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Publication numberUS1938200 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date5 Dec 1933
Filing date28 Aug 1931
Publication numberUS 1938200 A, US 1938200A, US-A-1938200, US1938200 A, US1938200A
InventorsClarence A. Wells
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Band-saw operating mechanism
US 1938200 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. A. WELLS 1,938,200 I BAND SAW OPERATING MECHANISM Filed Aug. 28. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet l Dec. 5, 1933.

c. A. WELLS BAND SAW OPERATING MECHANISM Filed Aug. 28, 1

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Dec. 5, 1933 I NITED STATES PATENT OFFICE- 1,938,200 BAND-SAW OPERATING MECHANISM Clarence A. Wells, Three Rivers, Mich. Application August 28, 1931. Serial no. 559,965

' Claims. (01. 143-19) This invention relates to improvements in band-saw operating mechanism of the type used in meat markets for cutting: bones, the main object of the present. invention being to provide a device of this character which is better adapted to the needs of the meat trade than the saws marketed heretofore, and which is also adapted'for use by the wood-cutting industry.

One of the main objects of the'jinven'tion is to provide. a band-saw mechanism wherein the motor is-more directly and efficiently associated with the saw driving elements thereof than heretofore.

A further important object of the invention is to provide means for distorting the band-saw during use thereof to enable the operator to vary the direction of the out made by thesaw.

A further object of the invention is to provide simple and eiiicient means for. so adjusting the sheaves or pulleys over which the saw is trained asto obviate the disengagement of the saw therefrom during operation of themechanism;

Other. objects of the invention will be pointed out or understood from the following description.

In the, accompanying drawings illustrating a suitable embodiment ofthe invention:

Fig. 1 is a plan, view and Fig. 2 is-aside elevation of amachine constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 31s a detail vertical sectional .view on an enlarged scale on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3. i 1

Fig. 5 is a plan section on the line 55 of Fig.2.

Figs. 6, '7, and 8 areverticalsectional views on the lines 6-6, '7-7, and 8-8, respectively, of Fig. 1.

The machine of this invention comprises the frame 1 which consists, preferably, of a unitary casting comprising a pair of substantially cylindrical end portions 2 and 3, having dished heads, and an intermediate connecting portion, indicated by the reference numeral 1, which is of inverted channel shape. The said end portions 2 and 3 areopen at the bottom. 1

The saidend portion 2 is disposed at the end of' said frame which iscommonly disposed adjacent to or in overhanging relation to a meatblock 4 or an equivalent thereof. In the instance illustratedthe said frame 1 is carried by a bracket 5 secured to the meat-block 4 in the manner hereinafter described.

Within the end portion 2 there is rigidly socketformations 28 and, at their other ends, to

mounted a ball bearing 6 for the stud-shaft of the pulley 7 over which the saw-'8 is trained. The said pulley 7 is equipped with an internal spur-gear rim 9 which meshes with the spurgear 10 mounted on the shaftof the motor 11- which is rigidly mounted on the head of said end portion 2 of the frame 1.

Mounted within the endportion 3 isapair or rails 12 on which a carriage 13 isslidably mounted. This carriage is equipped with a 5 threaded sleeve 14 in which the threaded shank of the set-screw 15 engages. The said set-screw 15 is rotatably mounted in the circumferential wall of said end portion 3 and is held against longitudinal movement relatively thereto by means of the collar 16 inan obvious manner. The ball-bearing 17 for the stud-shaft 18 of the pulley 19 over which the saw 8 is trained, is equipped with trunnions 20 which are engaged in bearings disposed upon thecarriage '13, the axis of said trunnions 20 being-perpendicular to the rails 12 and'to the axis of the set-screw 15. The said bearing 17 is thus-a rocking element which is also provided'with projections 21 in which the set-screws 22 engage, the latter being mounted so in the carriage 13, as shown in Fig. 7, for effecting adjustment'of the bearingl'l and pulley-19 to position necessary to prevent the saw 8 from be- 19 and '7 1 Said stud-shaft24 rests upon the upper end of .a set-screw 26 mounted in the bracket 5 and enables the. yoke 25 to be raised or lowered. 9 The arms of said yoke 25 are arcuate to pass around the peripheral portion of the end portion 2."of the frame 1 and are pivotally engaged at their upper ends with the trunnions 2'7 of the frame of the motor 11 as shown in detail in 5' Figs. 3'and 4. As is clearly shown in Fig. 3,the trunnion '27 projects from at sleeve or socket formation 28. The ar'mof the yoke 25 carries the 0 bearing 29 which receives the trunnion 2'7. The bearing 29 is equipped with an annular flange 30 between its ends which fits. the sleeve or socket formation 28 and closes the 1 mouth thereof. Clock springs 31, under given normal tension, are secu'red'to the circumferential walls of the the bearings 29, thelatter being confined upon the trunnions 27 by means of nuts 32' mounted upon the threaded outer end portions of said trunnions. The frame 1 is thus rendered pivotally movable about the vertical axis of the stud-shaft 240i the 1 yoke and about the horizontal axis of the trunnions 27, the tension of the springs 31 being such as will normally maintain the frame 1 in raised position.

A handle 33 is pivotally mounted on the end portion 3 of the frame 1 to rock on an axis parallel with the travel of the free portion 34 of the saw 8 shown in Fig. 1. To this end the said end portion 3 is equipped with bearings 35 in which pivot pins secured to the handle 33 are. engaged.

A segmental gear 36 is rigid with the handle 33 and is rotatable on the axis of the bearings 35 which is concentric with the gear teeth. The latter nest with the rack teethilf?v of. the. bar 38 which is slidable at one end in'a bearing or opening in the circumferential wall of the'end portion 3 (see Fig. '7) and at its other end is pivotally engaged with the crank arm 39 at one end of a rod 40 which constitutes a rock-shaft journalled' in bearings 41 in the respective end portions 2 andl3= ofthe frame. 1, the. rodor rock-shaft 40 beingmainly disposed within the channeledportionof. theframe 1 joining saidend' portions 2 andB.

"The end portion of said rod or rock-shaft 40, which projects into the end portion 2 of the frame, is also equipped with a. crank arm 42 aligned with the crank arm 39 and this companion crank arm is pivotally engaged with a rack-bar 43. Thelatter and the rack-bar 38Jare provided onitheir lower. edges with rack teeth which mesh with those of segmental gears 33 rigid with rocking saw-guides 45 equipped with guide recesses throughwhich the said free portion 3a of the saw 3 engages. Said'saw-guides 45 are journalled in bearings carried by adjustable plates 46 mounted upon the opposed portions of the peripheral walls of theportions 2. and 3 of the frame 1.

This mechanism is such' that if it be desired to distort thefree orcutting portion 34 of. the saw 8 to divert the direction of the cut from the normal plane'to one angularly disposed there'- to; this being frequently desirable in meat markets andotherwise to bring the plane of the saw-cut perpendicular to'the bone or other object which is angularly disposed upon the block 4 or other support.

In practicathe saw 8 travels at very high speed in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig 1. The saw teeth thus carry the saw-dust into the portion 2 of the frame, the particles adhering to the teethbeing dislodged by centrifugal force as the teeth pass around the pulley '7. As the teethare disposed in aplanewhich' is sometimes slightly below that ofthe lower" edge of the peripheral. wall of the portionZ of the frame 1, the adhering particles are apt to be" projected for some distance and thus bespatter employes or customers of the meat market;v

To avoid this possibility; the bracket 5; or equivalent support, is equipped with. parallel guide rails 45'? to engage the inner opposed parallel flanges 48 bordering a recess in the bottom wall of a pan 49 having a U-shaped wall, the arcuate portion of the latter projecting above theplane-of the lower edge offthe peripheral wall of the portion 2 of the frame when the latter is horizontally disposed, which is usually the lowest position assumed by said frame. The arcuate portion of the wall of the pan is substantially semi-cylindrical and is of appreciably larger diameter than the opposed arcuate portion of the peripheral wall of the saidportion 2 of. the frame soas to be spaced from the latter. I The parallel side portions 50 of the wall of the pan being cut away at their upper ends to afford ample pivotal movement of the frame 1 about the axis of the stud-shaft of the yoke to meet the requirements of users.

In use, the frame 1 is usually so disposed relatively to the meat-block 4 that the cutting portion 34 of the saw 8 extends substantially diametrically of the said block 4. The said frame is normallyv disposedratan incline to the surface of said block with its end portion 3 raised suiiiciently not to interfere with the butchers cutting of steaks, chops, and the like.

After the knife-cuts have been made, the piece of meat in which the same are made is adjusted to bring the first cut substantially into the plane of cut of the portion 34 of the saw 8 which is then brought down to cut through the bone in the plane of the knife-cut.

Obviously, the bone, as in the case of a hindquarter. of. beef, will rarely be disposed otherwise than at some angle of inclination to the surface of the meat-block 1; Hence, as the butcher lowers the saw, he also tilts the handle about itsv pivotal axis to distort the portion 34 of the saw 8. relatively to the balance of said saw to bring-the same into the plane of the knife-cut or into theplane substantially perpendicular to theaxisof the bone tobe'cut.

This'distortion of the saw Sis believed to be novel in the art and is highly advantageous to the user as practice has demonstrated that such distortion may extend through an angle of approximately ninety degrees without injury to the saw.

When the machine is intended for use by carpenters, cabinet'makers, and other artisans, the frame 1 may be pivotally mounted to suit their needs with respect, for example, to effecting a long saw-cut in a horizontal plane, suitable mountings being easily within the skill of persons engaged in machine manufacture without specialillustration or description herein.

The lower end portion of the casing of the motor 11 is rigid with the bearing for the motor shaft shown in Fig. 5. This bearing is rigid with a frame 51 which is secured by bolts 52 to the end portion 4 of the frame of the carriage.

The said frame 51 is rigid with the casing 53 of the ball bearing for the shaft of the disk or pulley which is geared to the motor shaft and over which the saw 8 is trained.

The said frame 51 may be adjusted to extend slightly angularly to the plane common to all of theteeth of the saw 8 for the same reasons as are recited with reference to the idle pulley over which thesaw 8 is trained.

I claim as my invention:

1. A band-saw driving mechanism including a frame equipped with pulleys over which the bandi saw is trained, a support for said frame, a motor casing rigid with said frame and equipped with trunnions, a yoke pivotally mounted on said'support and with the said trunnions to cause said frame to be pivotally movable relatively to said I;

yoke on an axis extending laterally of that on which said yoke swings relatively to said support, and springs operatively associated with said yoke and said trunnions for counter-balancing the weight of said frame.

2. A band-saw driving mechanism including a frame equipped with pulleys over which the bandsaw is trained, a support for said frame, a motor casing rigid with said frame, a pair of trunnions on said motor casing, a yoke pivotally mounted on said support and engaged with said trunnions, sockets in said casing around said trunnions,

. springs mounted in said sockets and operatively associated with said yoke and said motor casing for counter-balancing the weight of the other end portion of the frame, a motor in said casing,v

and gearing between said motor and one of said pulleys.

3. A band-saw driving mechanism including a frame equipped with pulleys over which the band-saw is trained, a support for said frame, a vertical bearing on said support, a yoke journalled in said bearing, means operatively connecting said frame with said yoke to cause said frame to be pivotally movable relatively to said yoke on an axis extending laterally of that on which said yoke swings relatively to said support, pan

supporting means mounted on said support and a saw-dust receiving pan disposed below the pivoted end portion of said frame and detachably engaged with said pan supporting means.

4. A band-saw driving mechanism including a frame equipped with pulleys over which the band-saw is trained, a support for said frame, a

vertical bearing on said support, a yoke jour nalled in said bearing, means operatively connecting said frame with said yoketo cause said frame to be pivotally movable relatively to said yoke on an axis extending laterally of that on which said yoke swings relatively to said support, a pair of horizontally disposed guide flanges rigid with the said support, a substantially U-shaped saw-dust receiving panequipped with guide rails engaged with the guide flanges of the said support for detachably securing said pan to said support,

the upper edge portion of the said pan being disposed about and spaced from one end of the said frame with said pan during pivotal movemerit of said frame about the vertical axis of the said yoke. Y 5. A band-saw mechanism including a frame, a pair of band-saw pulleys rotatably mounted in opposite ends of the said frame, an internal gearwheel rigid with one of said pulleys, a bearing rigid with said frame and disposed adjacent the pivotal axis of one of said pulleys, a pair of trunnions rigid with said bearing, a motor shaft journalled in said bearing and equipped with a gear pinion meshing with said internal gear, a support for said frame equipped with a vertical bearing, a yoke journalled in said bearing and having its I arms engaged with said trunnions, and counterbalancing springs engaged with said yoke and said first-named bearing.

6. A band-saw mechanism including a frame, a pair of band-saw pulleys rotatably mounted in anci'ng springs engaged with said yoke and said first-named bearing, said springs being mounted opposite ends of the said frame, an internal gearsockets around said trunnions, and counter-bal-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2556670 *15 May 194712 Jun 1951Ashworth Joseph LSwinging frame band-sawing machine
US2596081 *10 Jun 19476 May 1952Sacrey Elmer PHand manipulated power band saw
US4160320 *27 Feb 197810 Jul 1979Best & DonovanHand held band saw
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