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Publication numberUS1972339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date4 Sep 1934
Filing date21 Feb 1933
Priority date23 Jun 1932
Publication numberUS 1972339 A, US 1972339A, US-A-1972339, US1972339 A, US1972339A
InventorsKarl Grosz
Original AssigneeCary Patentverwertungs Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 1972339 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ept. 4, 1934. osz, 1,972,339

SHOE

' Filed Feb. 21, 1933 Fly 1 [NI 271 703 TH/Pi GROUZ Patented Sept. 4, 1934 UNITED STATES SHOE Karl Grcsz, Budapest,

Hungary, assignor to Gary Patentverwertungs-Aktiengesellschaft,

Vaduz, Liechtenstein Application February 21, 1933, Serial No. 657,883 In Austria June 23, 1932 6 Claims. (CI. 36-12) This invention relates to that type of shoe in which the sole has a substantially rigid, upwardly extending side wall to which the upper is secured. Such shoes are especially suitable for use as beach shoes and walking. shoes.

The invention provides improvements in such shoes, and more particularly an improved method.

of and means for stitching or otherwise securing the upper to the sole.

In known-shoes of the type stated, the stitching extends to the inside and the thread used, which must be strong because of the substantial thickness and rigidity of the sole, often causes unpleasantness and even pain by contact with the wearers foot.

According to the invention the relatively'rigid, upwardly extending side wall of the sole has its free upper edge turned outwards to form a flange or seating to which the upper is secured wholly beyond the inner confines of the shoe, thereby eliminating the defect just mentioned.

The outer edge of the upper may be bound by a separate strip which may enca'se the said edge in the form of a roll. The stitching securing the upper and sole may then pass through the outturned flange of the sole and through the portion of the upper bearing thereon in such a position that it is concealed by the roll while being wholly beyond the inner confines of the shoe.

Preferably the binding strip is first'attached to the top surface of the marginal portion of the upper and is thereafter rolled over on itself and brought to the under surface of the upper so as to encase or enclose the edge of the upper. A portion of the strip is thereby disposed between the upper and the out-turned flange of the sole, and the stitching effecting the union between sole and upper may pass through the flange, through the strip and through the upper.

If desired, the stitching may also be concealed from below by rolling the out-turned flange of the sole downwardly and inwardly away from the roll constituted by the binding strip. The roll and the said flange not only serve to conceal. the stitching but also impart a pleasing finish to the shoe.

By way of example a constructional form of shoe in accordance with the invention is illustrated on the accompanying drawing. Fig. l is a side view of the shoe, Big. 2 represents a section on line 1-1 of Fig. 1, and Fig.3 shows the union between the sole and the upper on a larger scale. The sole 1 is relatively rigid and is moulded or otherwise formed with an integral, upwardly extending sidewall 2. The free upper edge of the sidewall 2 is turned outwards to form a seating or flange 3 for the upper 4 of the shoe. Said flange extends wholly outwards from the side wall 2 of the sole and constitutes an essential part of the sole as well as an important feature of the invention. The upper 4, which is of any suit able construction and material, also has an outwardly directed edge 5 which is positioned over the seating or flange 3 of the sole, this edge being equipped with a separate binding strip 6.

As illustrated, the strip 6 is stitched at 'l to the top surface of the edge 5 of the upper and is turned over on itself and brought to the under side of the said edge which it therefore encases in the form of a roll extending outwardly of the upper 4.

The flange 3 of the sole 2 is united to the upper 4 and to the strip 6 by stitching 8. The thread employed for the stitching 8 can be of any desired strength or thickness because it does not extend m tothe interior of the shoe and never comes into contact with the wearers foot, for which reason it cannot press against the foot or cause pain.

It will be seen that the stitching 8 extends through the flange 3 of the sole approximately at the middle of its upper surface and through the part 5 of the upper closely adjacent the inner edge of the roll formed by the binding strip 6. In this way the stitching is concealed from above by the roll. If new it is also desired to conceal the stitching from below, the outer portion of the flange 3 of the sole can be rolled downwardly and inwardly. The roll formed by the strip and the downwardly and inwardly bent portion of the flange 3 of the sole not only conceal the stitching but also constitute a pleasing finish to the union between the sole and upper and enhance the appearance of the shoe.

I claim:-

1. A shoe having an upturned relatively rigid side wall, the upper free end of the side wall being projected outwardly, an upper, a strip rolled about the edge of the upper and disposed between the upper and outwardly projected portion of the sole, stitches uniting the strip and upper and completely concealed by the roll of the strip, and stitches uniting the upper,-strip and sole.

2. A shoe having an upturned relatively rigid side wall, the upper free end of the side wall being projected outwardly, an upper, a strip rolled about the edge of the upper and disposed between the upper and outwardly projected portion of the sole, stitches uniting the strip and upper and completely concealed by the roll of the strip, and stitches uniting the upper, strip and sole, said latter stitches leading through the upper im- .the edge of an upper, rolling said strip above and over the securing means and over the free edge of the upper and beneath the upper, and securing the upper and that portion of the strip beneath the upper to the outturned edge of the sole.

4. That method of making a shoe consisting in forming a rigid sole with vertical, upstanding side walls, with the upper edges of the latter outturned, stitching the edge of a finishing strip onto the upper surface of an upper adjacent the edge of the latter, rolling the finishing strip over said line of stitching and over the free edge of the upper and beneaththe upper, and stitching the upper and that portion of the strip beneath the upper to the outturned edge of the sole, the latter stitching passing through the upper on a line substantially beneath the inner edge of the roll of the strip.

5. A shoe sole having a sole member with-a relatively rigid, upstanding wall, the free edge of the wall being outturned, an upper, a strip secured on the upper surface of the upper by a line of stitching passing through the strip and through the upper, the strip being rolled from and over such line of stitching around the free edge of the upper and beneath the upper to conceal the line of stitching passing through the upper, and stitches passing through the upper and that portion of the strip below the upper and theoutturned edge of the sole.

6. A shoe sole having a sole member with relatively rigid, upstanding wall, the free edge of the wall being outturned, an upper, a strip secured on the upper surface of the upper by a line .of stitching passing through the strip and through the upper, the strip being rolled from and over such line of stitching around the free" edge of the upper and beneath the upper to conceal the line of stitching passing through the upper, and stitches passing through the upper and that portion of the strip below the upper and the outturned edge of the sole, said latter line of stitching being arranged inwardly from the first line of stitching relative to the edge of the upper, and being substantially concealed at the upper surface of the upper by the roll of the strip.

KARL GROSZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6438868 *21 Jun 200027 Aug 2002A. Testoni S.P.A.Method for making shoes and the shoes obtained using said method
US6662469 *31 Oct 200116 Dec 2003Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Footwear construction and method for manufacturing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/12, 12/142.00T, 36/16
International ClassificationA43B3/10
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/10
European ClassificationA43B3/10