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Publication numberUS1897205 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date14 Feb 1933
Filing date3 Aug 1931
Priority date3 Aug 1931
Publication numberUS 1897205 A, US 1897205A, US-A-1897205, US1897205 A, US1897205A
InventorsMaccabee David E
Original AssigneeGrigsby Grunow Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigeration apparatus
US 1897205 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 19.33.

D. E. MACCABEE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Filed Aug. 3, 1931 Patented Feb. 14, 1933' UNITED STATES PATENT-Ionics n DAVE) E. MACCABEE, OF ELMEUBST, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO CRIGSBY-GR'C'NOW COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A. COBPORATION OF ILLINOIS REFRIGERATION arraaarus This invention relates to refrigeration apparatus, and particularly to a refrigerator through which there may bemaintained a steady flow of air. For certain purposes, it may be desirable to establish an air flow through the refrigerating chamber, and with this object inview I have devised a system whereby the usual means for coolingthe re: frigeration apparatusaids in establlshing a flow of air through the refrigeration chamberitself.

In the drawing, v Figure 1 is a front view of a refrigerator embodying this invention; and Figure 2 isa side view of the refrigerator with certain partsshown in-section.

The refrigerator in general comprises a cabinet 1 having a door opening 2 and a compartment 3, in which there is disposed $0 the refrigeration apparatus. While the apparatus is here shown as mounted above the refrigerating chamber, this is in no wise essential and the positions may be reversed or changed in any desirable manner. The refrigeration apparatus may take on any of the well-known forms and, as shown here, includes a power-driven fan 5. This fan may be driven in any suitable manner, and in use serves to establish a current of cooling air through the refrigeration apparatus. As

here shown, the air currents aredrawn intochamber 3 throughany suitable opening and discharge through louvres 6 in a flue '7 mounted at the rearof the cabinet.

t Suspended fromthe top of refrigerating chamber 10 is a cooling unit 11, of any type -'whatsoever. In order to establish a circula tion of air through chamber 10, anair inlet,

pipe 12 passes through the cabinet wall above door opening 2.- The free end of. pipe 12 has a pivoted cover 13 disposed over itand adapted to function as an air inlet valve. As shown, pipe 12 extends inwardly into chamber 10 for a short distance and terminates in an upwardly-disposed portion 14.

Air flowing into pipe 12 will be cooled by cooling unit 11 and drop toward the bottom of chamber 10, cooling whatever articles may be disposed therein] Disposed within chamber 10 and toward therear thereof, i sa pipe 17 whose bottom open end is disposed well toward the bottom of chamber 10. Pipe 17 extends up chamber 10 and through up per wall 18 into the apparatus chamber 3. ghe5upper' end of. pipe 17 terminates near an r When fan 5 is idle, therewill be a small circulation of air through refrigerating chamber 10, because of the tendency of warmed air to go up pipe 17. When fan 5 is operated, usually during the operation of the refrigeration apparatus, it is clear that there will be an increased circulation of air through chamber 10 because of the suction action of'the fan. In general, pipe 17 of the exhaust should be led to the fan and terminate in a low pressure region created during the operation of thefan. Obviously, the system may be reversed,': if desired. The circulation of air throughEchamber 10 may be controlled or may be eliminated entirely by means. of cover 13.

I claim:

1. In a refrigerator of the mechanical refrigeration type having a fan or similar means for establishing a flow of air in the exhaust being disposed within said-refrig-- Y crating chamber and the other end of said exhaust being-disposed in proximity to said fan, whereby when said fan is operated a forced circulation ofair through the refrig- I e'rating chamber is established, the flow of air being so small in comparison to the volumetric capacity of the'refrigerating chamher as to have a negligible effect on the refrigeration process. w

2. In a refrigerator of the mechanical type having a fan or similar device for establishing forced circulation of air through said refrigeration apparatus, the combination of two pipes, each of which gives access from the outside to the inside of said refrigeratingchamber, and means for disposing the outer end of one of said pipes in proximity to said fan, whereby a portion of the aircur' rents set up by said fan are-eflectivein .es-

tablishing a flow of air through said refrigerating chamber, the flow of air being so small in comparison to the volumetric capacity of the refrigerating chamber as to have a negligible effect on the refrigeration process.'

3. In a refrigerator of the mechanical refrigeration type, wherein means are provided for establishing a flow of air to dissipate the heat of refrigeration, the combination of two pipes, each of which has one end inside of said refrigerating chamber and the other end outside thereof, and means for disposing at least one of said outer ends adjacent said first means, whereby a forced circulation of air through said refrigerator cabinet is established, the flow of air being so small in comparison to the volumetric capacity of the refrigerating chamber as to have a negligible effect on the refrigeration process.

In testimony whereof he .aflixes his signature.

-- DAVID E. MACGABEE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2741897 *3 Nov 195017 Apr 1956Armstrong Cork CoEqualizing duct for hardening rooms
US4714304 *29 Dec 198622 Dec 1987Whirlpool CorporationBuilt-in refrigerator cabinet
US5040378 *27 Apr 198920 Aug 1991Walter HolzerNo frost cooling process for a cooling range above zero degrees Celsius
WO1989010523A1 *27 Apr 19892 Nov 1989Walter HolzerNofrost cooling process for a temperature range above 0c
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/411, 62/455, 62/451, 454/183
International ClassificationF25D17/04
Cooperative ClassificationF25D17/042
European ClassificationF25D17/04A