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Publication numberUS1861332 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date31 May 1932
Filing date28 Oct 1925
Priority date28 Oct 1925
Publication numberUS 1861332 A, US 1861332A, US-A-1861332, US1861332 A, US1861332A
InventorsWaitz Charles A
Original AssigneeWaitz Charles A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for applying pressure to oil sands
US 1861332 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. A. WAITZ 1,861,332

APPARATUS FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO OIL SANDS May 31, 1932.

Filed Oct. 28, 1925 law ATTORNEYS.

QOOO.

Patented -May- 31, 1932 CHARLES A. WAITZ, OI ERIE, PENNSYLVANIA APPARATUS FOR APPLYING PRESSURE TO OIL SANDS Application 111ed ct0ber 2.8, 1925. Serial No 85,885.

It is common practice to place one well under pressure of water or air to realize the efiect of such pressure through ad'acent wells. Where there are several sands the practice has been to treat the several sands by utilizin .a difierent well for each ditferent san The present invention is designed to place pressure on a plurality of oil sands through one well, thus economizing inthe Wells apparatus. Features and details of the invention will appear from the specification and claims.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings as follows Fig. 1 shows a vertical section of the apparatus.

Fig. 2 a section on the line 22 in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 a section onthe line 3-3 in Fig. 1.

1 marks the upper sand, 2 the second sand, and 3 the third sand of a well 4. The usual casing 5 with the casing head 6 is used.

A strainer or perforated tube 7 rests on the bottom of the well. A step or shoulder 95 8 carrying a rubber packer 9 is arranged on the tube 7 and the packer rubber 9 rests on the shoulder 8. A tube 10 rests on the expanding cone 9a, the tubetelescoping the packing rubber in the usual manner of packers as shown in Fig. 3. The packer 9 is above the third sand.

A bypass 11 is secured to the tube 10 and ,a tube 12 extends upwardly from the bypass to a packer shoulder 13. A packer rubber 14 is arranged on the shoulder 13 and has an expander 14a. The packer 14 is above the second sand so that the second sand is between the two lower packers. A tube 15 extends upwardly from the expander 14a to a packer shoulder 16. r A packer rubber 17 is arranged on this shoulder. A tube 18 is incontinuation of the tube 15 and extends through the casing head 6. It is connected T 19a with the a pipe .20.

A packer 17 is above the first sand. The bypass is preferably arranged at the level of the second sand. It has a pipe socket 21 from which radial openings 22 extend pressure fluid supply through used for this and also in the and consequently w th the source of supply.

by a pipe 19 with a T 1911 and by way of thethrough a shell 23. Passages 23a are arranged in the pipe socket and-the shell 23 and between the walls of the passages 22 forming thebypass for the tube line leading to below the first packer 9. A pipe 24 fits in the socket 21 and extends upwardly through the severahtubes 12, 15, 18 and through a stufling box 25 on the casing head. The pipe extends by a lateral pipe 18a to a T 26 which is connected by a pipe 27 with the T 19a The bypass openin s 22 are radial so that if any uid under sure, particularly hot liquids are refera ly igh presused the liquid will be driven against the sand and thus will cleanse the surface and remove paraffin so as to facilitate the movement of the pressure fluid.

A packer cap 28 rests on the rubber 17 and a conduit 29 extends from the cap 28 through the rubber 17 to the space between the packing. A conduit 30 leads from the cap 28 through the casing head 6 and is connected by a conduit 31 with a conduit 32 connected to the T 26 and thence to a source of supply.

Pressure gauges 33 are arranged on each of the lines 31, 18a and 19 and each are rovided with valves 34. By manipulating t ese valves, the pressure delivery to each of thesands may be controlled as some of the sands are usually very much more open than others. Unless such control is used practically all the fluid ,will be delivered to some one sand. Check valves 35 are also arranged in each of the lines 31, 18a and 19 preventing a backfiow from one sand to another when pressure is off the supply line.

With this apparatus controlled pressure may be delivered to each of the sands and this is readily accomplished through a single well, thus making the operation of the wells to which the oil is delivered much simpler than where separate pressure wells are used and also the installation is very much cheapened and1 the pressure supply may thus be local- 1ze What I claim as new is 1. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combinationof a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; and means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube, and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and a bypass continuing the tube.

2. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combination of a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; and means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and continuing the tube, said discharge of the fitting being radial toward the sand.

3. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combination of a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube, and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and a bypass continuing the tube; and a second packer above the fitting.

4;. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combination of a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube, and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and a. bypass continuing the tube; a second packer above the fitting; and devices delivering fluid under pressure above the second packer.

5. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combination of a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube, and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and a by ass continuing the tube; a second packer a ove the fitting; and devices delivering fluid under pressure above the second packer comprising a conduit outside of the tube.

6. In a pressure apparatus for oil sands, the combination of a packer between two sands; a fluid pressure tube leading through the packer; means delivering fluid pressure to the well and above the packer comprising a pipe within the tube, and a fitting forming a discharge for the pipe and continuing the tube; a second packer above the fitting; and devices delivering fluid under pressure above the second packer comprising a conduit outside of the tube, and a packer through which the conduit extends.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my band.

CHARLES A. WAITZ.

, CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

Patent No. i,s61,332. May 31, 1932.

CHARLES A. WAITZ.

it is hereby certified that the residence in the above numbered patent was erroneously written and printed as "Erie, Pennsylvania" whereas said residence should have been written and printed as Rouseville, Pennsylvania, as shown by the record of the/case in this office; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of thecase in the Patent Office.

"Signed and sealed this 30th day of August, A. D. I932.

' M. J. Moore. (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2609878 *27 Apr 19469 Sep 1952Halliburton Oil Well CementingMultiple zone testing
US2611436 *26 Apr 194823 Sep 1952Pure Oil CoApparatus for injecting fluids into well bores
US2624603 *13 Sep 19496 Jan 1953Sweet Oil Well Equipment IncWell packer rubber
US2643208 *23 Dec 194723 Jun 1953Pure Oil CoApparatus for the selective injection of fluids into geological formations
US2724267 *26 Aug 194822 Nov 1955Pure Oil CoMethod for measuring flow of fluid in earth bores
US2785754 *27 Oct 195419 Mar 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoPermanent well completion
US2963089 *7 Mar 19556 Dec 1960Otis Eng CoFlow control apparatus
US2965173 *28 Apr 195520 Dec 1960Brown Cicero CWell apparatus and methods of setting a plurality of tubing strings in a well bore
US2973036 *3 Dec 195628 Feb 1961Brown Cicero CMethods of and means for producing well fluids from multiple zones
US2978031 *25 Sep 19564 Apr 1961Otis Eng CoSelective cross-over device
US3040813 *5 May 195826 Jun 1962Jersey Prod Res CoPlural completion of wells
US3050116 *26 May 195821 Aug 1962Phillips Petroleum CoMultiple zone production by in situ combustion
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US3115185 *2 May 195524 Dec 1963Brown Oil ToolsDual completion apparatus
US3381753 *20 Sep 19657 May 1968Otis Eng CoFluid flow control system for wells
US3598183 *29 Sep 196910 Aug 1971Byron Jackson IncMethod and apparatus for treating wells
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US4360062 *12 Mar 198123 Nov 1982Browning Engineering CorporationMethod of gaseous detonation fracturing of wells
US4640355 *26 Mar 19853 Feb 1987Chevron Research CompanyLimited entry method for multiple zone, compressible fluid injection
US632514322 Jun 19994 Dec 2001Camco International, Inc.Dual electric submergible pumping system installation to simultaneously move fluid with respect to two or more subterranean zones
US6481503 *8 Jan 200119 Nov 2002Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-purpose injection and production well system
US7096954 *31 Dec 200129 Aug 2006Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and apparatus for placement of multiple fractures in open hole wells
US8220537 *25 Nov 200817 Jul 2012Chevron U.S.A. Inc.Pulse fracturing device and method
US859634913 Jul 20123 Dec 2013Chevron U.S.A. Inc.Pulse fracturing device and method
USRE4030819 Nov 200413 May 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedMulti-purpose injection and production well system
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/185, 166/305.1, 166/191, 166/115, 166/308.1, 277/339, 166/269, 166/189, 166/67, 166/222
International ClassificationE21B43/16, E21B33/12, E21B33/124
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/16, E21B33/124
European ClassificationE21B43/16, E21B33/124