Kew gardens; or, A popular guide to the Royal botanic gardens of Kew (Google eBook)

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1852
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Page 28 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 30 - Weak with nice sense the chaste Mimosa stands, From each rude touch withdraws her timid hands; Oft as light clouds o'erpass the summer glade, Alarmed she trembles at the moving shade; And feels, alive through all her tender form, The whispered murmurs of the gathering storm; Shuts her sweet eye-lids to approaching night, And hails with freshened charms the rising light.
Page 12 - ... 1838 the abolition of the whole establishment was contemplated by the Government. Public opposition led to the appointment of a Treasury Committee, the report of which was presented to Parliament in 1840. The following paragraphs briefly defined the functions of the reorganised establishment...
Page 12 - A national garden ought to be the centre round which all minor establishments of the same nature should be arranged. . . . From a garden of this kind Government would be able to obtain authentic and official information on points connected with the founding of new colonies ; it would afford the plants there required, without its being necessary, as now, to apply to the officers of private establishments for advice and assistance.
Page 7 - Kew were contemplated about the year 1840, when, from being a private garden belonging to the Royal Family, and maintained by funds from the Board of Green Cloth, it was liberally relinquished by her present Majesty Queen Victoria, and placed under the control of the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Woods and Forests, with the view of rendering it available for the general good.
Page 2 - So sits enthroned in vegetable pride Imperial Kew by Thames's glittering side ; Obedient sails from realms unfurrow'd bring For her the unnamed progeny of spring...
Page 38 - in the royal gardens, first of Hampton Court and then of Kew, probably from the earliest introduction of the species into Europe, upwards of a century ago (in 1731). On one and the same day, in the summer of 1844, each was seen to produce a flowering stem, which resembled a gigantic head of asparagus, and grew at first at the astonishing rate of 2 feet in the twenty-four hours.
Page 12 - ... should be arranged: they should be all under the control of the chief of that garden, acting in concert with him, and through him with...
Page 38 - On one and the same day, in the summer of 1844, each was seen to produce a flowering stem, which resembled a gigantic head of asparagus, and grew at first at the astonishing rate of two feet in the twenty-four hours. So precisely did the twin plants keep pace with each other, that at the very time it was found necessary to make an aperture in the glass roof of the house for the emission of one panicle of flowers (twenty-six feet from the ground), a similar release was needed by the other.

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