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Publication numberUS1773127 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date19 Aug 1930
Filing date28 Mar 1929
Priority date22 Sep 1928
Publication numberUS 1773127 A, US 1773127A, US-A-1773127, US1773127 A, US1773127A
InventorsLouis Auster
Original AssigneeLouis Auster
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bathing sandal
US 1773127 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1930.

L AUSTER iBATHING SANDAL Filed March 28 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR.

A TTORNEY.

Aug. 19, 1930. L. AUSTER 1,773,127

BATHING SANDAL Filed March 28, 929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig.6.

Fig.7.

gyvuento'c Lama A rm.

Clitozmq Patented Aug. 15?, 1930 hATENT OFFICE LOVES AUSTER, F NEW YORK, It". Y.

BATHING SANDAL Application filed March 28, 1929, Serial No The present invention relates to bathing sandals and to a method of manufacturing the same, and consists in the steps of procedure in making and combinations and arrangements of elements forming the article as hereinafter described and particularly set forth in the accompanying claims.

The type of sandal shown herein is proposed as an improvement or modification of that style or construction of sandal and meth- 0d of manufacturing the same disclosed in my co-pending application for U. S. Patent entitled Bathing sandal and method of producing same, Serial No. 300,618, and filed August 20, 1928.

Present known bathing slippers are characterized in that they are made in several pieces united together, as by cementing, in the so-called curing process with the result that there is no uniformity in the strength of the article and consequently the different portions of the slipper frequently come apart due to insecure union along the seams. To avoid this defect it is here proposed to produce a bathing sandal or slipper in one piece and in a single and unbroken process of moulding.

Present made slippers are furthermore bulky and require individual packing boxes with the natural result that considerable space is needed for keeping on hand a reasonable supply or stock on the part of the dealers, and this in turn has resulted in many dealers refusing to carryaline ofbathing slipers for ready sale to the trade. There is a urther disadvantage in that the present day bathing slippers in addition to being bulky are tending to run in styles, and this obviously further aggravates the disadvantage above referred to.

From the standpoint of the wearer the resent known bathing slippers are not only lieavy in themselves but they collect and retain water around the wearers feet and thereby considerably retard ones progress in swimming. As a consequence of the slippers becoming too heavy they are frequently forced off while swimming, and lost, and for this reason many bathers prefer to remove the slippers before entering the water.

. 350,542, and in Canada September 22, 1928.

Another objection is that if the slipper be worn for some time while out of the water the wearers feet being entirely encased inv rubber become excessively hot and perspire, thereby causing great discomfort.

To overcome these disadvantages it is proposed to provide a bathing sandal or slipper that is moulded in preferably one piece and consequently is lighter, cheaper, stronger, and less bulky than the kind now used. Secondly, to provide a sandal which during wear will permit free circulation of air to every part of the foot while on land and elfectively shed water when swimming. And thirdly, to pro vide a sandal which may be easily put on and removed, readily adjustable to the foot, and neat and attractive in appearance,

A further advantage-and an essential one is to produce a bathing slipper which with its foot attaching appendages may be manufactured, shipped, and stored in a substantial lay-flat condition all to the end of economy in cost of production, conservation of space both for the dealer and owner, permitting a -full line of articles being easily carried by a is dealer with the minimum space in his sales room, in like manner requiring minimum spacein transportation, and which because of the personal advantages aforesaid will commend the article to the wearers.

The invention is shown by way of illustration in the accompanying drawings,

wherein Figure 1 is a perspective view of the sandal.

Figure 2 a perspective view showing the sandal in its lay-flat condition as coming from the mould.

Figures 3, 4 and 5 illustrate the selective application of the sandal to the foot in the Grecian, Swimmer or Roman styles, 9 respectively. I

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a modified form of sandal, and;

Figure 7 a perspective view of this modified construction in its lay-flat condition or as coming from the mould.

Referring to the construction, in further detail and wherein'likereferencer characters designate corresponding parts in vthe different views, the sandal consists'of asole portion 9 of suitable pliable material, preferably rubber, and having a heel portion 10. The soleand heel portions may be of uniform thickness throughout or the heel portion 10 may be of greater thickness than the sole proper if preferred. Suitable means are provided for securely holding the sandal to the foot of the wearer at the toe, instep, and ankle thereof, and said attaching devices are preferably formed integral with the sole of the sandal as a unitary structure and all in one and the same moulding operation.

The toe attaching device comprises a pocket-like ortion 11 having apertures 12 and 13 at t e sides and extreme front. This construction of the toe engaging portion gives in effect the usual crossing toe straps characterizing the ordinary household sandal.

A air of instep straps 14 are formed integral and continuous with the sole portion 9 as elearl shown in Figure 2 and the free ends of said straps are apertured as at 15 to receive the detachable button 16 for adjustabl holding the straps across the instep of t e wearer. Instead of the button member 16 any other suitable form of adjustable securing means may be employed. And instead of moulding said instep straps 14 as two separate members the invention contemplates moulding the same as one continuous piece adapted to be severed after the moulding operation as will be understood.

A heel piece 16 has a bifurcated connection 17 at the extreme end of the heel portion 10 and at its upper end said member 16 has a transversely extending and continuous member providing a pair of stra s 18 of suitable length for encircling the an le of the wearer. Apertures 19 are formed in each of the ankle straps 18 to receive the adjustable fastening means 20 as with the instep strap 14.

In its application to the foot of the wearer the two strap portions 14 are adapted to be selectively fastened in either of the positions illustrated in Figures 3, 4 or 5, accordin ly as the wearer desires to have the recian, Swimmer or Roman style. And it will be further understood that both of the strap members 14 may be secured across the instep of the foot if so desired.

In conformity with the foregoing the Grecian style of sandal is obtained by havin the two foremost strap portions 14 extend to the toe portion 11 where they are secured to the same button 21 or other fastening device. In this instance the other pair of straps are brought across the instep and connected by the button member 16. In the Swimmer style the foremost straps are connected as in the Grecian style (Figure 3) and the rearmost straps '14 are connected to the button 22 on the heel strap 16 located at the rear of the ankle. In the Roman style the foremost straps 14 pass over the .instep and the two rear straps are secured sandal will remain firmly on the foot with-- out discomfort from perspiration, and due to the novel form of foot attaching means there is ample ventilation entirely around the foot, and while swimming there is the least possible hindrance to action inasmuch as there is a complete avoidance of water pockets but on the other hand effective shedding of water.

It will be understood, of course, that in all places on the sandal or its attaching means where there is an appreciable fold-over or bend in the material that the moulding ele ment thereat will obviate any liability oi break or rupture in the texture or body of the rubber or other material.

Referring to Figures 6 and 7. The con struction of sandal is in all essentials the same as above described, except that in this instance there is only one instep strap instead of the pair of instep straps 14 in the other arrangement. It will be understood, of course, that when this style of sandal is used the two straps 23 fit about theinstcp of the foot in the ordinary way.

In the processes of moulding both the forms of sandal shown the instep strap portions (14 and are formed in the lay-flat condition as illustrated. That is to say, said instep straps in the process of moulding lay within the plane of'the sole and heel portion of the sandal. Also the ankle engaging strap 18 is formed in a lay-flat position with the heel portions (16 and 17) in the folded over arrangement as indicated in F igures 2 and 7.

It will be understood that the invention as herein disclosed is not limited to the details of construction shown and described as these may be varied without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims.

lVhat is claimed as new is:

1. A sandal comprising a sole portion, a toe as set forth.

tion adapted to engage with said toe and ankle portions, substantially as set forth.

4.. A sandal comprising a sole portion, toe and ankle engaging portions, and instep engaging strap members integral with the sole portion adapted to be connected with said toe and ankle engaging port-ions, substantially as set forth.

5. A sandal comprising a sole portion, toe and ankle engaging portions, and intermedlate strap members integral with the sole portion adapted to engage the instep, or said instep and either the toe or ankle engaging portions, substantially as set forth.

6. A sandal comprising a sole portion, toe and ankle engaging portions, and intermediate strap members integral with the sole portion, said straps adapted to selectively engage either the instep only, or the toevand ankle portions; or the instep and toe portion, or the instep and ankle portion, substantially 7. The combination with a sandal having a sole portion, and toe and ankle engaging strap portions, of intermediate strap portions integral with the sole portion and adapted to selectively engage either the instep, or said toe and ankle engaging strap portions, substantially as set forth.

8. The combination with a sandal having a sole portion, and toe and ankle engaging strap portions, of intermediate strap portions inte gral with the sole portion and adapted to selectively engage either the instep, or theinstep and either of the aforesaid engaging portions, substantially as set forth.

9. A bathing sandal constructed of rubber and as a single unit comprising a sole portion, toe and ankle engaging portions, and instep engaging portions; said instep engaging portions being integral with the sole portion and adapted to connect with either or both the toe and ankle engaging portions, substanti ally as set forth.

10. A bathing sandal constructed of rubber and as a single unit comprising a sole portion, a toe engaging pocket, an ankle strap, and a pair of instep engaging straps; said instep straps being integral with the sole portion and adapted to connect with either or both the toe engaging pocket and the ankle strap, substantially as set forth. v

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at New York city, New York, this 22d day of March, A. D. nineteen hundred and twenty-nine.

LOUIS AUSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2658510 *26 Apr 195110 Nov 1953Hilton Joyce JProtective covering for feet or hands
US3680551 *27 Nov 19701 Aug 1972Bell Oran MAnkle hitch
US4535554 *17 Aug 198320 Aug 1985Obaldia B Marcos G DeMolded footwear
US4640025 *17 Apr 19853 Feb 1987Derenzo Joseph MFigure eight shoe tie system
US723425119 Mar 200326 Jun 2007Keen LlcToe protection sandal
US72903568 Jun 20056 Nov 2007Keen, Inc.Footwear with multi-piece midsole
US7513064 *22 Jul 20047 Apr 2009Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US776201129 Jan 200727 Jul 2010Keen, Inc.Toe protection sandal
US776201227 Sep 200727 Jul 2010Keen, Inc.Footwear with multi-piece midsole
US7845094 *30 Jan 20097 Dec 2010Gaskins Jr ThomasIce gripping attachments for footwear
US79970091 Apr 200916 Aug 2011Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed and articulated toe
US803762113 Sep 200718 Oct 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a woven strap system
US853397615 Aug 201117 Sep 2013Keen, Inc.Footwear having an enclosed toe
US865660625 Aug 201125 Feb 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear including a woven strap system
CN100441119C19 Mar 200410 Dec 2008基恩公司Sandal with function of pretecting toe
EP1459874A1 *9 Mar 200422 Sep 2004Keen LlcToe protection sandal
EP2464253A2 *14 Jul 201020 Jun 2012Nike International Ltd.Article of footwear accommodating different foot sizes
WO2004085139A1 *10 Mar 20047 Oct 2004Keen LlcToe protection sandal
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5
International ClassificationA43B3/12, A43B5/08, A43B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/124, A43B5/08
European ClassificationA43B5/08, A43B3/12D