Galápagos Islands

Discover Darwin's living laboratory

Explore isolated volcanic islands

Charles Darwin’s observations and collections of the Galápagos wildlife in 1835 contributed to his theory of evolution by natural selection.

Join a modern-day mapping expedition

For the first time, scientists and researchers are using Street View imagery to study the land, coast, and sea of the Galápagos islands.

Discover animals found only in the Galápagos

The Galápagos are home to hundreds of endemic wildlife species, found nowhere else on earth.

Galápagos sea lion

Zalophus wollebaeki

Galápagos sea lion

Zalophus wollebaeki

IUCN Red List status: Endangered

Based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Learn More

Their loud bark, playful nature, and graceful agility in water make them the "welcoming party" of the islands. Galápagos sea lions can be found on each of the different islands of the Galápagos archipelago. Wikipedia

Blue-footed Booby

Sula nebouxii

Blue-footed Booby

Sula nebouxii

IUCN Red List status: Least Concern

Based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Learn More

They are easily recognizable by their distinctive bright blue feet - the blue color comes from carotenoid pigments obtained from their diet. Males display their feet in an elaborate mating ritual by lifting one and then the other up. Wikipedia

Galápagos Giant Tortoise

Chelonoidis nigra

Galápagos Giant Tortoise

Chelonoidis nigra

IUCN Red List status: Vulnerable

Based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Learn More

The largest living species of tortoise, with a lifespan of over 100 years, it is one of the longest-living vertebrates. The tortoise is native to seven of the Galápagos Islands - yet shell size and shape vary between populations. Wikipedia

Galápagos Marine iguana

Conolophus subcristatus

Galápagos Marine iguana

Conolophus subcristatus

IUCN Red List status: Vulnerable

Based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Learn More

Found only on the Galápagos Islands, it has the ability, unique among modern lizards, to live and forage in the sea, making it a marine reptile. The iguana can dive over 9 m (30 ft) into the water. Wikipedia

Magnificent Frigatebird

Fregata magnificens

Magnificent Frigatebird

Fregata magnificens

IUCN Red List status: Least Concern

Based on IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Learn More

The Magnificent Frigatebird on the Galápagos Islands is genetically and morphologically distinct from all other frigatebirds; it has not been exchanging genes with mainland counterparts for several hundred thousand years. Wikipedia

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