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Publication numberUS1022672 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication date9 Apr 1912
Filing date17 Jun 1911
Priority date17 Jun 1911
Publication numberUS 1022672 A, US 1022672A, US-A-1022672, US1022672 A, US1022672A
InventorsPeter Hammer
Original AssigneePeter Hammer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe attachment.
US 1022672 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. HAMMER.

, SHOE ATTACHMENT. APPLIoA'TIoN FILED mm1?, 1911.

Patented Apr. 9, 1912.

2 SHEETS-SHEET l.

Peler Mmmer cnLuMBlA PLANOURAPH C0., WASHINGNN. D. c.

P. HAMMER.

SHOE ATTACHMENT. APPLIOATION FILED 111112111911.

'1,22,672. Patented Apr. 9, 1912.

2 SHEBTS-SHBET 2.

w/r/vEssEs f IN1/Emol? Peer TTNTTE STATES PATENT OFFTCE.

PETER HAMMER, oF MARLBORO, NEW YORK.

SHOE ATTACHMENT.

To all 'whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, PETER HAMMER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Marlboro, in the county of Ulster and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Shoe Attachment, of which the following is a full, clear, and eXact description.

This invention relates to a new and improved attachment to be placed in the shoe, which embodies the features of a shoe cushion, a ventilator, an arch-support and a heel corset.

An object of this invention is to provide an attachment to be placed in the shoe, which will be yielding under the pressure of the foot, so as to absorb any shock or jar in walking, and provided with apertures and channels whereby air may be circulated around the foot and ventilate the same.

A further object of this invention is to provide a yielding arch-support for the foot, with a heel corset for protecting the shoe and the stocking from becoming saturated with perspiration and from becoming worn.

These and further objects, together with the construction and combination of parts, will be more fully described hereinafter and particularly set forth in the claims.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specication, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views, and in which- Figure 1 is a vertical longitudinal section through a shoe with my attachment there:- in; Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of the attachment; Fig. 3 is a vertical sect-ion on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a bottom perspective view of the upper plate; Fig. 5 is a bottom perspective View of the cushion; and Fig. 6 is a bottom perspective view of the reinforcing spring member.

Referring more particularly to the separate parts of this invention as embodied in the form shown in the drawings, 1 indicates a shoe, in connection with which my improvement is shown.

2 indicates the shoe attachment, which embodies an upper plate 3 made of any suitable comparatively stili' material, such as thin sole leather. The plate 3 is turned up at each side, as indicated at 4 and 5, to t to Speccation of Letters Patent.

Application filed June 17, 1911.

Patented Apr. 9, 1912.

Serial No. 633,679.

the instep and thus support the arch of the foot.

Secured to the plate 3 in any suitable manner, as by means of an eyelet 6, there projecting extension 8, having arms 9 and 10 extending from opposite sides thereof to form a somewhat cross-shaped member. This cross-shaped member contacts at its tip with the inner sole of the shoe, and will yield under pressure due to the whole weight coming thereon.

The front part of the spring plate 7 is somewhat enlarged, as at 11, and on one side is provided with a series of toes 12, which add to its resilience. At the eXtreme front of the spring plate 7, there are provided downwardly-projecting prongs 13 and 14, which are adapted to engage the inner sole of the shoe, and secure the device as a whole from movement in the shoe. It will be noted that in between the prongs 13 and 14, the spring plate 7 is provided with an upwardly-arched channel 15, which projects in a corresponding groove 16 provided in the upper plate 3. This groove arrangement makes the upper plate and the lower plate somewhat more resilient, and has the padded eifect which is easily observable at the base of the bottom of the hand. To this extent, the device copies nature, and gives a resilient yielding support not ordinarily obtained by mechanical devices. The sides of the enlarged portion 11 of the spring plate 7, as will be seen by reference to Fig. 6, curve up at 17 and 18, to correspond to the curved-up portions 4 and 5 of the upper plate 3. To this extent, the spring plate 7 adds to the arch-supporting feature of the attachment.

Interposed between the spring plate 7 and the upper plate 3, adjacent the` rear thereof, so as to give a slight elevationto the heel of the wearer, there is provided a cushion-pad 19, which may be of any suitable vyielding material, such as rubber, and is provided with a plurality of crossing channels 20 and 21, which may be termed Ventilating channels, inasmuch as they provide the necessary passages for air to circulate in the shoe. The tops of these channels are perforated, as at 22, to permit the air beneath the attachment to be pumped up by the up-and-down motion of the device as a whole, under thel give-and-take ofthe pressure of the foot in walking. The under side of the paid 19 is provided with an inclined groove 40, which permits the insetting of a portion of the spring plate 7 where it arches, as indicated in Fig. 6.

The upper plate 3 is provided with apertures 23, which are arranged so as to come in register with the apertures 22 in the channels 2O and 21. There is also provided an aperture 24 in the spring-plate 7, which permits the air to pass therethrough, and which is in register with one of the apertures 22 of the cushion-pad 19. The upper plate 3 may be also provided with notches 25, arranged at the margin thereof, which are directly superposed above the channels 20 and 21 at the ends thereof, so as to i provide additional Ventilating passages through the device. It will be noted that the tops of the channels 20 and 21 are cut away at 26 to correspond tothe notches 25.

In order to protect the shoe from wear and from becoming dirty, and also to protect the stocking from being worn, there is provided a heel corset 27, which comprises a base 28 and .a bent upwardly-extending shaft 29, which is adapted to envelop the heel on all sides. The base 28 is provided with a central aperture 30, through which may extend the rearmost projection 31 of the extension 8. There is also provided in the base 28 a pair of slots 32 and 33, through which the arms 9 and 10 may project, to hold the corset in place. Of course, it is to be understood that inasmuch as the corset is of light, flexible material, such as very y thin leather or kid, it can be readily slipped olf from the spring-plate 7, and removed, if it is not desiredto use the same.

It will thus be seen that there is provided a simple and inexpensive device, which will be resilient under t-he foot, which will support the arch comfortably and strongly, and which will yield under the pressure of the foot, so as to force air through the various channels and passages, and thus ventilate thefoot and keep it cool and comfortable.

While I have shown one embodiment of my invention, I do not wish to be limited to the specific details thereof, but desire to be protected in various changes, alterations and modifications which may come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said' top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, and a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring late. p. 2. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spi-:ing plate comprising an enlarged front portion anda cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to con l tact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, and a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, said cushion pad` having cross channels therein, with apertiires through the pad communicating with said channels, and said top plate having apertures therein located in register with said first-mentioned aper- 1 tures.

3. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged fron-t portion and a cross-shaped rear portion,

said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby tlie spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, and a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, said cushion pad having cross channels therein, with apertures througli the pad communicating with said channels, and said top plate having apertures therein located in register with said first-mentioned apertures, the tops of said channels being cut away to form notches permitting the passage of air from said channels, and said top plate having notches therein corresponding to said first-mentioned notches to permit the air from said channels to come up above said top plate.

4. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield' under pressure thereon, and a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, said top plate having a longitudinally-extending groove therein tapering from a maximum at the front to a minimum toward the rear, and said spring plate having an arched channel fitting in said groove.

5. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, and a heel corset for enveloping the heel of the wearers foot, having means thereon for engaging the arms of said cross-shaped portion of said spring plate.

6. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, and a heel corset, comprising a base and Shanks extending upwardly from said base at the rear and sides thereof, said base having slots therein through which the arms on said cross-shaped portion of said spring plate may extend, to secure said corset to said spring plate.

7.. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, and a heel corset, comprising a base and shanks extending upwardly from said base at the rear and sides thereof, said base having slots therein, through which the arms on said cross-shaped portion of said spring plate may extend, to secure said corset to said spring plate, said cushion pad having Ventilating channels therein, with the tops notched away at the margin of the pad, said top plate having notches therein corresponding to said notches in said pad, said pad having apertures extending through the top thereof into said channels, and said top plate having apertures therein located in alinement with said apertures in the top of said pad.

8. The combination with a top plate, of a spring plate secured to said top plate, said spring plate comprising an enlarged front portion and a cross-shaped rear portion, said spring plate being arched so as to contact with a support at spaced points, whereby the spring plate may yield under pressure thereon, a cushion pad interposed between said top plate and said spring plate, and an eyelct for securing said spring plate to said top plate.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specication in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

PETER HAMMER.

Witnesses:

JAMES S. CARPENTER, HOWARD S. TUTHILL.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5701686 *29 Nov 199430 Dec 1997Herr; Hugh M.Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US6029374 *28 May 199729 Feb 2000Herr; Hugh M.Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US644987810 Mar 200017 Sep 2002Robert M. LydenArticle of footwear having a spring element and selectively removable components
US660104217 May 200029 Jul 2003Robert M. LydenCustomized article of footwear and method of conducting retail and internet business
US701686721 May 200221 Mar 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US710723524 Oct 200212 Sep 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US775277511 Sep 200613 Jul 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US777030623 Aug 200710 Aug 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US82098838 Jul 20103 Jul 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00R, 36/37, 36/179
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/06