Grass Roots

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James Lorimer & Company, Jan 1, 1973 - History - 370 pages
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Heather Robertson's classic account of life and death on the Canadian prairie was praised and reviled with equal vehemence when it first appeared: "a pack of lies" said one reviewer; "dynamite" said another.

Both her reporting and analysis are, in fact, explosive. The book offers intimate profiles of four modern prairie towns and of the immense difficulties faced by farmers in Western Canada. It offers sweeping descriptions of the forces that led to the settlement of the West, and examines how those same forces, controlled from eastern Canada, are causing the inexorable decline of many rural communities.

Grass Roots is a superb portrait of an imperilled way of life, combining economics, history and politics with a remarkable eye for storytelling.
  

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Contents

Gordon Taylor
9
The West
33
Breaking
43
Moose Jaw 1882
62
Coalsamao
83
The Industrial Revolution
91
Miami
98
Winkler
165
Bienfait
233
Biggar
282
Moose Jaw 1972
351
Sid Cox
362
Notes on sources
365
Bibliography
367
Photographs
370
Copyright

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Prairie madness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
355 OCLC 497697; Robertson, Heather (1973) Grass Roots James Lorimer & Co., Toronto p. 53, ISBN 0-88862-099-3 Grass Roots from Google Books; Silverman, ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ Prairie_madness

About the author (1973)

Heather Robertson was born in Winnipeg, Canada on March 19, 1942. She was a reporter at the Winnipeg Free Press in the 1960s and helped pave the way for women journalists to leave the "women's pages." Her first book, Reservations Are for Indians was published in 1970. She won the Books in Canada First Novel Award for Willie: A Romance and received the Outstanding Achievement Award from the National Magazine Awards Foundation in 2011. She also co-founded The Writers' Union of Canada. She died from cancer on March 19, 2014 at the age of 72.

MYFANWY PHILLIPS is the author of The Children of Peace. Her photographs are also featured in Heather Robertson\s Grass Roots.'

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