon pictorial( representation of ascene 2. rNote: The numeral 2 refers to a scene. When followed by an 01.V reference is to a scene-card without dialogue, and when followed by a fb reference'is toa scenecard with dialogue. The scene-cards 2a`without dialogue are hereinafter referred to as scenecards, and the scene cards with dialogue 2b are hereinafter referred to as `scene-dialogue cards. A scene may show an inanimate object, such as a table 3, or characters 4, with their dialogue 5, if desired. t

Adjacent the scene 2 is the title yof the scene 6 which I preferv to place above the scene 2. The

designation 'I refers to scenes 1, 23, 4, etc., underneath the title 6.

- to inform the player which cards constitute the This is 4preferably placed at the bottom of the card and made conspicuous by capitalization and a star l0` orV other means. If the author is known; his name 11 may be' placed near the title or source.Y l If copyright 'permission has Vbeen obtained, noticemay begiven` as at 12.

Each card of a set or book has a special designation 13 which may belocated anywherev on the card,jbut preferably in theupper right hand corner. This designation 13 may be of any` design, but I prefer to use letters of the alphabet, numerals and designs, as shown. The let-1 ters in this instance referto the set or book; thenumerals to scenes; the star design to the source card. Y 1 *n It should be noted that all scenes on the cards in Figure l were taken from a well known book, Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. While I have shown only three scene-dialogue cards PATENT OFFICE.- Af

and one scene-card in the set er bookj it is obvious that other scene-cards or scenedialogue cards such as The pool of tears, The queens croquet ground, or any other scene from the book may be used, depending entirely upon the number of cards desired to constitute a book or Setf With such scene-cards or scene-dialogue cards is used, a source-card, such as shown in Figure 2, these cards showing the source from which the scenes and dialogue are taken, one such source-card, being used with each set or book.

This source-card has thereon a pictorial representation of the book 14 showing the title l5 of the story, legend or the like from which the scenes and dialogue or the particular set were drawn, and author 16, if known. Above the pic torial representation of the book 14 is the title 17 and author 18 of the source-card 4to correspond with the title 6 of the scene-cards and scene-dialogue cards. The source-card also contains the notations, scenes l, 2, 3, 4, 19, depending upon the number of scene-cards and scene-dialogue cards which constitute the set. In the upper right hand corner, there is a star design 20 to make the source-card conspicuous.

The game may be played according to the following rules:

After the cards are shuffled they are dealt one at a time until all the cards in the deck have been distributed among the players. After each player has arranged his cards into designated groups or sets the game begins.y Y

1. The player at the dealers left has the first privilege of play and may call upon any player for a source-card or scene-dialogue card he may need to complete the cards of a set he has in his' hand, subject to the following restrictions:

a. No player is allowed to call for a sourcecard until he has a complete set of scene-cards, and scene-dialogue cards in his hand. If he calls for a source-card by mistake, that is, when he has not all the scene-cards and scene-dialogue cards in his hand, he forfeits all cards of that set and places them face-up on the table, with the next player having the privilege of call. If he receives the source-card, he reads aloud the title and author (if known) and places the set face down on the table, and has another turn until he misses.

b. The player calling for and receiving a scene-dialogue card, reads the dialogue aloud and receives another turn c. A player calling for a-scene-card, (without dialogua) does not have another turn regardless of whether he receives the card or not.

2. The player having the source-card in his hand may call at any time for the other cards of the set, designating them by scene 1, scene 2, scene 3, etc., or, scene l'-Down the rabbit hole; scene 2The glass table, etc. The player should not disclose where the source-card is until he has located as nearly as possible the position of the scene-cards and scene-dialogue cards.

3. 'Ihe cardsv may be called for by name or by scene or by letter. Upon receiving a source-card or scene-dialogue card," the player must read aloud the title of the book and the name of the author on the source-card and the dialogue on the scene-dialogue card before taking'another turn. If the player obtains the card called for, (except the fscene-card without dialogue) he continues to call for and receive other cards from any of the players until he misses, (that is,

until he fails to receive the card called for), the privilege of calling or turn passing from player to player, always to the left. i

Ll. When any player obtains a full set, he lays them aside on the table, announcing the name of the completed book. The player winning the game is the one who has the most sets at the end of the game.

I claim:

l. A deck of playing cards divided into two or more groups of cards, each card of each group bearing indicia relating each card of that ygroup to every other card of the group, some only of each group of cards bearing additional indicia for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards or the group, and some only of each group of cards bearing additional indicia for further distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards oi the deck.

2. A deck of playing cards divided into two or more groups of cards, each group bearing indicia relating each card of that group to every other card of the Vgroup, some only of each group of cards bearing indicia for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the group and some only of said deck of cards bearing additional indicia for further distinguishing said cards from the remainingV cards of the deck, and an additional master card for each group bearing indicia relating said master card to every other card of the group and the group to a common source of derivation such as a work of literature and its author, known.

3.` A deck of cards having amusement and educational value, comprising two or more groups of cards having pictorial representationsthereon, each group bearing data relating each card of that group to every other card of the group, some cards of each group bearing additional data for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the group, and some of said cards bearing data for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the deck; an additional specially designated master card for each group bearing data relating said master card to every other card of the groupand the group to a common source of derivation, such as a legend, Work of literature and its author, ifV known.

fi. A deck of cards having amusement and educational value, comprising two or more groups of cards having thereon pictorial representations of scenes, each group bearingl printed matter relating each card of that group to every other card of the group, and some cards of each group bearing additional printed matter such as dialog for distinguishing said cards vfromv the remaining cards of the group; some of said cards having pictorial representations of scenes, and printed matter thereon for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the deck; an additional master card for each group having there-on a pictorial representation of an object which, together with printed matter, relates said master card to ,every other card of the group andthe group to a commonscurce of derivation such as a legend or book and its author, if known.

5. A deck of cards having amusement and educational value, comprising two or more groups of cards having thereon pictorial scenes either real or imaginary derived from books, legends and the like, each group bearing in print titles of the various scenes, designating numerals, letters and the like, and relating each cardof that group to every other card of the group, and some cards of each group bearing printed dialogue for disgether with printed titles of scenes lderived fromv tinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the group; and some of said cards comprising a ygroup having thereon pictorial scenes, printed titles of scenes and designations for distinguishing said cards from the remaining cards of the deck; and an additional master or group card bearing a pictorial representation of a book, iso-'-v saidbook, and other data relating said master Vcard to every other card of the group and the group of cardsto the book from which the scenes were derived. l Y v Y LUCILLE D. SCHOOLFIELD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2634132 *19 Oct 19497 Apr 1953Edward H FreedmanDeck of playing cards and holder therefor
US5180306 *4 Feb 199119 Jan 1993Mcinroy Thomas REducational art game
US5547199 *12 Jun 199520 Aug 1996Calhoun; Christopher A.Method of playing a sentence forming game
US7281928 *17 Aug 200016 Oct 2007Freeman Victoria JMethod and apparatus for conducting a competition using a divided literary work
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/307
International ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02
European ClassificationA63F1/02